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i. 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL. COLLEIOE: 



Vol. XXIV. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, September i6, 1913. 



No. I 



LARGEST ENTERING CLASS PRES. BUHERFIELD RETURNS PULL GOES TO SIXTEEN 



In History of the College. Numbers 
Nearly Two Hundred. 

The class of 1917 has the honor 
Itfing the hirgest elass ever eii- 
iilled ou the college iKJoks. Nearly 
•JiM> men are now registered. The 
8tt'a«ly increase in the enrollment of 
tlif freshman class has been marked 
fill several years past. The list to 
.I:ite follows : 



Aiiams, H. L. 
Alcott, W. J. 
Andrews, R. M. 
Armstrong, J. H. 
Avery, H. S. 
lUbcock, F. R. 
Haer, R. M. 
lUrnes, H. W. 
Ilehrend. O. 
I'.evan. K. (i. 
Hrchard, J. I>. 
I.oles, R. S. 
■ nil. \V. (.. 

i.M.lll, A. 

i;(iid(-n. R. 
i>owen, I). J. 
! -yce. H. I*. 

.yd, R. L. 
ti'ckenridnc, I., 
lueed, R. W. 
Br<iinar(l, D. (>. 
lirowri. K. W. 
liuchanan, \V. < • 
ixiLk. K. i i. 

ickman, I.. T. 
lUirlcigh, A. L. 
i^uttrick, D. H. 
Cite, R. M. 

' ihcrlain, S F. 
te, C. E. 

Si 

& :, W. T. 

= .n, E. P. 
3 i, W. I. 
C ». M. H. 

i? J. H. 

•; M erritte, F. 

^ ^ psey, P. W. 
- '' .tt.ll K. 
Dickey, H. G. 
Dizer, J.T. 
iJoll, O. H. 
Donavan, K. K. 
Dosch, I). 
Unwd, W, L. 
Dudley, L. L. 
Dumas, W. F. 
Dunham, H. (i. 
1 ' uham, K. H. 
Dunn. A. P. 
I '1 wards. F. G. 
Ei'iiot, K. \V. 
K»trbeck, G. C. 
K irwell, A. 
t.i'.or, R. W. 

nng, R. 
J .ris. Miss A. 
' \V. M. 
S. 

fl. T. H. 
'' <"<:is. f), M. 
ixirn. T. M. 
-h, I). L. 
age, C. E. 
tte, C. G. 
Istein, M. 
. M. B. 
«old, L. S. 
H.C. 



Newburyport 
Everett 
South Carvtrr 
North Adams 
San Juan, Porto Rico 
Lynn 
Wellesley Farms 
Whitinsville 
Natick 
Newtonville 
Springtieid 
lJ<irche»ter 
( jrafton 
Middktuwn, N. V. 
Fall River 
.Nortlieast, Penn. 
Haverhdl 
Lynn 
Lynn 
Lynn 
Dorchester 
Sciluate 
Lhic«»p»'< 
Wuice.sl' r 
Wilkesbarre, Pa. 
Lynn 
Arlmgton 
Faneuil 
Holden 
Framingham 
(jranby 
Woburn 
Hingham 
Orange, N.J. 
Hatfield 
Watertown 
Dorchester 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Dorchester 
East Weymouth 
Ad^ms 
Turners Falls 
Elizabeth, N.J. 
North Amht-rst 
Long Branch, N.J 
Boston 
West Bridgewater 
North Bennington, V't. 
Maiden 
South Beverly 
Chartley 
Winthrop 
Turner's Falls 
•Somerville 
Dorchester 
Ridgefield, N.J. 
Mittineague 
Lowell 



Med ford 

Athol 

Fall River 

Sandwich 

Lynn 

Montague 

Lynn 

Woods Hole 

Wethersfield, Conn. 

Amherst 



From Tour of Europe as Member of 
Agricultural Commissions. 

On August ir>. President Butter- 
field returned to the United States 
after spending three month.s in 
Europe as a member of both the 
United States and American commis- 
sions which made a study of European 
melhoils of farm finance. President 
Butterfiield's trip was made especially 
pleasant by the fact that, in com- 
pany with his father and brother, he 
was able to spend three weeks after 
the commission left Europe in tour- 
ing over England, Scotland, Holland, 
and Belgium. Dr. Cance, who was 
employed as expert by the Uniteil 
States commission, has been giving 
his entire time to the commission's 
work in Washington since his return. 
In or<ler to fully appreciate the 
work of the commisstons, an uuder- 
stantling of the movements that lead 
up to their appointment is necessary, 
Davi«l Lubin, a California merchant, 
became deeply interested several 
years ago in agricultural problems, 
anil advocat(>d an international insti- 
tute of agriculture. lie iii«t with no 
Miccess until he lai<l the matter before 
the King of Italy, wU*t no. oii».» 
erected a magnificient building for 
the home of the undertaking, but also 
insured ita supiwrt by a handsoim' 
endowment. The institute is in- 
tended as a world clearing house for 
agricultural questions, ami it is made 
up of delegates from over fifty 
nations. 

Mr. Lubin at once saw that Euro- 
pean methixls of co-oi>eration in agri- 
culture, especially in the matter of 
getting ready money for the farmers 
to work with, were far !<uperior U> 
ours. As an authority on this sub- 
ject, be was invited to this country 
bv the Southern Commercial con- 
gress. Mr. Lubin urge<l that a large 
commission l>e api)ointed to study the 
question on the ground. The Ameri- 
can commission, which was backed 
by the Southern Commercial con- 
gress, was the result, and was nm<le 
up of delegates from all parts of the 
I. S. and Canada. President Wil 
son apiM>inted the United States com- 
mission to assist the American com- 
mission and to make a report to con- 
gress. President Biitterfield was a 
member of this commission and was 
also chosen first vi< c-chairman of the 
American commi»Mi<Mi, and, owing to 
the fact that the chairman, Senator 
Fletcher of Florida, was prevented 



Small Margin Wins for Sophomores in 
Annual Contest. 

For sixteen minutes Friday 
afternoon, the members of the two 
lower classes fought f«»r honors 
across the pond in the annual rope- 
pulling contest. The customary audi- 
ence fiom the surrouiKling coun- 
try assembled early, and as the 
freshmen were on the lielcl some time 
before the hour, they lutd a gcnxl 
opportunity to l<M>k them <)\«i . The 
contest this year was lacking in ex- 
treme excitement and the lotikers-on 
were disappointe«l not to see either 
side go through the pond. As soon 
as the shot to cease pulling was fired, 
a discussion arose as t«) how to de- 
cide which sitle had won as the rope 
had been swerved from its original 
course by the freshmen. After much 
advice had Imiii wasted some 
one found a metluMl, and ho the 
result wa!« determined to l>e all in 
favor of imO. It is to be hopeil 
that next year some rules can be laid 
down which will give the pull slightly 
more exciteineiit than it has lia'i the 
la«t two years. 



SHERMAN BASEBALL CAPTAIN 



Veteran Pitcher to Lead Team in 
Cuming Season. 

At a meetiuir of the baseball team 
after the AndHMHt game last .luiie, 
.loel P Sherman was electe<l captain 
for the coming ye:ir. Sherman IS ft 
member of the tl;i>- of l'.MI,aiid 
has played varsity ball for three 
years, alternating from the box to 
right llelil. His cunHiHtent work in 
iMith positions ami with tlie )>at dur- 
ing this time is a siitlicient guaranty 
that the right man has been picked to 
lead Billy Fitzmaiiricc's Imys for 
aiioilicr vear. 



PARADE A SUCCESS 
What may l)e among the last of 
the Night-Shirt Paiwles to Im" helfl at 
this college. if threatened rumois that 
the faculty are determined Uj have 
them slopiieil are carried «nit, was 
successfully executed .Saturday night 
under the auspices of the sophomore 
class. The weather conditions were 
fine, and despite the determined 
efforts of the juniors ami some of the 
town "roughs" to break up the Par- 
ade, the Hophom.-res were able to 
hoUl their own. The freshmen as 
usual were frightened and were 
only Uh) willing to<lo anything asked 
of them. Speeches, songs, and high 
school cheers were requested of a 
select numl»er f>f freshmen, and all 
those rc'imsted. who were present, 
respon<led with alacritj. General 
rough-housing <Ud not seem to be 
generally in order, the freshmen in 
many cases resisting it with as much 
vigor as <lid the sophcmiores. It 
seems rather strange that these two 
classes that are so antagonistic the 
rest of the year should stand together 
8o well in such an event, liie suc- 
cess with which this year's parade 
was carried off ought to forestall any 
attempts to abamlon it. 




Captain Shrkman 

George I). Mclicn of Worcester 
was ele<te«l manager, ami the follow- 
ing Sophomores were m»niinated for 
the jMwition of assistant manager: 
Prouty, Ilager and Curran. The 
election will be held on Wednesday 
after the assembly. 



[Continued en page x] 



FRESHMAN RECEPTION 

IIKM» IN lUdl.l. M M I WKI.I. ArrKNIiKH 
U\ Ml. ' I.AS5l':S. 

Nearly four hundred students, 
instructors and ladies of the faculty 
gathiie*! together in the Drill hall 
Friday evening for the annual Chris- 
tian association ree«'ption and wel- 
come to the freshmen. The new 
men had slips of paper bearing their 
names and home towns pinned to 
their coats and for a time th. -glad 
hand" was much in evidence. Thin 
Richard H. Powers '11. president of 
the association inlr<Kluced Presi<leiit 
Butterfield as ''the man who alwjtys 
starts tilings aiouii<l here." The 
president, in welcoming the fresh- 
man, gave a strong talk on the differ- 
ent kinds of ehiilhnge-, tliiit confront 
a freshman as he enters college. 
Not the least important challenge is 
that of the Christian asstK-iation, 
ancl the jiresident heartily recom- 



•71.— Koliert W Lyman, L. L. IL, 

from leaving- for Kurope, President ' ^^^^^^^^ university )H7h and L. L. «.... — i - .■ 

Butterfield acted as the chairman of I j^j^ Boston university \'.>12, was | memled that the men idenlifv tliem- 
the American commission. In speak- ' ^,1^^!,^^ honored last June by the 'selves with it and enter into the 
ing of the work of the eotnrnissions. ,,gg,.g,,|,„,.tor of (jivU Law, conferred! religious work of the college. 

by Yale university. | 



[Continued on page aj 



[Continued <.n p^iK*' '•;] 




The College Signal, Tuesday, September i6, 1913. 



PRESIDENT ftETl^RNS 

[('niitinued from pane i] 

President Hutlerfield said : 

" The work was carried on mainly 
by means of juries of inquiry. A 
sort of hearing was conducted where 
the authorities on agricultural sub- 
jects told the (!oni mission the differ- 
ent phases of the problem as seen in 
their countries. Italy, Hungary, 
Austria, liussia, Kgypt, Switzerland, 
Germany, Denmark, Holland, Bel- 
gium, France, Kugland aiitl Ireland 
were all visited. Hut more attention 
was given to (Germany than to any 
other one country as she is the home 
of agricultural credit. 

"The commissions studied princi- 
pally the different methmls of rural 
credit, the means by which Kuropean 
farmers secure money for the pur- 
chase of land, and also short time 
loans for the growing of crops etc. 
Hut attentu)n was also given to all 
forms of cooperation. We founti 
that the main reliance of Kuro{>ean 
farmers is not on the regular banks, 
but on local cooperative banks of 
various types. We also found that 
a common feature of long time credit 
was amortization, which is the extin- 
guishment of the entire «lebt by a 
series of small yearly payments with 
a reasonalde rate of interest. 

"Theif is also an enormous amount 
of cooperation in prtxluction, the 
buying of supplies, and the sale of 
prtxUicts all over Kurope. Switzer- 
land is perha|)s tiio leading country 
in this respect. 

"We were received everywhere 
with the greatest attention and hospi- 
tality, and apparently every effort 
was made to give information. 
Nearly everywhere there were recep- 
tions and banquets, and one of the 
great advantages of the trip was the 
meeting of men prominent in govern- 
mental and agricultural affairs. 

"The American commission also 
gave some attention t«> country life 
in general. The ciunmissiona could 
not make an exhaustive study, l)ut I 
think that they serve a very useful 
purpose, as they were representative 
and will form centers of information 
and suggestion. President Wilson 
says that rural credit is the next big 
problem, and has asked for no legis- 
lation till the United States commis- 
sion has reported." 

The commissions are to rejK)rt this 
winter. President Butterfiehl has 
been appointed chairman of the com- 
mittee on the compilation of rejwrt 
for the American commission, and 
chairman of the committee on per- 
mant work of the American com- 
mission. 

Dr. Cance's work was that of an 
expert on the United States commis- 
sion. He gave his time la.gely to 
the investigation of agricultural 
credit systems, working with Con- 
gressman Moss of Indiana, who was 
acting chairm:iii of this commission. 



LARGEST CLASS 

[Continued from paf[e i] 



The Unb Index vrWl'he dedecated 
to Mr. Machmar. 



Guilford. C. H. 

(jurshin, C. A. 

(iustetter, R. 

Haaren, I'. 

Haglestein, C. H. 

Hallett. C. H. 

ilarlow, ¥. E. 

Harlow, P. G. 

Harris, W. T. 

Hartford, C. E. 

Hauck, R. M. 

Hawley, R. D, 

Henderson, E. 

Heustis, W. C. 

Hig|j;inbothain. H. 

Higgins, (i. W. 

Hill. K. H. 

flolden. R. L. 

Holder. R. C. 

Holt, K. S. 

Hooper, A. A. 

Huhhell, F. 

Ill man, Miss M. 

Irving. W. R. 

Jackson, R. M. 

Joslyn, K. 

Kelsey, L. I). 

Kinsman, A. O. 

I.ancey. C. S. 

Landers, (I. K. 

Larson, F. 

Latham, I*. W. 

Lawrence, NL R. 

Leigh.]. A. 

Lyrshires, l>. .M. 

Little L. 

Livermore, \V. I . 

Loring, A. ii. 

Matk, W. A. 

MacLeod, D. j. 

Mac.Naught. W. H 

Mars.M. R.C. 

.M artel, J. K. 

Mather. F. 

Mayo, F. \V. 

Mayo. W. 1. 

Mc^'allv. L. A. 

McKae, H. R. 

Merrill, D.O. 

Morehouse. N. 

Nash. H.C. 

Nason, L. H. 

.North, M. 

Nelson, J. it. 

Nestle. W. J. 

Nims, H. W. 

Noyes.j. W. 

Oliver, <;. T., Jr. 

I'arcrs, K. L. 

I'atton. W. G. 

Petit. A. V. 

Pickard, R. F. 

Pickard, W. D. 

Pierce. H. D. 

Pike. C. A. 

Poland, R. R. 

Porter, W. R. 

Pratt, H. A. 

Pyne, R. S. 
Quimby, C. F. 

Randall, K. M. 

Ratner. C. C. 

Record, H.J. 

Reed, H. L. 

Ritter, K. 

Robinson, H. M. 

Rodger, R. M. 
Rosstrom, H. A. 
Rosenthal, L. 
Rosequist, H. R. 
Ross. L. W. 
Russell, H. L. 
R utter, W. F. 
Saidel, H. S. 
.Sander, B. C. L. 
Sargent, G. L. 
.Schafer, L. C. 
Schure, A. L. 
Schwab, A. 
Seavey, M. H. 



Lynn 
Lynn 
Hartford, Conn. 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 
Dorchester 
Mansfield 
Maiden 
Maiden 
Millbury 
Townsend 
Cincinnati, O. 
East Hrookfield 
l^ingham 
lielmont 
Taunton 
Norfolk 
Rutherford, N. J. 
Milford, N. H. 
Millis 
Cambridge 
Lynn 
Westport, Conn. 
Amherst 
Taunton 
Georgetown 
Northlield, Vt. 
West Hartford, Conn. 
Merrimac 
Town.send 
Cataumet 
Everett 
Nortwich I'own, Conn. 
Falmouth 
Worcester 
Somerville 
Leominster 
Lawrence 
Hull 
Springfield 
Wakcticld 
Plymouth 
Walpole 
Turners Fails 
Taunton 
floullon, Me. 
Framingham 
Fall River 
Maiden 
Pepperell 
Worcester 
North fladley 
Auburnd.)le 
Dorchester 
Newbury port 
AmhersU 
Montague 
Chelsea 
Everett 
Elizabeth, N. j. 
South Framingham 
Amherst 
Hadley 
Hopedale 
Westminister, Vt. 
.Smith's 
West Acton 
Amherst 
.Shrewsbury 
Springfield 
Cape Neddick, Me. 
Somerville 
Springfield 
West l$oylston 
Waltham 
New Britain, Conn. 
Reading 
Everett 
Boston 
Maiden 
Campcllo 
Arlington 
Worcester 
Lawrence 
Worcester 
Cambridge 
Merrimac 
Somerville 
Boston 
Wallingford 
West ford 



SPECIAL SALE 
TAIT OXFOilDS 



$5 00 Grade, 
{4.00 Grade, 



Now $3.98 
Now $3.25 



SCOUT SHOES 

Tan, Brown and Black 



$2.50 



PAGE'S Shoe Store 



BETWEEN THE BANKS 



THE 



Hoover & Smith Go. 

616 Chastnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 



Pbllailelpliia's Official Prattrniti Jewelir 

SPBOtALISTS IN 
Fraternity Badges, Fobs. Novcltita, 

Rings, Charms Prises. Trophies. 

Medals College Pins. Fobs, Seals, 

Rings, Charms.-. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

Williams Block, Amhkkst, Mass. 
OrricB Hours: 



CDe 
Pheasant 

"Bmtt^ St., 
amberdt 

Telephone 470 

BRSAKFAST 

LUNCH BON 
AFTERNOON TRA 

^iaser if arrRiigwi for. 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 



Now at 13 Plessant St. 



Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Fine Watch Repairing Promptly and 
Skilfully Done 



Ssttsfaction Guaranteed 



A Chance to Save Money 

A $5.00 Safety Razor for S5.00 

Rut we give you a coupon which when signed with your 
name and home address we refund you $3.50. It carries 
the Rexall guarantee, " Money back if not satisfied." 

We carry a full line of 

Waterman, Conklin and Moore's Fountain 

Pens, Stationery, Pipes, Tobacco 

and Cigarettes. 

Liggett's, Belle Meade and Green Seal Chocolates 



THE HENRY ADAMS CO., Druggists 



The REXALL Store 



ON THE CORNER 



The CoHece Signsl, Tuesday, September 16, 1913. 



ville, W. J. 

\rene, L (1. 
.-.humway, P. 
.Simons. C. H. 
Sims, J. S. 
smith, H. D. 
smith, H.H. 
Smith, R. W. 
Spaulding, A. W. 
Scjuire, P. R. 
Stackpole, F.C. 
Stearns, C. M. 
Stempler, M. 
Stiles, R. A. 
St)*rnlof, A. U. 
Stowell, H. T. 
Strong. W.T. 
Sturtevandt, W. B. 
Swett, F. S. 
Terrill, H. W. 
Tucker. A. C. Jr. 
Tucker, 1.. H. 
I'urner, W. 
Tuthlll. S. F. 
Walbridge, H. B. 
Warner, H. H. 
Warren, H. M. 
Warren, J.J. 
Westman, R. C. 
White. J. E. 
White, L. B. 
Whitney, J. T. 
Wilbur, C. L. 
Williams, A. F. 
Williams, H. C. 



Waban 
Medway 
Springfield 
Newton Center 
Melrose 
Poughkeepsie, N. Y. 
Springfield 
Pittsfield 
Dorchester 
Helchertown 
Somerville 
Melrose 
Boston 
Arlington 
Worcester 
Amherst 
New York, N. Y. 
Springfield 
Southbridge 
Ansonia, Conn. 
Upper Nyack, N.Y. 
Ware 
North Reading 
.Mattapoisett 
Bennington, Vt. 
.Sunderland 
Melrose 
North Brookfield 
West Roxbury 
North Bennington 
Eastondale 
Brooklyn, .N. Y. 
Walpole 
Sunderland 
South Hadley Falls 



COMPETITION IN BUSINESS 

DEPARTMENT 

The HusinesB (lopurtiiient of the 
has :i(lo[)te<l the 



Coi.I.K<iK SitiNAI. 

following rules 
competition. 
1 . Camlidutes 



SWAGGER SUITS FOR YOUNG MEN 



mm;. — Edwiti 11. .Scott received the 
il>'j:ree of Master of Science, for 
^iraduate work in ecUjcntioii at Dart- 
iixHith college last June. 



Au«l once more the song "llow 
green I am" is beard in the laud. 



for this year's 

shall be voted 
upon during the lirst week in March 
by the members of tlte boanl then 
holding ollice. A two-thirds vote 
shall be necessary for election. 

2. To become a canditlale for 
election each competitor must have 
at least twenty-five ('iA) points to 
his credit before March 1. These 
may be earnc<l as follows: 

Those competing for positions in 
the business departiueut will receive 
one point ftir each $iM) worth of 
new ailvertising matter secureil, and 
one point for each two-hour period 
spent Id otHce-woik. The retiewal 
of old advertisements will be consid- 
ered odice work. Work in this 
department will be in charge of the 
business manager, Krnest S. Clark, 
Jr. and the advertising manager, 
Krnest F. Upton. The latter will 
make all assignments for competition 
in the a«lvertising division. The 
1 former will make all other assign- 
I ments in the department. 

:\. The circulation manager will 
Iw elected from the class of I'JIT. 
The assistant advertising manager 
will be elc(te«l from the class of 
r.H*",. .\ll candidates f<ir the \itm\- 
tion of assistant advertising manager 
must hand their names to the adver- 
tising nmnager l»ef«ire Oct. I. 



Concenira+ion 



Many of the world's 
greatest scholars say 
that good tobacco 
helps the mind to 
focus its faculties. If 
that is true, where 
could you find a more 
delightful aid to con- 
centration than 





Made of tender mid- 
dle leaves, to which 
long aging has given 
a temptingly satisfy- 
ing flavor and a vel- 
vety mellowness that 
wooes your senses and 
smoothes out the 
wrinklesofyourbrain. 



^^403!^^^^* t^JC-^ ^ 



KQUAM ANT «KV 
irschbaum 

Clothes 



ALL WOOI. 

MAMO 
TAILOBKO 




All our Young Men's Clothes have 
just the right sort of style tailored 
right into them. The Fall Suits are 
ready and tiny aie up to the last 
tick of the clock. Not a has-been in 
the enlir*:? line. Our Young Men's 
Tratle is the pride of our .store, and 
we hold this trade by having the 
sort of clothes young men desire. 



The Hart Schaftner & Marx 

A. B. Kirschbaum Co. 
The Royal Tailors 

The International Tailors 

B. Stern & Son, Tailors 



.'\ll first class ami prii cs reasonable. 



i;«rr'>K*x. •■'•!• A h ioi»>.biMiuB C*. 



SA NDERSO N & THOMPSON 

ScDool and College pl)otograp^cr$ . . . 




LOO ALLY: 5^ Center St., Northampton Mass.. 

and South Hadley. Matt. 



Main Office: 

1546-1548 Broadway. 

New York City 



These StiiHios offer tlir bcM Hkilleri 
itrliKta aii'l m«>st r«mipl« le 

equipment oliUinahle 



Wi- SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 

In so far as our henLfits arc mutual. 

THE AMHERST CAS COMPANY 

Elverythirtg Electrical 



^ 1^4 AM a 



NON-LKAKABLK 



_ FOUNTAIN PEN 

Minimize your fountain pen 

r- troubles by owninft a Moore's. C It U the 

r Mfest. soundest and most depen.hib c PC" known, 

r C ItsVtrenftth lies in Its very simplicity. Nothlnft 

flnlkytoftetoutof order. C. You can gve your- ^ 

wlfno better treat than a Moore's Non-leakable. /^ ^ 

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American Fountain Pen Company ^y 

Adam«. <;u«hlnft & Foster. .Selllna *«""• -C/; 

168 DKVONSHIRK. STREET :: :: HOST ON . M A.S.S. "^V, 




-^iJJ- 



> I 



; I 






The ColUge Signal, Tuetdaj, September i6, 19 13. 



The Collefe Signal, Tuesday, September 16, 1913- 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 

the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOABD OF KDIT0B8. 

CHKSTKR R. WMRKLKR 'u. PMitor in Chief 
HAROLD C. HF.ACK '14, Assistant Editor 
S'I'UART B. FOSTF.R '14. Athletic Editor 

ERVINE F. PAKKKR'm. Alumni Kditor 

HAROLD J. CLAV '14. Department Editor 
J. ALBEKT PRICE "is. Athletic Editor 

GEORGE E DONNELL'M. Alumni Editor 
EARLE S. DRAPER '15. Campus Editor 

TYLER S. RO(;ERS'i6. Associate Editor 

CHARLES W. CURTlN'i6, Associate Editor 

BUSINESS DFPARTMENT. 

ERNEST S. CLARK, IR. '14. Hus. Manager 
MAURICE J. CLOir.H '1;, Ajs't Bus. VlRr. 
ERNEST F. UPTON '14. Advertising Manager 
WILLIAM R. SEARS '15. Asst. Adv. Manager 
CHAS. A. HUNTINGTON, JR. '16. Circulation 

Subscription I1.50 p«r year. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all orders p^able 
to Ernest S. Ci.akk, Jk. 



Cnlarad ■• Meond 
Pwi OKIM. 



al the AmlMnt 



Vol. XXI\'. TUKSDAV. Sept. 16. No. i 



It was certainly a f^rr^nt joy to all 
tlie mon to greet President Hiitterfiehl 
again after his trip. His message to 
U8 on his return was one which will 
he remenil>ere<l by the men thnuigh- 
<»ut the coming years. He struck tlie 
keynote for the new and better 
Aggie, toward which we shall strive 
this year. If everyone, no matter 
how small his talents, does his little 
share. nothiii<i can stop us from 
^'B<K>8ting Old Aggie to the highest 
place of all." 



A Ni'MitKR of men are endeavoring 
to satisfy the cravings for fcxxl, by 
lM>arding themselves, or patronizing 
the restaurants. It is bad for a man 
to exist on an irregidar diet while in 
college. It leads to a condition of 
indigestion and consefpiently inter- 
feres with college work. The dining 
hall offers a go<Nl. substantial diet, 
served at regular hours, for a normal 
sum. In addition to the ifholesotne 
food, there are the opportunities for 
meeting the men. which are well 
worth grasping. We would urge all 
men not now eating at the dining hall 
to enroll there as soon as possible. 



A woKi) to the new men, and one 
which might be profitably absorbed 
by the old men is in order at this 
time of the year. In the mad rush 
of college activity, let us not forget 
the fundamental thing for which we 
enrolled as students in the college. 
Much t«K» often do we hear the cry 
from college graduates, "Why did I 
not put more time and thought into 
my lessons ? I hold a college diploma 
but my mind is not far enough 
developed to work ,t problem through 
to the end.*' Tliink of Mie future for 
a tiuie and regulate the daily life in 
college with a thouglit of the life 
work after gra<luatiou. It isn't 
"grinding," it is just plain, conmion 
horse sense. 



Some change in the appearance of 
the dorms. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

[Notices for this column should lie dropped in 
the-SiriNAL Office or handed to Earle S. liraper 
1$, on or l>efore Saturday preceding each issue. 1 

Sept. 17 — Assembly 1-10 p. m. Pres. 
Kenyon L Butterfield. 
20— Social Union, 6-30 p. m., 
Drill Hall. President Butter- 
field. 



CAMPUS NOTES 

"Woe is me — I am a poor fresh- 
man :" 

The Beta Kappa Phi fraternity 
has moved into its new bouse on 
Pleasant street. 

Three new companies in drill, and 
two more wpiads at football practice. 
Always advancing. 

The class of 191'! has laid down 
some go(xl rules for the freshmen. 
It is up to you to enforce them, 
sophomores ! 

Prexy's speech at College opening 
exercises was welcomed after his 
four month's altsenee from the cam- 
pus. 

Devotees of the new dances tl<X'k 
to the Social Unhm Koom after sup- 
per evenings. f..ots of opportuni- 
ties for the backward to learn ! 

Kvery untlergraduate should take 
a personal interest in the work of the 
f<M>tliall team. We want a winning 
team this year. Put some enthus- 
iasm into it and get the habit of 
watching practise from outside the 
lines. 

Some close rope pull ! Of late 
years experience has seemed to over- 
balance extra weight. It l«K>ks as if 
there would be no more "quick hauls" 
through the pond for some time ! 

North (h>rni has a new mascot this 
year in the shape of n young green 
parrot In one of the rooms. So far 
the bird has refused even to open its 
mouth, displaying none of the swear- 
ing propensities afTecteil by its tril>e. 
It will soon leain ! 

It is bad (x>licy to get stuck in 
sophomore sidijects. The sopho- 
more profs seem to take great de- 
light in changing text lxx)ks each 
year, much to the disgust of the un- 
fortunates repeating their courses. 

Students are urged to eat at the 
Dining Hall. The larger the num- 
ber of students, the lower the price 
of lK)ard will be The "Hash House" 
is the place to get ac(piainted with 
your class mates, fieshmen I 

It is rumored that the freshman 
class is going to have a chart made 
of all the numerals on the campus in 
order that they may not skip jump- 
ing any. 

The outdoor football mass meeting 
on Thursday night brought out a 
large percentage of the student Ixxly. 
Remarks were made by Dr. Brides, 
Professor Hicks, Captain Brewer '14, 
Manager Freeborn '14, "Kid" Gore, 
'13, and the old M. A. C. spirit 
seemed as active as ever. 

One of the varsity tenuis courts 
have been put in good condition due 



to the untireing work of several up- 
per classmen, ably assisted by those 
of the lower classes wlio were unlucky 
enough to come within hailing dis- 
tance of the court. It is hoped that 
the Athletic association will take the 
hint and fix up the second court. 

Special attention is called to the 
notice at the head of this column. 
The campus editor wishes to make 
the Campus Calender this year a real 
schedule of college events — a full re- 
sume of the events of the following 
week, but it is impo.ssible to do so 
without the co-operation of the var- 
ious "publicity" otHcials of the M. 
A. C. clubs and associations. Kindly 
hand in all notices as specified above. 



E. RUSSELL NORTON 



SALES AGENT 



Tarbell'u 



Eldridge '14 



All Student Supplies 



M. A. C STORE 



BANNERS AND POSTERS 



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Clark '15 



Kendall '16 



Have Your snoes Bepalred Wlin 



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Prompt Service Strictly 
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85 Water St. 



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E.M.BOLLES 



THE ftHOEMAN 



GOOD - TABLE - BOARD 



House Next to Laundry. 



I_0%V RRICE TAILORING CO. 

SI ITS M.\I)E TO ORDER 
Sait<i Clean««l. Pressed And Dyed. All kinds of 
Rppairihe lor I.adi?<i and (l*ntlenien n«atlv donf. 
Highsradc wiwk by fifst-cia** tailor. Work 
calWd lor and deli»ered. Sell tickets for pre.wng, 
4 SUITS FOR ti.;o 

GEORGE KOrOWITZ, P>f«Of>. 

M^in Stu-el. Amherst. Mas*. Nash Klock 

( )n your way lo the F<i»t < )fficc. I el. 4J&-W 



Coolep's Role! 

Sprin^eld, Mass., 

Solicits the patronage of the Siu 
dents of the Agricultural Collc^t- 
to class dinners and individually. 



PANORAMA PHOTOS OF THE CAMPUS 



Student Group, Seniors and Military. 



Sl.OO EACH 

at the Treasurer's Oflice or by mail postpaid. 



The Mcclellan Studio 



Northampton. 



GEO. W. HAWSE, 

Outside Operator. 



WATCHWORD FOR THE YEAR 

At the opening asseinltly of the 
1. I'icsiilent Huttorflelil uctonling 
1,, liis iinnuul custom, gave the watch- 
word for the year. He took the 
motto of the senior olasB, ''Hfiost 
old Aggie" and gave it to the collfgc 
us its motto. He saidl that the best 
cdllege sftirit was that which worketl 
f(»r the best interests of the college 
Ixvond any other interests whatever. 
In other words it means co-opera- 
tion. Everyone must |)Ut a shoulder 
to the wheel. Again it means a hms- 
taiiied enthusiasm, or steady burning 
force. He asserted that we have 
not yet reached the state of continued 
Mip|>ortof a good thing. However, the 
iiifii bv woikiiig<ni it :iiid at it can 
:»( tiially hel|» the thing along. The 
welfare and gcHwl name of a college 
ifter all, lie with the student ImmIv. 
The life here on the campus is the 
test of the college. He suggested 
hfvcral things which the students can 
do to "IJoost Old Aggie." The Hist 
in to induce other men to come. This 
IK heliMMl or hindered by the attitude 
toward the college. Another is to 
work for college interests as against 
fuctional interests. Kvery man can 
at least use the watchword that far. 
The '"lioost" de|>end» on the way in 
which each man ami all the men ron- 
tliiet themselves. This thing make.n 
or breaks a college. Still another 
thing is to praise nmre than you 
Maine. ( ollege men are apt to get 
into the habit of sheer "knocking." 
Tile facidty should gel a little prai.se 
oii«e in a while. Lust but im|Mir- 
taiit is the suggestion to get down to 
good hard work. The severest test 
ctunes from the establinhment of a 
universal spirit of g<Kxlhar<l work. 



RESIGNATIONS AND NEW AP. 

POINTMENTSON FACULTY 

AND OFFICE FORCE OF 

COLLEGE 

During the summer the following 
resignations among tiie Faculty and 
••Ulcers of the college have become 
flTective : 

Hiitman, C. A., Instructor in Physics. 
Diiiley, Arthur T., Supervisor of 

('orres|)ondence Courses. 
' ^kell. Miss Helen V., Clerk, 

Department of Floriculture. 
Hager, Miss Uiith M., Stenographer, 
Division of liural Social Science. 
King, Miss (leorgia A., Clerk. Regis- 
trar's Onice. 
KiiifTHbiirv, Miss Mary H.. ( lerk. 
Department of Poultry Hus- 
biindry. 
"^ ! !e, Miss Virginia, Clerk, Dean's 

ottice. 
i'lsona. Samuel K., Assistant in 
Mathematics. 

.. .Miss Stella H., CKiK. Presi- 
ilont's oflice. 

ite, Ktlward A., Professor of 
Kloricidture. 

large number of new appoint- 

its have been made to take care 

•lozen new courses offered 

■; and to fill vacancies caused 



by recent resignations. The new 

appointments are : 

Haiid, C. (J., (Jiaduate Assistant in 
Agricultural Kconomics. 

Blanchard, Frank N., Instructor in 
Z<)ology and (Jeology. 

Huckley. .1. P., Assisttuit Chemist, 
Kxperiment Station. 

Brown, Henry L., Graduate Assist- 
ant in Chemistry, 

Byard, .John, Foreman of Apiary. 

Christiansen, Miss Bertha K.. Assist- 
ant to the Dean. 

Clark, Oiton L.. Assistant Botanist, 
l-.xperiment Sttition. 

Comstock, Miss Laiint, Kxtension 
Professor of Home Kconomics. 

Davies, K., (Iratluate Assistant in 
Microbiology. 

KIw<hk1, p. II., Kxtension Instructor 
in Civic Improvement. 

Forbiish, Krwin H., Supervisor of 
Correspondence Courses. 

(Jore, llarohl M., Assistant in Phy- 
sical Kducation. 

Hazeltine, B. A , Assistant in 
Mathematics 

Hillary, H. W.. (irtnluate Assistant 
in Landscape Cardening. 

Itano. A., (Jrailiiate Assistant in 
Microbiology. 

Lund. U. F., (Iradiiate Assistant in 
Agronomy. 

McDougHll, A. F , demonstrator in 
charge of aut«>mobile truck, 
Kxtension Servi<e. 

Milton. Miss Nell ( ., .steiio^riiipher, 
division of Kural So<-ial Science. 

Milton. Miss Fay L., clerk, depart- 
ment of Poultry Husbamlry. 

Norton, .lolm B.. (Jraduate Assist- 
ant in Horticulture. 

Bobbins, H K , Assistant Profe8S4»r 
of Physics. 

Hobinson, Harold A., Graduate 
Assistant in Chemistry. 

Serex, Paul Jr., <;ra<luate Assistant 
in Chemistry. 

Sherk, KIgin, Sm-ial Service Secre- 
tary. 

Smith, Miss Dorothy, clerk, depart- 
ment of Floriculture. 

Thayer. C I-.. (li:idii:ite .\sMistant 
in Kloricidture. 

Turner, Miss Olive .M , clerk. Regis- 
trar's olllce. 

Van Suchtelen, F. H., Assistant 
Professor of Microbi(»logy. 
Two members of the faculty beside 

Presiclent Butterfield are on leave of 

absence. Prof. H. W. Neal and 

George II. Chapman. 



'I'J. Kric N. BohuHl has been 

chosen instructor in animal imlustry 
at the Cniversitv of Maine. 



FRESHMAN RECEPTION 

fContinufrf from page I] 

Other speakers w< r. Professor Cham- 
berlain, Pr<'fi-^"i llnr-I. Professor 
Mackimmie nii.i Mi. Mi.rk. the new 
social service seciet:irv, whoso func- 
tion is to help the dilTcrent college 
institutions with suggestions aii-l 
advice, though lie will work primarily 
through the religious organizations. 
After the .spee<lies, the <'ollege 
orchestra furnislied music for (lanc- 
ing and light refreshments were 
served. 



The Weakest Link or Limiting Factor 

There are fields that contain an abundance of potash on analysis, 
but on which crops fail if thev are not supplied with ,Uiuhil>!e potash, 
and the same is true if aiatltihle phosphorus is lacking. 

We are all familiar with the limiting factor in crop production, 
namely, the weakest luik in the chain of fertility. One never kn<.ws 
when one has reached the limiting factor, the weakest link; one never 
knows when one has exhausted the available phosphorus or the avail- 
able potash, or the available nitrogen until crops fail to respond. After 
a farmer has harvested a bumper crop he hus taxed all the links in the 
chain of fertility, but which one is nearest the breaking point he does 
not know; therefore, if he is wise he applies at least all three of the 
leading elements of fertility in some shape, cither in the form of stable 
manure, green crops or commercial fertilizers, or all combined (which 
latter is the better plan), knowing that any excess which he may have 
applied will not be lost out of the reach of crops, if a rational system 
of rotation with deep-rooted and shallow-rooted crops is practised, in 
eluding cover crops. Moreover, these undoubtedly promote bacterial 
growth in the soil, which, .iccording to Hall, may be the limiting factor. 

Study the riant Food problem 

Many have "an" answer 
'*The" answer wil! he wurth while 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER COMPANY 
43 Chatham St., Boston 




. A. SHERARD. 

MIEN'S STORE 



Kuppcnhcimcr's 
Fine Clollies 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



Agency for the French Shoe 

CUSTOM TAIIORING A SPECIAITY 




JOSEPH P. CAMPION 



Has Moved Into His New Store On 



PHOENIX ROW 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 16, 1913. 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobljersof Wroiight Iron and IJrass Tip*-, Valves 
and KittinKS fur Steam. Water and (la*, \sbestos 
and Magnesia Boiler and I'lpe CoverinK*. I'ipe 
Cut to Sketch, Mill Supplies. Kn^iteers and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Wafei HealinR. 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Boiler am) KnKine 
Connections. Holyoke, M«*«. 



theTeachers Exchange 



Of Boston 



1 20 Hoyliton St. 



Recoininenils Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



It is earnestly requested that n'l, 
especiully freshmen, who have pla\ d 
tennis at all, come around to t e 



C^rp^n-tcr & Morehoust, 
PRiNTtI 



No I, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Students Attention ! ! ! 

We are ready at the start to furnish you with a fine 
line of Campus and Fraternity House Views, also Post 
Cards. Kodak work given prompt and careful attention. 
Knlarging and picture framing given our personal at- 
tention. See us about Croups and Portraits for the very 
best work. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. Patronize 
the Square Deal Studio 

KINSMAN'S COLLEGE STUB 10 



Nash BlocK. Amherst 



H. M. R<k;krs, '15, Agent. 
87 Pleasant St., 



Studio Phone 303-2. 



GRAND SWEEPSTAKES TROPHY 



(f750.00 StwUni Silver Cup) 
rOR 



BEST STATE EXHIBIT OF POTATOES 




AT THE 

New York Land Show 

1912 
WON BY 

TheLLQeyelandCompaiiy 

HOULTON. M«. 

/^NE of the larecst and most 
^^ reliable seed potato houses 
in the United States. Competi- 
tion open to the entire United 
States and Canada. Messrs. E. L. 
Cleveland Cotnpany also won the 
First Prize for Best Coonty Exhibit 
of Potatoes. (Silver Cup valued 
at $200.00.) 
The E. L. Cleveland Company use 

L FRANK COE 
FERTILIZERS 

E. Frank Coe Fertilizen have 
been the business farmer's favorite 
for over tifty-five years. Why not 
follow the example of these lead- 
ing commercial potato growers. 

T»ii Mffc* •• T*U "Th* Story nf A Pmfltahl* Potato 
Crop" "HH»« hj in irwHlMk CmMj, ■•!» Hrmtr 
A raff la •'■> fr** •■ rcqaclt 



The Coe-Mortimer Company, 



SI CHAMBERS STREET. 
NEW YORK. N. Y. 



1913 MEN ORGANIZE 

A LOCAL CLI B KOKMKU. 

During the past sunnner n number 
of members of the class of 1913 courts, uud attend the meeting.s a 
organized the Hm M. A. C club of \ «h''cl» the theoretical side f 
Amherst. The ain. of the dub is to -«l«««»'Ic's playing" will be discuss, i. 
bind together I'.MM Aggie n.en iu I'romising men an.ong the enter, .g 
Amherst, to provide some home : <-•!»«« ""^.V l«">f f^'' ««P«*''''*1 «"«"^-" 
organization for returning 'l.J meh. 



and to keep in touch with members 
of the class in the vicinity of 
Amherst. Hegular nieetingsare hehl 
the last week of each mouth, and 
special nieetings may be called at any 
time by the president. Active mem- 
bership is restricted to '13 men hav- 
ing a locution in Amherst, but nearby 
members of the class arc invited to 
enroll as associate members. 

At the annual September election 
the following otticers were electe«l: 
Presiilent, II. M. Gore; secretary 
and treasurer, K. H. Van Zwalen- 
bnrg ; executive conunittee, A. K. 
.MclJougal and C. L.Thayer; chor- 
egus, Paul Serex, .Ir. 

FALL TENNIS AT M. A. C. 

A DuUltLKS TolKNAMKNT Is I.IKKI.V. 

With the opening of college in 
September, one's thoughts naturally 
turn toward the fo<»tliall team, and 
keen interest is taken in its develop- 
ment and success. Notwithstanding 
this fact, at alnMit every college there 
comes too, with the opening of a new 
year the anticipation of a tennis tour- 
nament of some description. Some 
rolleges run it o(T in the form of a 
singles tournament for freshman ; 
others for the entire college, but the 
majority of colleges are now turning 
their attention in the fall to doubles 
tournaments. These are sometimes 
plave<l off as fraternity matches, and 
again, others are openetl to the entire 
student botly, but regardless of how 
these are played, they all aim for one 
pur|><>He — that of building up *' team 
play " and of making a start at one 
of the most importiint elements of a 
successful tennis team — that branch 
cH)mprising the two doubles teams. 

Heretofore at M. A. C the fall 
lournanunts being in singles, have 
merely been advantageous in as nuich 
as they gave the captains an idea of 
his material for the f<»llowing spring. 
This year, however, plans have f»een 
made to go at the Fall tennis in an 
entirely diflferent manner, one which 
will not only show up the promising 
men but will give these men a chance 
to work together and develop, if pos- 
sible, into creditable doubles teams ; 
teams, which after playing together 
continuously, will play the game as it 
should Ikj pKiyed 

As has been stated Itefore, this fall 
we will stick closely to doubles play- 
ing ; learning the gutiie, Itotli theoret- 
ically and practically, a.s it is played 
correctly. After a few weeks of 
practising, a tournament of doubles 
will be played off, open to the whole 
college, the winners and runners up 
of which will, in all probability, start 
as the Varsity doubles teams in the 
following spring. 



as it is the intention of the teunis 
aasociation at M. A. C. this year to 
put the sport on a sound fonndati> m 



RUSHING RULES 

SEASON SMOIITLV .silOKTENKU. 

The fraternity conference Iiuh 
drawn up the following rules in reg:m| 
to the rushing and pledging of 
freshmen. 

1 , The rushing season shall open 
the day college opens. 

2. The rushing reason shall ♦•nd 
ut f>-(H) o'clock on Sunday evennig 
the 2Gth of October. 

8. Freshmen shall pledge during 
chapel on the last Monday in ()<to- 
t)er. Pledge buttons shall be put ou 
at that time <»nly. 

t. Candidates for fraternitii'S 
nnist be'undergraduates and inuxt 
also be caodidateB for a four year 
degree. 

.^. The rushing of freshmen is to 
be done only by the undergratlunti- 
members of the fraternities of tlii" 
college. 



SOCIAL UNION STATEMLNF 


llalance on ha 


nd Sept. 1, 




l'.H3, 




$2it^.7r 


Receipts from taxes, 


7'.»x."J»' 


»' (J 


line r<K>m, 


n.s.;{7 


'• M 


iscellaneous 




sources. 


$1 


j.;y 




,1227.1H 


lilnHLR^KMKNTS 




Piano, 


|2(K)0() 




Chairs, 


KMJ.OO 




Kntertainment, 


14.5.50 




Game room, 


l.v.t.y? 




F'urniture, 


.•J. 61 




Fuel, 


8 2.1 




Refunds, 


12.75 




Miscellaneous, 


H2.H7 






«7 12.95 


^:\j.'yi 


Balance May 


31. 1913, 


411.23 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

Fl.oKK I 1,11 KK. 

Prof. E. A. White has resigneii. 
to go to Cornell University as lie»d 
of the floriculture department tliero 
As yet no permanent arrangeiut'Dts 
have been made for Prof •***<"^ 
White's successor, but Mr. K. .1 ' »"• 
ning, who has been curator (>^ th'' 
Botanic gardens at Smith Coll' '" 
many years, will assume the in 
ual work for the fall or until "i* 
man is appointed. C. L. Th:i>' !'• 
has been appointed graduati ■ " 
tant in the department. 

Work on the new additi^ n to 
French hall, provided for by t 1=*-^ 
legislature, though started son ti'"^ 
ago, is progressing very slowl 



The College Signal. Tuesday, September 16, 1913' 



E LAVAL 

' CREAM 
SEPARATORS 



Make Fall and Winter 
Dairying More Profitable 

''I'^HERE are special advantages In usins 
i a good cream separator during the fall 
and winter months. 

The milk from cows lontr in lactation is 
hardest to cream,— and lilcewise hardest to 
separate with an inferior separator. 

Moreover, cream and butter prices are 
hiithest. so that the waste of gravity setting 
or a poor separator counts for most 

Then there's the tweet, warm skim-milk 
fnr stock feeding, alone worth the cost of a 
>« parator in cold weather. 

There is stirely no reason to delay the 
imrcbase of a separator or to continue the 
use of an inferior one. A De L.avul machine 
will save its oust by spring, and may be 
liought on such liberal terms if desired aa 
to actually pay for itself meanwhile. 

See your local De Laval agent. 



ft 



THE DE LAVAL 
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NEW YORK 

CHICAGO 

SAN FRANCISCO 

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MOr^TREAL 

WINNIPEG 



THE KENNEL CLUB 

Fine Home Made Pies 

Are being baked for ui by Miss Canavan 
Have you tried them ? 

That we are carrying a good line of 
— Tol^tiooo 



BIRDSUL '13 



FARRER 15 



WiUiam H. Watson's 

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"The consensus of press opinion of 
both continents, speaking eloquently of 
I)R. Watson's work, is that he is a mas- 
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books. Each picture a work of Art." 

AKT SCHOOL PUBLISHING CO. 

aj|7 MtckHiM AveaM, Cklcag*. U. S. A. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 



A Specialty of College Classes 



' -U-n St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



Ihere are seven good reasons 
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COAL 



OP 



C R. ELDER 



EXTENSION SERVICE. 

Sumtner School anil Conference. 

The F^xteusioii Service hiiB been 
far from iniietive duriug the suiuiuer 
mouths. The summer schot)! was 
without doubt the Itest yet held. The 
registration was 121) and the courses 
themselves were better and the inter- 
est of the students were greater than 
ever before. There were 212 regis- 
tered for the C^onference of Rural 
community leaders, which was also 
exceptionally successful. A new 
feature, which proved very success- 
ful, was the Hoy's camp. Thirty- 
three boys, frou) different sections of 
the state, camped out in tents and 
followed a regular routine of drill, 
study and recreation. 
A<ldUiona (uul (Jhanijes in Famlty. 

Domestic Science — Miss Laura 
Comstock has been secured as Kx- 
tension Professor of Home Kcono- 
luies. Miss Comstock receive<l her 
training in Domestic science at Pratt 
Institute. From there she went to 
the University of Maine, where she 
established the department of Home 
economies in the State College of 
Agriculture, and had charge of the 
Extension work as well. Her work 
this year will include lectures, dem- 
onstrations and conferences during 
Farmer's Week, the laU .Summer 
School and Conference, and the ex- 
tention schools, single lectures and 
demonstrations u|>on re<iuest, assis- 
tance in fornting girls* and woman's 
home economic clubs, an<l co-0|>era- 
tion in any other {KMsible way. 

CVi'ic IteUeniyut. 

r. H. K1Iw«xk1 has Itcen secure<l as 
Instrmtor in Civic Improvement. 
.Mr. KI1wo<kI is a graduate of Cornell 
College of Agriculture, an«l fur the 
past three years has l»een iD the 
ollice of a landscajjc architect in New 
York city. Assistance will l»e given 
in all kinds of rural and village 
improvement enterprises. 
AiUo-Demonat ration (Jnijii . 

An automobile truck equipped with 
spraying apparatus, pruning tools, 
Habcock Tester and other dairy 
apparatus, farm account and dairy 
record blanks, a radioptican with 
sets of pictures for illustrative use, 
books, pamphlets and other equip- 
ment have been provided and will 
visit towns all over the state, u|M>n 
request. Mr. A. F. Dougall M. A. 
C. '1.'), who in his college course was 
a member of l>oth corn ami stock 
judging teams, is the instructor in 
charge of this outfit. 
Sujwrvistor ofCorrenponrlence Conrsen. 

The place of Mr. Dailey, who has 
resigned, is being filled by Krwin H. 
Forbush. Mr. Forbust is a graduate 
of the Connecticut Agricultural col- 
lege, and since graduation has served 
as Assistant l^litor of the Connecti- 
cut Farmer, and. for the past IT, 
months, has been clerk in the State 
Board of Agriculture. 

Prof€»9or Hard. 

The college came very near loiing 



the services of Professor Hurd, dur- 
ing the summer. He was offered a 
very attractive position in the now 
Rural Organization service of the 
United States department of Agri- 
cidture in charge of Dr. T. N. Car- 
ver, and it was at considerable sacri- 
fice to himself, from a financial view- 
point, that he was liually prevailed 
upon to continue aa director of the 
Kxteusion Service. 



ALUMNI NOTES 
'87._JameB M. Marsh died July 
H, at Chicago, while on his way Fast 
frdra California where he had gone 
in an effort to regain his health. 
He was a prominent business man of 
Lynn being at the time of his death 
president and treasurer of the (Jeorge 
O. Marsh soap company. 

'(>9. — (i. R. Fulton, who has been 
chemist for the Farwell Hleachery 
of Lawrence, has been put in charge 
of the dyeing department. Ad- 
dress, .5 Stearns Ave., Lawrence. 



Attention of Students. 

If V"ii arr lo<iktriK 1"' i<>ni{«'i>ii<I .mil i.-niu- 
nrtdtivr <iccu|>iit>iin dutinK »uriiim-r, «iite 

TMK flKNKHAI. %i'»'l.|.%NCK K.i« TOUV, 

(lncorp<ii;ttFd) »l«rln»-Ur, HI iMcanklii. 

foi p4rticuUr». 




Massachusetts Northern Rail- 
way Company- 



RHTAni.tsHBn IH«»a 

St v. p 11 K N \j A .V f; F <» i- «» k k 

MANi;rA€-r»'Hir«c» jkwbi-kh 
180BK0AI»\VAY. >fKW YOKK 

IMNH ANIJ KINCIH .* 
•OU>. ■II.TBH AJtD BMOMZa MMD^IM 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papcri 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found-at 



EWELL'5 

STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWKR KXI'ENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 



AND 



CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



cox SONS 



— AHO — 



■■P^ VINING 

72-74 Madison Avenue. New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

Itest Materials and Workmanship 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



»7 Main St., Masonic BIdg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Cht0d tnly tr»m t A. M. to 4 A. M. 



Toefil Mientka 

snoes Sinned and Folisiieii 

Make old shoes look like new 

Neat, classy workmanship 

Op«n Hnnriay M»ln Nt. 

On wsr to Pott Office 



M 



in 







or t 



The Collefe Signal, Tuesday, September t6, 1913. 



TENNIS 
RACKETS 




—At— 



DEUEL'S 



AMHERST 

Chp Laundry 



High-Grade 


College Work 


LAUNDRY 

Shirts, 

Collars, 

Cuffs, - . - - 

Plain wash. 

Same, rough dry. 


10-15C 

2 I-2C 

3 I-2C 

48c per doz. 
30C per doz. 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, #1.50 a Suit 



Ralhh ). BoRDKN. AKent, 7 North Cottage 
KiiWAHri C. KuWAKUS, Agent 

Put full name and address on laundry 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Loose • Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 

Before buying elsewhere, see our assort- 
ment of pennants and banners 

CURRAN ft DYER. Props. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty six teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Agriculture 
Agronomy 
Animal Husbandry 
Dairy img 
Poultry Husbandry 



Horticulture 

Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

PomolQgy 



Agricultural Chemistry 
Economic Entomology 
Plant Physiology and Pathology 
Agricultural Education 



For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 
SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWKLKK AM) OPTOMETRISI 
Lenses ground while you wait 

COLLEOK JeWKLRV 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and liuitar Stfitigj 

AMHl!:K!tT, MA^^. 
Next to Post (Jttice. 



STEAM FITTING, Telephone 59^ 4 

GASFITTlNt;. TINNING. 

P. W. Dance & Co. 
PLUMBERS. 



Specialty of Repairing 

Church \Vini>ows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Leao Lights, &c. 
« Clifton Ave.. AMHERST, MASS 



Athletic Hoard, 

'J'he College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball AHSuciatiou, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Assoi-iation, 

Tenuis AsMociatiou, 

Hide club, 

Uoisti'r Doisters 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Fourteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Fifteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

SUx-kbridge Club, 



George H. Chapman, Secretary 

I). W. Jones, i'lesident 

S, li. Freeborn, Manager 

L. E<lgar Smith, .Manager 

¥.. C. h^lwards. Manager 

J. 1). Pellett, Manager 

C. Itokelund, Manager 

J. W. T. lA'sure, .Secretary 

Harold F. Jones, Manager 

J. 1). French, .Manager 

E. S. Clark, Jr., Manager 

II. M. Uogeirt, Manager 

K. 11. Towers. President 

J. L. Mayer, President 

W. S. Little, President 

K. H. (iaskill, President 



Catalogues of 

Pcall Ae "Wliitc^r Gooclai 

.\reout. Copy mailed to any address. CoIIckc 
students and Athletes who want the ie«l. sui»Ti..r 
articles fur the various sports should inMNt ui>i.n 
thow lurarmi; the Wright & Ditson I ia<l«- M^ik 



Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Hockey 
Skates 




Skat'gShoes 
Sweaters 
' Jerseys 
Uniforms 
for all spurts 

■tandard lor 



l^hen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green* 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations,violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300 



Barsalotti & Gentoso 

cigars Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresh Candy 

Ice Cream, Fruit, Soda, Etc. 

The Right Goods at the Right Prices 

Open till II o'clock EVERY night 

Ccraer Amity and Pl«a*aat Strewta 



If you want to be 

hOI.III WITH THE niKI.M 

70U must have yourclothet pres^ieil and cleaned 

AT BPSTBZlf' 8 

11 Amity •'<t. Maroon Store 

Prcaalng and Cleaning a »p»Tlalty 

MoMi liberal Ucket ay stem In town 
Tel. 3».1-li 



Wright &' llitson tio<ids are the 
all sports 

J44 Washington St., Uo»ton, M*« 



THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CLEANSING, 

PRESSING. 

REPAIRING. 

Uulckral Mtrrlw, B»ii« Work, l,owr»l ITIr* 

All woik carefully done Work called (or »nd 
delivered, iients' overcoats, suits, t>ant^ »nd 
coats. Ladies' hne linen suits a specialty. 

Teams will call every day at M. A C. 

Wn. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rear Nash Bl'k, Amherst. 



Tel No. J«H 



CARS 

Leave AOaiE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 

CARS 

Leave AMHERST lor AOaiE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 min. past sacli 
HOUR. 

SpccM Can at Rcaaanabte Rates 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. " 



1434-1426 Chestnut St., 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



AIHERSI & SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CO 



NEW ENGLAND JOURNAL OF INFLUENCE 

Established in 1S24 by .Samuel Bowies 

SpriDgfleld Republican 



•,of 



A NEWSPAPER THAT EDUCA 

The Republican gives the best rt 
Agricultural College and Am' 
news, also the best new^ 
of outdoor sports 



Dmily,%i- Sunday:%i. We uU 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEOE 



Vol. XXIV. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, September 23, 19' 3- 



No. 2 



SIGNAL COMPETITION 

I'lve Vacancies on Editorial Board. 
Contest Opens October i. 

At a meeting of the SiiiNAi. lioard 
this week, the rules for this year's 
■^h.^•Al. couipetition for the editorial 
hoard were adopte<L 

Membership to the Coi.i.kok Si<iN.\i. 
iMmrd shall be gained as follows : 

1. (andidatesshall l>e votetl y\\vi\\ 
during the first week in .March by the 

iiiinlteirt of the board then holding 
otHee. A two-thirds vote shall l»e 
necessary to election. 

2. The competition shall begin at 
midnight on Sept. SO, I9l:{, and shall 
L-iiii at midnight on .Matvh 1. Vi\\\ 

I lid to iMfCorae a candi«late for elec- 
ti«)n, each competitor iiiiist have 
twenty-live (2.'») jM)ints to his rredit 
hifiire the close of the rtmtest on 

.M.H.ll 1. 

3. To be etegibic to coiu|>cte, a 
eantlidate must have hamled his name 
to the ("om|)etition Kilitor, II. C 
Uluck '14, before Nov. I. 191.'.. 

I. Points in the competition may 
lie earned as f<»Uow8 : Those conipf t- 
itig for positions in the editorial 
-Itjinrtnient will receive one jioint f<»r 
each 7 iiK-hes of original ropy ac- 
I't'pted, one (»oint for each J" inthet 
tvuMjmed re|»rint matter a<'<H'pte<l and 
one point f«>r each two-hour pericMl 
s|M?iit in oHice-work. AsHignim'iits 
will U- ill charge of IL ('. ISlack 11, 
whi> ordinarily will makf certain 
:>->si^niiients on rojnest The reiMirt- 
iiig of assembly speeciies, addresses, 
t ^ « reprint work. 

The number of |K>«itions open 
ii ^ class, in the editorial depart- 
in « ^ in. 191 .'>—!. 1916—2, and 
r. •• U ' ; in till' business department, 
r.i o C^ ami 1917—1. 

< C"**" »e board reserves the right 
I'M t ^ >ld election in cilfwr depart- 



A NEW TRUSTEE 

George P. G'Donnell of Northampton 
Appointed by the Governor. 

(leorgo 1*. O'Donnell has recently 
been api>ointed by (Jovernor Fobs as 
a member <»f the Iwiard of trustees of 
•M A. C. to fill the vacancy cttimed 
by the resignation of M. V. Dickin- 
son who was pnvciitcd from serving 
by poor health. 

Mr. O'Donnell was lK»rn in North- 
ampton 011 .liih HI. l.'<72and is the 
s<m of ex-.Mayor .John H. ()'D«>niiell. 
lie graduated from Holy (iosh in 
1H92 and from Boston university law 
school in I«9.'i. Mr. O'Donnell is 
now aseociate<l with his father in the 
law firm of O'Donnell it O'Donnell. 



CAMPUS CHANGES 

Foretnost aimmg the campus 
changes are the dormitory improve- 
ments—South has been entirely g<me 
over, new metiil ceilings, Imrlap 
wainsi'otting and newly varnishetl 
rtoors and wtHnlwork a«hl mmh to its 
ap|M'arance, while the improved base- 
ment faciliti«'« add to it»c«nivenicnce. 
.North has alwi lieeu repainti-tl and 
cleaned. 

New granolithic walks around the 
cnmpiis were made in pursuance of a 
plan which each year will iiurease 
campus f.uilities. The new walk 
from (lark Hall to the stone bridge 
is of immense value, :i- ^^ >- iMiinted 
out in the Sn.NAi. last year. The 
sewer system, while making the cam- 
pus a little unsightly, vastly improve* 
the sanitary facilities. 

French Hall when <ompleted will 
be almost twice its present sixe, but 
at present the favorite entrance is 
through a snle window. 



!iur*5^« itorial or bu8iDe8,s if, in its 
jiid^iuent the poor work of any one 
^roiip of candidates justifies it. In 
8in-h case tile <x)mpelition for vacan- 
'ies will be in charge of the new 
tionrd. after it has come intoottlce on 
M.iidi I.'.. 

An 8d«lilion to rule 3 of the com- 
I " tifion in the business department is 

i-'i to be note«l. All candidates for 
'lie position «)f circulation manager 
'■iUsl have li:iM<led their names to the 
Uusi) -- Manager, K. S. (lark, .Ir. 

'1 hi tun Nov. 1. r.ti:5. in order to 
tii^iihle as competitors. 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 



'I J the Holy Cross game. IMan 

. lo (TO to Worcester ;mii ( lieer 
' team on loxicfory. It is nim- 

1 that another "side door puU- 
ii party" is being arranged. M. 

' ought to have a goodly sized 

-.aliou at that game. 



The first Christian assmiatton 

meeting of the year was held in the 

chapel on Thursday evening. After 

a few remarks by Hichard H. Powers. 

the president of the assoiiation, and 

L. Krnest Sinitli. who has charge of 

the lioys* clubs, the new so4ial wcre- 

tary, Mr. Sherk. 8|M.ke «»f the aims 

of the as8ociati«»n for the coming 

year. Th«- work will fall into three 

main <livisions : I'.oys* clubs, Knglish 

classes toi foreigners, and deputation 

work. Mr. Sherk is outlining a busy 

campaign for the fall and winter and 

I there will I.e a chance f..r every one 

' to get out and do something. Short, 

ii.forinal meetings will be li.l.l ui the 

chapel every Thursday night at a 

Irpiarter of seven. A cordial invita- 

! tion is extended all the men to <ome 

1 around and see what they are like. 



PRESIDENT SPEAKS 

At First Social Union Entertsinmeni. 
His Topic "Student Life Abroad ". 

The lirst Social Inion entertain- 
ment of the year was held in the 
Chapel Saturday evening. IVesident 
Butterliehl spoke on stutlent life 
abroa<l, and was assistetl by mem- 
bers of the choir who sang typical 
(ierman student songs. The first 
waa a song which he had heanl in 
the streets on one occasion and could 
not learn its name iinlil he heard it 
sung again at a slmlent gathering at 
one of the German universities. He 
s|Kikeof the verirns or duelling corps 
which corres|>oiul to our fraternities, 
and of the extraordinary dress they 
don on all im|>ortant occasions. 
After a si^ech to the stu<lents at one 
meeting the Tresident attended, he 
was given the greatest honor that 
could \w tendered a guest. It was 
the performance of the -'Halamander" 
for his benefit. The 'salamander" he 
explained is a drinkihg song act-oni- 
panied by gestures and appropriate 
action. A song IxMik presented to 
him tui this o<-casion as a souvenir 
was shown t«> the audience. It was 
l>eaulifully l»ouml ami covereil ami 
at each corner held a large brass 
stud, which, as President Hutteifiehl 
explained serve<l to pnitect the bind- 
ing fmni Iwer spilled on the tables. 
In summing up his impressions of 
( ;ertnan student life he said that on 
the whole l»eer drinking was not as 
excessive as haa many times Iwen 
pictured. 

liCaving the eontiiwnt and its e«in- 
cational Institutions the President 
sjioke of the two great Knglish uni- 
versities, Cambridge ami Oxfonl, 
with much enthusiasm. He said 
that it was one of the l>est parta of 
his trip, this visit to these centers of 
learning, ami that as a result he 
eould now understand why they were 
such wondiiful schools. 

At the close of the address, the 
choir sang another (;erman stmlent 
song that was commonly heard at 
student gatherings in the (Jerman 
universities. 



FOOTBALL OUTLOOK 

For the Year is Good. First Game with 
Dartmouth Saturday. 

Tlie liist call for candi<lates for 
the f«M»tball team was issued by Cap- 
tain Uiewer two weeks ago, and al- 
thougli only a few men reporte»l at 
that time, the stpiad s«M»n increased 
in number to al»out .'>0. giving (^oach 
Hiides a giMxlly bunch with which to 
work. Professor Ili<'ks and (Jore 
I'.MM are assinling Dr. Hritles in 
rounding out the teams. The change 
ill the schedule whereby all classes 
stop at .'».<K) I'. M. is aitling the 
coaches materially. 

Three varsity men were lost by 
graduation last .June, (i«»re. Kisen- 
haure and Captain Samson. (Jraves, 
who cleveloped into a promising full- 
back last year, has not returned. 
Hut in spite <»f thew lossaes, pros- 
pects are bright There is a wealth 
of material in the freshman class, a 
bunch of last year's second string 
men. and the varsity veterans U> Iks 
developed into a winning cocibina- 
ti<»n. Present indications jMjint to a 
heavy line with a rather light back- 
field, a situation similar to last year, 
although this backfield seems to lie 
stronger. 

Coa<h HridcH lias m:»de a few ten- 
tative ch.inges. shifting .Melican to 
.piarterback. Dole l<i guard and is 
giving Strong, a freshman, a tryoiit 
at center. 

According to Manager FreelH»rn"s 
schedule, the first game is wltli Dart- 
iiMMith at Hanover on Satunlav. 
'The opening of the season is a week 
late this year, there l»eing no game 
with UIhmJc Island. This is a gixsl 
M»ove as the coach gets more time in 
which to round his team into shape, 
and can thus make slower, but more 
sare progress. The team will leave 
for Hanover Friday afternoon and 
ought U> mkiIn. the contest a <lose 
one. 



NOTICE 

A few suggestion-^ nre in order in 
regard t^) Sionai. b<»ard correspond- 
ence. Ka«'h man fni the board is 
assigned U) the oversight of a partic- 
idar department. These facts are 
published at the head of this column 
each week for the benefit of our 
readers. It is out urgent desire that 
all communications be sent to the 
proper persons. Circulation and 
advertising queries are in charge of 
ithi' business department, but it con- 
stantly happens that complaints, 
subscriptions, etc. are sent to the 
editor-in-chief. 



FOOTBALL SCHEDULE 

For tlie benefit of those who may 
have displaced this year's ffHjtliall 
schedule, it is again published. Two 
of the games, th<»se with Norwich 
ami Middlebiiry are bi be played at 
home on Oct. 1« and J.', respectively. 
'The 8che«liile : 

.Sei't. .^7— Dartmouth at Hanover. 
N. H. 
Holy Cross at Worcester. 
I nioii at Schenectady. N. V . 
Norwich at M. A. C. 
.Middlebiiry it M. A. C. 
Tufts at Medford. 
-New Hampshire. 
-I. Y. .M. C A. college at 
Sjiringfield. 



Ort. 1- 
O.l. 11 
Oct. 1:5 
Oct. ■J-< 

N<.\. I 
Nov. /* 
Nov. 1.". 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 23. 1913. 



CLASS LETTER OF 1912 

The first 11)12 class letter Imw 
recently been sent out by the class 
secretary, Francis Madison. Follow- 
ing is a revised copy of the 11M2 
class roll : 

Ackernian, Arthur J., Amherst, 
graduate student M. A. C. 

Baker, Horace M., 274 Main St., 
Springfiehl, real estate. 

Reals, Carlos L., Amherst, assist- 
ant chemist, Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural experiment station. 

Heers, Kowlaud T., Cromwell, 
Conn., florist. 

Bent, William H., Princeton, prin- 
cipal of high school. 

Bodfish. Kdward H., 1101 Tremont 
building. Bonton, landscape gartleuer 
with W. II. Manning. 

Bolantl, K. N . Ames, Iowa, grad- 
uate student, Iowa state college. 

Brett, Alden C, North Abington. 
grain, hay and coal business. 

Brown, Merle R.. North Grafton, 
8. Lathrop l)aveni»ort fruit farm. 

Burnham. Arthur .1., .'i.'l Fairfield 
avenue, Ilolyoke. 

Binr, Frederick II., clepartment of 
agriculture, Rutgers college. New 
Brunswick, N.J. 

Carpenter, Jesse, Attlelioro. 

Castle, Fred A.. .Springfield, laud- 
scape architect. 

C.app.Raymoini K. Mineral Valley 
Farm, Westhanipton. fruit grower. 

Curran, Daniel J., Mexi<<>. N. V. 
agricultural instructor in high sciioot. 

Deming. WiufredCJ., Wetherslield, 
Conn., farmer. 

Dmlge, Albert W., 2.')3 Ix)well St., 
Reading, lands<-ape forester. 

Fagerstrom, lA>on F,., Shrewsbury, 
with Bickenham «.V Miller, landscape 
architects, Broadway, New York. 

Fisherdick, Warren F.. Amherst, 
stock clerk, general maintenance 
department, M. A. ('. 

Fitts, Frank O., Kingston, R. I., 
assistant chemist, Rhodr Island 
state college. 

Fitzgerald, John J., i". 1.'. (treen 
avenue, BrfX)klyn, N. V., (>eneral 
Chemical Co. 

Fowler, (leorge S., Andierst, grad- 
uate assistant, department of chem- 
istry, M. A. C. 

Gallagher, .lames A., North Wil- 
mington. 

Gaskill, Lewis W., Cromwell, 
Conn., florist. 

Gelinas, Ix>uis F^., corner Fifth and 
Bellefield avenue, Pittsburg, Pa., 
with I^urlen Machinery Co. 

Gibbs. Robert M., Lawrence, Mas- 
s.ichusetts Forestry Association. 

Gibson, Lefter E., 35 Winthrop 
St., Melrose. 

CJray, Frank L., Box 18, Kingston, 
florist. 

Hall, Henry B., not beard from. 

Hall. Horace W., 3.3 Broad St., 
Boston, lumber business. 



Holowell, Ray R., 381 Center St., 
Jamaica Plain, engineer, Boston 
park department. 

Hamlin, Stephen F.,1101 Tremont 
building, itoston, with W. H. Man- 
nii>g, landscape designer. 

Harlow, Joseph A., Turners Falls, 
clerk. 

Ileald, Jay M., '.> Franklin St., 
Watertown, farmer. 

Hemenway. Thomas, AVest Palm 
Beach. Fla., teacher. 

Ilickey, Francis B., 3.5 Belmont 
St., Brockton. 

Hills, Frank B., Ames, Iowa, grad- 
uate student, Iowa state college. 

Holland, Henry L., Reading, Pa., 
chemist, Reading Bone Fertilizer Co. 

Hubert, Benjamin F., Orangeburg- 
S. C. director agricultural depart- 
ment of state college. 

Kingsbury, Arthur F.,«'>3 Pine St., 
Middletown, Conn., with Rogers & 
Hubbard Co., fertilizer business. 

Lamson. Rol)ert W., College Park, 
•Md., assistant in chemistry and bac- 
teriology, Maryland Agricultural 
experiment station. 

Lin. Dan Vang, Vale Station, New 
Haven, Conn., student in forestry. 

IxKlge, Charles A., 731 Leaven- 
worth St , Maidiattan, Kans., assist- 
ant in botany, Kansas state agricul- 
tural college. 

M:i<lis(tn, Francis L., Fast Green- 
wich, R. I., farmer. 

.Martin. James F., Amherst, grad- 
uate assistant in entomology. .M.A.C. 

.Mc(;arr, Thomas A., VJ Portland 
St.. Worcester. 

Merkle, George K. , Kingston. R. I., 
assistant chemist and agronomist, 
Rho<ie IslantI experiment station. 

•Merrill, Fre<l S., Manhattan, 
Kans., assistant entomologist. 

•Moreau, Theodore J.. .Mar«|uette 
buihling, Chicago, 111., with Ameri- 
can Park Builders, City Planning. 

Mueller, Alfre<l I .. 7ti;; South 
Tryon St., Charlotte, N. C , land- 
scape architect. 

Noyes, Harry A., Lafeyette, Ind., 
agriculturist in experiment station. 

O'Flynn, George B., ;i3 Hamilton 
St., Worcester, student at Clark 
university. 

Parker, Ralph R., Amherst, grad- 
uate student, assistant in zoology, 
M. A. C. 

Pearson, Charles C. 140 Whitney 
St., Hartford, Conn., salesman, Com- 
mercial paper. 

Peckham, Curtis, Worce8ter,N.Y., 
teacher. 

Philbrick. William K., H\r> Stein- 
way hall. Chicago, ill., with Jens 
Jensen, landscape architect. 

Pierpont, John E., Williamsburg, 
tree expert. 

Pratt, Marshall C, Ipswich. Tur- 
ner Hill farm. 

Puffer, Stephen P., North Amherst. 

Raymond, Arthur N., Woronoco. 



The College Signal. Tuesday. September 23, 1913. 



SPECIAL SALE 
TAN 02IF0±iDS 



$5 00 Grade, 
$4.00 Grade, 



Now $3.98 
Now $3.25 



SCOUT SHOES 

Tan, Brown and Black 

$2.50 



Pages Shoe Store 



BETWEEN THE HANKS 



THE 



Hoover& Smith Go. 

616 Cbcatnut St.. Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 



Ptilladelphla's Official FratemilY Jeweler 

aPBOIALISTS IN 
Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prises. Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals. 

Rincs, Charms.-. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass 

Orrtcm Hours: 
(» t-o 1» A.. IM. l.l« > toiS S>. AS. 



CDC 

Pheasant 

Bmiti? St., 
Bmberdt 

Telephone 470 

•RKAKrAST 

LUMCHSON 
AmrSNOON TEA 

'^inner if arranged for. 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 



N«>» at 13 PiMSMt St. 



Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses .Accurately Replaced 
Fine Watch Kepairing Promptly and 
Skilfully Done 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 



A Chance to Save Money 

A $5.00 Safety Razor for $5.00 

But we give you a coupon which when signed with your 
name and home address we refund you ^.50. It carries 
the Kexall guarantee, " Money back if not satisfied." 

We carry a full line of 

Waterman, Conklin and Moore's Fountain 

Pens, Stationery, Pipes, Tobacco 

and Cigarettes. 

Liggett's, Belle Meade and Green Seal Chocolates 

THE HENRY ADAMS CO., Druggists 

The REXALL Store on the corner 



|{i.e«i, Robert K., lOOH IVairie 
Ave, Chicago, 111., with Swift iV Co. 
U<>binf»on, Karle.l., Medfortl, Ore., 
I till Crest Kanc'h. 

Hockwood, Lawrence P., Hagers- 
towo, Md., V. 8. entomological 
l4ilK>ratory. 

saiiituary, William C"., Amherst, 
_r;i(liiate student, M. A. C. 

stllew. Lewis R., M Worcester 
^1.. Natick, with Massachusetts 
highway coiiunission. 

.Shaw, Kzra L, Haugan. Mont., l'. 
s. forest service. 

^oiithwiek. Benjamin G., Storrs, 
( uiin., instructor in agronomy. 

stack, Herbert .1 , Wallingford, 
( nil.. Hubmaster, high sch«M>l. 

Tcrrv, I.^on, -M-* Dickinson St.. 
spriiigReUI. 

lorrey, Ray E.. Grove City, Pa , 
tt'juher of biology in Grove City 
col lege. 

Tower, Daniel G.. Amherst, graci- 
iiatc student, M. A. ('. 

Tii|.|»er, (Jetirgc W.. Cu Bound 
ilill .St., Roxbury. 

Turner. Ilowanl A., bureau of 
plant industry, Salem. Ore. 

W.nles. Robert W , C<»e-Mortimer 
I I Chambers St., New York 

( ity, traveling fialesman. 

Warner. Roger A.. Sunderland, 
fanner. 

Weaver. William .L, Highland. N. 
V . M'iricultural teacher, high schocd. 



Whitney, Charles K., Andover, N. 
IL. Proctor academy, teacher of 
agricultural pursuits. 

Wilbur, Kmory S., Turner Hill 
farm, Ipswich, farmer. 

Wilde, Karle L, State College, 
Pa., assistant in landscape gardening. 

Williams, ICdward R., Concord 
Jimction. 

Williajus, Silas, 94 Munroc St., 
Chicopee Falls, with .Stevens Duryea 
Co. 



SWAGGER SUITS FDR YOUNG MEN 



RESOLUTIONS. 

Whereati, it hath pleased Gcxl in 
His Infinite Wisdom, to take iiit" 
himself the father of our belov«-«l 
friend an«l brother Nathaniel L. 
Harlow, be it 

Hfitoli't'ih that we the members of 
the Alpha Sigma Phi fraternity do 
extend to oui brother and his 
l>ereaved family our sincere and 
heartfelt sympathy in this their hour 
of sorrow and be it further 

Jtexolred, that a copy of these 
resolutions be sent to his family, that 
a c<»py be insered in the Coi.lmjk 
Sn.NAL, and lastly that a copy be 
placed in the record's of (iamma 
chapter of the Alpha Sigma Phi 
fraternity. 

Lkon K- Jm';;'. ) For the 

lAUou. \N. BuKWKK, p^^j^rnitv. 
BoHKHl I. I'Hoyr. ) 



"11. — William Titus is foreman of 
the thousanil acre farm owned by .M. 
F. Stevens Sons in North Andovei. 



RESERVED FOR VELVET TDBACCD 



irschbaum 
Clothes 



ALt. WO<X 
MANO 




All our Young Men's Clothes have 
just the right .st.rl ol style tailcjred 
right into theui. The Fall Suits are 
ready and they are uji to the last 
tick of the clock. Not a has-been in 
the entir-:* line. Our Young Men's 
Trade is the pride ot our store, and 
we hold this trade by having the 
sort of clothes young tnen desire. 



The Hart Scrhaftner & Marx 

A. B. Kirschbaum Co. 
The Royal Tailors 

The International Tailors 

B. Stern & Son, Tailors 



i«f,>l(M, |i<l|. A H 



All first <-lass ;mi<I pric«'s ren»«onahle. 



KitKbtMuai C*. 



School ana College PhotosrapDers . . . 




I^OOALLY: 5a Center St.. Northampton Mass.. 

and South Hadlcy, Mass. 

I These .Studios offer the bent skilled 
tfrtiiktA and nut.tt rt>mpii-te 
equipment obtainable 



Main OrricK: 

1546-1348 Broadway, 

New York City 



W1-; SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 

In so far as our bcnefit.s arc mutual. 

THE AMHERST CAS COllPANY 

Everytlning Ellectrical 



MgDRO $2^ 



NON-LCAKABLC 



FOUNTAIN PEN 

Minimize your fountain pen 

r- troubleH by owninft a MooreS. C. It Is the 

•r safest, soundest and most dependable pen known. 
C Its strenjlth lies in Its very simplicity. Nothing 
flniky to ftet out of order. C. You can give your- 
self no better treat than a Moore's Non-leakabie. 

For .Sale l>y Dealers Evm-y where <y 

Amerflcan Fountain Pen Company .,/ j 

AJami. Ounhlna & Ko»ter, Sellina Aftenis ^ 

168 DRVOSSniRE STRKET : :. BOSTON. MA.S.S. «V_ r- f 




The ColUge Signal, Tnesdaj, September 23, 19 13. 



Ttie College Signal, Toeaday, Septennber 23, 1913. 



m^ 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 

the Students of the Massachusetts 
A^^ricultural Collefre. 



BOABD OF EDITORS. 

CHESTKR K. WHKKLKR '14. Kditor I 
FKANK W. lilKl.I, 'I?. ManaRiiiR 

HAROLD C. BLA<;K '14. Confip«tili..n 

Assistant 

Athletic 

Alumni 

Athletic 



HAROLD L CLAV 14. 
SIUART B. FOSTER '14. 
F.RVINK F. PARKF.R'14. 
J. ALBERT PRICE '15. 
GEORGE E DONNELL '15. 

Depart nwnt 
EARLE S. DRAPER '15. Cimpus 

TYLER S. RO(;ERS'i6. Associate 

CHARLES W. CURTIN'iA, Associate 



n-Chief 
FMitor 
Editor 
Kditor 
Kditor 
Editor 
Kditor 

Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

ERNEST S. CLARK. |R 'u. Bus. Manager 
MAURICE J. CLOir.H 'is, Ass't Bus. VlRr. 
ERNEST F. l?PTf)N '14. Adwrtisinu Manager 
W.RICHARD SEARS '15. Asst. Ad». Manager 
CHAS. A. HUNTINGTON, JR. 'ifi. Circulation 

Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents Make all orders payable 
to Ernest S. Clakk, Jr. 

Efitarvd IM weond-cliM matlar at tk* Amharai 
PMt CXne*. 

Vol. XXIV. TuFsiiAY, Sf.pt. 23. No. 2 

Thk HUggention hna been made 
that, HJuci* we now liave chapel live 
titnea n week, a vote l>e taken tiniung 
the gtiuleut ImkIv to determine wheth- 
er it is desirable to have tlie eoinpiil- 
sory Sunday i-hapel continued this 
year. Several vearH ago, u vote was 
taken in favor of it among tlie stu- 
denUi, hut it Heenis only fair that 
they be again allowed to make a 
decision. Many of the fellows feel 
that the live ch.ipels a week are 
sullicient. .Since it is a stutlcnt- 
made affair at this institution, a 
renewed seutiment nf the student 
Ixxiy should be adowed to settle the 
matter. 



On the first day of (>cU>)»er, the 
tryoiits for that important non- 
athletie team, the Siunai. Iniard, 
commence. In thin work, the man 
who may possibly lack the brawn 
to engage in athletics Iiuh a chance 
"to make g04xl," by making use tif 
his alulities in other lines. Kvery 
man in college. es|»e<'ially every man 
ill the freshiiiaii class should try t4j 
win out in some college activity. On 
the eollege paper he not only shows 
his ability, but he is constantly in a 
|K>8ition to learn, not a gam«> which 
is useful f«>r tli«> tiiiie being, but a 
game which will \>v practical after he 
is graduated from college. It is the 
chance of the man interested in jour- 
nalism to find himself, and with th(> 
assistance of the courses ottered in 
that subject in cfdlcgc. be able to 
more nearly perfect liiiiiself in it. 
This year we want ten men .it least 
from each of the three lower < i.is^cs 
to eoine out. Heinember, it is your 
papiT ! Will you ensure its future 
by sending out an aliuiidaiKC of coiii- 
pelitors for {>ositions on the boai<l? 



for a walk which seems to l)e in great 
demand by the students. The ma- 
cadam roadway west of Professor 
Ilasbrouek'w house is a very danger- 
ous stretch of highway. It is a fre- 
quent passing point for automobiles, 
which usually take the double curve 
at a rather ia|)id rate of speed. It 
is not infie(pient that two machines j 
pass at this place, with the result the 
entire roadway is occupie<l to the 
exclusion of a pedestrian or danger 
to his limbs. Nobody has been in- 
jured there, fortunately, but that is 
no reason why such a thing should 
not be forestalled. In snowy weath- 
er, it is well-nigh impassible, and on 
wet days great caie must be taken to 
escape the p<M>ls of water ami the 
stretches of niiul. A cinder walk on 
the east side of the car tracks could 
be made both useful and ornamental. 
Its construction would certainly earn 
the heartfelt gratitude of those who 
arc obliged to tiamp over this road 
six or more times a day. While this 
particular strip of road is under dis- 
cussion, it is a gocMl time to again 
ask for that electric light near the 
conduit under the roatlway. Who is 
res|Hinsible for the lack of light at 
that place? We should like to l>e 
informed ! 



Several tennis meetings have been 
held during the past few days 
at which Captain Archibald gave 
black board talks on the theoretical 
side of the game. About 20 men 
were present. 

The sophomores have got a new 
mascot — in the shape of a yellow- 
hound. The dog fiunislicd consid- 
erable competition with the class sing 
leader during the nightly vigils of 
li>16 on the chapel steps. 

QNITY CHURCH 

North rLF.AsA.vT .St. 

A Church home of the lil»eral Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

KKUI'I.AK K1'N1>.4V .>sKKVIC-K AT 1 P M 



E. RUSSELL NORTON 

SALKS AGF.NT 

Davenport Miller 
Vein Coal 

Best Quality Pennsylvania Coal 



Tarbell '14 



Eldridge '14 



All Student Supplies 



I. A. C. STORE 



BANNERS AND POSTERS 



CANOV TONIC 



Clark '15 



Kendall '16 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

I Notices (or this column should be dropped in 
the Signal Offiopor handed to Earle S. Draper 
15. on or twJore .Saturday precrdini; each iMite.1 

Sept. 24 — Assenddy l-H» v. m. Sen- 
ator Ward, Trustee of the 
College. ' 

i.-i— M. A. C. A.— Chapel «- 
45 r. M. 

27— F«H»thall— M. A. C. vs 
Dartmouth at Ilan<»ver 

*i!» — Social I'nion program — 
('>-.'(0 Drill Hail, (;ames. 

Oct. I — Assembly I -It) i*. m. Ani- 
veraary Day program. 



BOS I O.N oKFICK 
85 Water St. 



I Hrcnilw IV 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest line in 
the state outside of Boston. 



Seeourlineof Drill Shoes 

$2.00 to $4.00 



MODERN REPAIR 
DEPARTMENT 



E.M.BOLLES 



OM MOUn %VAV TO P.O.) 



GOOD - TABLE - BOARD 

IVIWtM. AI^DBIV 

House Next to Laundry. 



TiiK new walkn an; a line addition 
to our pedal transpoitation faciliticH 
ami we heartily ajipicciatc llicm. but 
we would like to siiggcHt a location 



CAMPUS NOTES 

Kxciting tiuM'w over a class picture. 

.September Amherst weather is not 
up to its usual standard. 

The pond grows more valualile as 
each day goes by- in point of view 
of cameras I 

Drill again in eurncnt. Specula- 
tions as to what the new "liloke" 
will be like are wide«-asf. 

The Hophs used their nightly "guard 
duty" <M> the chapel step** to rehearse 
college HongM. Kalher early for 
class sing practice. 

The midnight fest of the sophs on 
Friday night was in line of congrat- 
ulating theiiiHeUcH on preventing the 
freshman class picture. 

The new w.-ilk from the stone 
bri«lge In Clark hall is certainly a 
great impi'o\ ciiuiil. :iih1 one that is 
appreciated by Htudeiits UHing it. 

Saturday afteniMon saw a little e\- 
citciiH-nt on tlu' .\ggie campus in the 
form of an iiitcrclasH m-rap between 
a few iiinlei cImsh men of the college 
at the other end of the town. 



LOW RRICe TAILORING CO. 

>ri r> M AI>K 1<> t>Kl>KK 
Sitilt* flrani-d. I're*«»-tl and l»v»d- Allkindtof 

KepairiliB lor I .1 ' , •' r •• ' i,,.. 

High ur.idp wm - 'rk 

called (01 and d«'i...- - ■ I'K. 

4 SeilH l-OM fi^o 

CeORGC KOrOWITZ. RltOf>. 

MainStrrrt, Amber?.!, M.is* Na-.hlUotk 

On ironr *ay to tlie l*u»i « »ffitr, Irl. 43>^\\ 



Coolcp's Role! 

Springfield, Mass., 

Solicits the patronage of the Siu 
dents of the Agricultural College 
to class dinners and individual!). 



Northampton. 



GEO. W. HAWSE, 

Outside Operator. 



1 ;,, middle of the week saw the 

,i;-i ,.1' the football scrimmages on 

,;u.ity field. Aspects are promising 

ria- most successful team that 

V, Tie has put on the gri<liron for 

veuiij. 

Ibe Junior Pomology class took a 
tup tt» the Bay Koad fruit farm of 
Irofesgvr Sears in South Amherst. 
N.tdless to say, every member of 
(u- class investigated the tpialily of 
ihr fruit. 

A small snapshot of the freshman 
, |,,>s on the chapel steps turned out 
siK«es»fulIy. Hather doubtful about 
(,.'. |>er cent, of the class being |tres- 
, „t an issue which the Senate may 
i,e (idled U|)(»n t«» <lecide. 

I iider the new schedule, the short- 
iH-Mft of the n<M>n hour \> utTecling 
tnaiiy men around e<dlege. Tlie dif- 
iVrcnce of five minutes lanween the 
old ami the new schedule makes it 
(lillieult for some men to make their 
(• hisses. 

Kight mighty splashes disturbed 
l|,c placid snr'atx' of the campus 
|K>nd on Saturday ikmui. marking the 
lirst freshman pond party of the 
yt-ar. Oiie of the sophs m. t the 
»ame fate due do insecure fmithold 
oil die bank. 



Stanley M. Prouty 'I<5, of North 
IJiookfiehl, was elected as assistant 
base ball manager at Wednesday as- 
sembly. The candidates were Hagar. 
IVouty and Curran, 'i:i. Herbert VV. 
Uishop 'J(i, of Doylestowu, I'eniisyl- ; 
vania, was elected assistant mana- 
ger of tennis at Wednesday assem- 
bly, the candidates being Maltoon, 
Bishop and .MeCiilloch. 



COMMUNICATION 

(Comniunicatloni to the Su;NAt concerning 
mattrrs of jjeneial inti-iest are welromt-d 1 he 
SlcNAl. IS not to b- held rr»pi>nsible tor the 
opinions thus expiessetl.) 

To TiiK r.iHTtm OK TiiK Sn;NAi.. 
Dear Str: 

As the last two '*rope pulls" have 
been more or less unsatisfactory in 
that neither side went through the 
water, I would like to offer a suggest- 
ion which might add variety to future 
"pulls". 

In as much as the classes are now 
getting s<i large, why would it not be 
a go«Hl idea to divide the classes 
into three sections and have three 
••pulls" instead of one. making it the ^ 
best two out «»f three. I'mler such 
conditions the chances are that some, 
at least, wouhl go thr«iugh the water. 

y. 1.. «,>. 



The Weakest Link or Limiting Factor 

There are fields that contain an abundant e of potash on anal) sis, 
but on which crops fail if thev are not supplied with ,n,i,/,iM- \wU\sh, 
and the same is true if itvailable phosphorus is lacking. 

We arc all familiar with the limiting factor in eiop prodiulion. 
nainelv, the weakest link in the chain of fertility. One never knows 
when one has reached the limiting factor, the weakest link; one never 
knows when one has exhausted the available phosphorus or the avail 
able potash, or the available nitrogen until crops fail to respond. .After 
a farmer has harvested a bumiK-r crop lie has taxed all the links in the 
chain of fertility, but which one is nearest the breaking point he does 
not know; therefore, if he is wise he applies at least all three of the 
leading elements of fertility in some sh.ipe. either in the form of stable 
manure, green crops or commercial fertilizers, or all combined (which 
latter is the better plan), knowing that any excess which he may have 
applied will not be lost out of the reach of crojis. if a rational system 
of rotation with deep-rooted and shallow rooted crops is practised, in 
eluding cover crops. Moreover, these undoubtedlv promote bacterial 
growth in the soil, which. ac( ordin- \o H.ill. mav l)e the limiiiii<; factor 

Studs thf riant hood f>roblem 

Many han "an" answer 
''The" answer will he worth uhile 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER COMPANY 
43 Chatham St., Boston 



I. M. LABROVITZ, Custom Tailor 

Fashions. Fit, First Class Work Guaranteed 

I »r« a^soronriu o.. L.uul < . i: N IS hf K .NLS III .N * .S. Ked M^in ColUm and 

|)rcs.s Stiitis Cleamnsj and frensiiig DKKSS hlJl I h 
ru KKNT Militaiy Collar* and (dovri 

II AMITY ST., Telephone ^o2 w AMHERST, MASS. 




A. 



MEN'S STORE 



PANORAMA PHOTOS OF THE CAMPUS | [ 

Student Group, Seniors and Military. 



$I.OO EACH 

at tlu- Treasurer's Oflice or by mail postp.iiii. 



The Mcclellan Studio 




Kuppenheimer's 
Fine Clothes 



FURNISHINGS 
and HATS 



Agency for the French Shoe 

CUSTOW TAILORING V SPECIALn 



The Secret of Good Batting 

is similar to the secret of good business— it Happens 
lo some and just misses the others. 

H there ever was a commercial home run it's 
Fatima, the Tufkish-blend c.garette. The expert 
who conceived this Wend was some batter 1 habma 
was first biwd out m the college towns-the student 
bodv quickiy proclaimed them winners. ioday 
Falima is the biggest selUng cigarette m this country. 

The secret is—pure, good, choice tobocco-no 
expense in the package— quality all m the smoke 
—"Twenty." J^^^^^Jfy^.t^Sim^O'^ 



SOLE AGENT FOR 



THE GENUINE AND ORIGINAL 



PATRICK MACKINAW 



«iiMi; wvi:viM>'vv i>issi»i-^w 



■At- 



20forI5<^ 



^Distinctively Individuar 



fATINi 

VrinkUFTTES ^ 




Agent, R. S. Bra'k,, Kapp.T Sij^ma House. 






The College Signal, Tuesday, September 23, 1913. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 23, 1913 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

JoblxTS of Wroiinht Iron :iii(l Hi.iss I'll*, \'alves 
and KittiiiKs lor .stcani. Water aixl (ia-, \sbestos 
and M;»|{Mesia Holler and l'i|ie t,overiiij{s, Hipe 
Cut to >ketch. Mill Supplies, KiiKi'eefs and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot \\ atei lleatint;. 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems. Uoiler and Knjji'e 
Connections. Holyoke, M«m. 



THETtACHERS Exchange 



Ol lioilon 



120 llyiit'in St. 

Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



C^rp^n-tcr & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



No I, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass, 



Students Attention ! ! ! 

We are ready at the start to furnish you with a fine 
line of Campus and Fraternity House Views, also Post 
Cards. Kodak work given prompt and careful attention. 
Kniarging and picture framing given our |)ersoiial at- 
tention. See us about Croups and Portraits for the very 
best work. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. Patronize 
the Square Deal Studio 

KINSMAN'S COLLEGE STUDIO 



CROSS COUNTRY NOTICE 

The iiunual cioss couutry intei- 
rliis.s runs will take place on Satur- 
day Oct. 4. Will the classes 
kindly meet aixl elect managers and 
get the men out for this event. 



Nash BlocK, Amherst 



H 



M kor.ERS, '15, Agent. 
6j Pleasant St., 



Studio Phone 303-2. 



GRAND SWEEPSTAKES TROPHY 



(1750.00 Sterling Silver Cup) 

roR 



BEST STATE EXHIBIT OF POTATOES 




AT THE 



New York Land Show 



1912 



WON BY 

The E. L. Cleveland Company 

HOULTON. M*. 

/^NE of the largest and most 
. reliable seed potato houses 
in the United States. Competi- 
tion open to the entire United 
States and Canada. Messrs. E. L. 
Cleveland Company also won the 
Eirst Prize for Best County Exhibit 
of Potatoes. (Silver Cup valued 
at $200.00.) 
The E. L. Cleveland Company use 

E. FRANK COE 
FERTILIZERS 



E. Frank Coc Fertilizers have 
been the business farmer's favorite 
for over tifty-five years. Why not 
follow the example of these lead- 
ing commercial potato growers. 

t»ii «atkt tn rMil "Thf Stitry tit A Pmfllahir Polatn 
C.rtip" wHltmhy ■» *rf»«.tiM»k (aiiMlj, H»\n* t%rmtr^ 



The Coe-Mortimer Company, 



51 CHAMBERS STRCCT. 
NEW YORK. N. Y. 



WANTED 

lly the M. A C. libiary : Coi.iIwjk 
SuiNAi.. \'(>l. 11 No. I, Sept. 19, 
llMl ; .M A. C. MulU'tln, Vol. l.No. 
2, vol. 2, No. 1. Vol. r». No. 4 ; news- 
paper clippings aliout M. A. C. ; 
photographs of hiiildingu and 
grouudM, programs, schedules, calen- 
dars, etc.. college history material 
of any sort. 

('iiAKi,i-> \i. (iui.KN, I-iltrarian. 

•ivl 



stantly occurring in the everyi 1 
life of the student. 

Mecause of poor health he ratiier 
lost touch with the college until a 
' few years ago when he attended Mie 
commencement of 1910. This visit 
re-awakened interest in his Alum 
Mater. He was greatly surpriseii at 
the remarkalile progress that had 
been made and constantly expressed 
his astonishment and approval at ilie 
new sights that greeted him on evi 
hand. He expressed to his wifV a 
desire to have her accompany him (in 
a visit to the college the prestnt 
Slimmer. 

In his death the college has I - 
one of its strong alumni, and lii^ 
associates a tine mid loving frit 1, 1 

.1. 11. I 



JAMES M. MARSH 

.himcs .M. Marsh, .M. A. C. 'Hi, 
died .luly the eighth at Chicago. 
Funeral services were held at Lynn 
in the lihodes Memorial ebnpel ou 
.luly fiMirtcfiith, and the interment 
was ill Pine (J rove cemetery. 

The tragic death of his father, 
(Jeorge K. Marsh, over a year ago, 
told heavily on the son and he was 
oliliged to he very careful of his 
health. He went to California in 
.March and apparently felt .s<» much 
improvcfl that he decided t(» make 
the journev « :i>i in i.i<I»m- to give 
ntteiition to his luisiiiess affairs. The 
strain of the trip tliuiiig warm 
wc.ilhi-r tli»n prevailing overcame 
him ami he paswd away siidilenly at 
a Chicagit hospital. 

Mr. Marsh was Ixirn in I.ynn 
fill t\ -five years ago. .shi<iily after 
graduation he entered the empl«>y of 
the (t. K. Marsh Soap Co. and upon 
his father's retirement la'came its 
picMideiil Mild treasurer. Ili- was 
({iiite acti\e in the business afTairs of 
his native city, was connected with 
one of its prominent banks, and was 
a member •»f the Mt. ( .unicl Lodge 
of Masons :inil other .Masonic bodies. 
lie was highly respeeteii among his 
biisiiiesH asH<M-iates for his upri||i)t, 
manly character, his high sense of 
honor, and his uniform kimlnesn to 
all with whom he came in eontacl. 

Marsh entered M. A. C. in the 
aiiluiiin of \xx'i\. In appearance lie 
was t:dl ami slender but of erect car- 
riage. During his c<dlege course he 
took nn active part in tli«' social life 
of the institution, and in his senior 
vearhe was adjutant of the battalion, 
vice-j>resi«lent of the College Chris- 
tian Lnion, presidi'iit of the Wash- 
iii'-ton Irving Literai\ ><-< nty. presi- 
dent of C. S, ('., ami -. . ictmy of 
his class. 

lie was uniformly kind and con- 
siderate and formed very strong 
altachineiits with many of his fellow 
students. lie |'osm--(i1 m luioyaiit. 
hopeful mind ami as a student 
always looked on the l>right side of 
things, lie had .'i strong sense of 
humor and would laugh most heartily 
at the niaiiv things that are eon- 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

/04»l.<KiY AM> «iKoLo(«Y. 

The ztMilogy niusenm has been tit- 
te<l out with one additional case fur 
exhibition purposes. It is located in 
the gallery, and is one of severid 
which mu»*t be uthled before the e\lii- 
bition space will be fully utilized. 

I'OtLTUV III .SHANDK^. 

A number of iui|M>rtant impio\*- 
meiitw have l>een made at the poiiltrv 
plant during the past summer. Ni\- 
eral buildings that were left niitiii- 
ished a year ago on account of Ijitk 
of funds have been completed attd 
placed in shape for lalwiratory •»«««. 

An oil intiise was bnili and i<>[>- 
necletl with the incubatit>n t ellai - 
that the oil for running iiiciil>al<>i- 
ean be drawn Hitlunit lea\ing tlic 
building. thuH mnteriully cutting 
down the chances for tire. 

A colony breeding house, eighteni 
by thirty feet, is now in pr<Ki">s ef 
construction, Kurt her more, a luiiii- 
lier of colony fo«>|>B were built fur 
growing st«M'k early in the season. 
a<-conimotl»te the extra niiiiit'< 1 
birils raised. 

l*OM«»l.«M,^ . 

|'r«>fcs.Hor Sears ju<lged fniit al 
Clinton on Sept. in at Kinjiston. 
Hhtxie Island, on the 16 and at 
Greenfield on the 17. 

With tlie exception of api' 
fruit crop on the college groim<i» la- 
been fairly g(M)d, and even «'*' 
apples there iias been some ver\ t ' 
fruit, ill pal tieiilar Mcintosh. U 
ami Palmer < intnings. Late frn-'- 
dry weather, and the fact that maay 
of the trees bore heavily last year are 
the causes of the shortage. The 
Craves orchard on the Hay l;.':nl. 
which the college has leased 
years, and which ought to liaM "i >' 
crtip of three or four hiindrei! 
is without a single apple. > 
the frosts of May I" 
I'nt while the <le|iai lineht \< 
\ei V few apples for sale, tin i' 
an unusually good siijipl^ ' 
work. 

The cherry ero|) was tli« 
the trees lia\ e yet hoiiie :ii 
I very prodtalde rmaiicially. 



f 



E L AVAL 

CREAM 
SEPARATORS 



Make Fall and Winter 
Dairying More Profitable 

'pHERE are special advantages in usjag 
i a Kood cream separator durinjf the fall 
.ind winter months. 

The milk from cows lone in lactation is 
liurdest to cream.— and likewise hardest to 
separate with an inferior separator. 

Moreover, cream and butter prices are 
tiikrhest. so that the waste of irravity settinff 
nr a poor separator counts for most. 

Then there's the sweet, warm skim-nfllk 
for htock feedintr, alone worth the cost of a 
■separator in cold weather. 

There is surely no reason to delay the 
imrchase of a separator or to continue the 
use of an inferior one. A De Laval machine 
will save lU cost by sprinK, and may bo 
liouu'ht on such liberal terms if desired as 
to actually pay for itself meanwhile. 

Se« your local De Laval aeent 



ft THE DE LAVAL 
ti =, SEPARATOR CO. 

^ NEW YORK - 

,' ' s^ « CHICAGO 

SAN FRANCISCO 
SEATTLE 
. MONTREAL 

' ^' WINNIPEG 



varieties, Karly Hichmond. Mont- 
morency, and English Morello, had a 
full crop which sold at ten cents per 
quart wholesale, and many of the 
trees gave as much as five dollars 
worth of fruit, which is not bad for 
trees nine yeais old. 

Peaches were al)out a full croi> and 
were very fine in l>oth size and quality. 
The list of varieties in the college 
orchards is as follows, arranged in 
the order of lipening : Ciieensboro. 
Waddell, Carman, Mountain Rose, ; 
Champion, Belle of (;eorgia. and; 
Klberta. This gives a continuous' 
supply from .Vug. 1 until nearly the 
end of Seittember. 

One of the most interesting things 
in the college i>rehard just at present 
is the crop of fruit of six .lonathan 
apple trees in the variety orchard. 
Two of these are standani trees and 
four are dwarfs on doiicin stocks. 
They were set in VM)H and one of the 
trees have borne light crops for the 
past two years. This year all six 
trees have nearly a full crop and the 
fruit is beautifully coh»red. It raises 
the (piestion whether the .lonathan 
does not deserve a place among the 
send-eommercial varieties of the 
state. 



Mrs. Orwell \\. Hriggs, ason, Thomas 
William. 

•0«j._()n .lune l;5, Ktlward I.Chase 
was united in marriage to Miss- 
Evelyn 11. Thompson at Somerville. 

'10. — Edward E. Damon is at pres- 
ent investigating the shipping of 
grapes ami ai»ples in California. 
His address is. Hotel Eresno. Eresno, 
California. 

M.J.— James L. IloUlen began work 
.luly I as head chemist for the 
Armour Eerlilizer Works at Ualli- 
niore, Md. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



EWELL'5 



Attention of Students. 

II viui are looking for cunpiiiiiil and rvmu- 

ner.tlive occupation during -sumnier, write 

TilK (iKM- It tl. 4l'FI.I.%Nt"l-: rtfTOKV. 

(IrKotp >ltirlnrHf, %% iiir4in»lu. 

for {tarticHl»rs. 



THE KENNEL CLUB 



WATCH TIIIH KI'AC'K 



mOCIi&DRIIrOBTH 



William H. Watson's 

Pictures, Stories, Lectures, Dramas 

■' I he consensus of press opinion of 
both continenl.s, speaking eloquently ol 
I)R Watson's work, is tttat he is a ma.s- 
mastcr of art and literature. Highly in- 
structive, illuminating and very wondrous 
tHxiks. Each picture a work of Art." 

AKT SCHOOL PUBLISHING CO. 

2m7 Mkhixan Avenue, Chtcac*. U. S. A. 



THE SHELDON STUDIO 



HIGH GRADE WORK 



A Specialty of College Classes 



Main St. 



Northampton, Mass. 



Ihere are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

GOAL 



or 



C. R. ELDER 



ALUMNI NOTES 
•h4.— Charles II. I'reston is a meiii- 
bei- of the commission appointed by 
the governor t«» investigave the taxa- 
tion of forest lamls in Massachusetts. 

•y.4. — s. E. Howard, former assist- 
ant professtH of ehemistry at .M A.C. j 
has aciceptcil a [Mwition as heati i>f | 
the chemical department at Noi wieh 
university. 

•y;,,_Herbert D Ilemenway, for 
seven vears secretarv of the North- 
ampton people's institute, has 
resigned his iKwition to go into the 
service of the national siniety for 
broader education as a staff lecturer. 
Mr. Ilemenway will immediately 
start on an extensive lecture tour of 
the I'nited States on«l Canada. 

•;»'.i.— On .luly -'-'. '"'"1 to (apt. 
and Mrs. William IL Aimstroiig. 
Casa Hlanca San .Iiian, l'<jrto Uico, 
a daughter. .lane Constance. 

•07.— Milford 11. (.lark, .Ir., ami 
Miss Ethel Clara Long were married 
.lune 1'*. .'t I'.ufTalo, N. X. They 
reside at .'»20 ElrawocKl Avenue, in 
that city. 

•07. _A class letter will be pub- 
lished about (><t. 1:.. Material for 
it should be in the hands of the secre- 
tary before that date. 

•((s.— Frank E. Thurston and Miss 
Kiigenia Van des I'yl were marrietl 
.luly I''. :'t Woi. r>t«r. 

'09.— I.aiiilxil S. CoiI.ett wJio h:is 
been assistant in animal industry in 
the Kentii.ky agricultural experi- 
ment station for the p.ist three years, 
has been elected 1- Hi'' ' li'"' of 
animal imbi^tn in the Iniversity of 
Maine. 

'Oy._Horn. July L^. to Mr. and 




STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUQS 
CARPETS 

Largest as.sorlmeni in .New Vxi- 
gland of .Speci.il Siuden lurnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

ANU 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



cox SONS 

— AMD — 

V I N I N G 

71-74 Madison Avenue, New Vofk 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

Itest Material?. .«nfl Wnfkman»hip 

WOODWARD'S 




Massachusens Northern Rail- 
way Company. 



LUNCH 



a; Main St., Masonic Bldf., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



KwTA Ml iwn r f I M(»'2 

Hrr-i'iii. N I.vNr; l'Mi.«ii;iv 

M A N ITAI 1 I l« 1 "^ < ■ ■" V'' I I. • l< 
IBO HKOAIJNVA ^^ NI.W ^OWK' 

^^^A^^^ \ni> c'<»i.i.F;«ii-; 

IMN.'S A.NI) KIXiH »« 
001.0. mi.vMR ANi» H«ot*r.n **mnKiJ* 



Cl0t«d only from t A. M. I0 4 A. M. 



Toefil Mientka 

Shoes SlUiied aim Polislieil 

Make old shoes look like new 

Neat, classy workmanship 

Open SnntlMjr Main Ht. 

On w»r to P««t OSc*. 



I 



The Collefe Signal, Tuesday, September 23, 1913 



TENNIS 
RACKETS 




—j^t- 



DEUEL'S 



AMHERST 

Chp Laundry 

Iligh-Grade College Work 

LAUNDRY 

Shirts, - - 10-15C 

Collars, - - • 2 i-ac 

Cuffs, - - - - s |.2C 

Plain wash, - 48c per doz. 

Same, rough dry, - - 30c per doz. 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Slcam I'ressing, 50c a Suit 
I>ry Cleaning and Pressing, fi.50 a Suit 



Kali-m j. Borksn. Ajjent. 7 North Cott-jge 
KiiWAKii C. KiiWAKli.s. Agent 

Put full name and address on laundry 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Loose - Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 

Hefore buying elsewhere, see our assort- 
ment of pennants and banners 

CUKRAN ft DYER. Props. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green* 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
camations.violets and chysanthetnums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis> 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300 



The Massachusetts Afifricultural College 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty six teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in ihe following subjects: 



Agriculture 
Agronomy 
Animal Husbandry 
Dairy img 
Poultry Husbandry 



Horticulture 

Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape (}ardening 

Pomology 



Agricultural Chemistry 
Economic Entonjology 
Plant Physiology and Pathology 
Agricultural Education 



For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



Athletic Hoard, 

'J'he College Senate, 

Footlnill Association, 

tiuHebuU Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tenuis Association, 

Rifle club, 

Roister Dolstore 

Musical Association, 

Niuet«eu Hundred Fourteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Fifteen Index, 

M. A. C Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club, 



George H. Chapman, Secretary 

1). W. Jones, Tiesident 

S. B. Freeborn, Manager 

I^. Etlgar Smith, .Manager 

E. C. Etlwards, Manager 

,1. 1). Pellett, Manager 

C. Itukelund, Manager 

J. W. T. I>esure, Secretary 

Harold F. .lones. Manager 

.1. I). French, .Manager 

E. S. (lark. .Jr., Manager 

H. M. Rogers, Manager 

R. H. Powers, Presiilent 

J. L. Mayer, President 

W. S. Little, President 

R. H. (iaskill, President 



IP hen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



Barsalotti & G^ntoso 

Cigars Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresli Candy 

ice Cream, Fruit, Soda, Etc. 

Th« Right Goods at ihe Kight Prices 

Open till II o'clock KVEKY night 

C*raer Amltjr and Flcaaant Htre«t* 



If 700 want to be 

NOLIU WITH THK fltKI.8 

you must hare ynurrlothea pron lol and cleaoed 

AT BPSTIIIirB 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWKLKR A.NO OI'TO.METRI 1 
Lenses ground white you wait 

COLLEOE JKWKLKY 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Uuitar Stttnp 

AMHKKhT, MASiS. 
Next to Post Ottice. 



STEAM FITTING. Telephone ,»-, 

GAS FITTING. TINNING. 

P. W. Dance & Co. 

RLUMBERS. 



Speciahy of Kepairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 

LeAU LUiHTS, &c. 
i Clifton Ave.. AMHERST. MAS.S 

Wx-iifflit 4Ss I3its(>n 

Catalogues of 

Infill 4lc X?Vln.tof Ooocla 

Are out. Copy mailed to any addrf»s. ( "I r;- 
Mudcnts and .\fhletes who want the r,-.; 
articles for the various sports should i; 
those lje;irinK the Wright Jic Ditson i luir- .1,, . 



Foot Bail 
Basinet Bali 
Hockey 
Sluites 




Skat'gSlioct 
Sweaters 
Jer.se> s 
Uniforms 
for all sports 



Wright & Ditson Goods are th« standard Im 
all sports 

Vm W.4»hingtOI> St., Boston, Ms" 



II Amity St. 



Maroon Store 



THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CLEANSING. 

PRESSING. 

REPAIRING 

UuU'kral (mrvln^. Brat Work, L.owr*i I'li" 

All woik cari-fully done Work calird !■ 1 ^ 
delivered, (ienls' overcoats, suits, luni- irJ 
coats. Ladies' tine linen suits a specialt) 

Teams will call every day at M. A. C. 

Wn. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rear Nash Bl'k. Amherst. 



lel. N« ]«H 



CARS 



Leave ACKIIE COLLEOE for HOL- 
YOKE on eacli HOUR. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AOaiF COL- 
LEOE at 7 and 37 min. past escli 
HOUR. 

SpecteJ Car* at RcaaanaMc Rates 



Praastng and Cleaning a specialty 

Most liberal ticket ayateiu In town 
Tel. 303-11 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of " Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



mm^ i SUNDERLAND ST. RY. CD 



For a Daily and Sunday N«rt>Pi«P"^f 
Vou should Read 



'rnK 

Springfield Republicao 

While you are at eollf^e in A ' 

II had all of Thf M. A. < . N« m» 

Tlif llJ-nl Sporllnn »•■ 

Kiill <l«"n«'r»il >■»•»«• 

A StrnnK Killtorlal I'hitp 

Int«'rf Mllnn Kj-atiirt-K 

It l« a Krai Nf«viipnp<>r 

Daily, 3 cents; 70 cents a m 
a quarter. 

Sunday, 5 cents; 50 cent.s a 

.Subscribe by mail or through tht- 
dealer. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAl 



:^ 1913 



i 



.1} . 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXIV. 



I 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, September 30, 1913. 



No. 3 



TRACK SEASON 



Olficially Opens with Interclass Cross- 
country Run on Saturday, Oct. 4. 

The track season opens Satuidiiy 
with the inter-cl»88 cross country run 
,,v.r the usual course. The contest- 
uiits will leave for Sunderland on the 
l-l;") lur, Jiiul it is expected that the 
niiish will be at about :»-40 p. M. just \ 
Jiefore the Informal. A gootl-sized 
nqiiad is out every afternoon, and 
•IS the varsity team will \w picke«l 
from the winners, a fast run is l<x>ked 
for. Besides some promising fresh- 
men there are Lucas, Richard8,Coley, 
iKiggett and .Schwartz from last 
year's wjuad, and these men will 
undoubtedly form the nucleus of a 
HtroHg team. In addition to the 
intercollegiate run there la a possibil- 
itV of meets with Amherst and 
Br<.wn. The New Kngland inter- 
collegiate run will l»e held at Dart- 1 
mouth this year ou Nov. V*. Aa it 
will Aggie's first ap|>earance io this 
meet, a good showing is ho|>ed for. 
Reganliiig prospecU for the regu- 
lar outdo«»r an<l indoor seasons, not 
much can be forecasteil at this time, 
rlie freshiuen are ex|>ected Vt pro- 
<lii<f Horae excellent material, ami 
M soon as football is over, work will 
. iiiimuMKP in earnest for the indoor 
^lastiu. Manager Ivlwanis is fortu- 
nate this year in obtaining the volun- 
y services of Mr. Whittier, who ia 
r: tudent in the graduate school, aa 
— . ich. Mr. Whittier was graduated 
m Harvard in 11M)'.», and while 
„ 're receive*! valuable instruction 
t *n such a man as AI Shrub, prob- 

- ly the beat distance man on Ijoth 
2: es of the Atlantic. Coach Whit- 

- r is lioptug to run off an outdoor 
mett this fall in an endeavor to 
obtain a line on the material'with 
which he is to work. He wishes all 
Tuld events men to get out for prac- 
tice at least three times a week. 



MUSICAL CLUBS 

To Have Services of Mr. Bland Again. 
Successful Year Anticipated. 

That the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College will turn out another 
musical club this year which will 
compare very favorably with those 
of past years seems now very proo- 
able. The musical club of last year 
took vast strides and progressed 
wonderfully both in the .piulity and 
in the selection of the music ren- 
dered, uiuler the able direction of 
Mr. liland, the noted tenor of Cal- 
i vary Church, New York. The club 
' will have Mr. Bland's services again 
this year, and it should be the duty 
of every member of the college who 
haa any musical ability, to try out 
for one of the clubs. 

Sixty-eight men, of whom a large 
number were freshmen. rep<»rle<l for 
the tilee Club when the call was 
iaaued. The <piartet of last year 
was broken up thnmgh the gradua- 
tion of Haspy. Flinch, and C<»bb. 
but Nuholsoii, first tciioi. Towne, 
HCtoiid tenor, Hildrcth or Blanpied, 
first ImsH, should be al»le to fill the 
vacancies, 

For tU« MaiMlolin Club, there are 
'Ih candidates ami the «>rcheslra will 
be of the same high stemlard as io 
former vears. 



BYRNES PRIZE CONIEST FOOTBALL SEASON OPENS 



Award of One Hundred Dollars Goes to 
1 Chester K. Allen, 1916. 



CLASS ELECTIONS 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

NOTICE 

The president of the M. A. C 
< liiihtittii ass<K-iation wishes to 
aunounce to the student Inxly that 
liecaiise of some uncertainty on tlie [ 
rettords as U» just who are memliers , 
of the association, a new membership 
'i-^t will be made out. In order to 
t«j ou this new list, all members voted 
'!! in previous years must register at 
nc of the regular Thursday evening 
• (tings. 

It is further to be statctl that men 

.'ho do not attend at least one meet- 

5ig a month will be droppe<l from 

'iiroll. Men who get out in some 

in of Christian associatitui work 

iiiug the week are of course ex- 

i't'd from this last statement. 



The sophomore class met Momhiy 
and elected the following officers: 
(;. N. Danforth of Foxcroft, Me., 
president: K. L. King of DorchesU-r. 
vice-pre8i«lent ; H. A. Mostrom of 
Somerset, secretary : L. K. Fiehling 
of Maiden, treasurer; L. Scblotter- 
beck of Uoxbury Station, t r.iin.. 
sergeant-at-arms ; C. F. (Wxidwin of 
Haverhill, historian for the year; 
ami S. W. Hall of Saxonville, class 
captain. In arldifiou to the aUive, 
H. T. Whitney of Mt. Vernon, N. 
Y., was elected manager of cross 

country- 

At a meeting of the class of I Ml 7, 
the following elections U>ok place: 
R.Borden of Fall River, president; 
L). G. Brainard of Don hester, vice- 
presi<lent; Ipsom of Lynn, sec- 
retory; Rupell, treasurer; H. M. 
I Warren of Melrose. HCig -at-arms ; 
1 L. H. Tucker of Ware, class captain. 
No historian has been chosen as yet ; 
but a committee has In-en appointed 
to select candidates on inerif. Be- 
Hides these. W. F. R utter of Law- 
rence was elected football manager ; 
(; T Oliver, Jr.. of Kverett, basket- 
ba'llmanager;andr. R. Bftbcockof 

Lynn, manager of track. 



The winner of the JSK'O pii/.e 
offered last March by T. K. Byriieb, j 
former vice-presitlent of the New ^ 
York. New Haven iV Hartford rail- 
road for the best plan of co-opera- 
tion between the railroad and this 
college for the development of the 
agricultural possibilities of .Massachu- 
setts was won by Chester K. Allen 
'U; of tiuincy. The judges who 
gave the decision were I'lofessor 
Toild of Amherst ctdlege and Pro- 
fessor lliinl of llie faculty. 

Mr. Allen's plan was essentially 
as follows: A joint 1>ohi«1 of super- 
vision compostnl of live men of the 
college and five from the railro:i<l 
shall have charge of the enterprise. 
The state shall Ik- «lividctl into f<»ur 
main agricultural <listrictH, each in 
charge t»f a hxal liuieaii, which shall 
have a two-fold duty ; liist, to tleal 
with ileUtils <»f U'chnical agriculture : 
and aecoiiil. with details of market- 
ing, advertising and transportati<»n. 
F-Hch district shall Ik- further divide<l 
into 2t) sub-«listricts each containing 
alKiiit I.'jO farms, ami one man sltall 
work in ea<h of these smaller tlivis- 
ions. Finally two men in each of 
llie four main «listri«t» shall have 
especial charge of atlvertising, mar- 
keting an<l tran«|Hirtati<m problema. \ 
This organization of h« men shall, by ' 
personal work among the farmera, 
demonstrate new metlnKls rec<mi- 
memled by the college and the expei 
iment aUtion, help solve imlivnlual 
problems, and try U» iMlter the con- 
ditions and faculties for the prixliic- 
lion of farm pro<lucts. The expense 
of such an «»iganization would prol>- 
ably be al>out «1()M,(KMI |M,r annum, 
and if the work resulle«l in a four |>er 
cent increase in the crop prfMluclion, 
it would add over a million and a 
half dollars to the slate. 

In a letter to the winner Mr. 
Byrnes stated that the plan was 
umler consideration by the liidiislrial 
Bureau of the railroad. 



At Hanover. Dartmouth Wins Qame 
in Last Quarter. Score, 13-3. 

The phrase of the hour, "We 
should worry," was the chief 
thought t»f every Dartmouth man dur- 
ing the game Saturday until the last 
five minutes of play. Kven though 
tin- team did not come home victors 
the opening of the stsasoii was promis- 
ing in every way. 

Aggie came back, and the old 
defeat of 47 to of last year ia for- 
gotten in the hard fight which the 
team gave the.dreeii iluring the entire 
ganu' up to Ihe last five minutea of 
play. 



Fxlgar Terry 'K'' of BoHtoi. has 
pledge«l Alpha Sigma I'hi. 



At Wednesday Aaaembly, the 
members of the new Informal com- 
mittee were elected by the student 
iKMly. The senior candidates were 
Brown, llazen. IMIet. Nissen, 
Brooks, Hutchinson and Uead from 
whom four men, Brown, Nissen. 
Brooks and HuUhinson were chosen 
for the wMumitU'c. I !'•■ .Iiinior elec- 
tions were Buell, Hyde and Diaper, 
the candidates being Buell, Hyde. 
I Draper, Hildieth ami I'erry. The 
' board now consists of ten men, the 
above meiitiiMied him I three senior 
aenators. 




Coach Bkioks 

The first score was made in the 
first of the stKond (piarter when 
"Mike" Brewer droppetl the ball over 
the goal |MJst. From then up to tlie 

iM-t fiw minute', of pl.'iy Dartmouth 
was worried ; then l»y a forward pass 
and three successive rushes the firat 
touchdown was made. Snow falle«l 
to kick the goal With only two 
minutes to play. Snow received the 
kickoffand carried the ball to Aggie's 
2.'i-yard line. (Jhee made another 



The College Signal, Tuesday, September 30, 1913. 



forward pass and Murdock made the 
second touchdown. Snow was suc- 
cessful in this goal and a luiuute later 
the time was called. 

Dartmouth won the kickoflf ami 
Kdgertou received the ball. Palmer 
made 5 yartls on the first rush and 
"Mike" made the first down with the 
two foHowing rushes. Rogers was 
shortly put in in lien's place. 
I'udrith went through left tackle and 
Aggie lost the hall on tlowns. Two 
forward passes were tried but both 
were unsuccessful. "Mike" punted 
for about 3.'> yards and Ghee fumbled. 
"Red" Carling recovered the ball on 
Dartmouth's A-yard line. After a 
couple of line plunges by Palmer and 
Darling the ball had reached the 
(ireen'a 3-yard line and time was cal- 
led for the first period. 

The second quarter was opened 
with a plunge by Palmer and then 
"Mike" dropped back to the l.'»-yard 
line and l>oo8e<l the ball over for 
Aggie'b score. Dartmouth again 
kicked and Jordan received the ball. 
".Mike" punted and from that time 
until the sky-rocket ending Dart- 
mouth ' was kept pu/zled by the 
"Minnesota shift," and luitlling sig- 
nals as given by Melican. The backs 
were slowetl down and the constant 
replacing of the (Jreeu linemen 
showed how her line was being weak- 
ened. Only once did the pigskin 
come near Aggie's goal an<t then the 
successful bhx'king of tries through 
tackle around right end gave the ball 
to M. A. ('. on downs. 

The Aggie team featured especially 
well in their ability to follow the ball. 
Mike's long punts were very well 
ci)vere«l by Ktigerton and Jordan who 
prove<l themselves to l»e a cijusidcra- 
ble worry to the (ireen backs. 

The liue-up : 

DARTMOUTH. M. A. r. 

Hogsett, Redfield, Winship, i.e. 

r.c-, Jordan 
Pudrith, l.t r.L, Schlotterbeck 

Colby, Minman, l.g r.g.. Baker 

Dunbar, c. c.. Dole 

Beer, Rogers, Kelley, r.g. l.g., Strong 
McAnliffe, r.i. l.t., Curran 

Loudon, r. e. I. e., Rdgerton 

(;hee, Llewellyn, (|.b. q.b., Melican 

Whitney, Ambrose, l.h. b. r.h.b., Darling 
Murdock, Tuck, r.h. b. I.h.b., Brewer 

.Snow, f.b. f. b.. Palmer 

Score— Dartmouth 13, M. A. C. 3. 
Touchdowns — Ambrose, Murdock. 
(ioals from touchdown — .Snow, (ioals 
from field— Brewer. Referee— Tufts of 
Boston. Umpire— Mc(irath, Boston Col- 
lege. Head linesman, Hoey, Boston. 
Linesmen— Englehorn, Hartmouth and 
Wood, M. A. C. Time — lo-minute 
periods. 



ASSEMBLY. 

Senator Charles E. Ward of Huck- 
land addrcssetl the aMmbly on Wed- 
nesday. Senator Ward, who is a trus- 
tee of the college spoke on the sub- 
ject of how a bill gets through the 
legislature, and the different steps in 
the changing of a bill into a law 
were clearly brought out. 

All bilLs that any individual wishes 
passed are introduced by a member 



of the legislature, no matter what 
the character of the measures may 
be. On a given date the receiving 
of new bills ceases, and the different 
bills are assigned to the proi>er legis- 
lative committees. A date is then 
set for the hearing. At this time 
anyone who is interested can appear 
and present arguments either for 
or against the measure. Then, often 
after considerable delay, the bill is 
reported by the committee. 

After several readings and the ad- 
dition of amendments, if any, the bill 
is voted on ; and then, if passed, it 
goes to the other branch of the legis- 
lature for its approval. If it pas- 
ses them also it is referred to the 
governor for his signature. Should 
he veto the bill a two-thirds vote is 
necessary in order to overcome the 
veto. 

In the course of his remarks. Sena- 
tor Ward stated many humorous in- 
incidents in connection with the work 
of the legislature. As a final word. 
Senator Ward impressed U|K>n his 
hearers that the great cure-all for 
present governmental evils is for 
every citizen to do his own part in 
our political life. The government 
is what the people make it. 



FRESHMAN FOOTBALL 
llolyoke High School f«M>tball team 
defeated M. A. C freshman team 
Saturday afternoon 7 to on the 
Hampden street playground, llol- 
yoke. The game was marred through- 
out by the unsi)ortsmanlike playing 
of the Holvoke team. It was only 
after Coach Gore threatened to take 
the freshmen off the field that any 
straight football was played. I'nder 
the circunisUuiccs the freshmen 
showed up very favorably. Holyoke 
was unable to score until the last 
period of play. 

All the mem{>ers of '17 played a 
scrappy game, hxlwanls ami Day 
were especially noticeable for their 
tackling, (^uigley and Walsh starred 
for llolyoke. The lineup : 

M. A. C. FRESHMEN. 

re, (iray 

rt, (Captain) Kdwards 

rg, McNaught 



HOLYOKE. 

M. O'Connor, le 
Hay (Captain). It 
I'endleton, Ig 
O'Neil, c 
Kenney, rg 
Kiley, rt 
Walsh, re 
Quigley, qb 
McDonald, 111!) 
Fitzgerald, rhb 
Kane, fb 



c, Butterick 

Ig, Cotton 

It, Bevan 

le, Hickard 

qb, Mack, Haaren 

rhb, Citayson 

Ihb, Day 

fb, Griswold 



.Score— Holyoke High 7, M. A. C. 
Freshmen o. Touchdown — Quigley. 
Goal from touchdown, Walsh. Referee 
— Shea. Umpire, Kohan. Linesmen — 
Greany and Rutter. Timers — Keough 
and Higgins. Time— 12 and lo-minute 
periods. 



I 



The entrance of a woodcbuck into 
a class in Pomology considerably 
enlivened matters. Upon the animal 
being caged a motion was made 
although not unanimously carried 
that a medal be awarded the three 
co-eds who so valiantly kept their 
nerve as not to jump upon the seats. 



HERMAN'S U.S. ARMY 
SERVICE BLUGHER 

In Tan Willow Calf or 
Gun M<;tal. A hand- 
some, snappy shoe 
ontheOrthopedic [ 
lust, desigaed by 
army surgeons. 
Yuu never saw 
a shoe like it 
for wear, com- 
fort and 
style. 

Single 
Nolu uf 
Texas un- 
scouredoak . )k>x 
toe, Kole leather 
comiter8,everj" part 
in.spected. Lining' of 
speolally tested drill. A Solid 
leather shoe tliat will uive the 
wear of the civilian shoe that 
sells for$0. This is one of the 
shiM's L'ucle Saiu hiivs for his 
HoldierH. IT'S A WOKI.I) 
BKATUii. Sec the Aruiy line. 




HERMAN'S U.S. 
ARMY SHOES 




Lasts (l«'sij,'ned \t\ 
AK3IY Sur- 
geons. Mattriai> 
urt-thebesttliai 
can bv ubtaiiK-d. 
Workmanshi]! 
nspeeted 
and g:uar- 
anteed. 



No. 968 

GARRISON 

BLUCHER. 

One of the moitt popular 
in the Army Liii«>. Ma<U< in Tan Wll- 
lomr Calf an<l Ciun Metal. Ifeiivy 
oinKln it(il«i. )mis t<H-. sulifl lenther 
t>ir<*ui;)iuut.AhMn<l!«uraetinap|tyslio«-. 
<'om« in to M*H tlu' liiii'. M;iiiuf;n-ttiri'.| 

>lly by Joseph B. ilerman Al'o., Boston. 



PRICE 84.00 



PRICE 84.00 



PAGES SHOE STORE 



THE 



Hoover& Smith Co. 

616 CtaMtnat St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 



PMIidilpkU's OfficUl Fntinity Jmlir 

SPKOIALISTS IN 
Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rini^B, Charme Prizes. Trophiea, 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

Rings, Charms.-. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

Williams Block, Amhbrst, Mass. 

OrricB Houa*: 

etoia j^.A>f. 1.00 to a K>. Ad. 



Pbeasant 

Bmitis St., 
Bmbcret 

Telephone 470 

BKKAKPAST 

LUNCHSON 
APTSRMOON TKA 

Diaacr if arrmnged for. 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 



Now at 13 PlesMnt St. 



Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Hroken Lenses Accurately Replaced 

Fine Watch Repairing Promptly ami 
Skilfully Done 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 



A Chance to Save Money 

A S5.00 Safety Razor for S5.00 

Hut we give you a coupon which when signed with your 
name and home address we refund you $3.50. It carries 
the Kexall guarantee, " Money back if not satisfied." 

We carry a full line of 

Waterman, Conklin and Moore's Fountain 

Pens, Stationery, Pipes, Tobacco 

and Cigarettes. 

Liggett's, Belle Meade and Green Seal Chocolates 



THE HENRY ADAMS CO., Dniggists 



The REXALL Store 



ON THE CORNER 



The CoUefC Signal, Tuesday. September 30^1913- 



INDEX NOTES 
111 tiie lOL't Itnlfx, the Ixjuid in- 
t.„.l8 to depict the various phases of 
,,,lk.gf life here at M. A. C. in such 
i, wuv a» to give people who kuow 
little of the lollege an intimate 
acquaintance with our customs and 
om traditions. College customs are 
^Ik.wu in a series of pictures 
,,f Freshman stuntu, drill, practical 
litltl work of various classes, etc. 
The social side of our life will he 
particularly well brought out in a 
history of "Aggie's" most demo- 
cratic feature— tlie Informal Very 
few of the men at present in college 
know that the firist informals were 
|„ 1<I in the old "C'hem" Lab. 

A new grouping of the men, in the 
.luiiior class at least, may be used. 
Instead of the old, alphabetical 
order, the major system will (piite 
proabbly l>e tried. 

The agricultural side of M. A. C. 
will be shown in a small |>ortion of 
the lKK)k, giving picturew of varii»UH 
ajjricultural assets of which we, as a 
lollege, are justly proud. 

The fraternity aection is to be 
ttltcreil somewhat tliis year. Pic- 
tures of fraternity groups aii<l the 
hoiiHes in which they live are to tjike 
the place of the inserts ami chapter 
rolls of the past. The li«Mird be- 
lieves that this arrangement brings 
out fraternity life at this college 
much stronger than the iuserU and 
the chapter rolls have ever done. In 



doing this, the Board is not trying to 
found a precedent ; it in merely try- 
ing an experiment. If the result is 
more satisfactory than the old way, 
well and good; if not, may I'.MC. go 
back to the insert and the chapter 

roll. 

The following is a complete list of 
the editors of the HUTi JtuUx: Kdi- 
tor-in-chief, Daniel .1. Lewis; assist- 
ant editor, WorthingtonC. Keimedy ; 
associate editors, l*hili|) K. Whit- 
more, Maurice .1. Plough, William 
L. Doran. William 11. Hatfield; 
artists, Raymond H. (Jriggs, Joseph 
S Pike ; class photographer, K«lwin 
K. Parker; business department, 
Harold M.Uogers, manager; Herlwrt 
V. Marsh, assistant manager; Kllis 
F. Clark, advertising manager. 



WACK1NAW8 



AND 



SWEATERS 



Thi.s is Mackinaw and Sweatt-r sea.son. Football, Golf and 
all other Fall and Winter sports call tor jrood Sweater pro- 
tection. We have in stock today several hundred Macki- 



naws in all «;rades. 



STOCKBRIDGE CLUB 

The Stockbridge club wi'l begin 
its work for the year on Tuewlay 
evening. < >• > 7- A sche<lule of 
speakers has l»een arranged, ami a 
g(MKl talk will be given every Tues- 
day evening throughout the year. 
It is especially hoped that members 
of the underclasses will attend these 
meetings. They are short ami very 
helpful for th«»s«- who are interested 
in agriculture and horticulture. 

The njenil»ership fee is $1 per year. 
Those wishing to join the club shouUl 
give their names to W. A. Davis 
I '14, •ecretary an<l treasurer. 



^4.C%C> t€» tHiM.OO 



The litmoiis Summit brand, well known in the Northwest 
and acknowled^etl to be one of the bewt. Coat Sweaters, 
the Shawl Collar, Coat Collar and the tegular shape 
Sweaters, all the best selling colors. 

IMI1.€M> to mTAn> 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



School ana Colkgc Pbotograpbcrs . . . 




, r^r^Al I V- <a Center St.. Northampton Mass., 
U^^AUi^T. a ^^^ g^^^j^ Hadley, Mass. 



Main OrricR: 

1546 I S48 Hroadway, 

New York City 



These .Studio* offer the l>«»t >killed 
artiftl* and moBt complete 

equipment obtainable 



WF. SOLICIT YODR PATRONAGE 

In so far as <»ur benefits are mutti.il. 



r* 



BESERVED FOR VELVET TOBACCO TH^: AMHERST C£CMY 






^_ FOUNTAIN PEN 

Minimize your fountain pen ^^ 

^ »«»„hle*bvlmnlnft a Moore's. C. It l» the ^1 
^ C It. strength Ilea »" » VVJu c^^ 1 yo"'" ^ 

For Sale by D«il«r. Rreryhw* ^/ . 

American Founlaln P«i CompMiy 

IW DEVONSHIRK STRKET :: BOS1 ON . M A.SS. 



I 



Wf^l 



The ColUge Signal, Tnetday, September 30, 19 13. 



The College Signal, Tneaday, September 30, 1913* 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening; by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Ai^ricultural College. 



BOABD OF EDITORS. 

CHESTKR H. WUHKLKR'14. Kditor-i 
FRANK W. IH'KI.I. '15, ManugiiiR 
HAROLD C. BLACK '14, Competition 
HAROLD J. CLAY '14. Assistant 

STUART B. FOS'I KR '14. Athletic 

ERVINF. F. PAKKF.R'14, Alumni 

J. ALBRKT PRICE 15. Athletic 

GEORGE E. DONNKLL'M, 



EARLE S. DRAPER '15. 
TYLER S. ROGERS '16. 
CHARLES W. CURTIN 



Department 

Campus 

Associate 

16, Associate 



n-Chief 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 

Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

KRNE.ST -S. CI.AKK. |R '14. Bus. Manager 
MAURICE J. CLOl'GH '15. Ass't Bus. MRr. 
ERNEST F. UPTON '14. AdvertisinR Manager 
W. RICHARD SEAKS '15, Asst. Ad». Manager 
CHAS. A. HUNTINGTON. JR 'i' . ( irculation 

Subscription I1.50 per year. .Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable 
to Ernkst S. Ci.ark, Jr. 

CiMarad m aeeond-ctaae matter m the Amhent 



Vol. XXIV. TuF.siJAy, .Sept. 30. No. 3 



Thk encouniging beginning of the 
football season this year, in the 
splendid 8tun<l ui:Mle against Dart- 
mouth, is an expression of the deter- 
mination to "Boost ()1<I Af^gie." 
Kvery man «>n Hm' team played for 
the college with all his might, and 
the results of the game proved it. 
A large share of the credit may well 
l>e given to our regular system of 
coaching and especially to the very 
excellent man who holds the position 
of coach. The team on Saturday 
showed the results of this training. 
After all, it was due in large measure 
to that irresistible ".Massachusetts 
spirit" which manifested itself u|>on 
the departure of the team for Han- 
over and again U|K>n its return. All 
Aggie asks is the continuance of this 
spirit. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

(Notices for this column should be dropped in 
the Signal Office or handed to Earle .''. Draper 
•15, on or before the .'^afurtlay preceding e.<ch 
issus. 1 

Oct. 1 — Assembly. Chapel l-IO 
p. M. Anniversary Day 
J'rogram. 

Oct. 2— M. A. C. A. A. (.-».» V. m. 
Chapel. 

Oct. 4— Drill Hall l-0(t i-. m. Id- 
fonii.'il. 

Oct. 7— 7-0(» 1-. M. South College. 
Stoekbridge club meet- 
ing. 
7-00 p. M. Wilder Hall. 
Landscape Art club. 

Oct. 8 — Assembly. Mass Meeting. 



CAMPUS NOTES 

Rogers *16 has some good views of 
the Dartmouth sendoff. 

Pictures of the llllfi "National 
duard" are being offered for sale. 

Patronize Sionai, advertisers. 
Show them that you appreciate their 
interest in the College. 

First meeting of the Landscape 
Art club on Oct. 7. Tiiose interested 
in the work are urged to attend. 



Early supper at the Hash house on 
Saturday. "Ham and beans" for 
those who do not attend the Informal. 

On Friday Richard H Powers '14 
was elected a member of the Pidjiic 
Speaking council from the senior 
class. 

A new dance order will be inaugu- 
rated at this year's Informals. Both 
the orders and the arrangement of 
dances have been changed. 

The series of tennis meetings have 
been continued with a goml attend- 
ance. At each meeting some salient 
|>oints of the game are discussed. 

A goodly delegation fron) Aggie 
witnessed the Amherst-Rhode Island 
State game on Pratt field. The 
game was rather poorly conte.sletl by 
the Rhmle Islaml State men. 

The .Stock-judging team nuide a 
trip to Brattleboro fair on Thursday 
accompanied by Professor .McLainc. 
The team expects to compete with 
other colleges at the Brockton fair. 

Business Manager Rogers of the 
191.'i Index desires all the individual 
blanks to be lilled out and handed in 
as soon as possible in order to facili- 
tate the routine work of the Imlex 
lioard. 

The showing that our team made 
at Hanover shoidd assure a strong 
delegation from the student Inxiy to 
accompany the team on every trip. 
A big delegation at Worcester on 
Oct. 4 will put a lot of spirit in the 
team. 

It is not too late to tiecidc to go to 
the Informal. Make either the Holy 
Cross game or the Informal on ( )ct. 
4. Freshmen are urged to begin their 
"social" activities now. Tickets 
may l»e obtained of Freel^orn '14, 
South college. 

The varsity wasgiven a goo<] send- 
off when they left for Hanover, by 
the entire student l>o<ly and by the 
"band" which playe<l an important 
part in the ceremonies. The march 
from the Dog cart to the center was 
mostly on the double ipiick ! 

At a meeting of the junior class it 
was voted that class day should take 
place at Commencement time in .June 
rather than during the fall. This 
move was made as it was thought 
that such a course would enliven 
that perioil of college activities. 

The varsity tcimis courts in the 
rear of the Drill Hall are to receive 
expert attention. A Northampton 
expert has been engaged to sidimit a 
bid for the complete rejuvenation of 
the courts, and it is probable that 
something will be done on them this 
fall. 

The SioNAi, competition is now 
open. The freshmen are particularly 
urged to come out for the college 
paper. Everyone who has ability 
along this line owes it to himself and 
to the college to try out for the pub- 
lication. The paper is becoming 
more aggressive and better each year 
as the number of students increases 
and the positions on the board 
become more closely contested. Go 
out and fight for a place. 



QNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

KKOIJLAR NlTNIIAl' SKKVICK AT 7 F M 



Clark '15 



Eldridge '14 



All Student Supplies 

M. A. C. STORE 

BANNERS AND POSTERS 

CANOV TONIC 



Montaj^ue '15 



Hager '16 



E. RUSSELL NORTON 



SALES AGENT 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest line in 
the state outside of Boston. 



Davenport Miller See our line of Drill Shoes 
Vein Coal $2.00 to $4.00 



Best Quality Pennsylvania Coal 



MODERN REPAIR 
DEPARTMENT 



lUl.STON OKKICE 

85 Water St. 



NKW YORK OKHU K 

I Broadway 



E. M. BOLLES 



(OM VOUM %VAV TO ^. O.) 



LOW PRICC TAILORING CO. 

.sriTS M.ADE TO OKOEK 
Sutt« rieanrd. Pressed and Dyed. Alllcindsof 
KppairihK for I^dips and Uentlrnien neatly don«. 
MiBhurade work by ftr<tt-cla^« tailor. Work 
called tor and delirered. Sell tickets for pre^^ing, 
4 si'lTs FOR I1.50 

GCORGC KOTOWITZ. PftOf>. 

Main .Street. Aniher»t, Mait. Naxh Block 

( »n your way to the Post ( (ffice. Tel. 43*- W 



Coolep's l>oici 

Springfield, Mass., 

Solicits the patronage of the Stu- 
dents of the Agricultural College 
to class dinners and individually. 



THE KATHERINE E. McGLELLAN STUDIO 

44 State St., North ami-ton, Mass. 

PORTRAITS — GROUPS — VIEWS 

Insist upon seeing our college work and prices before deciding 



Call or Tklkphonk 131 




Do Fertilizers Pay? 

The CJovcmment and Educational "Autliori- 
ties" spend cdnsiderable public money in printing 
contradictory statementsi on this point. 

Great fortunes have l»een made in manufactur- 
ing fertilizers. They evidently pay the makers. 

Farmers continue to increase their fertiliier 
purchases, indicating that they are profitable to 
the farmer. 

But are the kinds which the manufacturers pre- 
fer to sell the niost profitable to the farmer .' Do 
they give the greatest profit consistent with main- 
taining the prinluctiveness of the soil } Or do 
they merely supply the element most needed at 
the moment and reduce the available supply «f 
the other elements .' 

The avenge fertiliser contains 4 times as much phosphoric acid as Potash. The 
average crop takes fn.m the soil 3 times as much PoUsh as phosphoric acid. 
Vou can guess the answer. Use more Potash, for 

Potash Pays 

Send for FREE pamphlet on Profitable Fanning, containing syrtem of rational 
leniliiing and soil testing. 

GERMAN KALI WORKS, lac. 42 Broadway. N»w York 
ck llwk CMcMt. M. iMk 4 Trvtt •)«(. Satamuh. St. »MIm|f Im* Mg.. Urn SriMM, l«. 

Eattrs Isiitlaf . Iiiinli. 6a. 



MINING POTASH IN CERMXMY 



The Weakest Link or Limiting Factor 

There ai^ fields that contain an abundance of potash on analysis, 
hut on which crops fail if thev are not sup|)lied with ,ir,ii/<if>/r potash, 
and the same is true if ,iviu/iil>/f phosphorus is lacking. 

We are all familiar with the limiting factor in crop production, 
nainelv, the weakest Imk in the chain of fertility. One never knows 
when one has reached the limiting factor, the weakest link; one never 
knows when one has exhausted the availal.le phosphorus or tiie avail- 
able potash, or the available nitrogen until crops fail to respond. After 
a farmer has harvested a buu»f)er crop he has taxed all the links in the 
chain of fertility, but which one is nearest the breaking p(»int he does 
not know; therefore, if he is wise he applies at least all three of the 
leading elements of fertility in some shape, either in the form of stable 
manure, green cro|)S or commercial fertilizers, or all combined (which 
latter is the better plan), knowing that any excess which he may have 
applied will not be lost out of the reach of crops, if a rational systc-m 
of rotation with deep-rooted and shallow rooted crops is practised, in 
chiding cover crops. Moreover, these undoubtedly promote bat terial 
growth in the soil, which, according to Hall, may be iht 

Stui/y the I'hittl /',><>,/ f^rol'lftn 

Many ha if "iin" aHsu't-t 
"The'' ttttiwet wi/l t>e uuntfi u<hUe 



limilin'' fa< tor 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER COMPANY 
43 Chatham St., Boston 



I. M. LABROVITZ, Custom Tailor 

Fashions. Fit, First Class Work (iuaranteed 

Large aiwortment on hand. (iKN IS KU K.\ I.SH I N« .S. Krd M«n Coll.ir« and 
Dresa Shirla. Cleaninij and Presmmg DKKSSSIIIS 
TO KK.NT. Military Collar* and <.lovrs 



11 AMITY ST., 



Telephone .■joz-VV 



AMHRRST. MASS. 



F. A. &HEPARD 

MEN'S STORE 




There arc a hundred or 
more varieties bccktinin^ 
to you from every smoke 
shop but there is only one 
that is 
Distinctively Individual" 

the purest and best of to- 
baccos - delijihtful Havor 
—mild and satisfying! 
Your college chum. 



^^ TUMISM BUND ^ 

aCARETTES 




USE OUR NEW CASH DISCOUNT CARD 
AND SAVE FIVE PER CENT ON 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 



Man FaUmt told im this comntrj thmm any other ritarttfl 



SOLE AGENT FOR 



THE GENUINE AND ORIGINAL 



PATRICK MACKINAW 



«iiji5 vvirviiow i>i«i*iv^w 



I 



■A I 




Agent. R. S. BRAnc;, Kappa Sifima House. 



The College Signal. Tuesday, September 30, 1913. 



The Collefe Signal, Tuesday, September 30, 191 3. 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

joljliers of WronKlil Iron aiul IJtass I'll)*-, \;ilves 
anil KitliiiK'* f'>' Meani, Water ami (ia*. Asliestos 
and Ma|{nesi;i HoiI«t and Pipe coverings, I'ipe 
Cut to Sketch, Mill Supolies. KiiKiieeis and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water Mealni);. 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, lioiler and KiiK'i'e 
Connections. - Holyoke, Mass. 



T^EACHERS Mm. 



Of Boston 



1 20 Ihtyliton St. 



Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



No 



^krp^^■tcr fit AAorchoust, 

PRIfJTET^Sj 

Amherst, Mass. 



Cook Place. 



Students Attention ! ! ! 

We are ready at the start to furnish you with a fine 
line of Campus and Fraternity House Views, also Post 
Cards. Kod.ik work piven prompt and careful attention. 
Knlar^iiig an<i picture fr.uning giv«n our |)ersonal at- 
tention. See us about Groups and Portraits for the very 
best work. 



Satbfaction Guaranteed, 
the Square Deal Studio 



Patronixe 



KINSMAN'S COLLEGE STUDIO 

Nash BlocK, Amherst 



M. A. C. CATHOLIC CLUB i The new courses which the de| uit- 
The M. A. C. Ciitholic clul. was | "ic'i^ has offeicd, have proven .yen 
started in H>11, in an endeavor to '""''e popular than was anticipiUH. 
have the Roman Catholic memlxMs ^^'f^y men have enrolled, and th. ,„- 
of tiie college become better ac- P-i^'^v of Uie laboratory is tax. I lo 
• juaiutcd with one another and to '^s utmost. 



increase the good will that exists 
between Catholics and non-( atholics 
at this college. Meetings are .hehl 
every two weeks in Room (J, .South 
college. All those interested are 
cordially invited to come around. 
The olllcers for the ensuing year are : 
President, David A. Coletnan Hi 11 ; 
vice-president, James K. Harper 
I'.n.'i; secretary, Alfred A. (lioiosa 
liilC; seigeunt at arms, Robert K. 
Patterson, 1915' 



H. M. RcK-ERS, '15, Agent. 
87 Pleasant St., 



Studio Phone 303-a. 



GRAND SWEEPSTAKES TROPHY 



(f7S0.00 Sterling Silver Cup) 
r OR 



BEST STATE EXHIBIT OF POTATOES 




AT THE 

New York Land Show 

1912 
WON BY 

The L L. CleYeland Company 

HOULTON. M«. 

/^NE of the largest and most 
^^ reliable seed potato houses 
in the United States. Competi- 
tion open to the entire United 
States and Canada. Messrs. E. L. 
Cleveland Company also won the 
First Pri/.e for Best Coanty Exhibit 
ol Potatoes. (Silver Cup valued 
at $200.00.) 
The E. L. Cleveland Company use 

E. FRANK COE 



FERTILIZERS 



E. Frank Coe Fertilizers have 
been the business farmer's favorite 
for over Hfty-five years. Why not 
follow the exainple of these lead- 
ing commercial potato growers. 

t«ii aiicli) <" rn.t "The .Siriry "t ^ Pmfltrthir Prttafo 
Cmp" «rtlt»nt>7 an itra«,l«»li Caaiit}. ■■!■•• fkraifr 



The Coe-Mortimer Company, 



51 CHAMBERS STREET. 
NEW YORK. N. Y. 



A team conjp<j8c»l of M. A. C. men 

playtnl ii rather «ltdl game with a 
team from llu; Amherst gas works 
for the i-ntertaiument of the visitor.". 
of the local fair last Weilnesday. 
The score was I to in the eleventh 
inning, the "Aggie Indepentlents" 
having trouble in bunching their hits 
sutliciently until that inning. .John- 
son allowed no hits to the op|K>nents. 
which gave the intield but little to do 
while the oiittield t<Mjk a vacation. 
The winning rim was seore<l on Sher- 
man's hit f«>lli»we«l by one l>y v\rchi- 
bald and a Texas leagia-r by Hutrh- 
inson. Tlie Aggie men who playe«l 
were .lohnstm p.. Urooks c, Morse 
lb., Hutchinson •_'b.. FtrTmld -'tli.. 
Pike s . Arihibuld rf.. Slu-ruian cf., 
tludlield If 



WANTLD 



llv the M. A C. libiarv: Coi.i.MiK 
Sk.nai. Vid. li. N«». I, .Sept. l'.». 
I'Jll ; M A. ( . Hulhtin. Vol. 1, N<». 
2, vol. 2. No. 4, Vol. .'». No. 4 ; news- 
pa|>er clippings aUiut M. A. C ; 
photogiaphs of buildings and 
<;ii>tiiids. prugrams, schedides. calen- 
dar.s. etc., college history material 
of any sort. 

CiiAi(i.K.H R. CitKKN, Librarian. 



l£XTKN8ION. 

A new bulletin has recently liecn 
issued by the extension service en- 
titled : " Sending the College tu 
the State." This bulletin descriLts 
very briefly the helps that theciti/cns 
of .Massachusetts may secure from 
the college It is in no sense :i 10- 
port of the extension service. It i* 
issued in resi)onse t«) a large nuinlit'i 
of calls which have been coin! 11;; in 
asking for information on this siil,- 
ject. 

The Septendter issue of "Kacth fi.i 
Farmers" is a circular <»n poidtry liv- 
gieue by Prof. .1. C. (iraham. 

A. V. .McDoiigall, instructor in 
charge of the auto demonstrative out- 
fit, was a juilge «»f live stock sit tbe 
Amesbiny fair hcM .St-pt. 2:5, >'4 uml 
•J.'». .Mr. MfDougall also condiiott*! 
a standard milk and butter fat nm- 
test and had in charge the Iniys stoek- 
judging contest. 

Prof. Hurd has lieen apiiointol l.\ 
(iovern»>r 1'"«»hs as a mend«'r of :i 
special committee on agiicidtiiii' !■ 
gether with the secretary of the ^! 
lM»ard of agriculture and Charles M. 
(iartlner. master of the state graiij;e. 
The committee is to make recoiiiimti- 
ihitionsto the American Coinriiis^i'm 
f«u the study of Kuro|>ean Agrirul- 
tiual Finance, in regard t<» the need* 
of Massachusetts agriculture. Fjich 
state lias been asked to appoin' 
committee in order that the Atix" 
can commission may c«»me iwi*- 
closely In touch with l<»cal conditi<»ti« 

The first community pii>gre«»'<. 
ference of the •eason was IhI<I »; 
Sandwich on Sept. i-'i and 2«; iin<l"t 
the direction of Mr F.. L. Morpt 
of the extension service. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

ACKOKOMY. 

Mr. R. F. Lund, a graduate of St. 
Lawrence Fniversity of the class of 
I'.M)'.), has been appointed graduate 
assistant in the <lepartment of agron- 
omy. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'U4.— S. Francis Howard t« fw- 
feasor of chemistry and head of bi» 
department at N<»rwiih nniversilv. 
Northfield. Vt. 

•(H, — Prof. (Jordon spent 1 l^'i- 
tion of the summer in licl.i " 
with the New York Ceologital - 
vey. He also Mltcn<le<l the ii»tem»- 
tional geological congress at Toron- 
to, Can. 

'0.».— H. .1. Franklin, wli- ' 
charge <»f the Massachiixett^ cxptr:- 
mental cranberry bog.F.ast W;m-fi'<"' 



IIACTKKIOI o<;^ . 

F. H. Hesseliiik van .Suchtelen, 
who has l»een connected with the 
U»c(»'riologi<-al Institute of tlie.Michi- 

g:,., Agricultun.l college for the past ,,.,^ |,,„vcstod about Wm b 
two vc:ii^ in coiiinrtion with spe<i:il 
work on s«»il bacteritdogy. has been 
appoiiiteti M.«4si8laJit professor in bacte- 
riolugv. 'Iwo new graduate nf^sistants 
havealso born chosen. A. Itano.also 
from the .Michigan Agricultural col- 
lege, and Mr. Davies. si graduate of 

the Guelph Agricult.ind college of ber of the board ..f direct 
the Iniversity of Ontario will have 
charge of a portion of the work. 



licrries. It i^s expected tli.it 
^t.'iOOO and gif.tHMl will le 
from the sale of the state's ■ 

'(»7.— F. C. Peters is trea- 
director in the Ardmore Bm! 
Loan association and is als" 



r 
illt'li)' 



Lower Merion V. .M. C. A 
'10.— The following da- 



DE LAVAL 

CREAM 
SEPARATORS 



Make Fall and Winter 
Dairying More Profitable 

'■PHERE are n>ecial advantaires in using 
I a Bood cream separator durintf the fall 
and winter months. 

The millt from cows lona In lactation Is 
hardest to cream.-and likewise hardest to 
separate with an inferior separator. 

Moreover, cream and butter prices are 
hiifhest so that the wa^VP of gravity se«in« 
or a poor separator counts for most. 

Then there's the s^-eet. warm sklm-milk 
for st<xk feedinjf, alone worth the cost of a 
separator in told weather. 

There la surely no reason to delay the 
purchase of a separator or to continue the 
use of an inferior one. A De Laval niaihine 
will save its cost by sprtnir, and may be 
bouL'ht on such liberal terms if desired as 
to actually pay for iuclf meanwhile. 

See your local De Laval asent 



THE DE LAVAL 
^ SEPARATOR CO. 

^ NEW YORK 

CHICAGO 
SAN FRANCISCO 
SEATTLE 
{MONTREAL 
WINNIPEG 





1 


lu 



m SHOULD WORRY 

— And buy a — 

COMMUTATION TICKET 

$1.10 trade for $1.0O 

KENNEL CLUB 



been received from the secretary of 
the class : 

Uaymond.I. Fiske after spending 
a profitable summer working at the 
Melrose laboratories has taken up 
graduate work in entomology. 

William K. LeonanI was married 
to Miss Harriet Beatrice (J rev, .Inne 
•_'»;, at Limones, Central Soledad, 
Cienforegos, Cuba. 

The degree of Master of Science 
was conferred upon Samuel W. .Mcn- 
dum, last June, by the I niversity of 
Wisconsin. He is now fsirm account- 
ant for the Hoo«l Farms company. 

Frank L. Thomas has returnetl 
from the state nursery inspection to 
continue his graduate work, 

Sumner ('. lirooks has returned to 
his graduate work at IhirvanI, aftei 
spending the summer with a butaniz 
ing expedition in ()klahoma. Plants 
were collected in sixty «MJt of seventy- 
six counties of the state. 

U«>ss K. Annis ma«le :i brief visit 
to the college last week. He is now 
with the Texas company. Summer 
St., Boston, engage«l in the oil 
business. 

Robert 1*. Armstrong is taking 
jzraduate work in horticulture at 
Cornell. 

Walter U. Clarke and Miss Uutb 
Amelia Birdsall were married July 
30. at Leptomlalc, N. V. Ihey 
resi<le at Milton-on-Huds<»n, N. V. 

Ixjuis C. Brown was married to 
Miss Marion Frost at Camliri«lge, 
Sept. L'5. I'he couple will live in 
Akron, Ohio, where .Mr. Biown is 
pi|ie inspector for the city. 

William N. Wallace is engaged 
in farming in .South Wilbraham. 



Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

I'.\t KKItS, l>OI I.TKt lUll-SSKUH 
A.\l» III ITKK MAKKKH. 

W Hill l-SAI K 111 U 1 KS IN 

Beef. Mutton. I.amb, Veal, Pork, l^rd, Ham.«, 

Bacon, SausaKcs. Poultry, flame. Butter 

Cheese, l-.KKs, Heans. 

I iftice iV Stores v5-j;-57-Vi. ' ' "^ "3 Hlack«itiiiie St., 

hoktun. rackiMK llouse. liiiKliton, Mas<i. 

Natwe I'oullry Dreasini; t'lani, Huston. 

Cieamaries in Vermont. 



Attention of Students. 

11 ymi are lonkitiK for i itiiKetiial ,iml leinu 
Bei.itive uccupatiiin iliirint; Miniiner, wiite 

TIIK UICNICKAI. AI'I'I.IANCK l-A<:TORV. 

(li>cof|iorated) Murliiftlr, W l««"H»ln. 
for particulars. 



William H. Watson's 

Picture*, 5torlc«, Lecture«. Dramas 

'■ I'he consensus of press opinion of 
l>oth cotttinenLs, speaking eloquently of 
iJK Watson's work, is that he is a ma.s 
master of art and literature. Highly in- 
structive, illuminating and very wondrous 
IxMiks. Each picture a work of Art." 

ART SCHOOL PUBLISHING CO. 

2-M7 Mhrhttan Avenue. Chkwgo, U. S. A. 



BIRDS 
OF AMHERST 



-BY- 




Hubert L. Chirk, 



PRICE 25 els. 



lliere are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

GOAL 



-AT THl 



or 



C. R. ELDER 



RECORD OFFICE, 



Massachusetts Northern Rail- 
way Company- 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



EWELL'S 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUQS 
CARPE IS 

Largest assortment in New Kn- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

I,OWKR F.XPKNSKS Knable us 
to offer an abs<jlute lower pnce 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

ANO 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



cox SONS 

AMI 

Lf jf>^ V I N I N G 

7*74 Madison Avenue, New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

Best Materials and Workmanship 

WOODWARD'S 




LUNCH 



17 Main St., Masonic BIdg, 
Northampton, Mass. 



Sti: I'll KN I^ank Foi.ciK. k 

MANr'KA«-l l-HIXl .IKWKI.KK 

ISO IIKOAMWA Y. NKW VOKK 

<:i.l II A Nil iiUA^VAhlR 

IMNH A.NI* KI.N<iH ,# 

OOtJ>. art-VBH AMO HHONZM M«I>AI.I<I 



LUNCHES 



SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Ci9t«d cnly from r A. M. tc 4 A. M. 

Toefil Mientka 

Stoes stiined and Polisneil 

Make old shoes look like new 

Neat, classy workmanship 

Ot>eo Hun(l»]r Main St. 

Oo way to Post Office. 






The College Signal, Tuesday, September 30, 1913. 



TENNIS 
RACKETS 




At 



DEUEL'S 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundm 

High-Grade College Work 

LAUNDRY 

Shirts. - - - 10 15c 

Collars, - -a i-ac 

Cuffs, ... - a I-2C 

I'Uin wash, • • 48c per cloz. 

hame, rough dry, • - 30c per doz. 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

St«*am I'rcssing, 50c a Suil 
Dff Cleaning and Pressing, #1.50 a Suit 



K \i rn |. RitiiiiKN, Aaent, 7 North ('ottige 

Ki'WAMi' t'. Kl>w*klis, AK<M>t 

Put full name and addresa on laundry 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Loose - Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 

Before buying elsewhere, see our assort- 
ment of pennants and banners 

CUKRAN A DYER. Props. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



The Massachusetts Agricultural Gollese 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty six teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal llusbandry 

Dairyimg 

Poultry Husbandry 



Horticulture 

Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 



Agricultural Chemistry 
Economic Entomology 
Plant I'hysiology and I'athology 
Agricultural Education 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST, MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
turai department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations,vio1ets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300 



Athletic lioard, 

I'he College Senate, 

Footbttll Attsociutiou, 

Uusebull AriHoi-iution, 

Truck AMHociatiou, 

iiockcy A8t»o<'iutiou, 

TuuniH AHHociatiun, 

liide club, 

Roister Doisters 

Musical Association, 

Niuetecn liundrctl Fourteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Fifteen lutlex, 

.M. A. C. Christian Ass4K*iutioii, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Confereuce, 

Stoi*kbriiigc Club, 



(leorge H. Chapmuu, .Secretary 

1>. \V. JuueH, i'lcMident 

S. B. Freeborn, Munuger 

it. I). .Melicun, .Manager 

K. C. J*Alwanls, Munuger 

J. D. Pullett, Munuger 

K. K. .MucLuin, Munuger 

J. W. T. l^esure, Secreury 

I). .L lA'wis, Manager 

H. I). Hrown, Manager 

E. S. Clurk, Jr., Munuger 

H. .M. Rogers^, Munuger 

K. H. Powers, President 

I). A. Coleman, President 

J. I). Pellett, President 

N. H. Deuring, President 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELER AND UPTOMETRISl 
LenMis ground while you wait 

COLLECB jKWiiLKV 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and (Juitar Strings 

AMHKKMT, MASH. 
Next to Post Office. 



STEAM FITTING. Telephone w-4 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

P. W. Dance & Co. 



Specialty of Kepairing 

Church Wi.ndows, 
Memorial Wini>ows, 

LrAU LUiHTS, &c. 
t Clifton Ave.. AMHERST, MASS 

Catalogues of 

Pcsll Ae V\ritit«^t* Oc>«>cla 

Are Out. Copy mailed to any address. CulIrK' 
.Studrnts and Athletes who want the real, tuiwiiof 
article* for the various sports should insist upun 
those bearinK the Wright & Uitson Trade XIatk 



Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Hockey 
Skatca 




Skat'gShoes 
Sweaters 
Jerseys 
Uniforms 
for all sports 



Hhen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



Wright & Ditson Goods are the Mamlatit f"f 
all sports 

J44 Washington St.. Boston, Ma-^ 

THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CI-EANSING. 

PRESSING. 

REPAIRING. 

Uoitkrat iMrvlcw, H«at Work, L^iwpiit Prla^ 

All woik carefully done. Work called lor and 
delivered. Gents' overcoats, suits, uants and 
coats. Ladies' hne linen suita a specialty 

Teams will call every day at M. A C 

Wn. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rmt Naah Bl'k, AmiMral. 



T«L N'«.JM-< 



CARS 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



Barsalotti & Gentoso 

cigars Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresh Candy 

ke Cream, Fruit, Soda, Etc. 

The Right Goods at the Kight Prices 

Open till II o'clock KVEKV night 
C*ra«r Amity and l>l«N»«»Ht Streota 



If you want to be 

MtLIU WITH THK OIKLS 

70a auBt have your clothes presMMl and cleaned 

ATBPSTIIZlf'S 

11 Amity ■■«(. Maroon Store 

Preaslng and Cleaning a apf-claliy 

Meat lit>eral ticket aystem In town 
T«l. S03-11 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts .\gricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



Leave AOtilE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AOOie COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 min. past esck 
HOUR. 

Speclel Cars at RaaaaoaMa Ratas 



AIHERSI k SUNDERLAND SI. BY. CO 



For a Daily and Sunday .Newspaper 
You should Read 

SprlDgfleld RepublicaD 

While you are at eollege in Amiu 'st 

It hn« all orxhr M. A. C. Nrwn 

Til.- ItenI MporliriK News 

Full General New* 

A StronK Kdltnrlal Paffe 

IntereHtinir rrntiirra 

It la a Keal NewHpaper 

Daily, 3 cents ; 70 cents a montli ; $tff> 
a quarter. 
Sunday, 5 cents; 50 cents a qiw'!^'' 

Subscribe by mall or through the .Ainh ' ^•'*' 
dealer. 



im COLLEGE SIGNAL 



OCl JO Wl? 






W1 



I 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEOEI 



,1. XXIV. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 7, 1913. 



No. 4 



COLEY WINS CROSS-COUNTRY 



FORTY-SIX YEARS OLD 



FIRST INFORMAL 



1916 the Class Winner with 1917 Second 
Three Miles Done in 15-43- 

With 140 points to their tredit, 
!!„ s()phoin<»re claBS won the annual 
iiiloiTlusB C108S {-01111117 run, which 
«:is held .Saturday afUTiioon. The 
oiirsc thin year was shortened to 
tlnfo miles on reeominendatioiiH of 
( n:ith Whittier, who tlioujjht that 
*i.\ miles w.ts to<. far to run at this 
liini'. Coley '1<>, who ciiiiii' in fliHt, 
iiKidc the diMtam-e in !.*> min. r.\ see. 
I'he start whh made from the IMum 
Trees aUmt three o'ehKik. The lead- 
ers Met up a fast clip, au<l the field 
w:is liun«ln'<l for some time. At 
North Amherst the men had strung 
out, with Coley. Uichards, Uuer and 
Schwartz in the lead. Haer held 
MtetMul U) ('<*ley until near the exi>er- 
imtut station when Richanls passed 
hill). The race was well contesU'd 
lliioiighotit and the material shown 
u;is excellent. 

The race went to I'Jlfi, as was 
.iiJiripated with 14<» |>ointH, with the 
freshmen serond, UO |>oints The 
nenoirs and juniors followerl along 
in order, with 06 antl Irl points 
ii-s|M»<-tively. • 

The ninnera finished in the follow- 
ing order : 

(•..ley '16, Uichards '16, Baer '17, 

^.liwartz *I6, Chisholm '16, ,Sinall 

II, Canlarelli '16, Ipton '!*», Lucas 

14, Hiissell '16, Day 'I/i, Ulake '14, 

Smith 17. Merrill '17, Nute 'H. Kel- 

sey '17, Whitney 17, Trutt '17, 

Hishop 'i:.,Lindqui8t* 16, Latham '17, 

lower 'lA, .Tohnson 'L'», SUukpole 

17. 



Anniversary Day Celebrated. W. H. Attended by Sixty Couples. Affair a 
Bowker '71 Offers Prize. | Great Success. 



FOOTBALL VICTORY 

Over Holy Cross by the Score of 6-0. 
Brewer's Work Feature of Game. 



PUBLIC SPEAKING. 

An »\teiisive schedule in deluiting 
i.s plunnerl »>y the pul.lic speaking 
< ouncil thia year. A triangular de- 
liate with RlifHle Island SUite college, 
hifts or Clurk, and .M. A. C. is to 
Ite arranged, which will necessitate 
two varsity deliating teams instead 
■f «me. as in previoim years. This 
means of course that new men are | 
iMt'detl and the council is especially 
lUxiouH to get new materal from the 
I reshiimn class. 

A series of inter-class debates will 
Im- held l>efore the Christmas recess 
s\W\ the view of developing material 
fur the college debating learns. 
•11 Frid.ty. Oct. 17, the preliminaricH 
- I'rcshiii.'ui and .Iimlors will take 
.1:1.,. Oil Friday, Oct. 24, the 
-'.pliomore and Senior preliminaries 
ill o«cur. Nov. 14, the Freshmen 
ill tlebate the Sophomores, the win- 
irt competing against the team 
hosen as the result of the Junior and 
>' iiior contest on Nov. 21. The 

IContinued on page 7] 



Wednesdav Assembly was given The lirst infoniial of llic year w:.s 
over U) a program in celebration of held Satuiday afleino«.ii and eveninti 
the forty-sixth anniversary of the I in the Drill Hall. About sixty 
founding of the college. l»icsi<lent couples attemled, and the alTair was 
Uutterlield iutroiliiced the speak- successful in every way. 
ers, and siK,ke in part as follows : In the .enter of the hall, the 
"Trnlay is the birthday of «Old orchestra was quite hUhlen from view 
AggiJ." Forty-six years ago to- i by large palms. Mar<Mm streamers 
morrow, the first class appeared on were hung from the ceiling to the 
the campus— forty-six men. It has walls on either sitle aii.l were Ibmkcd 
always been a custom U) remember by nuiiicrous banners. A large -M" 
this day in litting testimony of the composed of niartKm electric lights, 
appreciati(.n which we feel to all the shone from one end of the hall, 
men who constituted Aggie's first C<mway's orchestra from Northamp- 
class, uiul to all the men who have t<»n furnished the music, 
followed them, f<.r the alumni of this The patn»mHses were Mrs. Ibitter- 
college are really the fruitage of the lield aii.l Mrs. Ilasbiouck. Miss 
work of the college and its greatest Dunbar was the Ifolyoke chnperone, 
asset. A noble struggle has been and Mrs. Hillings and Miss Kobbins 
made ; to those first men much of the ! were chaperoms from Smith, 
credit for Aggie's prestige an<l sue-' Among those present weie.fnmi 
cess to-dav must be given. There is the faculty, Mr. I.aiabee ami Mr. 
nothing to regret in the past. The Hrown ; i:»H, Norton. Hr.H.ks, 
future is blight; Aggie's traditions Stevens, Tower, Potter, Clark, Ilar- 
will continue U> live with a renewed | ris, Nissen. F.»ster, Hlaek, Peterson, 
vigor and they will be iiphehl as fer- .loiies, Hrown, IIiiUhinHon. Parker, 
vently as they have l.een up U» now." i Walker, Tarbell, Ktlwai ds. aiirl 
Mr. W. IL Howker was intnsluced Ulake : P.M.'i, liiBliop,Hildreth. Marsh. 
M » trustee of the colleKe ami a CiotigU, PtriTy, BtwH, FWiyt, Me- 
memlH-r of the class of 71. that ; Keelinie. Archibald. White. Une, 
sUrted in work on OcL 2, IM67. He Seats and Severance; r.H6. Liurd. 
said in part: "Outs was the first Clover. M<»sch, Hogers. Wilcox, 
class U. appear on this campus. Wc Heed. Ilalhawa.s, NichoUm. .Scl- 
werean experiment; we were iniro- kiegg, and FeinaM ; 11M7, Huchanan. 
ducing a new order of things ; wc Huckman, llallet. Novcs. I pwm, 
were a departure from the old so- (latnage, Uupelle. .Schaefer, Hell, L. ] 
called classical college. The college |I. Tn.ker. OthcrH attending wee 
itself was an experiment. No one WiUard Hillary, SUidley, and 
took the pro|K)8ition seriously, and /abriski e. 

the whole .oUege continued to In- re- ^^^^^ ELtCTIONS. 

garded lightly by many or as tnuch ^^ ^^ ^^^^^ .j,,^^^^^ 

as thirty vears after its founding. mu iw u 

aa luiriv »r, ,l.iv after ciaoe and elech-d the ^ol- 
'rl...r« wna no such beaut fii campus "••.^ ""^' "" ' 
h;rar:hris trs.ay; 1 there lowing oHlcers to serve for the ensn- 

were only three .mall w.ss.en ^^^f--^::'':;\,,,_,^^, Needham 
iugs ami an alntost equal number J^ ,.^,,..., 

of instructors. I came tx> Amherst "^ '^P""^' , \, ., 
and passe<l. without any special |.re 



paiati<m and with only one excep- 
tion every single entrame reqiiire- 



Hichaid 
H. Powers of .Maiden, vitre-presi- 
dent; L. Krnesl Smith of l^omins- 
ter, secretary ; C»ry l*>>'e «' ^'"••*> 



I'l'v mnirie eniruin-f n,-<|niiv- ■ - . . %• 

"> ^ . , .,. ' k Haillcy Falls. da.HS captain ; M.mrrM 

nient. » -'"r' llu n' "^ ^ Tarbeil of H field, sergeant-at- 

T '':\ ::: rr;eq d^ X ;:: ..1.. ; ami Miss .losephine Strange of 
..hanged . more .s icq "•• • MH,shfield, historian. 

t« be required. I he standa.d of tl^ nH;^-K. C. Towne of 

,„„ej5.. had to I., raised in order to ^a ^^^^^^^^ ^ ,. y,,.,, 

eom.iete with other col eges -''-^^^^.^,^ Sumleiland, vice-president; 
,,tr>pn...nt those unfitted from en- |. no ^^^ ^^^^^^^^^ ^^^ 

tering." Mr. H<-ker also spoke K ^ ^ ^^^^ ^^_^^^^ 

a..<.uttl.eloca,ionHof the buddings - ■• M ^g ^^^ ^^^^ 

U.e distances ^^^^-^^^-^^ ^ ^,...... ..,.,eant-at-ariiis : S. A. ...l. 

eriticisms made .Mh ^"^^^ ' „f „,,,swell Ferry, class captain ; W . 
that reason, lb" < l<'««< »y "^^""^ ,^ „,„„,. .^f North Dartmouth, his- 
ui.ri.cof S2. to that student .^ ^ the L.^_^^^ ^^^^^^ ^ ^^ ^^^^^^, ^^^ ,^^^^^^_ 

manager class track. 



;j„egc who would submit the best Jonan : a, 

report of the total <listance traversed IV", . . 

while going to ami from recitations, i.i,.t,„es of the Dartmouth game 
j . - . „ .,,„. ,1 are being shown on the cami.iis. 

[Continued on page 3J I""- o 



Playing a steady, consistent game, 
Ihe Aggie ftsitball team won a 6-0 
viet<»rv over Holy Cross at Worcester 

a * 

on Saturday Fbished with holding 
Yale at a W»-<> M-ore the prece«ling 
week, the heavy Purple team was ctm- 
fitleiitof vlct*ay, but against Massa- 
ehiisetts' sure bl.xking and the back 
liehl's line-pbiiiging they were |M»wer- 
less. Teamwork and the fighting spirit 
of the Aggie men won the <lay, and 
Coach Hrides ileserves a great deal of 
crerlit for instilling these qualities into 
the men. pio«lucing the Im-sI roiimled 
out team that the present iiii<ler- 
gradiiate ImsIv has seen. 

The nearest that Holy Cross caiii« 
I to scoring was at the end of th« 
second tpiarter when Ostergreii at- 
temptetla<lrop kii k from the id-yanl 
line ami failetl It was also in the 
Kccoiid quarter that our »*H>riiig wa» 
done. Hy a MUcceHHi<»n of plunges 
the team had reached the Holy Croita 
:t.'i-yard line. Hrewer hurletlu pretty 
forwanl pass, which Haker caught 
iK-foie being d«»wiied on tlie l.'i-yard 
lint. .\n«'il>«i forward pass waa 
liie.1. the pigHkin l»«ing ImtUnl by the 
Purple playei-M. -lust lH!f«»re it 
touched Ihe ground it was caught by 
Kdgerton for a ftmr yard gain. Two 
more rushes gained four yanls and it 
was the third down. Captain Hrcwer 
who tlid most of the ground-gaining 
in the first half, was given the ball, 
and Holy t loss was unable to resist 
his plunge until he was well over the 
goal line. 

Melican showed grnxl jiulgmeiit in 
running the team and ran back his 
punts excellently. I he stellar, all- 
round iM!rf«»rmance of Hiewer was 
one of the featiirea of the game. 
"Ued" Darling was always ready 
when called upon and his Hiiccessive 
gains totaling forty yanls in the third 
quarUr was admirable. 

Though lacking in '< "" work, 
individual Holy Cn.ss tmn stoo<l imt 
strongly. Rogers was iIm- star of the 
backfield, hisiUxIgingaroiind left end 
in the third quarter and passing 
tackle after Uickle until he wiia 
downed on the seven-yard line Indng 
the prettiest single run «»f the game. 
Ostergreii was the most brilliant and 
consistent of their players, and his 
defensive work at tackle waa proba- 
bly om r>f til. Iiardr'at prr»jH»silion8 
til. Aggie forwards will have to con- 
tiii.l with the re...t of the season. 
O'Hrien an.l Hrawley also tlid well 
for the losers. 

While the game was characterized 
by much roiiglin«-ss, only two penal- 
ties were inciirre.l. During the third 



i 



The College Signal, Tuesdajr, October 7, 1913. 




H 






<liiflrter O'Brien, who liad been taken 
out ill tlicsecoiiil period was icplaced. 
The rule !»ook di8tiiietly states tiiat a 
man taken out can only l»e reiilaced 
at the Iteginning of a subsequent 
<|uarter or at any time in the fourth 
ptM-iod. For this infringenient, Holy 
Cross hjst half the distance t<» the 
goal-line, netting the Aggies thirty- 
six yards. 

About sixty undergraduates at- 
tended the game, and though sonif of 
them "fumied" it. the ninaindcr, 
with the alumni present, bunched 
together and formed a stniiig cheer- 
ing section. The game in detail : 

Mullen began the ganit- by kicking 
off to Hrewer who retiniie<l tlie ball 
fifteen yards to the thirty -yar<l line. 
After a down without gain he punted. 
Mullen fumbled but recovered on his 



advanced fifteen yards, but was 
tackled so fiercely that he fumbled 
and the ball went to Aggie, lieing 
unable to penetrate the Holy Cross 
line Captain Brewer essayed a for- 
ward pass, which was intercepted by 
Ilolv Cross. O'Brien immediatelv 
kicked out of danger. 

Then began Darling's successive 
plunges down the held for ten and 
liftcen yanls at a clip. His ability 
to throw off tacklers and pick his 
holes well classes him as one of the 
best bucks Aggie ever bail. 

An exchange of punts followe<l. 
With the liall on Aggie's twenty-eight 
yard line, the illegal substitution of 
O'Brien resulted in Holy Cross being 
penalized half the distance to her 
goal line. Brewor tried a drop kick, 
but thf ball fell a little short of the 



The College Signal, Taesda/, October 7, 1913 



thirty-live yard line. Darling landed ! goal post. The ipiarter ended with 
I^>e, who came through center, au<l 
Holy Cross kicketl out of liounds. 
A punting duel foUowed. with Aggie 
easily su|M>rior. Holy Cross fumbled 
and H>lgert<»n nailed .McCabe for a 
fifteen-yard loss. After more punt- 
ing. Brewer made gains of live and 
ten yards through right tackle A 
forward pjiss to Fldgcrton was suc- 
cessful for ten yards, but a second 
attempted |iass was incomplete As 
it was the last down. Captain Brewer 



thi' liall on Holy Cross's eleven-yard 
line. 

KnirKTII ^il AIMKK. 

The fourth quarter opened with a 
kicking duel between Bogers and 
Brewer, with Brewer having a shade 
the lietter of the argum«>nt. During 
this quarter Holy Cross's offence 
strengthemMl and O'Brien and Rogers 
made several long gains, but the sub- 
stitution of Nissen in the Aggie back- 
tield was all that was needed and the 



fell back for a heUI goal at a dilHcidti ,. , . .■ , 

f. . rurple team was at no time danger 

angle. 1 ins was bl(Mke«l and the 

ball changed liandH. The quarter 



endeil with the liall on Holy Cross's 
eleven-yard line. 

-K <>M> vl AKTKK. 

When play was resumed, O'Brien 



ous during the rest of the game. 

The whistle blew for the end of the 
game with the bull in Aggie's |>osses- 
aion in her own territory, and Aggie 
had won, O-U. 

No one individual man was res|K>n 



punted for forty-live yanls and Meli- sible for the victory, unless it be 
can ran it ba«k twenty yanls. | Coach Brides, whose system is just 

Brewer. Palmer and Darling advanced iKjginnih^ lo show its merits. The 

the ball to the Ihirty-rue yani line, whole team played as a unit. The 

Then came the f«M ward jiass. Brewer backliehl, c«»n»lsting of Captain 

to Baker, whl<h was one of the neat- Brewer, Palimr and Darling, with 

est plays of the game ami which .Melican directing the play, proved to 

gained twenty yanls. Ancahcr for- ; Im! one of the stnuigest olTensive ami 

wanl pass was intercepted, l«ut defensive combinations the <ollege 

K^Igerton caught the ball as it UMUMed has yet pro«liice<l. Baker an<l Strong 

off a I'lirple back for four yards gain, pn.ved bulwarks on the defeme and 

rainier added four yanls moie but many «»f our largest gains were due to 

fumbled. Again tlie M.u.kmi team their splendUl interference. Holy 

was t<io quick for her opponents and Cn>»s was unable to gain anmnd 

recovered the ball. Brewer tore either lUlgerton or .Ionian, most of 

an.uiHl end and the only sctue of the their end runs being driven into the 

game was m.nde. The captiin missiMl : side-lines. Curran was in practically 

the kiik for goal only by inches. every play, an<l Dole and Schlotter- 

Metivier received the kick-off ami lieck played their usual game 
ran with it through nearly the whole 
Aggie team before he was downed by 
Curran. Time was taken out for 
Strong, whose head, injured in the 
Dartmouth game, had not fully 
rec«)vered. It was due to Strong's 
consistent and hani tackling that 



Holy Cross's delayetl passes through 
center were successfully held in check. 
lloI\ Ciiiss tJH'ti clianged her tiictics 
and Kogers made a neat crisscross 
tackle around end. reaching the seven, 
yard line. The Aggie line proved 
impregnable and Ostergren attempted 
a dn>p kick, but it went wide and 
time was called. 

THIRO V' ARTER. 

Ostergren received the kick-off and 



The line-up : 
M. A. ( . 
lidgerton, le 
Curran, It 
Strong, Terry, ig 
Dole, c 



IIOI.V (ROSS. 

re, Capl. Metivier 

rt, Calnll 

rg. Hunt, Haggcrty 

c, Hrawley 



Makcy, rg Ig, Magerty, Cogan. ()"Keefe 
Schlolterbetk, rt It, Ostergren 

Jordan, Plaisted, re le, McCabe 

Melican, qb qh, Mullen, Carey 

Capt. Brewer, llili rhb, Lee 

Oarling, rlih Ihb, O'Mrien, Rogers 

Talmer. Ni.ssen, fb fb. Donavan, Dolan 
Score — M. A. C. 6, Holy Cross o. 
Touchdown — Hrewer. Referee — Hutler 
of Brown. Cmpire— Foley of Amherst. 
Head linesman — I'ugh of Germantown 
academy. Time— four lo-minute periods. 



If we have a few more celebrations, 
wjxkI will certainly be at a premium. 



HERMAN'S U.S.ARI»Y 
SERVICE BLUGHER 

In Tan Willow Calf or 

Ciiin Mi'tul. A huuil- 

soine, snappy shoe 

untliuOrtliopeilic 

last, desipueii by 

army Hur^jeons. 

Vou never Hiiw 

a shoe like it 

for wear, cor 

fort and 

sty it 

Single 
sole <»l 
Toxas iin- 
sc<»iir«'(Ioak >'<i.\ 
toe, solo leatluT 
cuiiiilerM,t-v«'ry part 
inM|H'ct(><l. l.iniii<r of 
8p«'cially testeil drill. A S<did 
leather slioe that will Kivetlu' 
wear of Hic civilian siioo that 
.si'lls for))«l. This is one of I lie 
shoes I iicle Sam l»ii\sforiiis 
soMiers. IT'S A WOIM.O 
1S1:AT1:U. see the Arm \ line. 




HERMAN'S U.S. 
ARMY SHOES 




I«ast.s <lrsi|jlU'tl Ji\ 

AICMY Snr. 

gcons. Miiteiial.-. 

aietllO best that 

can be ul)tainiMl. 

WorhniJinshiji 

i ti s p e o t V (1 

and gnar- 

aiiteed. 



No. 968 

GARRISON 

BLUCHER. 

<>ii« of tho most jMiftid.ir 
in tlio Army I. inc. M.t.'f in Tan Wll- 
low <'nlf'aiii| <ilill Meliil. IIpunv 
siiii;li' s>ilf, Imx ic"-. M»lid leather 
tliMiiKlioiit. A han(ii4uinesiiH|»|tyshoe. 
Ciilin" ill 111 >.<••• till- lini-. M.inuf:iil mill 

only l>\ Josr|i'i M. llrrmaMiVCo.. BqnIoii. 



PRICE S4.00 



PRICE $4.00 



PAGES SHOE STORE 



THE 

Hoover & Smith Go. 

6t6 Chestnut St.. Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 

PMIidelpUis Official Fratinlti Jeweler 

SPBOIALISTS IN 

Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 
Rings, Charms ..... Prizes Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

Rings, Charms.-. 

E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass 
OrricB II0UKS: 



Che 
Pheasant 

Binit^ St., 
Smbcr«t 

TeWphon* 470 

RMtAKPAST 

1.»1N< IIK>|i( 
ArT¥.ntHM>N TEA 

Ilinnrr if ^nu^fed lot. 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 



Nnw at ijl PWaMliI St. 



Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Kroken Lenses Accurately Replaced 
Fine Watch Repairing Promptly and 
Skilfully Done 



SatisfactKin (^ii'arantced 



A Chance to Save Money 

A $5.00 SafotY Razor for $5.00 

Hut we give you a coupon which when signed with your 
n<tme and home address we refund you $3.50. It carries 
the Rexall guarantee, " Money back if not satisfied." 

We carry a full line of 

Waterman, Conklin and Moore's Fountain 

Pens, Stationery, Pipes, Tobacco 

and Cigarettes. 

Li^^ett's, Belle Meade and Green Seal Chocolates 



THE HENRY ADAMS CO., Druggists 



The REXALL Store 



ON THE CORNER 



ANNIVERSARY DAY. 

[( (iiitimied from i>iiRe i 1 

,.iilv :iiid amount of fxercise de»ive<l 
us a u'snlt. 

Mr. ('. A. (lleusonof SininglU'ld, 
Iht' iiiesidiug ollicor »if the hoard of 
inistees, hrietly docrihed his appoiiit- 
iiHiit to tho lioard h\ (iovcrnor 
A 11108 twenty-four years ago. He 
welcomed "riexy" haok from Ku- 
Kjpe. Hiid extended his siiicerest 
gieetings to the men of this year. 
H»' deolared it to he an actual joy to 
h;ao the present facility on the cam- 
|uis, and expressed congratulations 
..II the prospects for Aggie 

Ml. (>*|)onnell of Northampton, 
»Ui<» has just Ihoii appointed to the 
hoard of tnistoos, was called upon 
fur an ••inlKHluclioii" Hpoech. Mr. 
(V|>«>nnell sahl that he wan not an 
Aggie graduate hud never atten<lod 
the college — and had not seen it for 
vcuirt. "Hut," he ^aid ipiite eiii- 
pliaticiilly, 'this college shall have 
llie t'ost that 18 in me just as long as 
I ;iiii it lueiiilierof the Hoard of Trus 
tee«." Mr. O'Donnell further olTered 
his assistance to aiiv sliideiit at any 
time it might he desired. 

|)tlliiiai W. Jones 'H, descrihed 
I in- origin and Hiihse«pient use of this 
Aral's watchwuitl '•llooKt (Md Aggie" 
hv lii» class, and also rel.iled hrielly 
for what activities M. A. (' is known 
among her contenipoiarics andaiiunig 
Ihc p<*<»ple «if the state and elsewheie. 

••I'n \\ . " ;i> the last speaker do- 



fined ''Aggie's joh " lie said in suh- 
stance : "Wonder has often heen 
expressed as to what is the real pur- 
pose of this college as ditToring frtim 
other colleges — what oilier idea it has 
hesides merely teaching agiiciiltiire 
and suhjectB allied to it. In other 
words, what is Aggie's joh ? This 
college is the chihl, the ward of the 
state. A ipiurter of a miili<m dollars 
a year are not spent on it every year 
in«U(ler that live hundred or a thou- 
sand men may have an education at 
the exi>ense of the people of the 
whole state. The c«»llege is an out- 
growth of u desire of the national 
governiiiont to foster this type of c<»l- 
lege. and it has one great fuudameii- 
tal, umlerlyiug piir|»o8e— lo serve the 
interests of the rural peo|»le of the 
state, no matter how. t>r hy what 
metluxls. Tho graduates of this col- 
lege must make the I onimonwoalth 
'the people* the full heneliciaries. 
The tusk of training you men is a 
ilelinite task, ami you should utilize 
your talents for the heiiolit of your 
communities You are in training 
now to lie great leaders whether in 
agriculture or in something else, and 
you should forever have in your 
hearts the high hieals which I lielieve 
you have." 

The singing of "Sons of Old 
.Mass\husetts" closetl tlie program 

There will Ik- a hiaiik page in the 
I'.tla //.</• J- the fieshinuii pictni* 
prc»vo«l an utt«r failure ' 




THE 
SMOOTHEST 



EVERY heahman wants to ttart right. 
Put him next lo Velvet— the college 
MDoke. It's the real, lime-matured 
loijacco with a smooth, 

dclighliul flavor - a i^K\^ / ^ 

taste that never palls ^IPO / I 

on you — doesn't bum ^^ " ' 

hoU 

Vel»el tt tupetb tobacco — 
•ged two yean — an ideal 
•Hake. TcNiav — loinonow 
— whenever you do smoke 
iu (Hal day vtill biing you 
• new vetsioQ of pipe pica<- 
ur?. You will become- • 
Vel»eiari«n. Juil keep il 
ia niad. At all dealett. 



4^fy4jr«>4^M4A^^iAM)co Cb: 




\ TOBACCO 



Mackinaws 




AND 



Sweaters 



This \» Mackinaw and Sweater season. Football, Golf and 
all other Fall ami Winter sports call for ^ood Sweater pro- 
tection. We have in >l<Hk tiMl.ix srxti.il IuiikIhiI Maiki- 
naws in all ^rade.s. 



The famous .Summit brand, well known in the Northwest 
and at kin»wlcd;;eil to be one of the btsl. Coat Sweaters, 
the Shawl Collar, Coat Collar and the rc-^idar shape 
Sweaters, all tlie best sellinfj; colors. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



School ana College Pbotosrapbers . « . 




UDIO 



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and South Hadlcy, Mass. 



Main OrKtce: 

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Tliene StuditM ntfcr the IwM »kilied 
arliata i«nd m«>»t mmplrtr 

r>|iM|>nifiii i>lii.iinahle 



Wi; SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 

In .so far as our benefits are mutual. 

Tilt AMHERST CAS COMPANY 

Elverything Ellectrical 



MflPRTS $25$ 






FOUNTAIN PEN 
Minimize your fountain pen 

m^ troubles by owning a Moore'n. C. It l« the 

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C Its strenftth Ues in its very simplicity. Nothlna 
finlky to ftet ou t of order. C You can djve your- 
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Adam*, Cuahlnft & FoMer. Srillnft Aftrnta ^ 

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ii 
ii 




The College Signal, Tnesday, October 7. 1913- 



The College Signal. Toetdajr. October 7, 1913- 






THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural Colleg;e. 



BOABD OP KDIT0B8. 

CHRSTKR K. Wll KKLKR 'u, Kditor In-Chief 
FKANK W. HrKI.J. 'IS, ManaRing Kfiitor 

HAROI.D C. BLACK 'u, Conii>i'titi.in Kditor 
IIAROI.O |. CLAY "14. Assistant Kditor 

STUART B. FOSTFCR 'u, Athletic Kditor 

ERVINK F. FAKKKR'u, Alumni Kditor 

J, ALBKKT FRICK'15. Athletic Kditor 

GEO. E. DONNKI.L 'i5, Departnit-nt Flditor 
EARLE S. DRAPER '15. Campus Editor 

TVI.ER S. ROGERS '16. Associate Editor 

CHARLES W. CURTIN'16. Associate Editor 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT- 
ERNEST S. CLARK, IR. '14. Hus. Manager 
MAI'RICE J. CLOrCH 'i;. Ass't Bus. Mgr. 
ERNEST F. L'FTON '14, Advertising Manager 
W. RlCIIARl) SEAKS'15. Asst. Adv. Manager 
CIIAS. A. HUNTINCtTON, J R.'ifi. Circulation 

Subscription $1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable 
to Ernest S. Clahk, Jr. 

Enl«r*d u Mcond-cteM matter at tha AmherW 
PMt Offtea. 

Vol. XXIV. Tuesday, Oct. ?• No. 4 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

[Notices for this column should be dropped in 
theSl(;NAL Office or handed to Earle S. Draper 
•15, on or before the Saturday preceding each 
issue. 1 



Oct 



8 — 1-10 V. M., Assembly, Act- 
ing Pn'sident K. M. Lewis; 
Htiideiit muss meeting. 
9_6.4r) V. M., M. A. C. C. A. 
chapel. 

11_6-;J0 V. M., Drillhall, Social 
Union, to be announcetl. 

14— 7-<H> i: M., South College, 
Stockltridge club. 

lii — Asseuibly, riesident Alex- 
ander Meiklejohn. Amherst 
college. 



«« Boost Old Aggie.*' 

F«»im-six years old I Young in 
years, but old in traditions, Aggie 
has sent her graduates forth to do 
her honor. During all these years, 
the sons of t)l<l Mass'chiisttts have 
with might an«l main striven to 
"lJ«»ost Ohl Aggie," and their work 
is appreciated by those who now live 
on her campus as undergraduates. 
Here's lung life, and an evtr inn eas- 
ing pros^ieril^^ U> her ! 



It has been the custom for some 
time past, to have suggested at the 
fH'ginntng of the session, a metlnMl 
whereby confusion in rising for 
chapel singing might l»e eliminated. 
Adherence to some definite methoti 
woidtl greatly improve the conditicins 
as they now exist. We woidd 
respectfidly stiggest the primiple 
mode use of in former years. 
In substance, this was that 
the senior class rises tis a 
unit, this being the signal for 
all the other classes to stand up. It 
has always worked well, and it would 
be just as gooil this year. 



The Tufts game is some weeks 
ahead, but it is not too eaily to begin 
to think of this contest, which has be- 
con\e our other "big" game. Last year 
200 men out of .'»00 went to Medford 
ami supported the team in excellent 
shape, 'i'his year, there should be 
twice 2<>0. i'he cheer leader, with- 
out doubt, will bt-able to secure very 
reasonable rales, and every one 
shouUl, as the saying goes, "beg. 
borrow, or steal" the money to get 
there. If no other means is avail- 
able, the time-lionore<l "sitle-dmjr 
pullman," which has carrieil football 
enthusiasts before, can be made to 
do duty again. Hegin to save now, 
and when the time tonus. if necessary 
sell your old coat, but at all events 
(;() to the game. 

And "woe is me" is heani no more. 



CAMPUS NOTES 
Varsity cross country practice will 
start in a few days 

The old l»ell rang for twenty min- 
utes Saturday night I 

'Thontas Lincoln Harrocks HMO of 
Westminster has pledged Sigma Phi 
Kpsilon. 

The first meeting of the Land- 
scape art club t>ccurred on Tuesday 
evening. 

Men wishing to get pictmes of 
the Dartmouth game should see 
Choate '17. 

The |iictine of the I'.H."'.-! J Si.;nai. 
BoanI will be taken on Weilne»<^lay 
morning at White's studio in 
Northampton. 

The first "Wax Tread" of the sea- 
son <x'curre«l in the Drill hall on 
Saturday night. These stag iufiMm- 
als are well attemled. 

The college store might tlo well to 
get in a supply of pedometers in 
anticipation of the long distance con- 
test for the Bowker prize. 

Bonfires and parades are certainly 
becoming a fashion. The football 
team is living up l<i the M. A C. 
motto of "Itoost Old Aggie" in fine 
style. 

Several students have l)een think- 
ing of forming an Italian club along 
the lines of tin- ("erele Krancais. 
All interested are requested to see 
Dunuis '17. 

North Dorm has been honored with 
a new cork bulletin boanl in West 
entry. Now that we have a decent 
looking "sign" Iioard, let us use it 
with snflicient care. 

On Sunday night. North Dorm ser- 
enaded South College. The 'east 
said the better— if there was as 
mticli music as noise in North we 
would have some band I 

Kntries in the fall doubles tennis 
tournament comprise about thirty 
players. The first round must be 
finished by Oct. ^. The finals, as 
planned, come about Oct. 2;'). 

The Norwich game, which was to 
come on Oct. 1^. the afternoon of 
the second informal, was cancelled 
by Norwich due to the sad death of 
one of the men on the team. It is 
generally understood on campus that 
the annual Sophomore-Freshman foot- 
ball game is to come on this date. 



The "Heave ! Heave !" of practis- 
ing teams is again silenced for a 
year. However, there still remains 
the scarred campus as a reminder of 
those mighty struggles in the ilark- 
ness ! 

The band is doing some real prac- 
tising these days, with the idea of 
"Boosting Old Aggie" at the Tufts 
game. Captain Tarbell promises 
some real uiusic, and contemplates 
secret practise in the near future I 

The loyal cheering of the small 
band of Aggie supporters at the 

LOHT— On the campus. Oct. 3, a Bronie Medal 
from a Watch F..b The medal prosciiptuin Is 
"Proficiency in Shooting:" National Ritle Asso- 
ciation on the reverse side. Fleaie return to oHice 
or to Wm. C. Sahctuakv 'la. 



Clark '15 



Eldridge '14 



All Student Supplies 

M. A. C. STORE 

BANNERS AND POSTERS 

CANOY TONIC 



Montajjue '15 



Hager '16 



QNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

KKUI'I.AK srSOAV SKKVICK AT 7 V U. 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest lint in 
the state outside of Boston. 



Seeourlineof Drill Shoes 

E. RUSSELL NORTON $2.00 tO $4.00 

1 



SALES AGRNT 



Davenport Miller 
Vein Coal 

Best Qualny Pennsylvania Coal 



MODERN REPAIR 
DEPARTMENT 



E.M.BOLLES 

ON VOUM %»^AV TO R. O ) 



BOSTON OFFICE 

85 Water St. 



NEW VOKK (iKFUK 

I Broadway 



■_0%V PRICE TAILORING CO. 

SL ITS MADE TO ORDER 
Suits Cleaned. Pressed and Dyed. All kinds of 
Hepairihs for Ladies and Gentlemen neatly done. 
Ilish crude work by first-class tailor. Work 
called for and delivered. .Sell tickets for pressing, 
4 aillTS FOK |i.$o 

GEORGE KOTOWITZ. Rl»Of». 

Main Mreet, Amherst. Mass. Nash Hlock 

On your way to the Fosi ( >lfice. Tel. 43*-W 



Cookp's l>otcl 

Springfield, Mass., 

Solicits the patronage of the Su 
dents of the Agricultural Colh ;;e 
to class dinners and individually. 



THE KATHERINE E. McCLELLAN STUDIO 

44 State St., Northampton, Mass. 

PORTRAITS — GROUPS — YIEUS 

Insist upon seeing our college work and prices before decidi ^ 



Call or Tklkpiionk 131 



II C10H8 game was noticctible for 
i„l»" ami college spirit. It is 
„. ,|,iiit llmt Aggie men are sliow- 
i,i tliis vear that rushes their teams 
.i.i.t to the finish. 

Iho Sophs again demonstrated 
tf„ii ability with the "eord" when 
tljcv won from the freshmen by a 
jr.MKi two feet. Kxperiome certainly 
Tlks count a lot in these rope pulls. 
Ill, honors in cross country were 
, luiietl away hv '16. 

( .iptain Sherman of the varsity 
!,.,Ml»all team issued the first call for 
fn oilman candidates. About I.') 
imii reported for practise on Satiir- 
,Ij,v iiioniing. Hahcm-k, Dowd. 
Il.irrington, Hunnewell and IMcaid 
.liuwed up well in practise. 

All fellows having lioxes at the col- 
I. u« post-olIJce wotild confer a favor 
,,h llie Amherst authorities and inci- 
.1, iilally save them a g«KMl hit of 
(iMiil.le, by having mail achlressed 
liiiectly to the college with their 
I, .-jieclive box iiumber.«t in plain view. 
Sunday morning a host of sharp- 
>li,«,Urh and rille exiHMts assembled 
oil the south sitle of North Dorm, 
where a young partridge was flirting 
»itli Whitney's parrot. After a 
iiiiss country run iii wUksh 'lO'n 



hound fignretl, the biril was finally 
caught. 

There seems to be a host of track 
material in the freshman class. Un- 
der the guidance of Coach Whittier a 
8<piad of track men are seen [iractis- 
ing each night. Now is the time to 
'•btM)8t track"— get out antl show j 
what you've got. One freshman 
showed up rather well in Cross 
Country. 

The stock-judging team, consist- 
ing of Clegg, Davis and Taylor, 
returnetl Thuis<lay night from the 
Hirnkton fair. Although fifth place 
WHS the best they were able to 
secure, I'lof. Mcl.*an was satislletl 
in view of the fa<t that there was 
only 1:5 points diflfereiue in the sror- 
ing among our men. 

A shelf of '*li<M>krt on College Life 
for College Men" has been set apart 
III the College library. Among the 
titles are "Why go to College" by 
Cooser. "The College Man and the 
College Woman" hy I'lesitlent H\de 
of I^owdoin, "The Keal College' by 
President Ik-ntoii of Vermont, and 
"i'he Care and Culture of Men" by 
.Ionian. There arc also some l»o«»ks 
on the gieal universities, self help 
ami self culture. 



1. M. LABROVITZ, Custom Tailor 

Fashions, Fit. First Class Work Guaranteed 

I atge ««orlment on hand C.KNT'S J-'H^^'^"' ^;u•ks'^1 MTS ^''•"*'" '"^ 
Dre«» Sliirm CIcaninu and I'reMing DKKSSSIIIN 
TO KINT. Militaiy Collars and (jloven 

II AMITY ST., Telephone 302-W. AMHERST, MASS. 



** Keeping in Front " 

You fellows know what that means! 
We've been very successful in ihis 
regard with Fatima Cigarettes. By 
the way, rfiese cigarettes were firrt 
sold in the coUecc towns — and you 
agreed with us that they were good. 

Then we put out foi* the biff race, 
to make Fatimas of nation-wide rep- 
utation, and today more are sold than 
any other cigarette in this country. 

No purer, or more carefully chosen 
tobacco grows than that in t atimas. 
We purposely put them in a plain 
inexpensive wrapper — in this way 
we can afford quality tobacco, and 
twenty of the smokes for 1 5 cents. 

Now your college crew is of utmost 



ood 
life 



importance to you — so is a g 
cigarette, and it's your aim in Iile 
to keep Fatimas in the lead —right 
up to their good quality — right up 
to where you first found them, and 
will always find them. 

Success fellows I You started mis 
cigarette on 'ts successful career 
and you pull a strong oar all over 
this coimtry. 




TUOUatBLUtD 

aCARETTES 



20/&rl5< 




-ru^mHir^ hJlrithimi' 



The Weakest Link or Limiting Factor 

There are fields that contain an abundance of jwtash on analysis, 
but on which crops fail if thev are not supplied with avmhiHe potash, 
and the same is true if available phosphorus is Kicking. 

We are all familiar with the limiting factor in crop production, 
namely, the weakest link in the chain of fertility. One never kiiow.s 
when one has reached the limiting factor, the weakest link ; one never 
knows when one has exhausted the available phosphorus or the avail 
able p<.tash. or the available nitrogen until crc.ps fail to respond. Atter 
a farmer has harvested a bumper crop he has taxed all the links ii.the 
chain of fertility, but which one is nearest the breaking point he drn^s 
not know; therefore, if he is wise he applies at least all three of the 
leading elements of fertility in some shape, either in the b>rm of stalile 
manure, green crops or commercial fertilizers, or all combined (which 
latter is the better plan), knowing that any excess which he may have 
applied will not be lost out of the reach of crops, if a rational system 
of rotation wilh deep-rooted and shallow rcM,ted crops is practised, in 
eluding cover crops. Moreover, these undoubtedly promote bacteiial 
growth in the soil, which, according to Hall, may be the limiting factor. 

Study the Plant Food problem 

Many have "an" answer 
''The" answer will be worth while 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER COMPANY 
43 Chatham St., Boston 




A. 




MEN'S STORE 



Use our new cash discount card 

AND SAVE FIVE PER CENT ON 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 



ONE DOZ^EN 



PATRICK MACKINAWS 

GIVEN AWAY 

Absolutely .It lost. We are doinj; this to introdiHc i., y«.u the 

jrtnuinc and ori^jinal Patrick Diilulh Mackinaw.s made Irom hm^ 

libre Northern wool, nature s re.sistance to cdtl, wind and moisture. 

This Dozen Mackinaws will be .sold h. iwcen the hours of 

SIX AND TEN 

SATURDAY EVENING, Oct. 11th, ONLY 



CAMPION'S STORES 



AMHEIRST 



DARTMOUTH 



r 

■ 



The College Signal, Tuesday. October 7, 1913. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 7, 1913. 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

jobliers of WronKlit Iron .iiid lii »ns I'lpe, Valves 
and KitliiiKs for Steiini. Water uinl (iai, Asljrstos 
aixi MagiieMa Holler and Hi|>e Coveiiii(;<i, I'ipe 
Cut to Sketch. Mill Siipidies. Kii(>iieers and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot W'^tei Heating. 
Automatic Sprinkler Systenjs. Koilei ^ind i-'iiuiie 
Connections. - Holyoke, Mass. 



T^EACHERS Exchange 

Of Boiton 1 20 lioylttoH iV. 

Recotnmeniis Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



(^arp^n-ter & AAorehous^, 

PRINTET^S, 



No I, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mau. 



II 



Students A.ttention ! ! ! 

We are ready at the start to furnish you with a fine 
line of Campus and Fraternity iiuiise Views, also Post 
Cards. Kodak work given prompt and careful attention. 
Knlarging and picture framing given our personal at- 
tention. See us about (Iroups and Portraits for the very 
best woik. 



Satisfaction Guaranteed, 
the Square Deal Studio 



Patronize 



KINSMAN'S COLLEGE STUDIO 



NasK DlocK. AmHerst 




H. M. R<>«:ers, '15. Agent. 
87 Pleasant St., 



Studio Phone 303-2. 



ti 



GRAND SWEEPSTAKES TROPHY 



(1750.00 Sterling Silver Cup) 
r OR 



BEST STATE EXHIBIT OF POTATOES 



AT THE 

New York Land Show 
ifit 

WON SY 

The L L. Cleveland Company 

HOULTON. Me. 

/^NE of the largest and most 
. reliahle seed potato houses 
in the United States. Competi- 
tion open to the entire United 
States and Canada. Messrs. E. L. 
Cleveland Company also won the 
First Prize for Best County Exhibit 
ol Potatoes. (Silver Cup valued 
at $200.00.) 
The E. L. Cleveland Company use 

L FRANK COE 
FERTILIZERS 



E. Frank Coc Fertilizers have 
been the business farmer's favorite 
for over fifty-five years. Why not 
follow the example of these lead- 
ing commercial potato growers. 

Ten »"rH» 10 I mill "The Siort of A PniflltiMv Pnlaln 
Cr'>/>" Mrlltrnhy an ArtHt.lmth ('•«nt}. Main* hrmrr 




The Coe-Mortimer Company, 



51 CHAMBERS STREET. 
NEW YORK. N. Y. 



A big bonfire, plenty of enthusi- 
iiHiu, nn<l the ever [)resent band and 
rillt>nien were some of the things 
which helped to make the celebration 
of the Holy Cross victory uieniuralile. 
Ah soon h8 news of the win was 
received the class captains startetl 
the bonfire, which was lighteil just 
before the close of the inforihtd. 
When the lire had <lie<l down a <lele- 
gatioii nj.'irclied down town, gather- 
ing strength all the way until it num- 
bered close to 4(M> men. While wait- 
ing for the team the townspeople 
were treated to snake dances, cheers 
and Hongs. On the arrival of the 
s»jiiad a large delegation accompan- 
ie<l tliem to the campus where n final 
cheer ended one of the !l<•>^l rtl( |pi;i- 
tions in ve.nrs. 



COMMUNICATION 

(Cvininunicationft (a th« i>tGM.%L concviiitnv 
UMtt rs of Keneral jnleieHt are welcoHtd llie 
Sk.n.m. i<> nut to In Iteld resiMiiisible for tlie 
opiiiiont tliUN expiessed.) 

Ki»rroi{>, CoLLK).!-, .*W<.N\i., 
(tf'iitfemt'u : 

I nt>tice in ytMir last issue that we 
have H new trustee appointed to 
the college, but we fail lo find any- 
where ill your pajHT any notice of the 
ra«-t that tw«> of our present board 
of tiUHlecH have been reappointerl. 
naniely. W. if. KoMkerof Ilie class 
of '71. :in<i (Jeoige II. Klli^ ><\' \\ r>i 
Xewtoii. It certainly -< i ni- to me 
as if yoM liarl made :iii oiiii»ion. 

.Mr. KIlis h.-is now bt-eii :tp|Niiiited 
for the lliinl lime .'is :i tni?«te«-, and 
III- li:i> .ilwriys rendered t«» the college 
most faitlifiil. loy:il, and entiiii>iaslic 
HiTxire, :ind to iiuiiiy students he Ii:ih 
lieeii more lliuii :i fiieiiil. As th<- 
l.ngesl d.-iin Mi:iii in New Kngl.-ind it 
not ill the eoiiiitiy, i»wiiing nearl\ 
six huiidi«-d cattle, and as the head 
of one of oiii huge piililishing lK»use!<, 
he has gi\en t<» the c«»llege the expe- 
rieiKf of a widely diversified kn(»w- 
ledge in liolh .•igricidtiind. eiliua- 
tioiinl :iiiil liii>>iii('s<« iiielhoils. :iii<| it 
cii l:iliil\ Minis 111 liir \oii li:i\r iiijide 

an oiiiissioii ill not speaking of his 
reappointment. 

'••Vgiiie" has again Ihh'H honor*-*! 
Iiy the reapptiiiitiiK'iit of .Mr. Kowker 
to the position of triiHtee for he cer- 
tainly has u rerord of which an\ 
iii.-iii may well be proud. Knlering 
in l?<C.7asa memlH-r of (he pioneer 
riass, he li:is up to the present time 
been active .is .1 student, as an 
alumnus, and :is a member of the 
Itoanl of trustees. I'liis is the fifth 
time that he has iniii app«>inted afi n 
memlter of the board of trustees, 
which surely is an honor th.it has 
been exteinleii to \iiy few men in 
their connection witii academic insti- 
tutions. 

You ask for alumni mites. I .semi 

yoM this :is one. 

Yours very tiiiiy. 

MaiU'os llrvKii;. 

( Ins-, of '7.1. 
( It ha-- liccii llic I iisloin of this 
paper to announce new :ip[>oiiitmenls 
to the lioard of trustees, but not re- 
appointments, while uiiiler orilinaiy 
coixliiion.H a man well appointerl is 
iontiiiued in olfice until iii- ileatli or 
voluntary withdrawal. I hat is the 
reason for the .ipiciunt omis- 
sion. — Kds. ) 



SIX MAN PULL 

The sophomore class tidded ain h, 1 
defeat to the freshmen's growiii;. Ijsi 
Saturday afternoon, when the ai, iiial 
rope-pull wjis held. After tiute 
minutes of pulling the "Suplis" 
had two feet and three inches of 
freshman ro[ie on their side. The 
contest was given a bit of color 'v u 
large number of feminine visitois 
who later attended the informal. 

l)ickinson '10 lireil the staiiiii" 
gun an<l each team droppetl sinmlta- 
nously The sophomore teamgiiiiKij 
one foot of roi>e on the tlro|i ;uh| 
gained steadily during the gnat. 
imrt of the three minutes. I>uriiii> 
the last few seconds the frehliiiieo 
team gained some I'f their Icwt 
ground The men of both t< uir- 
were in g<MMl condition, all twelvt- 
appearing fresh at the finish. 

The teams lined up as follows! 

1910, 1^1, 

Hisbee, (Capt.) i* apt.) Tui l< 



Danfoitli 




Kirtk 


(f;«vciit.i 




IWyrt 


Jeione 




Hraine' 


II cks 




f.ton 


Utidi-e 




I ' 1 >» >ii 


OflTi i.ils; 


r»nu*r!*— U 1. 


l'l"«fls 1, 


1) (;. "I'l.Mt 


1 1 J Si.iitn - 1. 


. i>tikifti><. 


'10: Kcli It. 


1 1 W I'tiu-x ■ 


M 



FRhSHMAN Ft)OTBALL 

Williston Seminary ojHMieil it- 
season .Saturday with a victory i>\.< 
M .\. C. fli'shnieii The fieshiiH n 
IttM-ame "stage struck " :ind oiilv f<ir 
a few moments dining the third •|ii;c 
ter shtiwed any eonlideiice in tin 11 
selves. Williston sc«ired their fit-' 
toiiehdown after eight miiiiiii « ■' 
play. With the seoie 11-0 al llw 
iMginiiing of the third peri<Hl ItMT 
rushed the b.-dl down the ttei>l 
siieees»tioii of line plnnges rni:ill 
He«>iiiig .a toiiehdowu. After fl i- 
Williston t<M»k the game in iL-iti' 
again and easily eluded the fir-t v* ' 
men. In ilic la-i few hhhik i '- ' 
play tiarviii, right halfback for NVii- 
listrm, drop kicked a pretty i£<>:)l 
fi«»in the .'?."i-yanl line. 

The line-nil : 



will 1 > 1 1 1 s 


M A. r 1- 


(.'ll.lphUlli. k- 


!• , 1 l.nriitf. Sii»»» 


l.arly. It 


It, i;.i 


Culliiis, Ig 


rg. 


Kyan, c 


f, hlilUi'l' 


Dcvimiey, t^; 


Ig, < t-tt- ! 


(iiady, >t 


It. nir.i 


Campbell, re 


jr, M..-. 


Sweeney, qb 


qli, M^ili 


Lin. 1. 11,1. 


rMi. 1' -k-i-'f 


( ,AT\ ill, llll> 


111 1, < . 


Fi.iley. fb 


fl.. (.1 -v»'<l 



Sciire Willis o'l ?.•<, .M. A. < '7 " 
Touclilnwitsi !'irk.4r(l, ('ampl"'' i 
Finley , <■ i.ii-- ir.im tiiiu;li<|i' ■ 
viii J. < ' tniplu'l, Huiti'ik. (ioui luro 
lu-lii -f".,ii\iii. .S.ilcMv l'\ M"' '" 
pile -Kelly of [).irimi)iii li I 
Sliirk (if .Svr.iciisf. I.iiifsiiifn 
I inn, kulicr. I'iine it miniiti' i ""^ 



Professor Seals judged d '' 
Palmer on the .Ul. and at Nor' ^'H'l'' 
ton on the Isl of October, h '«'''' 
cases, he was a<(onipaiii 
students who are candidale* 
Fruit .liidgiiig tciini. wliii h u 
the intercollegiate .(mtest in 



the 

I .tell. 



We have some 



I c> « ^v o o o 

\iid about next Saturday 
and Sunday we will have 
some good stulT to eat. 

THE KENNEL CLUB 



SEE AND 
iTRYA 
■ LAVAL 



Those who know! 
buy the De Laval 

I r>'Mfiirr> III. i him- tti> V .ir<" fx 

l>'■ft^ in the ' cir.ini ^nd liiui» 

!'"v -^> .. liut tlw III? I,av.il 

-.1 anit wi-jrs lotiRfNt. I hat 

: till- Worlds crraiin"iirs use 

•i . i If ! .iV.ll r-*! luSlVfh 

f «l>i.rlf ni-«-il lMlryii<«'n I ';- I ' I ,\i: 

illv 
I lllll 

»*ii i^vi- tn»-ni Ml' tl -,ltl-i.l I'lj NfI\I(^ 

OM ll<i Ijivikl I'MTM-WlHfnevcr a man 

* ■ " ■ ' ■• I .ival d« 

iCliint- Ik* 

■ ' . .1. 

Mru Who IntrntiK*'** ii'.i 

' .1 1 iiL'i* nisi ritvol l)«- I < !iin<"> 

irr uw-d l>v the \ir%t in 

\ whrie ; tli.it tl»r\ «land 

tlijt tlvir u««rsarf lirt 

s4-rsof otliri '^eparatois. 

THE DE LAVAL SEPARATOR CO 



i*.s itiiijilwav. 



Wt 



»l 



Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

AMI III ITKK M.%KKI{H. 



W Mill t <.AI K l'» < I I k ^ IS. 



H«l, MMtliM. LflMb. Vcel. Park. Uird. HaM*. 
HuMii, tIaMMtr**. P«Mnr>. (iainc. Bwiier 
Chew**. Hit's, Hcan*. 



■>t., 



, *;.t.,.i.^ i ...... . 

< I'^marips in Vermorit. 



Atteution of Students. 

H .tun. loultingfnr rointipntal and t»-mu 
'> '<cirM|>aiiiiii duriHK vHmttirr. writf 

'••• < I NKKAI. .%l'|>l.t,t!tii<;»C K%«TOKV, 

1 I it,.c| .MMrittfflr, WiM-oniaIn, 
fot particaiari. 

William H. Watson*s 

Hiciuro. 5tories, Lecture*. Dramas 

•tnsenisiis of pre.Hii opinion of 
■inents, spciikin(|; eloipiently of 

'OS's work, is ttiat he is a mas 
ma-' ' «( art and literature. Highly in- 
•^1' '• iltuminatinR and very wonilrou.s 

•rch picture a work of Art." 



lit: 



AW I SCHOOL PUBLISHINO CO. 
■'KhigBB Avenu«. Chtcafo, U. S. A. 



Ihe- are seven good reasons 
^hy YOU should buy 

COAL 



or 



C. R. ELDER 



CO-ED NOTES 

At a recent meeting of the Sionai. 
board. Miss S. .losephine Strange 
'14 was unanimously elected co-etl 
reporter for the .Sk.nai., unollieially 
conneete<l with the board. Co-ed 
notes will appear every two weeks. 



The iniM-easetl number of co-eds 
this year has changed the upper part 
of Draper Hall from a ipiiet, sleepy 
dwelling to a place full of life ami 
excitement. The "Boost Old Aggie" 
spirit seems to have taken hohl of 
the girls its well as the men. 

The pangs of hunger proved t»M> 
strong for wveral of the young ladies 
one night last week and a small sizetl 
raid upon the college orchard re- 
sulted. F\eii the pitch darkness of 
^^after midnight "failed Uf stop them I 

Wouldn't a •*poml-party" all our 
own l>e elfective':' The time and the 
[dace are under ('onsideration. 

Tennis i.s the one po|iiihir sport, 
and several matches among the 
girls are likely to Ik- played off. 

< >ur grateful thankH are due the 
authorities who gave u-< :i waiter in 
sympathy with woman siilTiage. 
\ tit es for women 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

itttl.TttY HrsHANDBT. 

A fine panoramic view liri> lieen 
taken of the {Niultry plant. 

l*rofesH<ir (iraham. of the I'oultry 
linsbandry department, deli vet ed a 
lecture on "I'oultry Farms ami I'oul- 
try Farming," before an appreciative 
audience in the thhl Fellows hall on 
Friday evening last. Iliw talk was 
illustrated with steieopticon \iews«>f 
an interetiting character. They in- 
cluded pictures from all pnrls of the 
state .'Hid elsi'wheie, and hail iicvei 
lieeii shown iH'fore. 

AMM\t. in •hanukv. 

The HtiM'k judging team, coni|K»R«»«l 
of Clegg. ha\is anti Tayloi . all from 
the senior class, represented .M. A. 
C. at the liriM-ktoii fair. There was 
A great uniformity of work on the 
team, there ladng just i.*> |M>intH dif- 
ference between the high-man ami 
the low-man. IVi>feHS4ir Wing «»f 
Cornell was in charge of the contest 
and lliiimghont the selections he 
showed a preference for the tleep- 
iHslietl, hcaw-uddered, dairy kind of 
cattle, rather than for those showing 
more markedly the breetl's chiiraeU'r- 
istics. The results .if the contest 
fidh)W : .Maine, lirst : .New llam|.- 
shire. sccrmd ; Kho«le Island, third ; 
Vermont, fourth: .Massa«husetls, 
fifth : and Connecti<ut, sixth. 

A ditTeieiil team of wtildeiifs will 
represent M N f m "•'' stm-k- 
jiidging contest at till' .N.itioiial dairy 
show in Chicago the latter part of 
October. This is the first firnethaf 
the deparliiieiit has endeavoreil to 
select two different teams for llie.se 
l«o < (.litest- and it is to Ire done in 
Older to give mf)re men a chanco to 
liarticipatc. 



Notice 1913. 
Friday evening, Dec 2(!, has been 
set aside as .M. A. C. '13 night. On 
that date there will be 'l.'l alumni 
suppers at various points, including 
Springfield. Iloston and New York. 
Wiieiever two or more of last years' 
graduates ean get ti>gether there can 
be an Aggie 'l.'l supper. The fol- 
h)wiiig have charge of the suppers 
already decided upon: Itoston II. 
M. (lore, Amherst : .Springlield ('. 
I.. Thayer, AmherHt; New York- 
(ieorge Zabriskie, 2d, Ilanover.N.II. 
Make one of these bampiets if it 
"breaks a leg," ami let tin- iii.an in 
charge of it know that yt>u will be 
there. 

PUBLIC SPEAKING 

;' onliiiucd ititii) p.ig* ij 

debab' will take place on Dee. \i\. 

F.very man in college who li:i.s any 
ability at all in public speaking is 
urge*! to enter the preliminaries. 
Prizes in the form of cups will Ik* 
avvarded to ca<di member of the win- 
ning team. Any information desired 
regarding the .series ean be obtained 
from Frederick W. Ueed, 11. The 
questhm to be didmted will be posted 
at a later date. 

At a recent meeting of the pnblie 
speaking eoiim-il the following «»lll- 
cers were elected for the ensuing 
year: Head 'II, president: Lincoln 
*|.'», vice-president : tJoidd *ll», nw- 
retarv ; Powers '11, treasurer. 




Massachusetts Northern Rail- 
way Company. 



1 <«.•,«> t S'»'J 

Stk.imikn I.«A>fi; I'oi.ciKw 

M A NI'KAI-ellHI N«J .IKVVICt.K.H 

IM4> |»|<OAI»%S\V, NKW Vi»RK 

« i.i It \ N i» <of.,i.i:«ii-; 
IMN.H ANI» KINIifS i/L 

OOLJ>. BILVBR AMD HROrrXH MMIIAI^M 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Paperi 
with a full line ol College Supplies 
may be found at 



E WELL'S 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUQ5 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New En- 
gland of S|)ecial Student Furnishings. 

LOWER EXPENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 



A.NO 



CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH, 




cox SONS 



A.NIi 



VININO 

7»-74 Madison Avenue, New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

llr»t Materials and Workmanship 

WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



97 Main St., Ma.sonic Kldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



CUS0^ fifify /rpm f A. M. to 4 A. M. 

Toefll Mientka 

Shoes Sinned ami Pollsliei 

Make old shoes look like new 

Neat, clas.ny workmannhip 
0|M>n Siitiilfty Main Mt. 

Oo way to Past Oftca. 



m 



.N. 



li 



The College Signal, Tuesday. October 7, 1913- 



TENNIS 
RACKETS 




The Massachusetts Agricultural Gollese 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty six teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



—At— 



DEUEL'S 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWKLKR AND OI'TOMETRI.T 

Lenses ground while you wait 

CoLl-ECB JFWELRY 

Violin, Banjo. Mandolin and (Juitar .Siring, 

AMHKKST, MASH. 
Next to Post < >ffice. 



AgricuUure 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairyinig 

Poultry Husbandry 



Horticulture 

Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 



AMHERST 

Chp Laundm 

High Grade College Work 

LAUNDRY 

Shins, «o ISC 

Collars, - - - - 2 I 2C 

Cuffs, • - - - a i-sc 

J'iain wash, -48c per dor. 

Same, rough dry. - - 30c per doz. 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam dressing. 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing. #1.50 a Suit 

Kalph J. BoBiiBN, ARent. 7 North Cotttce 
Ki'WAiiii C. Edwariis. Agent 

Put full name and addrcsA on laundry 

AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Loose - Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 

Before buying elsewhere, see our assort- 
ment of pennants and banners 

CUKKAN A DYER, Propa. 



Agricultural Cbeoiislry 
Economic Entomology 
Plant Physiology and Pathology 
Agricultural Kdutation 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



STEAM FITTING. Telephoni- 5»-4 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

F. W. Dance & Co. 
PLUMBERS. 



Spectsky of Repairing 

Church Wini>ows, 
Mbmorial Windows, 
Leao Lights, &c. 
« Clifton Ave., AMHERST, MASS 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



Athletic lioard, 

The College Senate, 

Footlmll AMJMKiution, 

Uuitebull Att8u< iutiui), 

Vrack Aaauciation, 

Hockey AsMXMution, 

TvoniH Aasociatiuu, 

Rifle club, 

KoiHter Duiiitera 

Musicul AtiHociutiou, 

Niuetecn Huudred Fourteen Index, 

Niiieteeu Humlied Fifteen hulex, 

M. A. C. Christiau Asiwjciutitju, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club, 



Catalogues of 

Pcsll *e Wls»tc.'t* 0«mmIh 

Areout. Copy mailed to any addr,->- -t^ 

Stndefits aad Alktate* wfco wmnt the ir*l u 
articles for the various sjwts should inM-tui«i 
thov learing the Wright & Ditson 1 ra.lr Uvi 



George H. Cbapinuii, Secretary 
1). W. .I«»ne», i'lesideut 
S. H. FreelK>rn, Manager 
(;. 1). Meliean, Manager 
K. C . Fxlwards, Mnnagtr 
J. I). Pellett, Manager 
R. K. MacLaiu, Manager 
J. W. T. Uaure, Secretary 
I). .1. I^wia, Manager 
H. I). Brown, Manager 
K. S. Clark, .Ir., Manager 
H. M. Rogers, Manager 
R. H. Powers, President 
1). A. Coleman, President 
.1. 1). Pellett, President 
N. II. hearing, President 



Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Hockey 
SkaUa 




5kat'x^hiMri 
Sweaters 
Jer*e> » 
Uniforms 
tor all sporti 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



U/hen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets. Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



Wright iV Ditson Good* «re tl»e Mai in 1 • ■ 
all sports 

■w-MiOH'T ae i>ii'«a«».>» 

iM Washington St.. Boston. M*" 

THE TERPSY PliltLOR 

CI-EANSING, 

PRESSING. 

REPAIRING. 

Ualrkcet Mrvic*. M«-»t Work, l-.iw"l V"" 

All work carefully done Work callrd lot ua 
delivered, tients' overcoats. sBits. iunt» j^i 
coats. Ladies' Hoe linen suita a sp«cialt \ 
Te*m»wUlcallevery day at M. v 

Wn. FRANKLYN, Prop. 

Kear Nash Bl'k. AroherO. t«L No J. • 



CARS 



Leave A(KJIE COLLEGE for HOI- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



JACKSON Of CUTLER 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
camations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300 



Barsalotti &; Gtentoso 

cigar* Cigarette* 

Nice Line Freah Candy 

Ice Cream, Fruit, Soda, Etc. 

The Right Goods at the Right Pricet 

Open till II o'clock EVERY night 

G*rm«r Amity aod Plesakat Street* 



If yoa wsnt to be 

HOMO WITH TMK OIKI.S 

yon must h»ve your clothes prcn .e«l %n<\ clesn#Kl 

AT BPSTBXir*S 

II Amity St. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AOOIH COL- 
LEOE at 7 and 37 min. past m^ 
HOUR. 

S^kW Car* at Reaaaaabte Rates 



Maroon Store 



MHERSI & SUNDERLAND SI. RY. CO 



Preatlng and Cleaning a spw-Jalty 

Moat liberal ticket syatetn In towm 
Tel. 30.t-ll 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. Pa. 



For a I>a«y and Sunday NVwspapf 
You should Read 

SprlngfleiriepDbliai 

While you are at college in 

It hniiall of Thr M. A. C.»»« 

The tWt !*|n»rllng New* 

Full <leneri«l Npwb 

A Stronu Kdllorlal I'age 

InltreHtlng r«-»tiirpp 

It U a Real ?I«"Wiii»«|mt 

Daily, 3 cent.s ; 70 cents a m '•' "- 
a (juarter. 

Sunday, 5 cents; 50 cents a 



Subscribe by mail or through the \ 
dealer. 



I after 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Vol. XXIV. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 14, 1913. 



No. 5 



AGGIE SECONDS 

Play to a 7-7 Tie at WillUton. Scrubs 
Showed up Well. 

Williston met the M. A. C. setond 



SIXTH ANNUAL PRODUaiON CROSS COUNTRY TEAM 



Of the Roister Doisters to be Shakes- 
peare's "Comedy of Errors." 

The sixth annual production of the 
tettin, Sutuidav at Kasthaiupton and | Roister Doistcr'H is to be Shakes- 
h.'M them to a 7 to 7 tie. Twice in | peure'H " Comedy of Krrors " a jJay 
tin- first perimi the Seconds had the | of higher merits than anything at 
hall on the -J-yard line but could not 
get it over. It was not until the 
thinl period that either side scored. 
Tlitn after a :i.'»-yaid run by l/.nd, 
Williston made a touchdown, (lar- 
,„uii kirked the goal, llagar made 
tbf Sec<md8* touchdown early in the 
fourth perioil, after a fumble by Wil- 
liston. Murphy kicked the goal. 
The line-up : 

SVII I.ISTON. 

(hapuMn, le 
Marly, It 
Collins, Ig 
Kvan. c 
|)<-venfy. rg 
(iraily, rt 
Campltell. re 
Sweeney, qb 
l.inil. fhb 
(.ufvin. rlib 
Hiiley, lb 



M. A 



C. SF.COIOS. 

re. Murphy 

It. Wood 

rg. St:heu(ele 

c, Verbeck 

1^. Dodge 

It. Walker 

le. (leossia 

ql), Mager 

rhb, Ricker Rich 

Ihb, Chisholm 

fb, Fuller 

Score-Willi»ton 7, M. A. C. Seconds 

7 louchdowns-Finlay. Hager. f.oals 

fr.im touchdowns - (i^rvin, Murphy. 

.al» from the &«ld roiaaed -tiarvin. 

Keferee— Jennings of Springfifid Y. M. 

' .A college. Umpire— Shiik of M. A. 

Head linesman— I'ride of Amherst. 

lime — lo-minutc periods. 



teinpte«l thus far. In Professor 
Smith, the club has a coach of 
marked ability ; a man who knows 
the rudiments of driinm and has hud 
lonsideriible experience in coaching 
college drainalies. From tlie num- 
ber of men now out, he should build 
up the strongest cast M. A. C has 
yet seen, despite the loss of material 
by graduation last year. 

The first pro«luction will Ins given 
during the first week of December at 
Montague. The following week, the 
play will probably be given in (ireen- 
field, under the auspices of the high 
8ch<K)l. The annual Christmas trip 
to New York ami New .leraey will 
take in Rutherford, Sidney, MonrcM-, 
Mi«ldletown, Su».|uehanua, Uinghain- 
Uhi, t »neonltt and Worcester. Sev- 
eial other tlateis are now pemling, 
including a week-t:nd trip into Con- 
necticut. 



Needs the Support of Every Long- 
distance Man in College. 

The M. A. C. cross country team 
is scheduled to run Hmwii ami also 
to run in the New Knglund iutercol- 
legiates at Hanover, while there is 
some talk of a run with Amherst. 
The material this year is very g«HMl, 
as was shown in the luterclass run. 
It is not coming out as well us wouUI 
Ik- expected. < »f the first six men U) 
finish in the inteiclass race, but three 
or four are out foi practice. Coach 
Whittier is working along the lines of 
Alfred Shrubb, the couch at Harvard 
and in onler to have the system a 
success, the men must follow it fuilh- 
fully. Tln)8e who make the team are 
eligible for the cMc, and it seems as 
if a big »«iuad should show up for 
practice. Amherst wouhl like a race 
on Nov, I, the tlay of the Amlurst- 
Dartmoulh game. This is one week 
after the Hi own run. and two weeks 
l)efore the New Knglund intereollegi- 
Mtes. Plans for this run are not 
completed, but it will probably take 
place. 



NOTICE! FRESHMEN! 



^ 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 
F.very one intereste<l in teaching 
I iiglish to foreigners is especially 
nrge«l li> l>e present Thurmlay even- 
ing, when Mr. (;eorge W. Tupper, 
wlio is at the head «)f the Y. M. C. 
A. work among foreigners in .Masaa- 
thnsetts ami RIumIc Islarnl will 
- X plain the Rotter U method of teach- 
ing, and start a training class in it. 
riie op[)ortiinities for teaching for- 
ligiier.H will be greater this year than 
iver iMjfore. Already arrangemente 
liiive l>een made with Uie mills at 
Three Rivers for several classes in 
Knglish and Civics, and others are 
Mi(b»rway. 

\\u- field in l>oy*s club work is 

t.u.lily growing. Several clubs 

liuve been started and L Krnest 

Smith '14, who has charge of the 

v>ork. can use eight or ten more men 

iniinediately in Ikjv scout and club 

»rk. A training class for lioys' 

I lull leaders will be started in the 

; u future under the leadership of 

ll:.rc.l(| M. flore '1.?. 



One of the members of the pres- 
ent Freshman class sent home a 
••opy of I he rules passed by the 
Sophomores, pertaining to the con- 
duct of the Freshmen. The father 
appreciated the situation fully, anti 
returnetl the following a.lditional 
commamlments for his Imiv. 

•' Keep in mind why your father 
wants you at M. A. C 

f.xpect opposition to your course 

and down it. 

Reverence your Professors anil al- 
8<i the hard working students. 

Make a daily retord meriting the 
recommendations which help a gradu- 
ate. 

Attend to your own duties l»efore 

yielding time to any one. 

I)<m't think monkeys aie men's 

best friends. 

Put a gentleman into y<mr shoes 

everv morning. 

Walk even more circmiispectly 

at night than by day. 

Cut Smith and Mt. Ilolyoke out of 

your dreams. 

Ami give your love to the taxpay- 
ers of tlH''<>MHay State." 



FR£SUMAN FOOTBALL 
The Connecticut fJterary Iwitllu- 
tion tlefi:it«<l the freshmen 14-6 in 
a close game at Sulllebl Saturday. 
In the seiHUid ikmIikI C L. I. worked 
a series <if line kicks and a success- 
ful forward pass for l.'» yards, and a 
touchil<»wn. 

Play in the thinl iieriotl was about 
even. At the opening of the fourth 
periisl Pickard received a forwuni 
pass and ran M) yanls Ui a touch- 
liown. I'.H7 then kicked off and 
Weiss received the ball and ran HO 
yards for a touchdown. 

The line-up : 
..1.1. " 



A C. KKKSHMKN. 

rr. Uavis 

rt, Cotton 

rg. Klang 

c. Hutlerwick 

Ig, <iray 

It, Kevan 

le. Smith 

ql). Mack 

rhb, I'ickard (captain) 

Ihb, (irayson 

fl). (iriswold 



DEAN S SATURDAYS 



Koerle, le 

|{.«rnes. Crandall. It 
(;<>o<lyear, Harnes. Ig 
iJockendoiff, c 
Church, rg 
L«Kkwood. rt 
Malcolm, re 
Maloney (captain). f|b 
Richards. Ilib 
Weiss, rhb 
Mercure, fl) 

Score— C. 1- I- M. Massachusetts 
Freshmen (>. louchdowns — Mercure, 
Weiss. I'ickard. Goals from touch 
downs — Lockwood 2. Referee- Has^ 
kins of y. M.C. A. college. Umpire 
Foot of Trinity. Head linesman -Raw 
son of Amherst. Time-eight. 10. eight 
and to-minute periods. 



At the first meeting of the Stock- 
M.lge club Tuesday night several' Deans s.t.irduys for the first sem- 
iicw members were voted in. Presi- ester are : 
•Unt Dearing *I4 presided. The j Oct. i'', l'*l"*- 



LniKlscape Art club has also enlarged 
ranks by the addition of new 

I' t'liibers. 



Nov. 29, 1913. 
.Ian. 10, r.»14. 



A large number of men are out 
practicing for the sophomore-fresh- 
men track meet which isctoming swn. 
It is hoped that enough men will 
enter to make the meet an interesting 
one. 



THIRD VICTORY 

For Football Team by Score of ao-o 
Over Union at Schenectady. 

After struggling through three 
scoreless perio«ls of play the Aggies 
came buck to their usual form 
and quickly buried luion ctdlege 
beneath u -'<l-<> sc«>ie at Schenectady, 
N. V. on Saturday. Team work and 
consistent plugging, which have 
characterized the team this season, 
carried thetlay, forlnitm was unable 
to withstuiid the fighting spirit, whi<h 
unimuted the Aggie men in the clos- 
ing peritxl of pluy uud went down U> 
.lefeat before the team which last 
week won over Holy Cioss. 

During the llrst three periotls of 
the game interest was lacking. A 
high wind l»lew ucioss the llehl and 
the first two perirsls ileveloped a 
punting game with the ball fretjuently 
going outsitle. The thinl peritsl 
Haw lK)th teams carrying the ball. It 
was in this periisl that Initm threat- 
tned most stnuigly t4> score. After 
this had passed, the Aggie advance, 
which terminated in the llrst touch- 
down, begun 

The forwani pass was freely tried 
ami in this style of play M. A. C. 
waa ewlly siijierior. Five for- 
ward passes nettetl them «3 yanls to 
the home teams one for lA yards. 
I iiiim's line sliifU were not pu/./ling 
U. the Aggie men and their wide end 
runs were usually stopped short. 
Penalties were freely inllictetl 
throughout the game, M. A. C- losing 
f.illy M yanls, principally from being 
<)ffside. Time was frwpiently calletl 
uud fresh men weic continually being 
MMit in to replace some other player. 
I'nion m-MT munageil txi pass 
Massachusetts' iO-yanI line until the 
middle of the thinl pericxl. A l<»ng 
punt slipped from .Melican's grasp, 
was inisacti by a I iiion man, and was 
recovere<l by the former on Aggie's 
Id-yard line. Two plunges had 
netted «', yanls when a fumble was 
recovered by Union on the visitor's 
I .-i-yard line. H«re Aggie prove<l too 
heavy a barrier. Twice the Union 
backs tried tin- line, only U) Im! 
thrown without u gain. A forwani 
pass was intercepted by Darling, 
who carried the ball 2.'» yanls ami 
I'nion's hopes were gone. 

A large crowd inclmling many of 
the fairer sex at various fraternity 
parties watche<l the .Massachusetts 
men come through to vi< t<>i v. Darl- 
ing was the star of the game. His 
defense work bn*ke up Union's bid 
for a score. Itesides scoring two 
touchilowns, he furnished the most 
specUcular play of the day when he 
ran •50 yards through the entire 
Union field. Nissen, never failing 



1^1 




W 




I 






The College Signal, Tuesday, October 14, 19 13. 



to gain when culled upon to carry 
the l)all, proved to he the most con 
sistent ground-gainer of the (Uiy. 
Ciiptain Brewer and Smith rounded 
out the hackfield. liut above allelse, 
it was teamwork that won tlie day. 
Hising up as one unit, the opponent's 
plays were stopped or broken, or 
their line was torn to make the open- 
ing for an Aggie back to plunge 
through Willi the ball. For the oppo- 
nents, tlieir line proved weak, espec- 
ially three of the center men. (lirling 
proved their best man to carry the 
ball while Captain Sarvey was prom- 
inent in defense. 

Massachusetts won the toss and 
chose to receive the kick-off with the 
wind on herriglit in her favor. Mel- 
ican received tin- ball and immedi- 
ately Brewer punted. I'nion tried 
wide end runs but. failing, kicked to 
Darling. 'I'hen followed an exchange 
of punts, the ball frequently going 
out of bounds. Nissen replaced 
Palmer at fullback and the punting 
continued till Dole dropped on the 
hall on Inion's 20 yard line. Dar- 
ling made eight yards around left 
emi, the (jimrter ending with the ball 
in M. A. ( "s. possession <>n rnion's 
12-yard line. 

Second ipiMitci. I'lay was re- 
sumed with I'erry at center in pla<-e 
of lK>le. .\ bad pass to lirewcr got 
away and he tinally fell im the ball. 
Id yards lieing lust. A forward pass 
to Kdgerton of 10 yards failetl to 
make the ilistance and the ball went 
to I'nion. Nisscn broke up a wide 
end nin, but on the nevi play Aggie 
was penalized ."> yanls ft»r being olT- 
skie. Smith took Captain Brewer's 
place at left half>ia<-k. I'nion punted 
to Melican. who rushed the ball back 
30 yards before being downed. A 
series of plunges by Nisscnand Darl- 
ing soon netted first <lown for Aggie, 
in spite of (iardner's ginxl defense 
work. .Melican brought the crowtl 
to its feet on a "iO-yanl forward pass 
to .Ionian. First down was again 
made. A forwanl pass over I'nion's 
goal line failed and the ball was 
given to them on their 20-yard line, 
(iirling made a yard and M. A. ('. 
lost five more for being offsitle. (iirling 
nuule three on a line plunge. liea- 
ver took Starbuck's place at (pnirter- 
back and imme«liately threw a ITi-yanl 
pass ti> Jenkins. The half ended 
with the ball in the center of the 
field. 

Third (piarter. IMay began with 
Captain Brewer and Dole in their <dd 
positions. Brewer kicke<l off to 
l{fX)f. who brought the ball back 1.") 
yards. A series of gains bv Sarvev 
and (iirling netted first down but 
Union srM>n had to punt. A series 
of rushes by Nissen and Darling was 
followed by a fumble, I'nion get- 
ting hold of the ball on Aggie's 16- 
yard line. Three times they failed 
to gain and Darling got their forward 
pass for a run of 25 yards carrying 
the ball out of danger. Nissen, after 
a series of rushes, made first down. 
A forward pass. Brewer to Kdgerton, 



brought Aggie 12 yards nearer its 
opponents. Nissen made three yards 
and Brewer four around right end. 
Nissen went through tackle for 12 
more, the period closing with the 
ball in Massachusetts' possession on 
I'nion's IH yard line. 

Fourth quarter. Page took Vroo- 
man's place at 'eft gtuird. Nissen 
promptly made first down, but M. 
A. C. was penalized 15 yards. Dar- 
ling made six yards. Nissen went 
through left tackle for two yards. 
Seeing the line was closing up. 
Darling was sent around left end for 
tiie first touchdown. Brewer kicked 
the goal. Score — 7 to 0. .lackson 
kicke<l off to Curran and the march 
to the opponent's goal began again. 
Darling made a yard, but both teams 
were olTside on the next play so the 
ball was brought back. Brewer got 
off a 4.'»-yard punt, Mgerton nailing 
Beaver on the catch. (Jirling made 
four yanis and Stover took Hoof's 
position as fullback when Strong 
grabbed a forward pass out of the 
air. After thus getting the ball. 
Brewer threw 8 yards to P^lgerton. 
Nissen was stoppe«l by Stover after 
uuiking 12 yanls through right 
Utckle. lie crt>88eil I'nion's line on 
the ne.\t play, but as Aggie was off- 
side the goal di<l not count an<l the 
team lost 15 yards as a penalty. 
Plaisteil t<K>k .lortlan's place and 
promptly sh«(t a forwanl pass to 
Melican for !."» yanls. Nissen got 
7 yanls tinough right tackle. 
With one yard to go. Brewer smashinl 
through the end for the se«'ond 
touchdown, but failed to kick the 
goal. Score — 13 to 0. Smith t<M»k 
Brewer's iK>sition and Perry, Dole's. 
.Melican leceivwl the kick-off and 
then Darling made a sensational run 
of CO yards through the entire Cnion 
field to their 5-ya«l line where he 
scoreil on tlie next play. Smith 
kicked t lie goal. Only tifty-five KC- 
onds were taken in making the last 
touchdown Sc«>re — 20 to 0. Cur- 
ran received the kick-off and s«M>n 
Smith punted. In a last wihi effort 
Union tried a number of forward 
passes, which failed. The game 
ende<l with the ball in the center of 
the field in I'nion's possession. 
Line-up : 

M. A. <:. 

Jordan, IMaisted, re 

Schlotterl>cck, rl 

Baker, rg 

Dole. I'erry, c 

Strong, Ig 

Curr.Tn, It 

Kdgerton. Jord.-in, Ic 

Melican, qb qb, .Starbuck, Heaver 

.Smith, IJrewer (captain), Ihb 

lhl>, Sarvey (captain) 
Palmer, Nissen, fb fb. Roof, .Stover 

Darling, rhb rhb, (lirling 

Score — M. A. C. 20. Union o. Touch- 
downs—Darling 2. Brewer. Goals — 
Brewer, Smith. Referee— Bird of Yale. 
Umpire -Rislcy of Colgate. Headlines- 
man — Campbell of Germantown acad- 
emy. Time of quarters — 11 minutes. 



I'NION. 

le, Mallan 

It, Gardner 

Ig, Jackson 

c, Hokerk 

rg. Vrobmen, Page 

rt, Price 

re, Jenkins 



HERMAN'S U.S. ARMY 
SERVICE BLUGHER 

In Tau Willow Call or 
Gun MctHl. A huud- 
bome, snappy shots 
ontheOrtliopeilic 
luNt, desijf ueil by 
army surfjeons. 
You never savr 
a shoe like it 
for wear, com- 
fort and 
style. 

Single 

Nolu of 

To.xas un- 

Ncour<-d<»ak.i>ox 

toe, sole IcaliiiT 

coiiiit«'r»,**v«'ry part 

ill.<«|>4.H.'ted. I.iuin;r of 
specially tested drill. A 8olid 
leather slioe that will give (he 
wear of the civiHan shoe that 
sells for)HO. This l.s one of the 
shovs Uncle Sam hiiys l'«»r his 
soldiers. IT'S A \VOIM.I> 
ISKATLIK. See the Ariuy line. 




HERMAN'S U.S. 
ARMY SHOES 




fiasts (lesig-ued 1 . 
AK3IY Snr- 
g(>ons. Materiic > 
lire the hesttliat 
can lie obtaiin.l. 
Wurkmanhh p 
nspectcd 
and guar- 
anteed. 



No. 968 

GARRISON 

BLUCHER. 

Oiip of tlio most popular 
in tilt) Army I.iiii'. .Ma-''' i" Tan Mil- 
low <'»lf and <Juii Metiil. Hc.i , 
sint:l<^ soil'. Im'X I'"-. w»li«l leiitlur 
t)in>u)!)i<M)t . A liaii<l!*onieNiiHp|>y shoe. 

i'oliii' ill to .>.»■•■ tli4- liiif. M:»liuf.ic 1 1.'. I 

by Joseph B. llfrmanArCo., Boston. 



•Illy 



PRICE $4.00 



PRICE S4.00 



PAGE'S SHOE STORE 



THE 



Hoover & Smith Go. 

6i6 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 



IS OfflcUl FntiriltY Jewilir 



tPBOIALlSTS IN 
Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prizes Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals. 

Rings, Charms.-. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

r>KivTrAiw wc>c>:vi» 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass 
Orrics liouss: 



Pbeasant 

'Bmitx: St.. 
BtnbcrM 

Telephone 470 

BSKAKfAST 

tUNCHKON 
AKTSRNCXiNkTCA 

DInMr tf arrmaaed few. 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 



Now at ij IMea»ant St. 



Oculists' Prescriptions Killed 

Broken lenses .Accurately Kepbcfd 
Fine Watch Krpairing Promptly and 
Skilfully I>one 



Satisfaction Ouarant««d 



Another pond party — Several 
rather big splashes this time ! 



A Chance to Save Money 

A $5.00 Safety Razor for $5.00 

But we give you a coupon which when signed with your 
name and home address we refund you $3.50. It carries 
the Rexall guarantee, *' Money back if not satisfied." 

We carry a full line of 

Waterman, Conklin and Moore's Fountain 

Pens, Stationery, Pipes, Tobacco 

and Cigarettes. 

Liggett's, Belle Meade and Green Seal Chocolates 

THE HENRY ADAMS CO., Druggists 



The REXALL Store 



ON THE CORNER 



The College Signal, Tuesday. October 14. »9'3 



I 



COMMUNICATION 

„miiK«tions to the Signal concerninR 



.,.w, of general interest are welcomed llie 
!^',!,i,u IS. not to be held responsible for the 
o,,,;,H.m$ thus expressed.) 

I i,iT<»R CoLLEOE SlOSAI. : 

Wliile the atmosphere at Aggie is 
i.Miivi.hial and distintlive, we could 
i,„,„„ve some of the details of our 
,.,-ui.i/.ation l.v »)orr<>wing a leaf 
f,Mtn tlie experiemos «>f <»ther eol- 
., ,. Kspetially is this true in re- 
.fuyi\ to the relations between under- 
^rnliiutes aii.l ahniuii. l»ractieally 
ti,.. ..Illy time that alumni couje to 
tollt'jie is at commencement time, a 
li,m- when college is closed or just 
drawing to a close. As a result they 
u,M-r see the college in noruuil oper- 
ation and so can get 110 idea of the 
iH»llige a.s it in in its everyday nmtiiie. 
It is certain that the <levoti!ig of 
one College night each year to the 
aliiiuni and making it an Alumni 
Nij.ht will hriiig our alumni in chiser 
toiK-li with the cH>llege. For such 
:ui Alumni Night a s|iecial eflfort 
i.Hild lie made to have all local and 
valley alumni come to the college. 
After a sup|>er at the ilining hall, 
;i iitass meeting with speeches from 
nliiiiini ami leading uiideigia«luates 
wuiild make a good program. The 
rvMilt wouUI be a rejuvenation of the 
olil Aggie spirit in many of the alum- 
ni : it woiihl also result in a keener 
appreciation on the part «»f gra<luates 
,.f the college's needs. The value of 



the resultant effect on undergraduate 
spirit is also evident. 

t)n the same date as the Alumni 
Night, the varituis M. A. C. alumni 
associations could hold their annual 
hampiets, thus making it an Aggie 
night from coast to coast. It does 
seem as if this idea is one worthy of 
adoption I'V the local alumni associa- 
tion or by one of the undergraduate 
liotlies. 

Very truly yours, 

U. 11. Van Zwai.im I m;. 
For the I'M.! M. A. C Club of 
Amherst. 



Maekinaws 



FALL TRACK MEET 
On suggestion of Cotuli \N liittier, 
a tiehl day will be held this fall 
instead of regular track iiictt. The 
events selected are : high jump, run- 
ning broad jump, shot-put, discus, 
pole vault, hammei thniw. and punt- 
ing contest. It is felt that such a 
a meet will give the coach a line «ui 
available material in the c<.llege, and 
enable him to go to work with a big 
advantage. Kntries may Ut ma«le 
u|K)n the sheets posted on the bulletin 
I iKKird in North. The meet will occur 
on .Saturdav. 0<t. IH. 



A picture of the freshmen class 
was taken on Thursday. This is the 
first satisfa«toiy picture yet taken- 
but caiiimt be used ill the tmltx. A 
sample picture is being sh»>wn on the 
campus by Nicolet '14. 



T7OR tKe man chasing tKe pill.uphill, 
1 down hill, in the »andy bunkers, 
VeWet is mild and smooth and pleasing. 
Vdvel— sclcctcdleaf —two years in the 
warehouse undergoing a change which 
eUininales the harshness of the leaf. A 
mellowness rarely attained — a smooth- 
ness you ^lould know all about. 
No « ImpoHble to bite or irritate 
— one imoke as cool and «wect a« 
»r.oa»er— imoke it for 54 bole* U you 
like — always agreeable. 
At your dealers. 





AND 



Sweaters 



Tliis i.s .Mackinaw ami Sweater sea.son. Football, Golf and 
all other Fall and Winter sports call lor jrood Sweater pro- 
tection. We have in stock totlay several hmuliiil Mackt- 
iKtws in all <;rade8. 

Htl^.CSO to l|j»«.CM> 

The famou.s Summit brand, well known in the Northwest 
and acknowledj^ed to Ik- t.ne ol the beM, Coat Sweaters, 
the Shawl Collar. Coat Collar and the ngular shape 
Sweaters, all the Inst selling' colors. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 

ScDool ana College Pbotosrapbcrs . . • 





/ i^r-AI lY- Si Center St.. Northampton Mass., 
LOCALLY. 5-«^ ^^^ g^^jj^ Hadley. Mass. 



Main OKriCR: 

1546 I S48 Hrojidway. 

New York City 



Tbeae Studion offer the \*esX nkilled 
artists ami m^>^t cumplptc 

equipment obtainable 



\Vi: SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 

In so far as otir benefits are miiUial. 

Till- AMHI'RST CAS COMPANY 

crw«rx/i:l-iir-»g Electrical 



NOE>RC*S ^ 

^^ FOUNTAIN PEN 

Minimixe your ^"""^^'j; .ffh", , . 



full 2 
ounce tins 



For S.I. by l>«ler- E*Ty^h«« 

American Foanlain P«n Company 

"-^:i;;"sT^^/r''• "' BOSTON.' MAS.S. 

Its PEVONSHIRK ■STRRI'-I •■ •■ " 



7j. 



i^'t 



I 



The ColUge Signal, Tuesdaj, October 14, 1913- 



The College Signal, Tneadaf, October 14. i9*3- 




* 



THE COLLEG E SIGNAL 

Published «very Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
AtT\eu\t\xTi\ College. 



BOABD OF BDITOBt. 

CHESTER E4WMEKI-ER'i4. Editor i 
FKANK W. lU'EI.I. '15. Managing 

HAROI.D C. BLACK '14. Competition 
HAROLDlJ. CLAY'i4. As»istant 

SIUARTB. FOSTER '14. Athletic 

ERVINE F. PAKKER'14. Alumni 

J. ALBEKT PRICE'15. Athletic 

GEO. E. DONNEI.L 'is. Department 
EARLE S. DRAPER '15. Campus 

TVLER S. ROGERS '16. Associate 

CHARLES W. CURTIN'16, Associate 



n-Chief 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 



BUSINESS DEPARTMBHT. 

ERNEST S. CLARK. |R. '14. Bus. Manager 
MAURICE J. CLOUGH '15. Ass't Bus. Mgr. 
ERNEST F. UPTf)N '14. Advertising Manager 
W. RICHARD SEARS '15. Asst. Ad». Manager 
CHAS. A. HUNTINGTON, JR. '16. Circulation 

Subscription #1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents Make all orders payable 
to Ernest S. Ci.akk. Jr. 



ARIBOTI 



PWl OfflM. 



Vol. XXIV. Tuesday, Oct. 14. No. 5 



(( 



Boost Old Aggie. 



It 



There b1ioiiI<1 1k' gratings of some 
kind platetl over the cellar window 
pits on the east and south sides of 
North College. A» they are now. 
there is danger of students sustain- 
ing broken limbs due to a fall into 
these deep holes. They lie very 
close to the paths made use of at all 
times of day and night. They are a 
menace, es|>ecially after dark. It is 
to be hojHHl that something will l»c 
done in the imiiie«liate future to fore- 
stall any accidents :tt th:tl point. 

CAMPUS CALENDAR 

(Nolicet for this column should be dropped in 
theSir.NAL fMRoe or handed to Earle S. Draper 
•|$. OB or l»efore the Saturday preceding each 
Im««.1 

Oct. 15. — 1-H» V. M. Assembly. 
Tresident Alexander Mcikle- 
john of Aiidierst College. 
16.— ft-4.'i p. M. M. A C. A. 
A. 

17.— 7-(Ml r. M. Koom G. 
South College. .lunior-Fresh- 
man debate. 

18. — 2-fM> V. M. Soplumiorc- 
Freshman Football game. 
Campus. 
l8._4.OO I 
Informal. 
21.— 7-(M) I 
Art Club. 
2l._7-(K> I 
Club. South College 
22. — 1-10 r. M. Assembly. 
President C. II. Spooner of 
Norwich Iniversity 



M. Drill Hall. 

. M. I^andscapc 
Wilder 11 all. 

, M. Stoi'k bridge 



CAMPUS NOTES 

The dean retiuests that all hour 
blanks from every class be handed 
in as soon a possible. Thi« should 
be attended to, as the results arc to 
the advantage of the students. 

Indian summer ! 

How about Sunday chapel this 
year? A matter for the attention of 
the Senate. 



Is theCercle Francais still in exist- 
ence? Or has it met the fate of the 
German Club? 

Juniors desiring herbarium paper 
for Horticulture 3, can obtain it 
from M. F. Sherman '1;'). 

Miss C. G. Babcock of Norwoo<l 
has recently been engaged as assist- 
ant in the college library. 

A poem entitled ''John" by Wil- 
liam A. Wattles of the Knglish 
department appeared in a recent issue 
of the IiKh'in'ndent. 

The new military uniforms are 
here, and real work has commenced 
for the regiment. Rifles were as- 
signed on Thursday. 

New <lrill suits are again in evi- 
dence. The Freshmen will not be 
so an.xious to wear them around af- 
ter the newness wears off. 

Sign up for Smith and Mt. Hol- 
yoke specials in West Kntry, North 
College. For tickets to Informal, 
see Freeborn '14, South College. 

The Assembly on We<lne8<lay was 
given over to a general mass meeting 
in order to arouse enthusiasm, and 
practise cheers and songs. 

All out for the Tufts game. Col- 
lege spirit requires it, the work of the 
team against Dartmouth, Holy Cross 
ami I'nioii (ienian«lB it. Don't forget 
Nov. I. 

.Several freshmen football men arc 
s|K>rting crutches as a part of tlieir 
walking habit. So far, the varsity 
men have l>een fairly free from seri- 
ous injuries. 

After Darling's wonderful sixty- 
yard run in tlie I'nion game .Satur- 
day, a fair spectator, who didn't 
know his name cried out : ''Oh, you 
little darling \" 

The band is doing some hard prac- 
tising and by the first of November 
we may exi>ect some real music. 
It is unfortunate that their leader was 
called away at this critical |>eriod. 

At the M.A.C. C. A. me»ting 
held in clinpel on Thursday night, 
Mr. Shirk stated that twelve men 
were neetled t«» teach in Three Hivers. 
( >ne class of eighty men desire 
instruction io Civics. 

Moses ' 1 r> was elected manager of 
the sophomore football team. Quite 
a little undeveloped material seems 
to l»c showing up in the sophomore 
class, a fact which promises to make 
the class game on Oct. IH rather 
interesting. 

The Informal on Oct. IH will oc- 
cur at a perio<l of the year when the 
Aggie campus is most l>eautiful. 
With the additional inducement of a 
class football game, this ought to 
guarantee a large attendance at the 
dance. Now is the best time to start 
in — Freshman I 

The pictures of the different classes 
together with those of the members 
of the Senate, the Informal Commit- 
tee, and the wearers of the " M " 
have been taken during the past week 
for the 1U15 Index. Wednesday 



afternoon a panorama picture of the 
entire student body was taken on the 
athletic field. 



'11 . — Clarence A. Smith is teaching 
in Jefferson Medical college and also 
working for Ph. D. degree in physio- 
logical chemistry. Mail address, 
1421 Arch St., Philadelphia, Pa. , 



•y5. — Piof. Robert A. Cooley has 
been made secretary of the newly 
created Montana state board of 
entomology. 

1.0.<*T— On the campus. Oct. 3, a Bronze Medal 
from a Watch Fob The medal prosctiption is 
"Proliciencif in ShootitiH;" National Rifle Asso- 
ciation on the reverse side. Fleaie return to uftice 
or to Wm. C. Sanctuarv 'is, 

QNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

BKOITLAR s|M>AV SKKVICKAT1P M. 



Clark '15 



Eld ridge '14 



All Student Supplies 



M. A. ex STORE 



BANNERS AND POSTERS 



CANDY TONIC 



Montague '15 



Hager '16 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest line in 
the state outside of Boston. 



SeeourlJneof Drill Shoes 

E. RUSSELL NORTON $2.00 tO $4.00 



SALES AGENT 



Davenport Miller 
Vein Coal 

Best Quality Pennsylvania Coal 



MODERN REPAIR 
DEPARTMENT 



E.M.BOLLES 



i€H<t VOCIN %VAV TO l>. O.) 



BOSTON OKHCE 

85 Water St. 



NEW YORK OKKH K 

I liroadway 



LOW RRICC TAILORING CO. 

SlITS MADE TO OKDF.K 
Suits Cleaned. Pressed and Dyed. Allkindtof 
Kepairiha (or l-adie» and (Jentlemen neatly done. 
HiehBrade work bv fir^t cla*^ tailor. Work 
called lor and delivered. Sell tickets for pressing, 
4 IVITS poll li.jo 

CCORGC KOTOWITZ. f>nOf>. 

Mam Stteet, Amherst. Mas*. Na>li lUoik 

O* your way to the Post ( >Ace. Tel. 4jft-W' 



Coolcp's Rotcl 

Springfield, Mass., 

Solicits the patronage of the Siu 
dents of the Agricultural CoIUkp 
to class dinners and individually. 



THE KATHERINE E. McCLELLAN STUDIO 

44 State St., Northampton, Mass. 

PORTRAITS — GROUPS — VIEWS 

Insist upon seeing our college work and prices before deciding. 



Call or Tklkpiione 131 



DR. FERNALD'S TRIP 
1„, n. T. Kernald iciently re- 
Hiiiipd from a trip to Europe where 
h,. spent five months in study in eon- 
iieclion with the Kxperiment station 
walk on the Adams' fund project. 
This project is an attempt to deter- 
iniiio the actual amount of benefit 
derived from the attacks of parasitic 
insects on American pests and their 
relative importance in this regard. 
I'liiH work re<piiie8 as a basis defi- 
„it*- knowledge of the identity of the 
digger wasps which are the insects 
cliiflly concerned. 

It became necessary to study the 
original specimens which had been 
lolU'cted in this country over one 
himdrcd years ago and :ii.' now in 
collections in dilTerent parU of 
Kiirope. Dr. Kernahl Hpent most of 
Ins tiiiu- working with the collections 
rmiiid at Naples. Vienna, Dresden, 
li^rlin. Lund, Kiel. Hand.urg, Wies- 
Imdtii. llalle. Paris, LoikIou, and 
O.xford. 

In «pi1i- of (he age of the speci- 
imiis and the prmsibilities of their 
ixpuKure to destruction by museum 
|K'sts ami other causes. Dr. Kernald 
sucteeded in finding all but about six 
of those which had at any time been 



in Kurope, and also has attained 
knowledge which will be of great 
value in connection with further 
work on the Adams' fund. 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

A<il!<>NO.MV. 

Prof. ¥.. N. McDonald lia.s been in 
Plymouth county during the past 
week, making a collection of soil 
types found in the recent survey. It 
is the plan of the <lepartment to 
commence a museum collection of 
soil formations of tlifTerent parts of 
the state. Such a collection should 
be of intense Interest and value to 
the student and practical observer. 

poMOLOIiV. 

The departuient li:is as fine a crop 
of lien Davis as could be grown in 
Missouri. 

The new variety vineyard is begin- 
ning t«» come into l>earing and is 
showing some varieties, both new and 
oM. that are worth putting into the 
home vineyaid. The Du<hes8, 
(liK-the, and Caertner were e»|»ecially 
goo<l this season. 

The cover crops which escaped the 
frosts early in .September are still 
flourishing and the soy beans in par- 
ticular have inadf a renmrkably good 



I. M. LABROVITZ, Custom Tailor 

Fashions. Fit, First Class Work Guaranteed 

I argr as«>rtment on hand. (.KNT'S ^ LJRN I.SIM N(.S Ked-Nlan Collar, and 

Dress Shirts. Cleaninn and Pressing DKKSS.SUIIh 
TO KKNI. Military Collars and (doves 

II AMITY ST., Telephone 302 W. AMHERST, MASS. 



** Keeping in Front " 

You fellows know what that means I 
We've been very successhil in this 
regard with Fatima Cigarettes. By 
the way, these cigarettes were first 
sold in the college towns — and you 
agreed with us that they were good. 

Then we put out for the bia race, 
to make Fatimas of nation-wide rep- 
utation, and today more arc sold than 
any other cigarette in this country. 

No purer, or more carefully chosen 
tobacco grows than that in Fatimas. 
We purposely put them in a plain 
inexpensive wrapper — in this way 
we can afford quality tobacco, and 
twenty of the smokes for 1 3 cents. 

Now your college crew is of utmost 
importance to you — so is a good 
cigarette, and it's your aim in life 
to keep Fatimas m the lead — right 
up to their good quality — right up 
to where you first foiud them, and 
will always find them. 

Success fellows ! You started this 
cigarette on its successful career — 
and you pull a strong oar all over 
this country. 




FATING 

aCARETTES 




tu^..Hird, b-JMdual' 



The Weakest Link or Limiting Factor 

There are fields that contain an abundance of potash on analysis, 
but on which crops fail if they are not supplied with ,ivailahlf potash, 
and the same is true if avatlnHe phosphorus is lacking. 

We are all familiar with the limiting factor in crop production, 
namely, the weakest link in the chain of fertility. One never knows 
when one has reached the limiting factor, the weakest link ; one nevtr 
knows when one has exhausted the available phosphorus or the avail 
able potash, or the available nitrogen until crops fail to respond. After 
a farmer has harvested a bumper crop he has taxed all the links in ihc 
chain of fertility, but which one is nearest the breaking point he does 
not know; therefore, if he is wise he applies at least all three of the 
leading elements of fertility in some shajH-. tither in the form of stable 
manure, green crops or commercial fertilizers, or all combinid (which 
latter is the better plan), knowing that any excess which he may have 
applied will not be lost out of the reach of crops, if a ratu)nal system 
of rotation with deep-rooted and shallow rooted crops is pr.ictised, in- 
cluding lOvcr crops. Moreover, these undoubtedly promote bacterial 
growth in the soil, which, ac< ording to Hall, may be the limiting factor. 

Study the Plnftt l-oihi froNfm 

Many hitve "<f«" iimwer 
"TMf" tttnu'ff will bf worth while 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER COMPANY 
43 Chatham St., Boston 




A 




MEN'S STORE 



IJSE OllR NEW CASH OISCOlJNT CARD 
AND SAVE FIVE PER CENT ON 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 



SOLE AGENT FOR 



THE GENUINK AND ORIGINAL 



PATRICK MACKINAW 



MUU W1a"VIM>\V i>IMI»I^^VY 



•AT- 




Agent, R. S. BRAHf;, Kappa Sigma House. 



.i 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 14, 1913. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 14. <9'3 



The Holyoke Valve £ Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of WrouKht Iron and Hrass l'ip«-, Valves 
and Pitlinns (or Steam, Water an<l (ia«. Asbestos 
and Magnesia Boiler and Hijie Coverintts. I'ipe 
Cut to Sketch, Mill Supi.lies. Knuii eet> and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Wafer lleatint;, 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Boiler ;iiid KiiKi' e 
Connections. Molyoke, Mm«. 



th^Teachers Exchange 

Of Boston 1 20 Pirylston Si. 

Recommeniis Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



C^^rp^n-ler St Morehouse, 

pRiriTEns, 



No I, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Students Attention ! ! ! 

We are ready at the start to furnish you with a fine 
line of Campus and Fraternity Mouse Views, also Post 
Cards. Kodak work given prompt and careful attention. 
Kniarging and picture framing given our personal at- 
tention. See us about Croups and Portraits for the very 
best work. 



late growth. In several bloekK of j "Power of Growth in I'huits." 1. ,tli 
orchanl they stand over three feet in , are being used in his department 
height. '1)7. — A recent issue of the ••( lul. 

AGBictLTLHtAi. Ki»ucATioN. Woman," the ofHcial publication <,f 

Acting President Lewis has re- the California federation of wonen. 
eentiv appointed a committee to^'"»t«"«« »» '"-tHJ^' ^'utitled "A,,,. 
make" recommenflutions of qualified <^^">t"'e «»<l the P.iblic Scluml," l.v 
stu.lents to the State boanl of edu- <^'»«>t«n ^' l'«»"'^''- '^'''*^ '^''^'^l^' ^^"^^ 
cation for certificates to teach in , originally presente<l to the national 
state-aided high s<hools. The com- educational association. Mr. Pal- 
mittcc will act in conjunction with I "HM- is superintemlcnt of agiKulunv 
the department of Agricultural Kd- ' i" t»'e public schools of Los Aug. 1... 
ueation. Further menti<.n will be During the i.ast year his department 



made of this, that those tlesiring such 
a certificate may know along what 
lines to qualify. 

A part of the store rmiin in the 



gave gardening experience to uvti 
•i.'»,000 pupils. 

'97. — I..aBt June at the annuiil 
meeting of the Alumni associntiun, 



Veteriiiaiy Science building has I'hilip II. Smith and Halph II. Par 



Satisfaction Guaranteed, 
the Square Deal Studio 



Patronize 



KINSMAN'S COLLEGE STUDIO 



Nash BlocK, Amherst 



H. M. RcMJKRs, '15, Agent. 
87 Pleasant St., 



Studio Phone 303-2 




GRAND SWEEPSTAKES TROPHY 

(f750.00 Sterlint Silver Cup) 

BEST STATE EXHIBIT OF POTATOES 



AT THE 

New York Land Show 

1912 
WON BY 

TheLLQevelandCompany 

HOULTON. M«. 

/^NE of the largest and most 
^^ reliable seed potato houses 
in the United States. Competi- 
tion open to the entire United 
States and Canada. Messrs. E. L. 
Cleveland Company also won the 
First Prize for Best County Exhibit 
of Potatoes. (Silver Cup valued 
at $200.00.) 
The E. L. Cleveland Company use 

L FRANK COE 
FERTILIZERS 



E. Frank Coe Fertilizers have 
been the business farmer's favorite 
for over tifty-five years. Why not 
follow the example of these lead- 
ing commercial potato growers. 

f M ••(ki •• r«Ml "Th* Slory of A Profitable Potato 

Cmp" wrKlmhjr ■■ »riM..<iM.k TMiilr. ■•In* hriwr 




been littcd up as a hil»orat(»ry. It 
will lie used by the class in methods 
of teuchiny for illustrating various 
ty|>es of lessons in secondary 
agriculture. 

Associate Professor O. A. Morton, 
has been busy in supervising the 
auricultiiral exhiluts at the various 
agricultural fali-s during the last few- 
weeks. The year's work of the Iniys' 
and girls' agricultural clubs has been 
very satisfactory. Nearly I'.i.OOO 
boys and girls have i>een engaged in 
some line of garden activity. 

A Civil Service examination for 
teachers in the Philippine service will 
be hehl Dec. Mi-M. I!»i;$. Details 
as to places of hoUliiig the examina- 
tions, kind of positions, salaries, ainl 
conditions of work may be «»I»tained 
from I'rofessor Hart. 

Professor Hurt addresseil the Wil- 
liaiiisbuig scliiM»| industrial club at 
Haydeiiville. Sept. 17. on the subje<t 
of Agricultural Kdiication. The 
agricultural feature (»f the work of 
the clul» is under the direetitm of F. 
L. Kdwanls 'U«. 

Part of the ii.emlK?rs of the class 
in Course 'A got some ('X|K'ri«-nce in 
teaching last week. They gave les 
sons in the planting of ludbs in a 
iHiinlier of rooms in Kellogg Avenue 
scIhmiI. Plan* are In progress for 
seeming siuiiljtr experieuce by givinji 
IcssonM in various agricultural topics 
ill lladley and Northampton. 



ALUMNI NOTES 



nn: 



ATTKNTIOK 



ker 'I "J, were elected members of the 
athletic board to serve this year. 

•t»7. — .Samuel W. Mendiim li:i> 
changed his residence from Madison, 
Mexico to 22 Wenlville street. |{<.\ 
Itury. 

•()7. — II. 1>. W(mkI has retiiills 
returned to Dallas, Tex., after »p«-ii(l- 
the spiing and summer in the llittri- 
ro«»t Valley investigating and a>>iM- 
inn in the eradication of the siMjtted 
fever lick . 

•08. — S. Lolhrop Davenport ..f 
North (Jr.aftou is instiiictor in limt 
culture in the new Kaavx county agri- 
cidtural school. 

'08. — Hairy M. .lennison i> ifi 
assistant professor of Isitany in ili< 
Montana state ctillege. 

'08.— HayiiHMiit D. Whinn . 
author of bulletin 2.'»;5 of tin 'iiii,, 
:igricultural ex|wriment si:iti"ii 
riie title «»f the bulletin i-^ •liiwrl 
IVstH of the lloiisihold." 

'{) . — ,1. C". Iluls<»n of the gradu- 
ate schisd was employed diirin'^ lli< 
summer by the .Montana agruiilHi' 
experiment stati«»n at lin/.vim\ 
Hutson and .1. Kolwrt Parker eutirol 
the Montana state tiiinis toiinii h ' 
held at Hunter's Il«»t Spring- :ii 
sucteed.'d in gel ting into the iin: > 
in the doul>les event, but were fuKilb 
defeated in the match forllHMMi, 
While ill Uo/.eman, liutstm won tlit 
city cliauipionshi[» 

•08._F. K. Tliurst<»n of the Im" 
dad Sugar C<»mpany, Trinidad. Ciil»a. 
was married to Miss Kiigeiiia Vnr 
der Pyl of Worcester, Ma-- 
.Inly i:.. I'.'i:',. 

•OH.— Orton S. Clark is takii -.: 



The Coe-Mortimer Company, 



51 CHAMBERS STREET. 
NEW YORK. N. Y. 



The rii.l M. A. { Club of Am- 
herst will have a "Wedding Ureak- 

fast" in the [.rivute dining icx)nis at 

^ , I placeof <teorge H.l hapmnn 

Draoer Iln I on Siiiidav morning, ' . "^ , . , 

' •• .. • ., ,„ '^ taut botanist at the experinnii: •'- 

()<'t. i;», at H-aO. Lv.TV r.M.! man ,. ^„ .' ,,,.,„f 

.. ,. , ,„ •; ... „ltion. Mr. Chapman is on l.:^''' 

wit nil a radis of 40 miles and then | . . i . , ,i.., i 

,, ,,,,. absence and studying at tlic I 
some 18 urged to attiii-i IWii Kills . »• 

, .. . r .. .-.I t > i- . ! sitv of Prague, Austria, 
and Ka ph Caskill of llie County • . . "T , , .. 



.Ml. < i:' '■ 

. , , ,, . . . I recently liiiished three years ol «"'' 

Agricultural school will be the guests 



of honor. Hemember Friday, Det . 
•JC, is to be " 1:h:? Night " How 
about it, una men r Are we going 
to get together after the Tiif I's game y 
'«);. — Dr. George K. Stone an- 
nounces the publication of iwo new 
bulletins. One is eiititleti "riie H» 



11 time of the laige (.eriiiaii i^' 
sities. 

'10. Kilward .1. lliirke wa:- ■ 

the managers of the North '|'"" 

fair and an ollKial at the Pain i ' 

•n.— Albeit \i. .lenks wa- ■' }»*^^ 

at bolli the Noilliaiiiptoii ' ' 



lalion of Light to (iiveii-liouse Cul- i mer fairs. His judging was :ii:>iui} 



ture," and is of special interest to 
florists. The second one is the 



confined to the juvenile agr il"if* 
exhibits. 



We have some 


r o B A o o t> 


And about next Saturday 


and Sunday we will have 


some good stuff to eat. 


THE KENNEL CLUB 






SEE AND 

TRY A 

D E LAVAL 



Those who know 
buy the^De Laval 

« rrtniirryiiifii— llecause thry are eK- 
'- III the liandlitiKuf creani and know 
ii({ exp«'ri«r»ice that the l>e l.aval 
s (.leaiirst »iut wear> lonint. I hat 
., why oM ol th«r SVurld'!. creameries u»* 
lir l)eLa»alexclu»ivel>. 
K«|><Tlrnre<i l»i»lr) Mirn- 1 lit- lie I.aval 
n Ihe iiniwiNal lavoiiteaiii'>ng (hk ilair>- 
I tif \ know that no nthn srparatui 
.: .;ive tlipiii such satisfactory leivice. 
iM<l !>•• In«mI i;M»m -Wlieriever •man 
. '..1-. iis.l1 .mold nicKifl lie l.aval de 
i. - t.. putcliaM- a later itvle machine he 
iMVui.ibly Ihoh another De l.aval. 
Men Who Invedllgwle— Because the* 
.. l.iiLieniajorltyof L>e l.avalniachines 
. tfiat tliev ate used l»v the best in 
, ,. \ . ■ .■ . .■ • ,„d 

• t 

THE DE UVU SEPARATOR CO. 



•12.— Alden C. Brett visited col- ] l*rovidence, as well as Springfield, 
lege Sunday. He is to manage the i The artists who will be heard at the 
packing of some apples in Hardwick first concert in the auditorium on the 



for the next month or two, for an 
association of that vicinity. 

'12. — Albert W. IKnlge was seen 
around campus last week. 

'l.t. — Stuart D. Samson and Miss 
Cladys Amamla Allen were married 
Oct. i, at (i rand Isle, Vt. The happy 
couple spent Friday and Saturday in 
A mherst. 

'l.'j. — Webster .1. Uirdsall was mar- 
ried to Miss Marion li. Churchill, 
Oct. l,at Kichlield Springs, New 
York. They will resitle in ()teg«». 
New York. 

'I;{.~<^uincy S. I.,owry has visitetl 
college a loiiple of times «piite 
recently. 

In attendance at the .'»<Hh 



: 1 1 1 ' 1 1 tl w a \ . 

s. A ^ ,11 k 



21 K M iilivui -t. 
Chu ,ii{' 



evening of l)<tober 29, will be Maud 
Powell, the greatest American violin- 
ist, man or woinin, of t«Klay ; Yo- 
laiida Mero. the brilliant young Hun- 
garian pianist wlu», though as yet in 
her 20s, has already won an enthusi- 
astic following both in Kiirope and 
America; and Lambert Murphy, 
tenor, one of the youngest members 
of the Metro|M>litan opera com- 
pany in New York, and a Spring- 
field man ; Francis L. M<K>re will 
accompany. 

Artists to be had at succeeding 

concerts will be .Mine. Johanna tiati- 

ski, dramatic soprano ( Metri»politan 

Opera) ; Herbert Withersp<M.n, basso 

i ( Metri»politan Opera;) K\an Wll- 

annual > |ij,„,H. tenor : Heinald Werrenrath, 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Suppliei 
may be found at 



meeting. American Medical N'eter- 
ary Association. Sept., P.H.I, Hotel 
Astor, New York city : F. H Oh- 
g«KMl *7H, iioston;.!. F. Winchester 
'7.'>, Lawrence; P. Lyman *'.t2. West 
Lancing. Mich.; K. 11. Williams "J2. 
Sunderland ; V. H. Higgius •l»4. Ot- 
tawa, Canada. 



Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

I'M'KKKs. fOI'l.TKV UKKHSKKM 
AM> Itl TTKK MAKKK.<t. 

— WHnLll.SAI.> I1EAI.KM5 IN 

Keel .MHiton. tjunh. Veal. Porfc. Utra, Nani.«. 

llacon, Sausaccs. Poultry. <iame. Rwltcr 

Cheese. bKC*. Hcan*. 

t r \ Ntores 53.55.57.5'». ' I & >'i BlackMone St.. 
I 1 ilon I'ackinic House. liliRhton, Mass 
Saliva Poultry Dressing Plant, Hoston. 
Creameries in Vermont. 

Attention of Students. 

I Atf lookinK for cungenial and remu- 
V occupation during summer, write 

THK <i»CNKKAI. AI'PI>I ANCK. KACTOKV, 

Incorporated) Marinrtle, Wlomnaln. 

for particulars. 



William H. Watson's 

I'iaures, StoricA, Lecture«, Dramas 

I he consensus of press opinion of 
' ' ' ii continents, speaking eloquently of 
l>K Watson's work, is that he is a mas 
fn.isier of art and literature. Highly in- 
structive, illuminating and very wonrlrous 
Itii'iks. Kach picture a work of Art." 

ART SCHOOL PUBLISHINCl CO. 

2.M7 Mtchigan Avenue. ChicaKo. U. S. A. 



Ihere are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

O A L 



O 



OF 



C. R. ELDER 



STEINERT CONCERT SERIES 

Great Artists Will be Heard in Spring- 
field Auditorium This Fall. 

The font Steinert eonceii- v%iiich 
will l»e given in the audiUuium, in 
Springfield this fall, on W.ilneHilay 
evenings, Octoher 21». Ni»venil»er 12. 
Nuxemlter 1'.', and Heceinher 1<>. will 
hring before the puidic <»f this vi< in- 
ily a numlK-r <>f the UM»st famous 
artists who can he engaged for con- 
cert pur|K>««'s at this time in America, 
and the program will sh<«w thes«* art- 
ists at their very Im'sI. at prices 
within the reach of all. The succes?. 
uf the Steinert concerts in Providen«e 
last spring, organizetl hy An»«rt 
Steinert, was matter for congratu- 
lation on all sides— <jn the part of the 
public as well as the .lii.<t.. I .if thf 
enterprise. The first dilticulty. of 
eourse, in such an undertaking was 
the matter of the pri<e ..f mlmission. 
It is unfortunately the case that when 
great artists perform they charge for 
their services an amount which the 
manager, in turn, must receive from 
his audience. As a result, the price 
of admission to a concert «»f the first 
rank is usually considerably more 
than till" average wage-earner can 
affonl to pay. 

Mr. Steinert, after cuhidatiDg care- 
fully, came to the conclusion that it 
would be possible to give comerts at 
prices far less than those ordinarily 
charge<l, if a siifliciently extended 
circuit of performances could be es- 
tablisheil, thiH making it possible to 
otTer the performing artists big fees 
for a series of ...ncerts. while they 
rt-cciv. .MUHiderably less per concert 
than is ..rdinarily the necessity. 
When the scheme was tried out, the 
resulU justified the undertaking. 

Steinert concerts will be given this 
fall in Worcester. Portland, Me., and 



barit«ine ; Im/. Harbour, soprano; 
t;eorge Harris, dr., tennor, Marie 
Kaphtdd, soprano; Nevatia Van der 
Veer ( Mis. Ueed Miller) c<Mitralto ; 
Marie Caslova, violinist; Felix Fox. 
pianist. Further particulars alK>ut 
these concerts are gi\en in the illus- 
trated pri»gram b<M»k which can Im» 
had u|M>n applicatitin li».M. Steinert 
& Sons ('«».. 242 .Main street. Spring- 
fiehl. The lMM»k will be sent by mail 
if desired. 




EWE L US 



Massachusens Northern Rail- 
way Company. 



MwrAHi.iaMBn IMf>9 

St k i» h p: n \j\s k F<» r>fi k h 

MANI'KA*'! I'HINO JKSVICr.KH 

IHO IIWOAOW AV. NKW YOMK 

IMNM ANIJ MINOK ,0- 
OOt.D. •IJ.TBH Alto BROMZa MMUAVm 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Fin- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWKR KXPKNSKS l-jiablc us** 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

ANO 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 

cox SONS 

— AMI»-— 

VINING 

71-74 Madiaon Avenue, New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

best Materials and Workmanship 




WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



s; Main St., Masonic BIdg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



C/M*/ m/^ /ram t A. M. U 4 A. M. 



Toefll Mientka 

Shoes Stmed and Pollsted 

Make old shoes look like new 

Neat, classy workmanship 

Op«>n Hnnrfajr Main Ht. 

Ob way to Past Ofiica. 










i 



>. 



The Coliefe Signal, Tuesday, October 14, 1913 



TENNIS 
RACKETS 




—At— 



DEUEL'S 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty six teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horliculture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Agricullure 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairyinig 

Poultry Husbandry 



Horticulture 

Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape (Jardening 

Pomology 



AMHERST 

Chp Laundry 

High-Grade College Work 
LAUNDRY 

Shirts, - 10 15c 

Collars, - • - - 2 I-2C 

Cuffs, - • - 2 I-2C 

Plain wash, - 48c per doz. 

Same, rough dry, - joc per dot. 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, I1.50 a Suit 



Agricultural Chemistry 
Economic Entomology 
Plant Physiology and Pathology 
Agricultural Education 



For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST, MASS. 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWKLKR AND OPTOMETKIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 

COLLKGK JkWKLKV 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and (iuitar ^ttmg, 

AMHKKST, MASH. 
Next to Post Oftice. 



STEAM FITTING, Telephoni- ^^, 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

P. W. Dance & Co. 



Specialty of Repairing 

Church Wisim)WS, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, &c. 
t Clifton Av«^ AMHERST, MA.S.S 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



KALfH J. BoMUBN. Agent. 7 North Cottage 
EiiWANii C. KiiWAiii», Agent 

Put full name and address on laundry 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Loose - Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 

Hefore buying elsewhere, see our auort- 
ment of pennants and banners 

CUKRAN A DYER. Props. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Athletic IU)ard, 

The College Senate, 

Football Artmwiution, 

Butiebull AiiHooiutioii, 

Track AsHociation, 

Hockey A«*»o<-iHtioii, 

TeuuiH AHHuciiition, 

Uiile club. 

Roister DoiMtem 

MuHieul AuHociutiou, 

Niucteeu Hundred Fourteen Index, 

Niiteteeu Hundred Fifteen Imlex, 

M. A. C Christian Ai»H<H-iutiou, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stuckbridge Club, 



George H. Chapman, Secretary 

I). VV. Jones, I'lCHideut 

S. U. Freeborn, Manager 

(i. I). Melicau, Manager 

K. C. hxlwardh. Manager 

.1. i). I'ellett, Manager 

K. K. MacLain, Manager 

J. W. r. l.«8ure. Secretary 

l>. .1. I^ewia, Manager 

H. D. Hrown, Manager 

K. S. Clark, Jr., Manager 

H. M. RogerH, Manager 

H. II. Powers, Presicleut 

I). A. Coleuiaii, President 

J. I). Pellett, Presitlent 

N. H. Deariug, President 



Catalogues of 

Are out. Copy mailed to any addrt-x (dint. 
Students and .VtliU-tcs wlio want thifirj' 
articles tor ll>e various siKjrts should 1 
th(>se iK^ring ttic NS'right & Uitkun I :. .. 



Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Hockey 
Skates 




5kat'g5lioct 
Sweaters 
Jer5c> • 

Uniforms 
for all sporti 



Wright & Ditson (ioods are tlM Maadaril M 
all sports 

144 Washington St., Uiiston, Mi» 



U^hen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



M TERPSY PARLOR 

CLEANSING. 

PRCSSINO. 

REPAIRING. 

UnU-kfat M>rvle«), Hrat Wurk, I.«»wp«i friw 

All woik carefully done Work called (or »k 
delivered, dents' overcoats, suits, u*nt» m 
coats. Ladies' hne linen suita a specialiT 

TMins will call every day at M . A L 

Wn. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Kear Nash Bl'k, Amheral. 



T«l N» >H 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



Buy your flowers of the floricul* 
tural department. The new green' 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations,violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300 



Barsalotti & Gtentoso 

cigars Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresli Candy 

Ice Cream, Fruit, Soda, Etc. 

The Right Uoods at the Kight Price* 

Open till II o'clock EVERY night 

G«racr Amitjr and Fleaaant Streets 



If yon want to b« 

SOLID WITH THK (ilRLH 

joa must have your clothe* pres.ted aotl cleaned 

AT BPSTBXir'S 

1) Amity St. Maroon Store 

Pressing and Cleaning a specialty 

Moal liberal ticket syatem In town 
Tel. 303-II 



CARS 



Leave AOOIE COLLEOE for HOL- 
YOKE on cm;Ii HOUR. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AOOIK COL- 
LBUE at 7 and 11 min. past mA 
HOUR. 

Special Care at RaMWMbto Rate* 



AIHERSI & SUNDERLAND SI. BY. CO 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 



Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. 



1424-1426 Chestnut St. 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



For a Daily and Sunday Newsp»p« 
You .nhould Kead 

Springfield Republican 

While you are at college in Ai .her^' 

It has Mil orrhr M. A. €.!<.•»»• 
The H.-SI MporlluK New* 
Full (if^nrrnl N.>wi> 
A Mtronit Kdltorlal Faire 
IntrrrstiRK Fnaturrs 
ltlaBK<>al Nfws|»a|irr 

Daily, 3 cents ; 70 cents a month; JJ" 
a quarter. 
Sunday, 5 cents; 50 cents a .| larter 

Subscribe by mail or through the A ^ *»« ' 
dealer. 



THE COLLEGE 




fJHKAKY oi 

I2;n9i3 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEOE 



^ L. XXIV. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October 21, 19 » 3^ 



No. 6 



FRESHMEN SMOKE ON CAMPUS PHI KAPPA PHI 



Victory Over 1916 '«» Annual Football 
Game by Score of 6-0. 



Pres. Meiklejohn of Amherst. Speaker. 
i Clark and Porter '14 Elected. 



In an exciting, but at times looHcly 
jihivt'd gaine, the fresbinun football 
t, nil defeated the soidiomores 6-0 
>:.lurdtty tiftcrnt>on, and tlms earned 
f,M their class the right to Hinoke on 
rainjtus. About the middle of 
s»-(«.iitl quarter, I'iikaid iiiter- 
,. ,.tt«l a forwanl pass near his own 
goal line, and, backed by the splentliil 
i.ti-rference of (Irayson, made a seii- 
!*tttio«al Ht)-yard run for the only 
iMiuhdown of the game. Uutterick 
iiiiswHl the goal. 

IMiring the liist half <»f the game 
the ball seesawed back and forth. 
iKilliei' side seeming to have any 
tdvanta<p'e. Danforth's punting here 
-howeil up t«» advantage for the sopho- 
.iiures. The fresliiiian team wurk j 
w8« especially noticeable as their 1 
ttrfereiice was sujierior to that of 1 
ilM'ir opponents. Ilaaren at tpiarter- 
h:H k ran his team well. 

After the fust two perio*!?.. in 
which there was re|»ettted fumbling, 
1.0th teams scttletl down to fast fcM»t- 
I After the freshman's touch- 
iown. the hophoiiiorcs came b:.ck 
•Hpecially strong. Hich making 
(.■|i*-!iI»m1 gains thnuigh the freshman 
lie after being shiftetl to the baek- 
Reld. The two teams were very 
• losely matchetl and but for the g«KKl 
fortune of the freshmen in the third 
perioil a 0-0 tie woiihl probably have 
trsulted. 

As ioon as time was called, the 
freahiiiM lit up their pi|)e8 and 
-uirtwl aeelebralioii which was s<hhi 
i.roken up by their rivals. 
The lineup : 

fKRilHUKfl. sm'H»)MOKKS. 

I. ray son, H,igel»tein. le 

re, liisbee, Tojjham 
H€van,lt rt, 1'l.nMed 

Hooth, Cotton, Ig 

rg. Kicker, Cu;>hing. Hams 
Warren, c c, Vcrl>eck. Anderson 

Itimritk (capt.), Choate, rg 

Ig, Umlge, Aiken 

•t.uire. rt It, Walker 

^;^iiil>oltom, re le, Kich, (iioiosa 

Ha.ucn, qb qb. Murphy (capt.) 

.,>s, Ihb rhb, Uanfotlh 

Kkard, rhb Ihb, Chisholm 

liowen, Higgens, fb 

fb, Clough, Sanderson 

.cure- Freshmen S .Sophomores o. 

I Hicltdown I'ltkard Keferer— Ken- 

'.f .\mlu'rM. Impire iSaker »if 

.->MtJuisitl<« amritultural college, 

arl linesman -Tower of Massachu- 

- .iKriciiltural college. Time— H and 

"un. (|uarters. 



The Wednesday assemiily was 
devoted to Phi Kappa Phi, the hon- 
orary fraternit? of the tHe college. 



LARGE INFORMAL 

Eighty Couples Qathcr at Drdl Hall tor 
Record Event of the Year. 

The aeconil Informal of the year 
was held Satnnlay, and was very 
successful. The attcntlaiK e was ex- 
Professor Fi.oid opene<l the meeting cepti.uially giH.d, abot.t eighty coii- 
and gave a short history of the pies being present, 
society, which was organi/.ed in IH'.»7 j Thcie was plenty of entertau.ment 
in resp<m«e to a desire to have an on the campus f,.r the visitois. 



honorary society that c<>uld take 
honor men from any course, in con- 
trast with Phi Beta Kappa, which 



Those who came early enjoyed the 
class f«M.tb:dl game; the others 
watchetl the tielil events and track 



iritai mill • m •»».". ■••-i-i .11,.. 

can have chapters only in classical work during the intervals between 

colleges. The chapter at this college .lances. The customary maroon and 

f' • . . , •• 1 _...: .„! ,.» ui.iu uiu>il 111 



w»« established in I'JOI. Professor 
Ford then intnMln«e<l President 
Alexander Meiklej<din of Amherst 
ctdlege as Phi Kappa Phi siwaker. 

President Meiklejohn spoke of the 
pleasure of being able to address the 
memlK-rsof the college which is 
eiigagetl in the same work as Am- 
herst college, although in a difterenl 
way. lie s:.i.l in part: However 
(lilTerent we aie, different IkMU in 
what we :iie tloiiig «nd the way wc 
I do it, let 11-. iievertbelcHs, know one 
!am»ther. ami be nuite.1 l.y our c«m.- 
Imon puriMise whi.li is to know and 
I know mrMc. 

You should pifk thin^>' thul liivt 



white decorative scheme was used in 
tlie Drill Hall, an«l the orchestra was 
hiihleii in an oval of palms in the 
center, a departure, borrowed this 
year from the last .luni«»r Prom, 
which has proven quite successful. 

The patnmesses «eie Mrs. Ilicka 
ami Mrs. ^^tiaife. I he Ml. lloly»»ke 
chaperone was .Miss Dunbar, ami the 
Smith chapel ons were Mrs. Hillings 
ami .Miss Hobbins. 

A partial list of those alleiiding 
follows: from the facully, .Mr. 
lirown, Mr. Hillary. Mr McLaugh- 
lin; lyU, lla/.en. Needham. Ilutcll- 
iuMuu, IWiil. I';<lwar4iii, l-ucus. I \N 
Head, Norton, Brooks, Frye. Alli 11, 



FIELD MEET 

Captain Nicolct Breaks College Record 
in Broad Jump. 

The sophom<nes took lirst, fresh- 
men secoiul, seniors thir»l, and 
juniors foiirlb in the Held meet, held 
SmIuhImv. 

Allhough not a Soph«»more-Fre«h- 
niaii meet the contest st»on developed 
into a duel iKMweeii the two, as the 
upper classes failed to show any 
class, except Nicolet who was easily 
the star of the broad jump event, 
lie iiiaile a pretty jump of 'l\ ft. and 
1-2 inch, betiting the college rcctml 
by 7-** of an inch. 



vahie In themsi.|ves aside from the Dearing. Ilarr... Dav.s "'l^'; ' 



value that is assigmNl to them. We 
talk of the virtues of mankind. ••<»ur- 
agc. honesty and Irutlifulness. We 
justify them by the statement that a 
man iM>ss<'»i»ing them is more useful. 



gerton. Black, Walker, Baker. Pellet, 
Foster, Jones; IUI'n Vinal, Perry, 
Wilkins. Haskell, Tower, Hildieth, 
Bishop. Buell, Hyde, Uogers, Ken 
ncdv. Archibahl, Towne ; 1!M»;. Tar 



l:rZ^2^^^^^^^^^^V^^- -^ ^^'-- NlColson, MatU.,.., 
.nee of desiring to be truthful lals-r, Dinamore. (.oi.lwin. Hunt. 




whethei it will help him or not It 
\n worth while to i-c truthful . honest, 
worthy and straightforward, u-t ..n 
actKMint of the effect on other men. 
but l»ecause it is best for the man 
himself. For that is the s«»rt of man 
one wants to Ik*. 

You at this college, and we both 
Udieve that for WK-iety at large ami 



Hathaway, Uuswll, MetulUKh. 
Ver!M?ck ; P.M7. Schaefer, Wheeler, 
pintle, Buckman. Buck, Saville, 
Baer. Smith. Bieck. Petit, I pson, 
Merrill, halhaii. Olliers were 
Latham. Willard. Sludley. Wat«on, 
lliggins, Hobins«m. DilUui. KIlis 'i:i, 
Harris I*. I ^>wry 'I.'.. 

Freshman exislua over iobimbus 
tlay was quite marked. 



ENROLLMENT AT THE MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL 
COLLEGE, OCTOBER 10, 1913. 



CHAPEL NOTICE 

From Nov. 1 until spring vacation, 
jxl will be held .M<mdays and 
I'lays only. 



Seniors 

juniors 

Sophomores 

Freshmen 

post ( iriiluates 

Unclassified 

ToT.M- 

Increase 

Since |S.>8 
Since 1903 
Since vp^ 
Since i«>'2 



I /13 

.>.s 

105 

140 

aoo 

604 



1912 

102 

>2S 

184 

23 

3' 

SS5 



1911 1910 



1909 igo* 



»s 
97 
127 

i«kH 

>5 

29 



47 

«7 

110 

.58 

»5 
»7 

434 



45 
SO 
91 
•34 
18 
12 

350 



49 
48 
52 
U7 
12 

1^ 



i'>o3 
ao 
34 
37 
61 

4 
1 

•57 



1898 

• 7 

29 
40 

34 

10 

2 

•3« 



357/'% 

2S47% 

117-3% 

9-0% 



. I io6'/(, 

• 771% 
. 19.7% 



The Si>plMmioie"' goi the start I'V 
placing two mew in the punting con- 
test, t»%o ill 111"- I'i^l' jii"i|'»* '»•"• 
two in the |Mde vault. The Fresh- 
men, however, came back strong by 
taking all three places in the shot 
put, and first and »**«-i>ml in the dis- 
cus Birchard was high man for the 
Frenbroen wioolng a total of nine 
lH>int«. Tb«' '"•■«'t !?»*« Coach 
Whitlier a line on some excellent 
new material from Uie Freshman 
cbisn, as well as gelling him in U»uch 
with all the men. 

The events were as follows : 
Punting Contest- Won by King 
n; : 2ml. .lohnaon 'l/i; ard. Brooks 
•|.'». Distance, .'»:i. I yards. 

High jump— Won by (JiKigina M6 ; 
2nd. Whitney 'If,; ilrd. Ibdt "17. 
Height, Ti feet 1-2 inch. 

Pole Vault— < toogins 'Ifi and Whit- 
ney 'Ifi, tied for fir»l;:Jrd Birchard. 
Height, 10 feet. 

Shot I'lit—Won by Kdwards '17; 
2n«l. Hupt'l 'I'*'; ;5rd. HarringUm '17. 
Distance \V1 feet .'5 inches. 

Broad .limi|. Won hy rjiplaiii 
Nic(det 'II; I'lid. Birchard; :W(1. 
Sturtevaiit. Distance, 21 feel 1-2 
inch. (New lieconl. ) 

Discus — Won by Biirc hard '17; 
2nd. Danforlli 'Ic, ; ;li.l. Bnpi.c! '17. 
Distance, 102 feet 2 inches. 
The Points : 

Sophomoics, 24 ; FicHhmcn, 21 ; 
Seniors, h \ Juniors, 1. 



I 



I 



II 



I 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 21, 1913. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October zx, 19*3 



j|^ 

w 




<p 




# 



n 



w 



COMMUNICATION 

(Communications to the SinNAL concerniiiK 
matters of Kcnera I inteiest aie welcomed. Tiie 
Signal is not to be held responsible for the 
opinions thus expressed.) 

To Tjik Kditor ok The Signal. 
Dear tSir: 

"Boost Old Aggie!" A better 
and more coniprehenHive phrase could 
not ]>e Helected us the motto of every 
loyal son of Old MaHs'eimsetts. It 
is needless to say that the full pur- 
lM>rt of this phrase is being carried 
out by the undergraduate student 
Ijody, but how about the alumni? 
Are not they, even more than the 
undergraduates, sons of Aggie? Is 
it not the job of every ahuuniis to 
consider M. A. C. the source of his 
ideals, the fundamental cause of his 
success in life, and the alma mater 
to which he owes all allegiance, 
whose meujory he nlioidd cherish and 
whose caii.se he should boost with all 
there is in him? In answer to this 
query I feel sure that every Massa- 
chusetts man, graduate or undergrad- 
uate, will unliesitatingly say "yes." 

Hut the (piestion does not hinge 
u|>on the willingness of the alumni to 
"iMjost," but of impressing them 
with the idea that Aggie is worth 
being exalted and so to imitue them 
with that phraM-, "Hoost Old Aggie" 
that it will l)c a second nature to 
every man. 

The business man doesn't sell his 
wares merely by sending out cata- 
logues to his prospective buyers, 
lie sends a travelling salesiiiun and, 
whenever poisNiM,', samples of his 
goo<|s so that the buyer may see and 
be convinced of their worth. This 
coin<i«les exactly to the relation ex- 
isting between Aggie and her alumni. 
Ninety i»er cent, of these men have 
not seen Aggie under full steam 
since they were graduated. Fifty |>er 
cent of this ninety subscribe to the 
Skjnal and simply read of Aggie's 
deeds. Hut they nnist d<> more than 
this; they must see. As the sales- 
man exhibits his gocxls, M. A C. 
must exhibit hers. Since the college 
cannot be brought to the alumni, the 
alumni must be brought to the col- 
lege, not as in .June when they can 
have no direct contact with the stu- 
dent body and the college is in gala 
dress, but during the year when 
everything is in full swing. They 
must see the various activities and 
get in touch with the plans of these 
organizations, they nuist see the im- 
provements which take place year by 
year, and they must meet the under- 
graduate body, since without this the 
college would cease to live. 

Hut, you say, how can this be 
done? Here is a suggestion. Three 
or four times a year Draper Hall is 
the scene of what is called "College 
Night." Various speakers address 
the student body, for the most part 
upon subjects of which every man is 
aware and the whole aflFair falls more 
or less (lat. Now, instead of having 
three of these somewhat doubtful 
"spirit raisers," for such they are 

I 



when devoted solely to the student 
body, why not take one of these 
nights and call it "Alumni Night"? 
Notify every living Aggie alumnus 
and ex-student that this night is set 
aside to show the college to the 
alumni and give every man the idea 
that he must get there or "bust." 
Arrange it so they can all come at 
the same time ; send the student 
body to meet them at the station, 
and escort them up to the campus 
Show them that Aggie is just as 
capable of caring for her older sons 
as for those whom she still fosters. 
Let the plans for the evening include 
a reunion lianquet, after which every 
alumnus shoidd l>e invited to the 
chapel or drill hall and given seats of 
honor. I^'t every undergraduate 
make it a point to be there s«) that 
the "old boys" may have a chance 
to see as good a crowd of college 
men as exists in America Uxlaj. 
Next in order should be a series of 
speeches l)y leading graduates and 
undergraduates ho that the spirit of 
the old days may become fused with 
that of the present. Half of the 
alumni are unacquainted with the 
songs and cheers of the college an<l 
no better occasion than this coultl 
arise in which to learn them. 

The following aftern<K>n might In: 
<levoted to <»ne of the more import- 
ant athletic contests, depending of 
course u|K>n the season of the year, 
thus giving the "ol<lgrads"an oppor- 
tunity to see Massachusetts' great 
progress in athfctics and to realize 
the great need of an athletic field. 
If the visitors could be persuaded to 
renuun over Saturday evening the 
UHisical and dramatic clubs might 
take advantage of this op|K>rtunity 
to demonstrate the progress along 
these lines. 

In the case of the more ilistant 
alumni who find it impossiltle to be 
in Amherst, it might l>e well to have 
a reunion that same evening in every 
large city where any sort of M. A. ('. 
club or association exists. Let each 
and every club exchange telegrams 
of good will, showing a determina- 
tion to stand by the old college for- 
ever. Have all telegrams received at 
the college read at the mass meeting, 
thus assuring to all present that 
every living alumnus is on that night 
thinking of Aggie and Aggie only. 
These reunions can be nuide so 
impressive that every Massachusetts 
man will attend them even when he 
is 90 years old and is dependent upon 
a wheel chair. 

Some stich plan as this can easily 
be carried out by means of a little 
pushing. M. A. C. has reached a 
stage where she needs the support of 
every graduate as well as the state. 
The state cannot support the under- 
graduate activities and it is to the 
alumni that they must appeal for the 
support which they must have in 
order to keep pace with the progress 
manifested by the college and its 
faculty. The needs which the state 
cannot, or will not provide for, must 



.H. 



HERMAN'S U.S. ARMY 
SERVICE BLUGHER 

In Tan Willow Calf ur 
Gun Metal. A haud- 
some.suappy shoe 
ontheOrtliopedic f 
lust, desi(;uetl by 
army surffeons. 
You never saw 
a shoe like it 
for wear, com- 
fort and 
style. 

Single 
Kolo ut' 
Texas un- 
scourcdoak.ix'x 
toe, sole leather 
ouni«T8,t'V<'ry part 
inspected. i.inin;: <>f 
specially tested drill. A (M>lid 
leather slice that will give the 
wear uf the civilian slioe lliat 
sells foDHO. This i.sone of tiie 
hIkm's I'ncle Sam huvs for his 
sol<liers. IT'S A >V01{L1> 
liKATEli. See the Aruiy line. 




HERMAN'S U.S. 
ARMY SHOES 




Lasts designed l> 
AKMY Sur 
geons. Materia 
are the best tli.i 
can be obtained. 
Wurkmanshi]! 
nspeeted 
and guar- 
anteed. 



No. 968 

GARRISON 

BLUCHER. 

One of tlio moiit popular 
in the Army Line. Ma-'o in Tan Wil- 
low C»lf anil Ouii BletHl. IIeit\ , 
BintriM Bolt*, Imis toe. solid leMtlifr 
t>ir<>uehoiit.Ab»ndsofneNiiap|ty.Hho<. 
t'oiiii* ill lt» ht-f till- li:ii>. .M:iiiuf;i(tiiriii 

♦ily by Joseph 3. Ilcrman A:t'o., B»st»ii. 



PRICE 84. 00 



PRICE 84.00 



PAGES SHOE STORE 



THE 

HooYerfi Smith Co. 

616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 

Philadtlphla's Official Fraternity Jewclir 

SPBOIALISTS IN 
Praternity Badfca, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prises Trophies. 

Medals College Pins. Fobs, Seals, 

Rings, Charms.-. 

E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass 

Orrici Hooaae 
e to laa a. ^i. i..0OCc>Ci s>. im • 




Pheasant 

amit^ St.. 
Bmber^t 

Telephone 470 



RKKAKFAST 

LVNCHION 
AKTERNOON TKA 

l>inner if arranced for. 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 



Now at ij Pleasant St. 



Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses .'Accurately Replaced 
Fine Watch Repairing Promptly and 
.Skilfully Done 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 



A Chance to Save Money 

A S5.00 Safety Razor for $5.00 

But we give you a coupon which when signed with your 
name and home address we refund you ^.50. It carries 
the Rexall guarantee, " Money back if not satisfied." 

We carry a full line of 

Waterman, Conklin and Moore's Fountain 

Pens, Stationery, Pipes, Tobacco 

and Cigarettes. 

Lig^ett's, Belle Meade and Green Seal Chocolates 

THE HENRY ADAMS CO., Druggists 

The REXALL Store on the corner 



uiken care of by the ahinini. Hut 
p.-int I wish to eini»hii8i/.e is that 
unless they can become sulliciently 
intcreBtcil in Aggie— ami this they 
, niiot become uuIcbh llicy ncliially 
MH- the college as »he really is with 
1,1 1 great progressiveness, aud are 
iiiude to realize the resulting greater 
,i. td of loyal BUpi>ort— this much 
miMled support will not be forth- 

, timing. 

AgaitJ I urge that some such idea 
in- pushed to the liuiit. Make it so 
that every iilumnus will love the col- 
U^'o and waut above all thiiign to see 
l„ I iir»»gress as all other colleges are 
progressing. lA>t this thought so 
iMiiiiuate the mind ami heart of every 
Massachusetts man that his last wc.rds 
will be a refpiest to his children, 
grandchildren and all hi» descend- 
ents to 'liOOST OLD ACCIK." 
Very truly yours, 
Ckorck Zabiciskik -io, I'n;^. 



TWENTY-FIVE DOLLAR 
BOWKER PRIZE 



The $i.'» IU)wker prize offered by Mr. 
William ILliowker '71 at .Xiiiiiversary 
|»:iy three weeks ago f«»r the liest 
, nHuv on the total distance c«>vered 
j{..ing lietween recitations for a day, 
will l»e coui|)eted for next semester. 
riie details governing the contest are 
to Ih' worked out by rrofessor Hicks 
.uid Uic Senate, and will be an- 
nounced at a later date. 



THE ITALIAN CLUB 

An Italian club has recently been 
formed through the inlluence of Pro- 
fessor MacKimmie and under the 
direct leadership of W. H. Dumas 
'17, of Hoston. the sole purpose of 
which is for the study of the Italian 
language, it being understootl that 
this will include composition; conver- 
sation, grammar and reading. Inas- 
much as the cltd> is still under organ- 
ization, nothing delinite can be said 
about it. Membershiii now includes 
about twenty-five nieu, most of whom 
are sophomores; but it needs men 
from the other three classes in order 
that a constittititMJ that will re|MeHent 
each class may be drawn up. The 
present idea, as outlined by Dunuis 
and agreetl to i»y the meinliera, is to 
join with the Cercle Francais and to 
devote We«lnesdays' meetings to Ital- 
ian and Friilays' meetings to French 
with a little Itidian. 

The clidi now meets every Wed- 
nesday and Friday evening at 0-10 
in Room Ci, South college. Mem- 
bership is open to all those attending 
, three consecutive meetings. The 
establishment of this club is a dis- 
tinctly progressive Btep l>ecau»e 
gra«ltiate8 of this i-ollege have fre- 
fpieiitly found themselves hiimpered 
in their work by a lack of knowledge 
,,f the Italian language. Names for 
membership sh<iuld be handed to 
Dumas '17 or I'rof. - r MaeKimmie. 



Mackinaws 




THB 
SMOOTHEST 



COME, boy«, a cheer— AH to- 
iether-V-EJL-V-E^T— MKiodi. 

Vehfet cheer* you on and cheen 
you up. It's »o smooth. The 
(elected leaf u hung m the ware- 
house over two yean — changing 
harthoeu to complete mellownos. 
Then all "bite'* hat disappeared 

—Mid food IMM ud dM M)i7fbh 
tmoothf an pn-couoail. ^This "liaa 
proccM** ■ not patented — |ii<^eo<i m 
mote — and the rewh i* "Velvet**— 
UKwlk and woaderiully pIc Mi m 

Now oocc mote — errrybody — 
V.E.L.V^T— HDooOkl AlaU 



J^lff4jt%/fy»U^rfatccCbl 




AND 



Sweaters 



This is Mackinaw and Sweater season. Football. Golf and 
all other Fall and Winter sports call lor good Sweater pro- 
tection. We have in stock today several humlrcd Macki- 
naws in all grades. 



The famous Sumniit brand, well known in the N(»rthwe8t 
and acknowledged tn be one of the be.st. Coal Sweaters, 
the Shawl Collar, Coat Collar antl the regular shape 
Sweaters, all the best selling c<dors. 

HJIt.OO to iH»T.c>t> 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



School and Colkgc Phoiograpftcrs . . . 




, r^r^Al lY- 5J Center St.. Northampton Mass., 



Main OpricK: 

1546 1548 Hriiadway. 

New York City 



and South Hadley, Mast. 

rhcKC Slu«lu»» offer the lieM >killcd 
itrtikU *w\ ""»>< < umplt-te 

rc|Uipmcnt obtainable 




Wi: SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 

In so far as our l^enefits are muttial. 

THl' AMHERST (AS COMPANY 

Fx/ervthing Electrical 



M(S>RE*S $2§9 



^ FOUNTAIN PEN 

- "MhTimlze your fountain pen 

For Sale by D-if- Everywhere ^/ . 

American Fountain Pen Company 

IM DBVONSMIRESTRKKT B0S10N. MAJM^ 



</\! 



FidlTwa 
One* Tot 



The ColUge Sifnal, Tuesday, October 21, 1913. 



The College Signal, Tnatday, October 21, 1913. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday eventng; by 

the Students of the Massachusetts 
Afrtcultural Coneg:e. 



BOABD OF EDIT0B8. 

CHKSTKR K4\VHKr:i.ER 'm, Kditor In-Chief 

Man.iK>i>g Kditor 

Competition Kditor 

Assistant Kditor 

Athletic Kditor 

Alumni Kditor 

Athletic Kditor 

|)ep.irtm«^nt Kditor 

Campus Editor 

Associate Kditor 

Kditor 



FKANK W. lU'KI.I. 'i?, 
HAROLD C. BLACK '14. 
HAROLD J. CLAV '14. 
STUART B. FOSTKK 'u. 
ERVINE F. PAKKKR'm 
J. ALBEKT PRICK '15. 
GEO. E DONNKI.L'i5. 
KARLE S. DRAPER '15. 
TYLER S. R(K,KRS'i6. 



CHARLES W. CLTRTIN'i\ Associate 



BUSIIfESS DEPARTMENT. 

ERNEST S. CLAKK. IR. '14. Hus. Manager 
MAURICE J. CLOl'C.H 15. Ass't Hus. Mgr. 
ERNEST F. UPTON '14. Advertising Manager 
W. RICH AKI) SEARS '15. Asst. Adv Miinager 
CHAS. A. HUNTINGTON. JR. '16, Circulation 



Subscription #1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents Make all orders payable 
to Ernest S. Clark, Jr. 

■■(•red u Mcond-ctaM matter at th« Amharal 
rm OWea. ^ 

Vol. XXIV. TURSDAV, Oct. at. No. 6 



•• Boost Old Aggie. 



The recent <;ontlmied rain lias 
einpbttsizetl tlie fact that thf lo\> stop 
at tljt? east riitruiuo of North HhoiiUI 
be fixed. The bricks have »agge<l 
BO that at every shower the depres- 
sion becomes fllletl witli water, and 
the unsiirtpectiijg victim, unless 
especially careful, steps out of the 
door into a puddle that at least wets 
his feet if it d<H«8n't spatter his trous- 
ers. The many i)e<»ple who use the 
entrance would appie«iate this l»eing 
attended to. II. J. C. 



TiiK attention of all the men in 
the freshman class is called to the 
fact that less than two weeks is left 
in which to enter the Shjn vi, ctun- 
petition. The response in the edito- 
rial department has Iteen very pleas- 
ing and encouraging, but in the bus- 
iness departnteiit only two men have 
come out. It is for thi^* reason that 
we take this opportunity to urge u|M»n 
the freshmen, that a few more men 
should enter this year's competition 
The man who makes the lH>ard on his 
fresman year in the busincHs depart- 
ment, is in tlirert line for business 
manager of the paper in his junior 
and senior year. This inducement 
should be great enough to cause 
many more men to come out. Don't 
be a .sluggard, freshman? (let into 
wjmething in college activities. Here 
is one chance to show your mettle. 



At this college, as in all other 
higher institutions of learning, cer- 
tain customs and tiaditionH liave been 
handed down from one class to the 
next as one of the sacred parts of 
college life. The better th.' fr.sh- 
man can understand that these cus- 
toms must be lived up to for their 
own sake, the better will he be able 
to help to maintain that spirit which 
has dominated his predecessors, and 
which shotild dominate liis successors. 
One of the customs wliicli Massachu- 
setts men have carried out from year 



to year is the one pertaining to fresh- 
men recognizing the members of the 
senior class by the military salute. 
This custom was never intentended 
for the use of a portion of the enter- 
ing class, but for all of them. It 
has been apparent this year, that a 
tendency to avoid carrying out this 
custom has appeared among the 
freshmen class. The sophomore 
class is given the authority to require 
the carrying out of this custom, and 
it is "up to" them. 



(Not 
theSu 
'15, on 

issue.) 

Oct. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

ices for this column should be dropped in 
;nai. Office or handed to Earle S. Draper 
or before the Saturday precedinu each 



A large number of candidates are 
out for the SniNAi,. There should 
be a lively competition for both the 
editorial and business departments. 

Coach Brides has been giving the 
varsity squad a rest the past week. 
Practice has now been resumed in 
earnest in preparation for the Tufts 
game. 

Wednesday mornings fire drills are 
(|uite spectacular. Lacking the 
freshmen, who are in College Life, 
this form of amusement is provided 
for the bored sophomores. 

Ilager 'KI ripped the muscles of 
his arm, Thursday during fot>tball 
practice. It was first feared that 



Clark '15 



Eldridge '14 



All Student Supplies 



M. A. C. STORE 



BANNERS AND POSTERS 



CANOV TONIC 



Montague '15 



Hager ' 



11. 



ONITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every studrnt will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

ftKOULAR Hli'NOAY SKKVICK AT 3 r M. 



Seeourljneof Drill Shoes 

E. RUSSELL NORTON $2.00 tO $4.00 



22 — 1-10 p. M., Assembly, I'res. 
C. II. Spooner of Norwich 
university. 

22 — 7-0<> p. M., Koister Dois- 
ters practice. 

23—6-45 V. M., M. A. C. C. A. 

chapel. 

2."» — .'i-1') P. M., Campus Mid- 

dlebury vs. M. A. C. Varsity 

football. 

2.^— r».;t(> p. M., Drill Hall. 
.Social Inion Prc^ram. Fresh- 
man Night. 

2« — 7-0f» p. «., Knt. Building 

Florist's ami (Jaidener's did). 

28 — 7-00 I'. M., Boom (i. 

South College. Stockbridge 

club. 

2y — I-IO i». M., Assembly. « .. « ■ • #* i 

Dr. Harry w. Laidier, secre- Bcst QuaiHy Pennsylvania Coal 

tary intercollegiate socialist 
Bocietv. 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest line in 
the state outside of IJosti ;. 



SALES AGKNT 



Davenport Miller 
Vein Coal 



MODERN REPAIR 
DEPARTMENT 



CAMPUS NOTES 

Are you saving fur the Tufts trip. 
If not why not? 

Another successful informal ! Ijei 
the gotxl work go on. 

Charles Perry Clough'K'. of Ded- 
ham. has pledged BeUi Kappa Phi. 

Some run I The freshmen knew 
their opjmrtunity when they saw it. 

H. .1. Matt(K>n was electe<l mana- 
ger of the sophomore track team on 
Thursday. 

Field day events proved popular 
with all classes, and worthy of Iwjiug 
|>erpetuated. 

President Spooner of Norwich 
university will review the regiment 
Wednesilay. 

The time has arrived when that 
first month's board at the hash house 
runs «>ut. Ante up. 

The picture of the 8tu<lenl Iwxly 
turned out very well. Orders are 
being taken at ?1 per. 

The trade in mackinaws has started. 
"Patronize home industry." Several 
students are agents for them. 

During drill Tuesday, two clear 
concentric rainbows caused by a 
"variety" storm, proved of greater 
interest than drill. 

In the account of the Inter-class 
cross-country run, the position in the 
finish of R. K. Nute, 1911 should have 
been seventh instead of fifteenth. 



E.M.BOLLES 



(ON y<HJn «VAV TO R. o.) 



BOSrO.N OFFICE 

8s Water St. 



MEW YORK OpfirR 

I liroadway 



LOW PRICE TAILORING CO. 

SI IIS MADE T<» oKDKK 
Soil* Cleaned. Pre*»td and Dyed. All kinds of 
KrpairihK for I.adu'S and tlentlenten neatly dcnp. 
Uluh urade wiiilt h\ ht>t clas* tailor. Work 
called for and delivered Sell lickH* f«n pressing, 
4 sens FOK |i-^o 

GCORGC KOTOWITZ. Pnof>. 

Main Street, Amhefst. Mas*. Nash Uloik 

( >n your way to the Post ( )fhce. Tel. 4jJ>-\V 



Cooiep's Rocci 

Springfield, Mass., 

Solicits the patronage of the S'u 
dents of the Agricultural Colic;;* 
to class dinners and individualh 



THE KATHERINE E. McCLELLAN STUDIO 

44 State St., Northampton, Mass. 

PORTRAITS — GROUPS — VIEWS 

Insist upon seeing our college v^'ork and prices before decidinu 



Call or Tklkimionk 131 



Itlie iiiiii wasbroken but later inquiry 
,1 ■ That no fracture resulted. 

O,,^ ol the newsiest of the college 

|,,ap.i.son lile in the library is The 

/,'. , :fl<' of I^)uisiana state university. 

I, , :,orne ideas which candidates 

for thti SniSAL board might make use 

I of. 

A sophomore donation to the sen- 
i,,i. in the form of a keg of cider 
outMile of South Dorm on Friday 
night gave many of the fellows a 
chaiK-e to drown that "boiled water" 

t:l^f«' ■ 

Trvouts for cross-country were held 
Wtdiiesday after drill over a course 
to the Plumtrees and back. Coley 
•]t: ' nislu'd first with llaer '17 a close 
From these tryouts the 
vu-itv men will, in all probability l»e 
Heleeted. 

At Wednesday afternoon drill seve- 
ral. I the Freshmen companies inves- 
ti- it.d the quality of the North Am- 
|„ iM cider, much to the discomfiture 
uf :i few of the f«M>lish freshmen who 
were endeavoring to drink the tank 
tirv. 

To us, it seems an injustice that 
rc.1l news of our intercollegiate con- 
tests is not printed in the Boston 



papers. Why not have our own 
reporters write up the games for the 
papers? Other colleges do it, and 
so can we. 

The College Store and Kennel club j 
have been doing a thriving business ' 
in soft drinks lately. In fact, the 
proprietors of l»oth "money ex- 
changes" are perfectly willing that 
the Amherst water supply remain 
putrid for an indefinite length of 
time ! 

There is a campus report to the 
effect that the Senior-Junior football 
game is to come oflT in the near 
future. We trust the respective 
managers will announce the time so 
that we may be on haml to see r.Ml 
and r.>l.'» get together f(tr a final 
scrap ! 

A suggestion has come to us to the 
effect that if the chapel bell is to l>e 
j rung because of a college victory 
away from lH>me in some sjMirt, it 
shouhl be rung if possible at some 
appointed time, say. (5-15. This 
would, certainly, obviate much of 
the present doubt. The idea ought 
to be considered. 



•09. — A new liaby i^ reported in 
the family of Charles H. White. 



I. M. LABROVITZ, Custom Tailor 

Fashions, Fit, First Class Work Guaranteed 

l.jrBc assortment on hand. (iKNTS KURMSHINflS. Ked Man Collars and 

Dress Shins Cleaning and J'ressing DKKSS SCI IS 

TO KKN T. ,N!ilitary Collars and (iloves. 

11 .\MITY ST., Telephone 302 W. AMHERST, MASS. 



" Keeping in Front " 

You fellows know what that means f 
We've been very successful in this 
regard with Fatinja Cigarettes. By 
the way, these cigarettes were first 
sold in the coUefle towns — and you 
agreed with us that they were good 

Then wc put out for the big race, 
to make Fatimas of nation-wide rep- 
utation, and today more are sold than 
any other cigarette in this country. 

No purer, or more carefully chosen 
tobacco grows than that in t atimas. 
We purposely put them in a plain 
inexpensive wrapper — in this way 
we can afford quality tobacco, and 
twenty of the smokes for 1 5 cents. 

Now your college crew is of utmost 
importance to you — so is a good 
ngarette, and it's your aim in life 
to keep Fatimas m the lead — right 
:p to their good quality — right up 
' " where you first fotmd them, and 
v.ill always find them. 

Success fellows I You started this 
garette on its successful career — 
d you pull a strong oar all over 
tins country. 




^ TUnUSHBUltD ^^ 

QGABETTES 

20/Grl5< 




'rHM«<«rB& flHOriduaf 



The Weakest Link or Limiting Factor 

There are fields that contain an abundance of potash on an.ilysis, 
but on which crops fail if thev are not supplied with availnhlf potash, 
and the same is true if iivaiUible phosphorus is lacking. 

We are all familiar with the limiting factor in crop production, 
namely, the weakest link in the chain of fertility. One never knows 
when one has reached the limiting factor, the weakest link ; one never 
knows when one has exhausted the available phosphorus or the avail- 
able potash, or the available nitrogen until crops fail to respond. After 
a farmer has harvested a bumper crop he has taxed nil the links in the 
chain of fertility, but which one is nearest the breaking point he does 
not know; therefore, if he is wise he applies at least all three of the 
leading elements of fertility in some shape, either in the form of stable 
manure, green crops or commercial fertilizers, or all combined (which 
latter is the better plan), knowing that any excess which he may have 
applied will not be lost out of the reach of crops, if a rational system 
of rotation with deep-rooted and shallow rooted crops is pr.nclised. in- 
cluding cover crops. Moreover, these undoubtedly promote bacterial 
growth in the soil, which, according to Hall, may be the limiting factor. 

Study thf Plant Fimi problem 

Many hiivf "an" answer 
"The" answer will he worth while 






BOWKER 



FERTILIZER COMPANY 
43 Chatham St., Boston 



F. A. SHEPARD 

MEN'S STORE 



Use our new cash discount card 
and save five per cent on 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 



SOLE AGENT FOR 



THE GENUINE AND ORIGINAL 



PATRICK MACKINAW 



MHU VVi:VI><>W I>I»I»I^AY 



■Al 




Agent, k. S. Bra(;*;, Kappa Sigma House. 



4| 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 21, 1913. 



The College Signal, Tuesday. October 21, 19 13 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobl)ersof VVrouBht Iron and Brass I'lpt-, Valves 
and Kitliiigs for Steam, Water and Ga*. Asbestos 
and Magnesia Hoiler and J'ipe CoverhiRS, Pipe 
Cut to Sketch, Mill Sii|itilies. Kiikii ef is and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water lleatinK. 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Boiler ;Hid Kngii e 
Connections. Holyoke, Mass. 



theTeachers Exchange 

Of Botton 1 20 Boyliton St. I 

Recoimnends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



TUFTS TRIP 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 



(^arp^n-lcr & AAorchoust, 

PRIf^TERSr 



No I, Cook Place. 



Amherst, Mass. 



Students Attention ! ! ! 

We are ready at the start to furnish you with a fine 
line of Campus and Fraternity House Views, also Post 
Cards. Kodak work given prompt and tareful attention. 
Knlarging and picture framing given our personal at- 
tention. See us about Croups and Portraits for the very 
best work. 



Satisfaction Guaranteed, 
the Square Deal Studio 



Patronize 



KINSMAN'S COLLEGE STUDIO 



Nash BlocK. Amherst 



H. M. R(k;krs. '15, Agent, 
87 Pleasant St., 



Studio Phone 303-2 



GRAND SWEEPSTAKES TROPHY 



(f750.00 SterUn^ Silver Cup) 
roR 



BEST STATE EXHIBIT OF POTATOES 




AT THE 



New York Land Show 



19lt 



WON BY 

TheL L. Geveland Company 

HOULTON. M«. 

/^NE of the largest and most 
^^ reliable seed potato houses 
in the United States. Competi- 
tion open to the entire United 
States and Canada. Messrs, E. L. 
Cleveland Company also won the 
First Prize for Best County Exhibit 
ol Potatoes. (Silver Cup valued 
at $200.00.) 
The E. L. Cleveland Company use 

L FRANK COE 
FERTILIZERS 



E. Frank Coe Fertilizers have 
been the business farmer's favorite 
for over hfty-five years. Why not 
follow the example of these lead- 
ing commercial potato growers. 

Tm m(hl (« r«t) "Tht Sutrynf A Prnfltahle Pntatn 
Cmp" •rlltrnhj ■■■ ArtM'losk remit}, ■■!■>• hrairr 



The Coe-Mortimer Company, 



51 CHAMBERS STRCCT. 
NEW YORK. N. Y. 



Go to the Tuft's game ! An encouraging number turni I (.i,t 

We want a victory over Tufts on Thursday afternoon and eveui.igig 

November first, but more than that hear Mr. G. W. Tupper, the ^ M 

we want a big crowd of rooters to C. A immigration secretary for M;,,^ 

follow and cheer the team, whether sachusetts and Rhode Island. .Mr, 

victory or defeat. Now is the Tupper spoke of the ditlicuUieii cdu- 



lU 



time to save up your money. Work fronting immigrants who lackeil a 
a little if necessary. There is identy knowledge of English and of tl,. 



to do around here, marking targets, 
husking corn, stripping tobacco, sort 



special opportunities open to nuu of 
this college in working among iIuih. 



ing potatoes and picking apples. ; His graphic portrayal of the first It*. 

With so many opportunities to work son in the Roberts system of tein hjug 

foreigners was of particular lulp to 
the men going into that work. 

This week the Thursday evening 
meeting will be given up to mchsages 
from the annual New Kiigland inter- 
collegiate Y. M. C. A, conferenc*. 
hehl in Boston on Friday, given b; 
tlie president and the secretary «f the 
association, Mr. Slierk and Ilan.ll 
M. (Jove 'i;5. 



no one should say be hasn't any 
nK)ney. You who live near Boston 
shoidd make plans now to see your 
folks or yom- girl ; you who do not 
live near Boston should invite your- 
self to someone's home down tliere, 
or work an invitation fi'om .some Bos- 
tonian in youi house. Not only go 
yourself, but ask your frien<ls to go 
to the game, to *how Tufts the big- 
gest cheering section and the most 
enthusiasm we have ever yet brought 
down with us. 

(Jo to the Tuft's game I 
Tliere will be a special train from 
Amherst to the game and Brown 'II 
is getting some special rates for those 
who gi». Announcements will Ik? 
made this week in chapel in regard to 
details. Papers will be posted soon 
to sign up for the trip. Be sure your 
name is on the list as soon as |K>S8ible. 
(io to the Tuft's game : 



SIGNAL COMPKIITION 

Much interest is being sho\^'n in 
the competition for |H>sition8 on the 
editorial department of the SiiiNAi. 
this year. There are a g<KKl many 
men out and the material which is 
lieing received is very good. There 
are four men out from the junior 
class, six from the sophomore and 
eleven freshmen, making a total of 
twenty-two, the largest numl)er that 
has been out in recent years. 

The credits received by the tliffer- 
ent men are : 
MiM)ney 'KI 
Favor '17 
Farrar '1.5 
Latirence '17 
Biickman '17 
.Smith '17 

W. I. Mayo. I r. '17 
F. W. Mayo '17 
Potter 'K; 
IbM)per '1 7 
liar rock 8 'H> 
White 'i:. 
.McCiillock '10 
Russell '1('» 
Pendleton '1«'> 
Gioissa 

The competitors are urged not to 
wait for assignmciits. Imt to write up 
anything of interest and pass it into 
the Si<;nai, ofHce. 

Hereafter the assignments will be 
posted on the bulletin board outside 
the Sk.nai. ollice in North Dorm, by 
Wednesday morning of each week. 



FLOREST'S AND GARDNER'S 
CLUB. 

A number of the members t.f ti,i 
Florist's and Gardener's eliilitt<iii 
on a tramp down to the Bay Road fruit 
farm last Saturday. The aftenuN.ii 
was spent in tramping around through 
the Notch with Mr ('anninjr. wlm 
pointed out many valualile horticul- 
tural lessons along the way. Mr. 
Whiting also contributed many practi- 
cal greenhouse management |)ointi. 
This lieltl trip was followed l>y m^ 
|»er. with a camp-fire, and the iii<ii«- 
peiisable bacon, coffee and roasts! 
|>otatoe8. Kveryone enjoyed the tri^i 
and another is promised. 

Dr. Fernald gave a talk l» tli» 
club on Tuesday evening. Orf. H 
His suliject was ••Greenhoiisr IVM* 
ami how to remedy them," and lii» 
lecture was exceedingly interestisjt 
and practical, lie accompanied hi* 
talk with il iistrations and showed 
specimens of «lifferent inserts 



1.76 

1.3 

2.7 

.93 
1.2(> 
2.7H 
1.H4 
2.3y 
1.4'.i 
3.17 
1.79 
2.'.i 
1.7 J 
2.. '.5 
2.30 
1.S 



'12. — Ray K. Torry is professor of 
biology in Grove City college. Grove 
Citv. Pa. 



Now is the time tol>egin to planoe 
yciur P.M.'i hnUx'. Don't forget U^> 
save u couple of "bones" out of tb«t 
ten dollar bill, when you go down to 
Tufts. You'll need the Iwl' x »<•'« 
than the money an<I you'll ^it tk 
biggest value for your money Utat vou 
have seen since you left tin- fa"" 
Don't forget that the de luxe edition 
will make a fine Xmas gift and wfl 
reasonable at that. The \n\ce for 
the de luxe will only be three dollan 
and a half, ami cheap at twice tbf 
money. Just think! We'll j:ive yos 
that ooze leather covered f'H>k f* 
three dollars and a half, :< ' 
want your name printed in j 'I'l 
all free of charge. I>ong iu> nes j«"' 
as heartily received as sli ' ""^ 
It's all the same to us, but 
name to II. M. Rogers 'l-' t ' ^ 
edition within two weeks, it 
to get your name printed 
front. l!'l.') Im»kx 



'HI.— .Joseph L. Hills. > 
the Vermont agricultural i 
station, spent the summer 
abroad with his son. 



H \\:i!.> 


,ii iIk 


vi:ii- 




.•riiiitB' 


.veiling 



PHI KAPPA PHI 

tContinucd from page i] 



for xW human purposes it is better 

,l,;,i ifi' and its workings be directed 

l,v l:tW8 ftud customs and that it is 

,n,,ir satisfiictory this way than if 

it «vre not so. There is nothing 

(iiH I for a man than to understand 

clearly and to think straight and to 

tiK' mark. I don't care what success 

J, mail may have when he gets out of 

..Urge, but I do know that if a man 

vfs a hfe of intelligence he is a 

,.tter man and a man who is living a 

, tt. 1 life, no matter what the result 

,ay be. 

So from one college to the other I 
hriiig this message, that we should 
exalt among our people the worth of 
ititolligen« e an«l clear thinking, and 
that a man who thinks is in the deep- 
est and truest sense such as a man 
ought to be. 



JACK FARRAR 

Is back with us again. 
Ask him for some of our 

FREE SPRING WATER 

DOG CART 



SEEAND 

TRY A 

DE LAVAL 



Those who know 
buy the De Laval 

2« ' •■Minrrymrn — H«caa>e the? are ex- 
in the handlinKof cream and know 
n« expenenff that tin- De I.aval 
» c leanest ami wears longest. 'I hat 
"vS^ of the World's creainerin use 
!»• l-a»ale»clusiveW. 
t \|MTleiirr«l l>»ir)rinrn--The I)el-av*l 
I'l- iinivfrval favorite among l>ig (i^iiy 
Tliey know that no other separator 
: vp them such satisfactory service. 
>''i lie l.«va| riierii— Whenever a man 
i.is iiv'd .^n old nuidel |)e I. aval de 
■■■ purchas*^ a later style machine he 
ibiy buys another De Laval. 
'I'l Who liivenllKatr — llecause the\ 
i irKPmajorityof De l.ava I machines 
that they are used by the best in 
• rs every wlierf ; that they stand 
• 'se. ancl that their users are liet 
1 •:' <-\ than users of other separators. 

THE DE imi SEPARATOR CO 



- ■! 'Hway, 
"• \ork. 



7) E. Madison 
Chicago 



Here are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

GOAL 



or 



C R. ELDER 



1913 NOTES 

The "1913 Wedding Breakfast" 
held on Sunday. Oct. 19th, was the 
best one yet ; ten men were present 
and there was lots of "pep." The 
sum of $100 was pledged towards a 
total of $1000 from 1913, as a begin- 
ning of the fund for ecpiipping the 
athletic field. We are g<»ing to have 
this $1000 by "19i;5 Night," Decem- 
ber 26, so think this over, '13 men, 
and come to the "Night" piepared 
to do your part. 

Those present at the "Breakfast" 
were Kills and Gaskill of the Bristtd 
County Agricultural school, Segre- 
gauset, M. Ileadle of Forest I'ark, 
Springfield, Harris of Wetherslield, 
Conn., Lowry of the experiment 
station. New Haven, Conn., Zabris- 
kie of the Tuck school, Dartmouth 
college, Anilersttn of the Sutton 
agricultural high sc1hk>1 and Gore, 
Thayer, and Serex of M .\ C- 

More definite !iunoiiineiiients con 
cerniiig the feed on ••191:5 Night" 
will lie made as soon as p«»ssible. 

KverybcHly be 00 at the Tufts' 
game, Nov. 1. 

AV//j( /«!.(/• thai we are going to 
get together after the game. 

FIRST STEINERT CONCERT 



Oreat Artists to Appear in Springfield 
Wednesday, October 29. 

I»ver8 of gcMMl music are»ntici|»at- 
ing much pleasure in the concert to 
be given in the .\uditorium, Spriiig- 
fiehl. in the Steinert Series. Kuur 
concerts will be offered fortnightly 
on Wednesday evening and the pro- 
grams promise a rare musical treat. 
A large aiidient e is a.«««ured for the 
first concert on Wetlnesilay. «»<t. _".», 
as well as for the following concerts, 
course tickets for the series have lK?en 
B<dling in large numl>ers. Family 
and neighlMirluKxl parties are being 
made up to attend these concerts cm 
account of the low price of the course 
tickets. The management is cer- 
tainly justified in anmmncing popular 
prices when reserved seats at $2.«Mi 
give the public a chance to hear such 
an impressive list of distinguished 
artists. 

Maud Powell who will play in the 
first concert is admitted to bo the 
finest American violinist. With her 
is the celebrated Hungarian pianist, 
Yolanda Mero, who although widely 
known in Kngland and elsewhere in 
America, has been rarely heard in 
New Kngland. and also .Mr. I.uimbert 
Murphy tenor, the first «.f the nota- 
l.le group of artists from the Metro- 
politan G|)era Company who will 
appeal at these concerts 

Kvan Williams. America's fore- 
most oratorio singer, is one of the 
stars of the sec«m<l concert, (iadski 
will lie a tremendous attraction in the 
third cell. .It. while no music lover 
will want to miss hearing Marie Rap- 
pold an.l Herbert Witherspoon in the 
last concert. 

Following is a «oinpletc list of the 
the attractions C)lTered : 

First C.'Nckkt, (Kt. 29. 
Maud Powell, violinist; Madam 
Yolanda Mero. the celebrated Hun- 
garian pianist ; Mr. Lambert Murphy, 



tenor from the Metroi»»litan Opera 
Company. 

Sk«oni) Con«'ki»t, Noo. 12. 
Madame Inez Barbour, soprano ; 
Madame Nevada Van Der Veer, (Mrs. 
Reed Miller), contralto; .Mr. Kvan 
Williams, tennor ; .Mr. Reinald Wer- 
renrath, baritone. 

Tiiiui» Con. Kiir Nov. 19. 
Madame .lohauna (iadski, the 
greatest living dramatic Wagnerian 
soprano from the .Metropcditan Opera 
Company, and leading opera houses 
of tire world ; .Mr. George Harris, .Ir. 
tenor; .Mi.ss .Maria Cashiva, violinist; 
I .Mr. Kdwin Schneider, ac-companist, 
I formerly accompanist for John M<- 
I Cormack. 
' Foi mil ("on. KiiT, Dk« . 10. 

.Madame Marie Rappohl, dramatic 
soprano; Mr, Herbert Withersp«M)n, 
basso; Mr. Felix Fox, solo pianist. 
.M. Steinert iV .Sons Co., 242 .Main 
St., will mail a complete prospectus 
and program to any one on re.piest. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

I'ACKI'llCs. l'«»ll.TKV IUtr>*«»Kll.<* 
.%NI» Itl I IKK MAHI-.Kn. 

» ll.il » > M F |.|M I K"> IN 

Bc«(. Mullon. \jmmh, Ve«l. Mwrh. Lard. M«iw«. 

Itecon. Saumages. Moultrv, «iamc, ttutUr 

Checac. I:gg*. Bean*. 

Of1ice\ >torp»;},S'.>7.>''- '* ' ' IHa< Wstonr M, 
lloston. r^ckli.K Mou^e. Hiluhton. .Mass 

.Naliye I'oultr* l)rr»sirg I'lant, ((••ston. 
CrMmeriM la \ttmom%. 



The Connecticut Valley 
Street Railway 



From Amlier»t, via North.inipton, 
through the Hatfield.s. past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to (Jreen- 
field. Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant. Mcjnta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 



50 Miles of Trackaxe flodern 
Hquipment Train Dispatch- 
ing System -Freight and Rx- 
prcss Service over entire line. 



EWELL'5 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn- 
gland of S|)ecial Student Furnishings. 

LOWKR KXPKNSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 



AND 



CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. nAR5H. 




cox SONS 

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VININO 

72-74 Madison Avenue, New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

Best Materials aod Workmaaslup 



Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



StKIMIKN Ka.VK FoT.CiKK 
1 HO MW >A I >\V A X. .V KW YO W K 

<;i..i;i» Axn <;<)r,.r.K<JE 

inNM ANn KIN<JH <^ 
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WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



«7 Main St., Masonic BIdg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Chitd 0Hly fr9m t A. M. tt 4 A. M. 

Toefll Mientka 

Shoes smaeii and Pollsnef 

Make old shoes look like new 

Neat, clasHy workmanship 

Open Sunday Mala St. 

Ob way to Past Office. 



I 
I 



M 



The CoUefe Signal, Tuesday, October 21, 1913. 



TENNIS 
RACKETS 




— A.t— 



DEUEL'S 



AMHERST 

Chp Laundm 

High-Grade College Work 
LAUNDRY 

Shirts, to-i5C 

Collars, - - • a i-ac 

Cuffs, - • - - a 1-2C 

Plain wash, - 48c per doi. 

Same, rough dry, - - 30c per doz. 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

.'-ktcam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, ft .50 a Suit 



Ralph ]. IIoiiukn, Aitent. ^ North Cotttce 
KiiWAKii C. KuwAROs, Agent 

Put full name and address on laundry 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Loose - Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 

Before buying elsewhere, see our assort- 
ment of pennants and banners 

CURRAN & DYER, Props. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green* 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
camations,violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty six teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects : 



Horticulture 

Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairyiing 

Poultry Husbandry 

Agricultural Chemistry 
Economic Entomology 
Plant Physiology and Pathology 
Agricultural Education 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



Athletic lk>ard, 

'J'he College Seoate, 

Football AsMK-ialion, 

Uastibull AatHM'iutiou, 

Track Attsociation, 

Hockey A8iM>('iutiou, 

Tennis Association, 

Rifle club, 

lioister Duisters 

Musical Associutiou, 

Nineteen Hundred Fourteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundreil Fifteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club, 



George II. Chapman, Secretary 

I). W. Jones, Piesideut 

S. B. Freeborn, Manager 

G. D. Melican, .Manager 

E. C. tklwards. Manager 

.1. I). I'ellett, Manager 

K. K. MacLain, Manager 

J. W. T. lyCHure, Secretary 

I). J. I^wis, Mhnager 

H. I). Urown, Manager 

E. S. Clark, Jr., Manager 

II. M. Rogers, Manager 

K. H. Powers, President 

D. A. Coleman, President 

J. D. Pellett, President 

N. H. Deariug, President 



U^hen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



Barsalotti & Gk;utoso 

Cigars Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresli Candy 

Ice Cream, Fruit. Soda, Etc. 

Th« Right Goods at the Right Prices 

Op«n till II o'clock EVERY night 
C«raer Amity and Ple»a»Bt Streets 



If yon want to Im 

f«OL.ID WITH THK GIRLS 

70a must hsTO your clothes presncil anri cleaned 

AT BPSTBIir'S 



11 Amity 8t. 



Maroon Store 



Pressing and Cleaning a specialty 

Most lit>ersl ticket system In town 
Tel. 303- 11 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of " Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1434-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



E. E. HILLETT 

JEWELKK A.\» Ol'TOMETI IM 

Lenses ground while you wait 
CoLLECB Jewelry 
Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar ^tr;i^ 

AMHKK^T, MA8M. 
Next to Host Office. 



STEAM FITTING. Teleph. ? yj-i 

GAS FITTING. TINNING. 

P. W. Dance & Co. 
PLUMBERS. 



Specialty of Kepairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, &c. 

♦ Clifton Ave., AMHER.ST, MASS 



^^Vfisiit <ss i:>it.^<iii 

Catalogues of 

F'rill Ac Wli^tei* OofMls 

Are out. Copy mailed to any addr<■^^ ' i..;. 
Students and Athletr^ who want tile in ;,.-■ t 
articles for the various sports shi>ul(l n ; l, t 
those bearing the Wright Sl Ditson It^aeMi-^ 



Foot Ball 


^TTl- Skat'K5ho« 


Basket Ball A 
Hockey 1 
Skates ^ 


^^/^ (or "" »purU 


Wright & Ditson Goods are the M .• .'. 
all sports 

344 Washington iit.. Bostoo, lUu 



THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CLEANSING. 

PRESSING. 

REPAIRING. 

Uulckesi iserviop. Best Wark, l.owt-*l i-rl<* 

All woik carefully done. Work calM \<m ui 
delivered, tients' overcoats, suits, luntt M 
coats. Ladles' tine linen suits a spccialtv 

Teams will call every day at M. A C 

Wn. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rear Nash BFk, Amherst. 



Tel No J^ 



CARS 



Leave AOtilE COLLEQE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AUOii; COL* 
LEOE at 7 and 37 min. past eack 
HOUR. 

SpecW Car* at RaaaaoaMc Rates 



AIHERSI & SUNDERLAND SI. H ^ 



For a Daily and .Sunday N vvspaptf 
Vou should Read 

Springfield Repul 

While you are at eollege in 
It has all of The M. A. C. New* 
The l{«*i>t Hpnrting News 
Full (ien«*rMl N>vi-ii 
A 8tmng Kdltorlal PMKe 
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a quarter. 

Sunday, 5 cents; 50 cents a 

Subscribe by mail or through the '* 
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irtcr 



OCU( 

THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



' rj 



Vol. XXIV. 



MASSACHUSETTTS AGRICULTURAL 

Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, October ^^9^ 




rushing'season closes! cross country run freshmen ej^d season 



With 93 Men Ptedced to Fraternities. 



List of Men. 



Qoes to Brov»n. Coley and Richards 
Finish Well. 

•n.o rusmng season .."»- The cross-eoiiutry run with Urown 

I,.,. Suiuluv >it r, o'cUK-k.nnaoii .Mon- ut I'n.vi.U.nce on Sat.inh.y resulU.I 

.ifv morning in chapel the following in u vutorv for the Uho<K. I-huui 

. 'iM.ou t<At<it»il I'.l ill iiointH won. 



Tlio rushing season elosetl at col- 



iiKiJ |ilf«lgetl : 

Tog. T. v.: 
11, <;. Dickey of Dorchester. 
K. Ihiitlerson of Ilinghaiii. 
M. H. ('. Mar.Hof Wal|M.le. 
N .Morehouse of Worcester. 
W. D. Hckard of 1l<»iKMlule. 
W Savillc .Ir. of WuIkmi. 
U. K. Stiles of Arlington 
M. II. Warner of SumU'rlaiul 
A K. Williuinsof Sunilcrlaml. 

To I'hi Sigma Kuppa : 
.1. D. Hirchaitl of S|iringncltl. 
I) II. Hutteriik «»f ArliiigUMi. 
I*. Ilaarcn nf llitxiklvn. N. Y. 
I'. <;. Harlow uf Mahlcn. 
I.. W. Uoaaof AilingUm. 
{',. Uiippel of Lynn. 
,), S. SiiiH of Mt'lriwo. 
W. li. Sturtevamlt of Springliclil. 
V.i',. hUlwanIs of SiMith IWvcily. 
fi. .M«(;uirc of Worcestei. 

To Kappa Sigma : 
P. K BalK-ock of Lynn. 
K. Bretkenri«lge of Lynn. 
D «;. Urainanl t»f Dorchester. 
C. K. (Jainnmge of Lynn. 
C. F. Harrington of Lynn. 
A. A. H<M»per of Lynn. 
(.. T. Oliver, .Ir. of Kverett. 
IL H. Smith of SpringUehl 
W. A. Strong of New York City. 

I'll Kappa (iamma I*hi : 
IL S. Avery of San .liian. 1*. R- 
II. 1*. U<»ycc of Haverhill. 
K. L. Ik)y»l «»f Lynn. 
O. II. Doll of Ailams. 
.1. Kautzenhack of Ik-ilin. Germany. 
C. H. HageUtcIn of Dorchester. 
W. A. Mack of Springfiohl. 
U. K. l'i( aid of Hadley. 
I.. 11. Tucker of Ware. 
!!. C Westnian of West Uoxhury. 
It'red Larm-n t)f Kverett. 
To IWta Kappa Phi : 
W. .1. AI>lM>tlof Kverett. 
\{. II. Hiick of Worcester. 
III.. Dunham of West Uri.lgewaUr 
W .M. Flagg of Mittineague. 
1). ,M. Fruncis of Athol. 



men. They totaKul I'.l in points won. 
while Massachusetts luul to l)c con- 
tent with II. The coursi- which was 
foor ami a half miles hing. starte«l 
from Aiulrews tiehl ami after passing 



With Tie Game at Monson. Played 
with Unfavorable Weather. 

Monson academy aiwl the Massa- 
rhusctts Aggie freshmen playe«l a 
f:ist gttiiHM.f--watcr"f.M»tlian Satunlay 
iiftcrmH.n at Mons<.n cn.ling in a 
seoicless tie. The liehl was com- 
pletely eoveretl with water, ii I'.iiig 
very tieep in niany phucs. All 
through thegaim- the men had to *on 



from Andrews tieitl ami aiier pa»»iiiK " ft 1- 

over hill and dale ended with one lapjwnd with a heavy d<.w«,KM,r of nun 




Tiu, r.M.1 l'«M.Mi\i.i. S./t .K\ 



of tlMJ cinder track. The course was 
In wrr l>o«»r wndition owing t<i the 
rain whidi bad fallen Un m day. 
However. the time made hy < ooi», H"*" 
first man to finish for Urown was 
within les(4 than a minute <»f Norman 
Tal»er'« recor.1 fo. lli. < iwirse. ("<s>p 
made the time of '-':» minutes and 2.. 
«jconds which was exceptionally fast 
EH all through the |M?ri«Kl of the run. 
the rain fell in torrents. Urown tiK>k 
the lirst three places, but the Aggie 
runners lamled fourth ami fifth. 
Captain Coley was the first man to 
(M-ore for Massat huscttn, and his 
sprint hsiked dangerous for iIm 
Brown man, hut since he alwj had a 
aprint left the p<.»ition of the two 
runners remained unchanged at the 
finish. Hi<hards was a close seron.l 
U, Coley. for Aggu-. Both men 



liesidea the unfavorahle eondilion of 
the llehl. 

Th«- game mtm f«»* Uii uBgliewl VOM 
nevei lncke<l iotcreat ff»r a moment. 
Monson won the kick <»fr uml llaaran 
re<«ive«l the hall. After running and 
"Mwimming," they advanced it to the 
.Monwm lo-ynrd line. The fieHhmen 
had IM» InMilile in getting through 
.Monmm's line and ende.l the |MTiwl 
with the f.nll V. r\ « hwe to the Mon- 

Hon goal. 

In the same peritsl, l»oth teams 
t«H.k «»IT all eveeaalve pads and many 
of the men took oflf their st«Hkings. 
In this |H'ri«Kl the M<»nson team hatia 
little better of the argument. 

In the second half the fieHhmen 
luid wnsiderahle trouble in kicking 
ofT and it was not until they had ear- 
ried a huge amount of mud on the 



U. Coley. for Aggu- .hum t,,„t thev nere able to buikl a 

...owed tine form. Doggett. who was « J'^^j '•.,,,„ ., ,., ^,, „., ^^„ 



oounted on to lan<l a place, was hand 
ioappc'l bya.oref.s.t and thereby 
finished seventeenth. 

Kach lean, was alhmcd to enter 
ton men. the first five from each team 



L.D.Kelsea of West Hartford, Conn. ^" 

It ■ 



fuiish fo >'•• <onut.'.l in the seore. 



K. L. I'areis of Klizalwth, N. d. 
W. U. Porter of Amherst. 
IJ M. lt«Mlgers of Kverett. 

\ \V. Sp:ud«rmg of Dorchester. 
>. 1- . Tuthill of .Mattaponsett. 
To Theta Chi : 

W. W. Ureck of lioston. 

I,. V. Uuckman of Wilkesbarre, Pa. 

II. Iligginbotham of Taunton. 

SV. U. Irving of Taunton. 

( S. Lancey of Townsend. 

I . Hitter of New Britain, Conn. 

[Continued on page 6] 



Brown finished first, second, thin 
Hixlh. and sevenlh, while Aggie tiK,k 
fourth, fifth, «»'»tl'- •'««-v««dh ami 
twelfth. The order of finish was as 
foUo«>*: A.U < ""!• (I'.'<'«")- •• '"■ 
Litchfield (Urown). A. C l-^ngley 
(Brown). Capt.W.S. Coley OLiss.) 
K S Hi(.hards(Mass.),W.K. Water- 

,;,an (Urown), II. Taylo. ( Uro.^ ) • 
E K. Uarnes (Urown), K. N. itoer 
(Mass ) W . K.Saunders( Brown) . U.K. 
Nute(Mas8.), K. Chisholm ( Mass.), 

tContlnuedon pagf f'] 



iiHMiml high enough to get the ball 
out of the water to kick oflf. The 
fiKshmeii kept the ball in Mons»»n 
territory almost all of the seroml 

half. 

The game WM most interesting for 
spectators. Many times the men 
carrying the ball when tackle«l wouhl 
be rompletely submerge<l in water. 
The priiiriple danger to the players 
WHK tli:it of being drowneil. 

The line-up : 

.M. A. C. 

Simes, McNaughl.le 
Hcvan, It 
(iray.lg 
Cotton, c 
Hultrick, rg 



liONSON. 

re, c.illette 

rt, Kusliie 

rg, liradway 

c, Francis 

Ig, iJarnard, Knight 



Simes, Kflwards,rt It. I.eake, W.»itc 

[Contlnaed on page S) 



MIDDLEBURY FALLS 

By Score of 33-0. Brewer and Darlinf 
Play Good Game. 

The Aggie f«K»tball team easily 
defeated Middlebmy college on the 
rampiiH Saturday by a score of JW — 0. 
Although eoiuliliiuis tiverhead and 
untlerf«Mil were the wt.rst possible, 
the game l»eing played in a steady 
.h.wiipourof rain. Dr. Brides' men 
put up a snapi.y exhibition of f.s.l- 
ball. The speed and "|»«l'' *''"'' 
has eharacterize.1 the team's playing 
all the scas«.n was in no wise aflfected 
j.y Ihe weather. 'I«'am w.uk was 
«onspi»uous by its presence. On 
defense the line was a veritable stone 
wall, and on ..n.-iise opened up big 
Ih.I.. al will. Mid.llebiiry was 
unable to slan.l up before the st^Midy 
rushing of Ihe Aggies, and until a 
serub team was put .ui during the 
third ipiarter the game was more or 
I, -. , pnseHsion up ai*tl «low" *!•*• 
Ibid. Ihe l.a.kfield «om|Mi«Ml of 
DarliHir. Nisseu and < aptain Brewer 
leele«l ••fT gains eonsistelitly. dar- 
ling's work was little Hh«»rt of s|mc- 
taciilar. Only once tlid be fail U» 
gain when called tiis.n, and he sioreil 
twiee, ome frtun Middlehury'a :W» 
y..rd line and again from the 4i)-yanl 
line shaking off tackleis like fliea. 

The forward pass was \\m^\ exteil- 
sively ami with <«msider»hle success, 
netting many gains. None «.f Mid- 
dlebuiy's passes were eomplete<l. 
.lust four pl«ys practically dhl the 
w«,rk; the forward paiiaea, NisaiMi 
through c«Miter. Darling Ihrongh the 
Uukles and Brewer uiound the ends. 
Middlebury whs completely out- 
.hissed. failing to make a single Hrat 
down The Vermoiiters Ujst heart 
«fter a few attempts at the Aggie 
line ami invariably punted on re- 
reiving the ball. 

,Mi<ldleburv receivetl the kickofT 
t.ut swm punted. M. A, C started 
off with a rush and in four minutea 
of playing s«-ored the first Umchdown 
after a series of rushes and a for- 
ward pass. The se<-«>nd scc»re <ame 
ertih in tlu »ex» quarter. Ihe 
iearlis lined up «»n Mi<hllebury's .W 
vard line ami a succession of gains 
i,y NisMeii, Darling ami Urewer 
pushed the ball across. The third 
touchdi.wn was made in quick time. 
.Ionian ran the kickofT back i:. yanls. 
Melican made « yanls and Darling 
failed to gain. A forwanl pass to 
F^lgerton was successful. F^lgertoii 
receivetl a second pass on Mid<lle- 
biiry's :5<» yn'l •'"'" =""' '""'' ^*" ""' 
goal. 

The latter l-url ..f the .piarter prc.- 
duceil another score. Darling pulling 
off a brilliant dash fn.m Middle- 
bury'stOyanl line, lie re|M!ated in 



I 



#. 



The Coliege Sitnal. Tuesday, October 28, 1913. 



The College Signal, Tuesday. October 28, 1913 



Hi 



if 

ji'v 
ri ;' 
r 



the third quarter, working his way 
through tljc entire Middlehiiry team 
for the hist score. 

INIiddh'lMiry had just one chance to 
score. In tlie third quarter on an 
intercepted pass, tiie man had a clear 
Held hut he was tackled from behin.l 
on Aggie's 85 yard line. Two for- 
ward pasHCH were tried ; the |»unt 
was iu<omplete. Brewer intercepted 
the second and the danger was past. 

KIKNT Vt'AMTKU 

Middleltury won the toss and re- 
reive.l the kick-off. Two attempts 
lo gain were smothered and Condit 
IMintcd to Melican. Darling made 
« yard.s through tackle mikI Brewer 
made first .lowns at right end. On a 
fake kick formation .NisKcn smahlied 
the center of the line twice for sub- 
stantial gains. Darling got a gtKxl 
start hut slipped in the mud. A for- 
ward pass to .Jordan was goo<l for l.'i 
yards. Brewer reache<l Middlehury's 
.5 yard line on an en<l run and scored 
on the next play. .Melican punted 
out to Brewer and Dole kicked au 
easy goal. Middlel)ury again re- 
ceived the kickoff hut was unable to 
gain. Condit punting to Nissen. 
Brewer made 10 yards Uirough tackle. 
Nissen hit lenter for first down, 
repeating after Brewer and Darling 
had gained s yurdH between them. 
A forward pass wan incomplete and 
Brewer got .-. yards at tackle. 
Another pa>s was intercepted but the 
Middlebuiv ur.iu fumbled, M. A. C. 
recovering. K«lgerton .lroppe<l a 
pass and the liall went to Mi.hlleburv 
on downs. Cimdit punte<l on the 
second down to Mrlirj,,, „|„, ...n 
back r, yards. Ihe Aggies started 
down the field and had reache<l Mid- 
dlehury's 10 ynr.l line when the 
whistle blew. Score: M. A. (*. 7, 
Middleburv 0. 



Darling made his spectacular dash 
for a touchdown. Dole's attempt to 
kick the goal was blocked. The half 
ended before the kickoff, 

Score M. A. C. 'ifi, Middlebury 0. 

.Middlebury kicked off to Nissen. 
.Middlebury braced and held for two 
downs. An exchange of punts fol- 
lowed with Middlebury the loser. 
M. A. C lost the ball on downs, but 
Condit i>unted on the first down. 
Nissen hit center for 6 yards. 
Brewer made 20 yards at right end. 
Darling nmde first down, hut the ball 
was brought back and M. A. C. was 
penalized .'» yards for offside. A for- 
ward pass to Melican netted .'iU yards, 
and Darling broke into the limelight 
again with another spectacular rnn 
for a touchdown. Dole kicked the 
goal. A bunch of substitutes were 
put in in here, replacing Kdgerton, 
Baker, Curran, Darling, Strong, 
Dole, Nissen and Melican. Middle- 
bury kicked off to Curran who ran 
back 20 yards. A forward pass was 
intercepted, and the Middlebury man 
starte<l off with a clear field, but was 
tackled from l>ehind on the Aggie's 
'iCi yard line A first forward pass 
was incumplete and Brewer nailetl the 
next one. The quarter ended after 
an exchange of punts. 

Score M. A. C. ;'..!. Middleburv 0. 



HERMAN'S U.S. ARMY 
SERVICE BLUCHER 

In Tail Willow Calf ur 

Gun Metal. A haud- 

huine, snappy shoti 

ontlieOrthopedic 

lust, deisigfaed by 

*riny Burjreaus. 

You never saw 

a shoe like it 

for wear, com 

furt aud 

style. ..^.^ 

Single 
holo of 
Texas un- 
Kooiin'doiik.iHi.x 
t«>r, sole leather 
couiiter8,every part 
In.HiM'cted. I.iuiuj,' <»f 
specially tested drill. A solid 
leather shoe that will triveflic 
wear of the eiTilian Nli«>e that 
sells fur)jt(i. This i.H one of the 
sh4M>M I'ncle Saai i»uvs lor his 
soldierM. IT'S A \V<>ltl.l> 
B1:AT1:U, see the Army Hue. 




HERMAN'S U.S. 
ARMY SHOES 

Lasts designed ).v 

AHMY Siir- 

greons. Materiii > 

are the best that 

a be obtaintd. 

Wurkmanhliiji 

Inspected 

iid KUar- 

auteed. 



No. 968 

GARRISON 
BLUCHER. 

One of the mn«t popnlar 
in the Arriiy Lino. Ma'lo in Tan IK'il. 
low Calf ami <«iin Metal. Ilciry 
Kinirln (m>1h, Imiz t<M>, solhl leMthi-r 
t)ir<iui!)iout. AhandsonieNiiappyNhof, 
I'ointi III to scf tin- iiiu'. .Manufa<'tiii">| 

•ily by Josfph M. Ufrman&l'o.. Bo^toi 




PRICE $4.00 



PRICE $4.00 



.>«K« oNIi v« AKTEK. 

Aggie's ball on opponents 10 yard 
line. Brewer reeled oir I'o v.ikIh 
around left end, and followed it up 
with »; yartls through tackle. Line 
plunges by Nissen an»l Darling, then 
Brewer scored through tackle. Dole 
missed th( g„Ml. I'laisted replaced 
SchIotterbe<k at right tackle. Mid- 
• llebury kicked oft to .Ionian who ran 
back !.'» yards. Meliran made H 
yards, but Darling failed to gain 
A pretty pass to l':<lgerton brought 
the ball to Middlehury's .10 
yard line. Fldgerton scored on the 
ne.vt play after receiving a second 
pass. Dole kicked the goal. Mi,l- 
dlebury kicke<l off to .lordon who 
was tackled on his 30 yard line. 
Melican made a short punt to Bresna- 
han, the Middlebury fpiarteiback. 
who was hurt on being tackled and 
had to le.ive the game. Condit 
])unted to Melican on his "20 yard line. 
After two plays, Melican punted to 
Condit who made a fair catch on the 
/iO yard line. Middlebury lost l.'i 
yard.s uii poor passing and punted. 
A series of line plunges and a for- 
ward pass pass brought the ball to 
Middlehury's 40 vard line whence 



KOI Kill <^| aKTKK. 

Aggie's ball on the ;>U yaril line. 
A forward pass was incomplete. 
Nissen went back, replacing Brewer, 
.lohnson got off a bullet-like pass to 
I'laisted. Another pass was inconi- 
|»lete. then .lohnson made 20 yards 
at right en«i. .lohnson through a 
forward to Nissen. .Mid«llebury inter- 
cepte<l the next pass hut fumbled. 
Aggie recovered the hall, but the 
referee ruletl the pass to be incom- 
plete. Darling gained but M. A. C. 
was penalized 1.** yanls for holding 
and the hall was given to Middlebury 
who punted. The scrubs got their 
signals crossed and .lohnson was 
thrown for a loss. Darling made .'> 
yards. A forward failed. Middlebury 
blocked .lohnson's punts, but Aggie 
recovered. The whistle blew before 
the ball couhl be put in play. 
The lineup : 

**• '*• <• MIDDI.KntrKV. 

Kdgerton. le re, Cowles 

Curran, It rt, Reynolds 

.Strong. Walker, Ig rg, Hutchings (capt.) 
Dole, Terry, c c, Lang 

Hal<er, rg Jg, Chapman 

.Schlotterf>eck, Wood, rt It, Parker 

Jordon. Flaistead, re le, Jones 

Melican, Johnson, qb qb, liresnahan 

Mrewer (capt). Ni.s«en, rhb Ihb, Weafer 
Darling, Ihl) rhb, Condit 

.N'issen, Fuller, fb fb, Hayes 

.Score— Ma.ssachusetts 33, Middlebury 
o. Touchdowns — Brewer 2, Kdgerton 1, 
Darling j. Goals— Dole 3. Referee— 
Hubbard of Amherst. Umpire— Foley 
of Amherst. Head linesman— Kennedy 
of Amherst. Timer— Kennedy of Am 
herst. Time — 13 and 12 minute periods. 

All indications show that there 
will be at least 400 Aggie students 
at the Tufts game. We want 500. 



A.11 MlaB*»M nnct %>vlcltl»M, f«t 

PAGE'S shoe: store 



THE 



Nooveri Smith Go. 

616 CbMtnut St.. Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 

Diamond Merchants 

PMiiflpMi's Official Fntiniiti Jtweler 

■PBOIALISTB IN 
Pratemity Badcea. Fobs, Novcltiea, 

Rings, Charms Prizes. Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Foba, Seals, 

Rings, Charms.-. 



J 




PDeasani 

amtti?st.. 

Bmbcret 

Tflfphone 47a 



BRSAHrAST 

LUNCH BOM 
AKTeHNOON TtA 



Dinner if arranged for. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

Williams Block, Amhbkst, Mass 

Orrici MouKS: 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAiN 

Now at 13 Hleatant St. 



Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Kroken Lenses .Accurately Replatd 
Fine Watch Repairing Promptly and 
Skilfully Done 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 



A Chance to Save Money 

A S5.00 Safety Razor for $5.00 

But we give you a coupon which when signed with your 
n.ime and home address we refund you ^.50. It carries 
the kexall guarantee, " Money back if not sati.sfied." 

We carry a full line of 

Waterman, Conklin and Moore's Fountain 

Pens, Stationery, Pipes, Tobacco 

and Cigarettes. 

Li^l^ett's. Belle Meade and Green Seal Chocolates 



THE HENRY ADAMS CO., DrugeJsts 

The RFiXATiTi Store on the corner 



KEDERATION FOR RURAL 
PROGRESS 



(i,„. of the ino8t iuiportuut au«l far 
iiiiig movenient» of recent years 
,,„ ii,e injprt)vement of farming and 
,,,,i,itiy life coiulitions in Massachu- 
,,!is was brought to a head at a 
iiuMting held last week. 

I ui some time past Tresideut Uut- 
tniiiUl has Iteen endeavoring t«> 
l.iiiig iilKiut union and co-operation 
Im tsvccu the ujany differaut organiza- 
tions that have to do with farm life 
,„ iIk« state. ( )u Tuemlay representa- 
tiN.s of twenty slate organizations 
ul this character met at Draper hall 
to iliMUss the adviHil.ilitv of getting 
in^.ther in order t«» work out agri- 
, ultural and country life prohhuis of 
h ^tiito. .Much enthusiasm was 
^l.oun and the final result of the con- 
ftuiice was the «irgani/.ation of the 
MHssachusetts fetleration for rural 

piogress. 

riie object of the federation is to 
Ml :ts a clearing house for the coun- 
uvlfe work in the sUite. It pro- 
xies for a long term program which 
^Mll emihlc systematic work to l.e 

died on. The workinji ImxIv of 
federation is made up of three 
(..iiunissioners ; one on farm improve- 
m.iit, «»ne on marketing and ex- 
, hinge, an<l the third on comnmuity 
lif. Ilie different organizations of 
tin- stale can ally themselves with 
uuy one or all of the commi»»i<»ll^, 
Mild e:ii h is given a place to work 



without interferenca from others of 
different purposes. 

The otilcers of the federalit)u are 
as follows: President, Dr.Kenyon L. 
Butlerfield ot M. A. ('. ; vice-presi- 
dent, Dr. David Sneddiu, state com- 



Mackinaws 



missioner of education ; secretary and 
treasurer, K. I. Morgan of the ex- 
tension service. 



FOOTBALL SPOTLIGHT 

.Saturday's game gave the student 
body their first opportunity to see the 
team in action, antl needless U) say, 
the residt was extremely gratifying. 
If the boys can play that sm t t»f ball 
in such miserable weather, what 
won't they do on a good tlay ? 

It's a safe bet that Darling will l>e 
one of the stars to which the Aggie 
hopes will be pinned ik \t Saturday. 
The college will be satisfied with n<» 
less than two of those forty-yard 
runs f<M' touch«h>wn8. 

One point noticeable Saturday was 
the tine physical eomlititm of the 
Aggie team. The Muhllebury men 
were plainly exhausted before the 
game ha<l progressed very far, but 
Captain Urewer's aggregation hit a 
fast clip from the start ami never 
slackened. 

It's the «luty of every h'yal Aggie 
man to be with the team next Satur- 
»lay. It's going to mean a h>t to 
everv player to know the whole < «tl 
lege' is with him. and the greaUr the 
volume .»f the Aggie yell, the harder 
will every nmn strive f«M vicl<»ry. 
Dig <leep'and s«-ra|»e up the price : 




THE 
SMOOTHEST 




AND 



Sweaters 



Thi.s is Mackinaw and Sweater .sca.son. Football, Golt and 
•ill other Fall aiul Winter .sports call lor jjood Sweater pro- 
tection. \Vf have ill stock loil.is scv< r.il liundnd Macki- 
naws in all ijrades. 



The famous Snniniit brand, well known in \hv Northwest 
and acknowledijetl to be one «>! the best. Coal Sweaters, 
the Shawl Collar, Coat Collar ;.ihI the regular shape 
Swe.ders. all the best selling coh-is. 

#i.c><> to imtr.cM> 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



School ana College Photosrapbcrs . • • 




PLOM Kick-off to Touch-down Velvet is pre 
eminently the popular pipe prefennent! The 
two yean aging in the leaf gives Velvet a maturing rare in 
these day*. Time only can produce the smoothneM and 

the full flavor of this tobacco, and 
time it lakes to get rid of your old 
foe, •'the bitel- Velvet— mellow 
and smooth, wiD unquestionably 
please y)U, AH dcalew. 
DoQ*t hesitate I 



J^f^0j^»^i3Stmmek 



, r%(^Al LY- S-« Center St.. Northampton Mass.. 
|_<JO/«i_L.r. > ^^^ ^^^^^ Hadlcy. Mass. 



Main Oj-ph r.: 

1546 1S48 Hroarf*»y. 

New York t ily 



These Studi«« offer the l>«M skilled 
artiftik .«nd nn»M toinplrtc 

rqtnptnrnt ohtainahle 



WK SOLICIT YOU It PATROIiAGE 

In so far as our iK-'ntfits an- mul11.1l. 

THi; AMHI-ltST (iAS COMPANY 

EiN/ervthiing Ellectrical 



MflBRE'S <m 



10» 

lnfun2 
ounce tina 



NON-LCAKABLC 



^ FOUNTAIN PEN 

Minimize your fountain pen 

^ trouble, by ownlnft a Moore's. CHI. the 

w VtfMt noundest and most dependable pen known. 

Vl?'?tre«ith l!^« '" «•- "^'y Himplkity. Nothing 

flnlky Joftet o*ut of order. C V<.u can ft ve your- 

•Tlf no better treat than a Moore's Non-leakable. 

For Ssl* by D«>l«r« E»*rywhere 

Amcrtcan Fountain Pen Com|>any ^^ 

1*8 DEVONSHIRE .STREET BOSTON. MA.S.S. >^^ 



UP 






\v^ 



Tne ColUge Signal, Tueiday, October 28, 1913. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening; by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Afrlcultural College. 



BOABD OF EDITORS. 

CUKSTKR K. WIIKKI.KK 14. Kd.tor in Chief 
FRANK W. HIKI.I. '15. ManaRiiiK K.liK.r 

HAROLD C. BLACK '14, Competition Kditor 
IIAROI.n'J. Cr.AY -K, Assistant Kditor 

S I UART B. FOSTKR ■14, Athletic Kditor 

KRVINK K. PAKKKR '14, Alumni Kditor 

J. ALBERT PRICK 'IS. Athletic Kditor 

GEO. E. DONNELL 'm. Department Kditor 
KARLE S. DRAPER '15. Campus Editor 

TVLER S. ROGERS '16. Associate Editor 

CHARLES W. CURTIN'i6, Associate Editor 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

ERNEST S. Cr.ARK. IR '14. Bus. Managar 
MAI' RICE J. CLfJl'GH 'is, Ass't Bus. M({r. 
ERNEST F. UPTON 'u. AdvertisinR Manager 
W. RICHARD SEARS '15 Asst.Ady. Manager 
CHAS. A. HUNTINGTON, j R. "i^ Circulation 

Subscription I1.50 per year. .Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable 
to Ernest S. Clakk, Jr. 

Bntjrjd M MooiMi-claM matter at tha Amhar« 



Tht 



Vol. XXIV. TuEsoAv, Oct. «8. No. 7 



«' Boost Old Aggie." 



Thk ides of hnving a college bnn- 
qiiet ufter tlio game at SpringtieKI 
seeniB to us to be a very fine one. 
With the large number of alumni 
present iit tlmt time, the majority itf 
the faculty uieiiibcrs, and all the 
8tu<lentB, it coiiltl be made an aflfalr 
which would work for ovtii {.^leater 
loyalty than oxiHts at present. The 
eutliusiasm an<l spirit which alMinnds 
here at Old Aggie would Ik* exhibited 
to the ahiiuni, in a way in whichthey 
seldom get it at other times. It 
would lie one of the be«t meauN yet 
devi»e<l to '-lUMjst Old Aggie." anc" 



If freshmen who went to Monson 
iire claiming credit as a water polo 
teanj. The Held was a young pond. 

Mr. William Larson Machmer, in- 
structor In Mathematics, has joined 
(Jainma chaj)tcr of Alpha Signui Phi. 

About \'tO freshmen and 'J( I soph- 
omores were sad at heart to see their 
names on the Dean's board Saturday. 

A cup for the Amherst— M. A. C 
cross country race on Nov. « is on 
exhibition in Adams' drugstore 
window. 

Interest in the tloubles tennis tour- 
nament seems to l>c lacking. A 
number of tlic matches are as yet 
unlinished. 

(iold-bronze medals will be given 
to all who won lirst places in the liehi 
evente held Satunlay, the eighteenth 
of OctolMjr. 

The men who atten<letl the New 
Kngland Hunt club dance at Helcher- 
towu (ui Tue8<lay evening, reported a 
splendid time. 

Next year, if we have enough loyal 
»up|>orters. we can get two trains, 
one to return the same night, the 
other to retiun on Sunday uight. 

A week ago last Friday night, two 
sophs were kidnapp«*d by several 
freshmeiL If rumors are true, we 
are going to have a big splash soou ! 

The niuioiincenient in the (Vh.i.koc 
SniNAL that after Nov. I daily cha|>el 
w«iuld be omitted on Tuesdays 
and Thursdays was greeted with 
euUiuitiasm. 

The freshmen were warned after 
chapel on Tuesday alK>ut saluting the 
seniors. Since then it has been rum- 



Few Freshies or Sophs are wearing 
smiles these days. As Billy said, 
"If you toy with your Zoo, play with 
yotn- Physics, and flirt with your 
Agronomy, you will find yourself out 
at the end of the Semester." 

About lifty Williams men spent 
Thursday afternoon on the campus 
on a biological excursion, visiting the 
various Hiological departments of M. 
A. C. "Mike" Lyons '\:\ accom- 
panied the Williams men on the trip. 

Five students have already handed 
in their names for assistant adver- 
tising numager of diamatics. All 
others wishing to try for this should 
hand their uumcs iu to W.J. Mahouy 



Clark '15 Eldridge'14 

Ail Student Supplies 



M. A. C. STORE 

BANNERS AND POSTERS 



CANDY 



TONIC 



Montague '15 



Hager '16 



UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasa.st St. 

A Church home of the lil)eral Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

KKiai I.Alt HINUA%- NKKVICK AT7 P M. 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the large.st line in 
the state outside of IJostou. 



E. RUSSELL NORTON 



Seeouriineof Drill Shoes 

$2.00 to $4.00 



SALES AORNT 



Davenport Miller 
Vein Coal 

Best Dualily Pennsylvania Coal 



MODERN REPAIR 
DEPARTMENT 



E.M.BOLLES 

(ON YOim %VAV TO ^. o.) 



we urge it upon the men to give the j ore«l that another i>oimI party is be 
idea the supimrt which it <leserves. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

(Nolicei for ttiio column «huu Id tie dropped in 
the .Sii.NAi. Office or handed to Earl« .s. Oraper 
•15, on or before the Saturday preceding each 
issue. 1 

Oct. 39—1-10 I'. M., Assembly. Mr. 
Harry W. Laidler, Secre- 
tary Intereollegiate So- 
cialist Society. 

Nov 1— y 00 I'. M.. "TuftM Special" 
leaves. 

Nov. 4—7-00 p. M., Stwkbridgc club. 

Nov. o— 1-10 p. M., Assembly. Stu- 
dent MaHs .Meeting. 



CAMPUS NOTES 

The new yelh trietl on the campus 
■ound well. 

Ixx)k out for the ra/,00 club. Thev 
will get you ! 

Karle Chester Mosh 'IC. of VVor- 
ceslcr, has pledged fr) .\. 

Tresident Spooner of Norwich re- 
viewed the regiment Wednendav. 



ing planned 

Ilarohl (;. .MattfKin of I'ittsdehl is 
chairman of the sophcunore smoker 
comnnttee. The smoker will \,c held 
as usual in Springfield after the 
SpringfieM game. 

Work has been started on the ten- 
nis court to the left of the rear of 
the Drill hall. Wiien it is fMii>she«l. 
I it will add materially to the athletic 
e<|uipment of the college. 

A. ('. Turker, class captain, was 
elected freshman cheer-lea<ler on 
Wednesday. It was also deci<le«l to 
elect a freshman athletic council to 
control all athletic affairs of thecla.«4». 

The smallness of the attendance at 
the Christian Association meeting 
was a pretty goisl sign. Many of 
the id.sentces were out tloing the 
kind of work the asscxiation sUinds 
for. 

At a imtting on Tuesday morn- 
ing, the student body dec i.|e.| to 



BOSr»)N OFFICE 

85 Water .St. 



NKW VOKK f>KFU F 

I Broadway 



LOW PRICE TAILORINO CO. 

.SLIIS MADE TO OKDF.K 
Suits Cleaned. Pressed »nd Dyed. All kinds of 
Kepaihhs for I.adies and (ienlletiten neatly donf. 
IlishKrade woik by first class tailor. Work 
called for and delivered. Sell ticketi for pressing, 
4 SeiTS KON |i.^ 

GEORGE KOrOWITZ. f>nOf>. 

Main Mr.-et. .Xinlierst. Mass ^a^h MIotk 

( >n jrour way to the Post » »lfice. Tel. 4 j»-W 



COOlCp'S Rote! 

Springfield, Mass., 

Solicits the patronage of the .Siu 
dents of the Agricultural Collej;e 
to class dinners and individually 



»'i"»"T » II '1.- 1 I . 1 1'''^'^^ ^''^'"P"""' tram leaving A 111 lersl 

'•lit' Tarbell 1 I is back on the 1 r. . *t 1* . .. . ^ *">i,^'in, 

,. f ., ''"^. for Med ford on Saturday morninu, 

campus after a siege of the niumi)8. !„,.,| ..... • ... \ , *^' 

' and returning Sunday night at y 

No more freshman caps on Sun- ' o'clock. 

dav. One day of graee will be wel- i ti » i 

• , ,. . j 1 lie freshman show schedued for 

come from the pen wipers. ' »j . 1 . »^" i"! 

. Saturday evening has been post- 

President Dearing of the Stock- ^ ,K,ned. The show will not be held 

bridge club aske.! the student body 1 now until after the Springfield game 

at chapel the other day to give their All the more time to get up a good 

support to the Judging teams. o„e '17^ 



THE KATHERINE E. McCLELLAN STUDIO 

44 State St., Northampton, Mass. 

PORTRAITS — GROUPS — VIEWS 

Itisist upon .seeing our college work and prices before deciding 



Call or Tklipiionk 131 



The College Signal, Taetday. October 28, 1913. 



Anyone trying for assistant 
L,i„ .> nianager, should hand his 
[,,,„i, t.. Prouty '16. 

In Political Economy an interest- 
L|,r Ichate on niscrimination in 
\nvAWA Tolls was held, the contest- 
L,, l„.ing Uokeliind '11 and Diaper 
1],, f,.r the alllrniative. Heed '14 and 
|,iii...|ii '15 for the negative. A 
^.f\^.s of these debates are being 
llMiiiied for this course. 

Owing to a lack of interest and a 
llt.-iif to put all energies into the 
ri.lUge debating team, the interclass 
tlrl'Hfex have lieen called off this 
UMi Tiyouts for the college debate 
(ill |.« iiehl on Friday evening, Nov. 
I-.'I All those chosen to take part in 
ItlR' rullege debate will l»e in line for 
Itii. « ..liege teams so it is up to every- 
|„ii,' who has any ability to get out 
|:iiiii work. 

Ndw that lushing reason is over, 

I till suggestion has come from many 

filUms* that next year's season lie 

I sIhu teiied to al»out four weeks at the 

iiiiiHt. It is argued that the lengthy 

I m:i!m»ii is hard on everyone concerned 

I :ui<l thai many freshmen get so hope- 

loHsly behind iu their studies that it 

i» but a tpiestion of time liefore they 

:tu- flunked out. The whole subjeit 



is worthy of careful attention, inas- 
much as I't^/r of the freshman class 
are at present posted on the Dean's 
Hoard. 

Why is it that the results of most 
MA. C. athletic games are either 
never printed or are barely iiien- 
tioned in many of the leading Itoston 
papers';' Aggie deserves a write-up 
in every [»aper in Hoston. Amherst, 
Williams, Wesleyau. and many other 
colleges are reported regularly, — :uid 
something should be ilone to "Itoost 
<Md Aggie'* in this manner. All men 
aeipiainted with newspaper men 
Hhoiild exert their iidliieiiee to show 
them that the rapid growth of M. A. 
C. in the last ten years has placed 
her among the leading colleges i)f 
New Kngland. 

FRESHMEN END SEASON 

ICoutiRut^d tiuiu{MiK<^i| 



Smith, re 
Maaran, <|b 
i'icaril, Ihb 
(irayson, rhb 
(•riftwtild, fb 



le, Casiiion 

<jb, Hrmis 

rhli, Klyiit 

Ihb. Waite. Hall 

il), .Sint klaiid 



Score M.»ssachuscUs AjiU'c frcshmrn 
o, Monson academy o. Referee Mow 
ard of Sprinjctield. I'mpire-^ Price M. 
A. C". Tinu' 12 minute periodn. 



I. M. LABROVITZ, Custom Tailor 

Fashions, Fit, First Class Worit Guaranteed 

rtmcnt on hand (;|:N I '.S KUR.MSU I .\<.S. Red Mai. ( nll..rs and 

i)ressShiru Cleaninn and I'reJising DRIISS SCITS 
TO RKNT. .Military CoUam and (iloves 



It .AMITY ST., Tekphooe 30= 



w 



AMHERSr, MASS. 



" Keeping in Front ** 

You fellows know what that means I 
We've been very tuccessKil in this 
regard with Fatima Cigarettes. By 
ihc way, these cigarettes were first 
sold in the college towns — and you 
agreed with us that they were good. 

Then we put out for the biff race, 
to make Fatimas of nation-wioe rep- 
utation, and today more are sold than 
any other cigarette in this country. 

No purer, or more carefully chosen 
tobacco grows than that in Fatimas. 
We purposely put them in a plaiir 
inexpensive wrapper— in this way 
we can afford quality tobacco, and 
twenty of the smokes for 1 5 cents. 

Now your college crew is of utmost 
importance to you — so is a good 
cigarette, and it's your aim in life 
to keep Fatimas m the lead —right 
up to their good quality — right up 
to where you first found them, and 
will always find them. 

Success fellows I You started this 
cigarette on its successful career — 
and you pull a strong oar all over 
this country. 




FATING 

aCARETTES 

20/6rl5< 




'TUMmctirr^ InJhiduaf 



The Weakest Link or Limiting Factor 

There are fields that contain an abundance of potash on analysis, 
but on which crops fail if thev are" not supplied with untilaNf ixMash, 
and the same is true if available phosphorus is lacking. 

We are all familiar with the limiting f.ictor in crop production, 
namely, the weakest link in the chain of fertility. One never knows 
when one has reached the limiting factor, the weakest link; one never 
knows when one has exhausted the available phosphorus or the avail 
able ponsh. or the available nitrogen until crops fail 10 res|>ond. After 
a farmer has harvested a bum|jer crop he has taxed all the links iu the 
chain of fertility, but which one is nearest the breaking point he does 
not know; therefore, if he is wise he applies at least all three of the 
leading elements of fertility in some shaiH-, either in the form of stable 
manure, green crops or commercial fertilizers, or all combined (which 
latter is the better plan), knowing that any excess which he may have 
applied will not be lost out of the reach of crops, if a rati<mal system 
of rotation with deejvrooted and shallow rooted crops is practised, in 
eluding cover crops. Moreover, these undoubtedly promote bacterial 
growth in the soil, which, according to ll.ill, may be the limiting faetor. 

Study the Viant hood ptoHem 

Many have "afi" answer 
**Tke" answer will he worth while 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER COMPANY 
43 Chatham St., Boston 




A. 




MEN'S STORE 



Use our new^ cash discount card 
and save five per cent on 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 



SOLE AGENT FOR 



THi£ GENUINK AND ORIGINAL 



PATRICK MACKINAW 



Mi^i^ wi:vi>c>\v I>I«l»I^A.V 



■AT 




Agent, R. S. Bra<.<;, Kappa .Sigma House. 



I 



I- 



The Collefc Signal, Tuesday, October 28, 1913. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 2^, 1913 



1^^^ 

" 



The Hoiyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 



THflMERS Exchange 



Jobljers of Wro'iKht Iron .iiid Ut;iss ript-, \ ulves 

ind Kitlinits fi>r Stpari). Watei amtcia". AsIm-sIos 

and MaKnesia Boiler and f'ipe C(iv<^iiii(>&, I'ipe 

Cut to Sketch. Mill Supnlies KnKiieei>and| Of Boiton mo Boylston St. 

Contractors (or Meain and Hot Water Healing, j 

comrtio'nl:.^""'"" ''''*':""• ""H«iy'«k'i.'*Mi;'.': Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



^arp^n-ter & AAorehous^, 

PRINTERS, 



No I, Cuuk Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



I 



Students Attention ! ! ! 

We are ready at the start to furnish you with a fine 
line of Campus and Fraternity House Views, also Post 
Cards. Kodak work ^iven prompt and careful attention. 
Kniarging and picture franiin}^ given our |>ersonal at- 
tention. See us about Groups and Portraits for tlie very 
best work. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. Patronize 
the Square Deal Studio 

KINSMAN'S COLLEGE STUDIO 

NasH DlocK, AmHerst 

H. M. RtM.ERS, '15, Agent. 



87 Pleasant St., 



Studio Phone 303-2. 



GRAND SWEEPSTAKES TROPHY 



(1750.00 Sterling Silver Cup) 
r OR 



BEST STATE EXHIBIT OF POTATOES 




AT THE 



New York Land Sbow 



1912 
WON BY 



TheL L. Cleveland Company 

HOULTON. M«. 

/^NF^ of the largest and most 
. reliable seed potato houses 
in the United States. Competi- 
tion open to the entire United 
States and Canada. Messrs. E. L. 
Cleveland Company also won the 
First Prize for Best Coanty Exhibit 
of Potatoes. (Silver Cup valued 
at $2(X).()(). ) 
The K. I^. Clevelan«l Company use 

L FRANK COE 
FERTILIZERS 



E. Frank Coc Fertilizers have 
been the business farmer's favorite 
for over fifty-five years. Why not 
follow the example of these lead- 
ing commercial potato growers. 

t«ii •njlil !■ r»«il "The Sutry of A PrtiflliiMe Potato 
f^rttp" i*rflli>n liy an jIniM.ttMik I'tManl;. Main* tmnmrr 



The Coe-Mortimer Company, 



51 CHAMBERS STREET. 
NEW YORK. N. Y. 



FACULTY BANQUET 

The freMhnmn aide of the dining 
hall presented :tn nnnsnal sight Sut- 
(irday night when I2(i iiielnding the 
inenibers of the Faeidty and their 
wives Mat down to a lianipiet 
ill iKjnor of l*rei»i«lent and Mrs. 
Hntterflehl. The tables were ar- 
ranged to form a long I ' , ' and 
were tastefully decorated with roses, 
asters, and candlestieks. The head 
table was respleiulent with two large 
eandelabrutns. 

Classroom worries ami household 
cares were laid aside for llie time lie- 
ing. everyone united to pay homage 
l«) the guests of honor. After the 
covers had been removed, chairs were 
|(iill((l Icick. the candles were li^litcij 
and the remainder of the evening 
given otT to the toasts and selections 
by the (Quartette. Tlie latlies vied 
with the men in showing olT their 
|M>wers H8 afterdinner s|»eakers, and 
it can safely stated that the fiuiner 
h>Hi nothing by the compaiison. 
Mrs. liicks with a dissertation on 
"Automobiles." and Mrs. Machmer 
on ••llabies" made the hits of the 
evening. In ftict, nil of the toasts 
were well resjM>nded to. The gather- 
ing broke up Milli the singing of 
••.Son- of ( »ld .M.iHsclinsettM " 



BJJST OLD aggie: 

Here is the latest idea : a big din- 
mi .iftti iIh- Springlield g.iine. a 
••feed" for .'»oo .xtiidents ami as many 
atiimni -ass alteiid the game or can 
come. Think alntiit it ! 

Here are some reasiins fur this 
idi a : 

I. It will gite a cli.-uu-e to iK'tlcr 
the citllcge spirit by gelling togeth«'i 
III ;iii iiifoiinal way. 

1 1 will give a chance t<i show 
the aiytnni what we think Uie word 
^'eiithiihiasnr' mean**. 

•"•. It will cut out little private 
•parties" and liaveeverylnKly around 
oiu- board with one big iilea — 
•M. A ( .• 

I. It will give an idea (»f what 
wc li.ixc lu'ie at .M. A. C. 

.'>. It will aid in the foiiiiatinn 
of new ideas and plans. 

The Senate thinks this idea is a 
g»KMl one. Tliey will b«H»st it. The 
que*ti<iii to you stiideiitii is, "Will 
iyoii liel|i.'' A committee will pro- 
I <lii<-e working plans after the Tufts 
g.iiiif. Watch the SioNAi., and l»e at 
chapel on .Mom lay 

I Ueniember tli:it this "feetl" is not 

, to cost tiKue than '»0 cents per plate. 

There can lie a <'abaret show, too. 

Don't buy theater tickets till you 

hear the plans. 



RUSHING SSASON OPENS 

(Continued from paR« i] 

R. Shiimway of Greenfield. 

II. W. Terrill of Ansonia, Conn. 

W. I). Whitconib of Waltham. 

To Sigma Phi I* psilou : 
11. (J. Hevan of Newtonville. 
I). (; Howen of Northeast, I'enn. 
K. P. Cotton of Wijburn. 
K. H. Dunham of Bennington, \ 1 
Cm. V. Kverbeck of Winthrop. 
K. W. Favor of .Somerville. 
L.S. CIriswold of Wethersfield.t utin 
F. S. Swett of Southbridge. 
K. L. Upson of Britain, Coun. 
C. L. Wilbur of Walpole. 

To Lambda Chi Alpha : 
K. L Ilolden <»f Milfoid. .\. II 
W. 'Turner of North Heading. 
F. V. Staekpole of Somerville. 

To Alpha .Sigma Phi : 
|{. V. Borden of Fall River. 
A. L. Burleigh of Lynn. 
C. II. Day of Ilattlehl. 

A. A Farwelt of Turners Fall" 
K. K. CJrayson of .Milford. 

(i. W. IliggiiiKof .Norfolk. 
K. B. Hill of Rutherford, N. .1 
(i W. Noyes of Chelsea. 

B. R. Rose<|uist of Bnx'kton. 

A. C. Tucker Jr. of Nyack. N V 

CROSS-COUNTRY 

[Continurd from P4MP$ )1 

A. R. .Nash (Brrjwn). A. M. l'|»l«t 
(Mass.) K.Corcoran (Brown). K K. 
Bnsscll ( Mass ) 

< tM»j> who won the run, fought Uf 
supremacy at the fiiiinh willi bil<l>- 
field. They were foMowed at w.ii 
disttnice by Lanj;Iey, who luul a nntfr 
tier of \:iiils fad «»n Captain ( ♦•!' 
The other men to score f«>r At:- 
were Ricli:inl«, Baer. Nnle, ;<" 
Chi^^holin. 



The sei^re : 






ltlt«»WN. 




II4«-, 


I. ("imp 






■J. Littlifiehl 






:\. Langlcy 








4. 


Coif. ,' 




it. 


Rich.-iol^ 


«;. Wa tier man 






7. Taylor 








9. 


I'ner 




II 


Nutc 




12. 


Chisli"lM 


!'.» BrovMi 


11 


.Mass. 


Won liy Hi'uvii 


1 


iiii*' 


2.'> sec. 







r.M.'. Noil. K. 

••I'M.'. I.et-togellier" after the 
Tufts gMiiic ! Clark 'TliMVer, (•lo\er 
[■',. Iluwe or ILiroid M. Clove will 
know all the pai ti<"iil:us. Be sure 
and l)umli up after it and help cele- 
hiMtf. You oiijj^lit to have seen our 
team play Saturday — yon are going 
tu see it play this Saturday. 



RESOLUTIONS. 

]\'ht'ini,s. It has pleas<'d <••"' 
His infinite wisdom to take iiiitoln' 
self tin' mother of oiir belovc'l t'roi!' 
Haymond Winslow Warner. ■ t 

/^ v-,/,,,/. That we, theim > l"i- 
the <^ T. y. Fratcrnity.il" 
him our sincere sympathy II. 
hour of sorrow ; ami be it fu! '"'"' 

Hr.Hf»h't'tl, 'That a copy <'f ''*•* 
resolutions fie sent to oin •x'lta"'' 
brother, that a copy be file-l in 'i' 
records of the Fraternitv. ni.'i tha' ' 
cojjy be piiblislie<l in the ('»>ui"' 

SltiNAI.. 

Wakukn .S. Bakkk. \ 1 ui (li* 
Davii. Pottkk, - [.•, ,J^.niitv 

Wir.i.iAM .1. Maiionv. ) 



I 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 

(;|{A1»UATE S«;il«M>L. 

1 . |.ost-graduate seminar was ad- 
.liesM'd by Dr. Joseph B. Lindsey of 
111, (l.parliuciit of chemistry on We<l- 
iie*lay, t>ct. -22, Dr. Lindsey's topic 
ht'inj? -'Agricultural problems." In 
;,lw. tice of Dr. Marshall, director of 
th, -tuduate school, M. T. Sinulyon 
i,m| and intrmlucetl the speaker. 

At the last meeting of the science 
,.|iil'. Dr. Charles A. Peters, asso- 
ciiitt' profe8.sor of chemistry, tleliv- 
eicil a paper on '•.Mi«'o-organisms in 
1 iiain.'reial lime-sulpher." Dr. Peters 
,1,1 \. W- Brooks of the senior class 
art- joint authors of the article w hich 
will be published in an early issue 
of the .lournal of Industrial ami 
Kiigineering Chemistry. 

KXTKNSloS .•'KIIVICK. 

The Oetoljer issue of ♦'Facts for 



JACK FARRAR 

Is back with us again. 
.Ask him for some of our 

FREE SPRING WATER 



DOG CART 



SEEAND 

TRY A 

DE LAVAL 



Those who know 
buy the'De Laval 

.« r< aiHorvmon — BManw ttlvy »re •«- 

"I crr^ni and know 

' Mt tli<- l>«f I.av.il 

lr^ lonKr^t. I h;«t 

'I's cti*Hriipri»'s ust- 

-Iv 

» «p<-rlrnrrd Italrymrn- Tlu> l>e l.aval 

s the univpr>i;il lavoritc amnnR lug dairy 
.-n. Tlwv know that no other separator 
• ill give them »uch tatisfactory lervice. 
01.1 !>«> |.««K| iriirni -Whenever a man 
^•"1 has used an old model l>e I.aval <te 
1 1^-, til purdiaM- a later style machine lit- 
' » irubly Ijuys another I)e I,a»al. 

*♦•■■ '*•■" '■'^' «llK«lr-|lecause tlte\ 

' viif l>f l.avaimachine^ 

ire uvd hy the \»%t in 

— 1 iivrt every wliere: that they 5tanrt 

'f-t in ii«e. and tliat their u%er<t are liet 

atutierl than users o( other separators. 

THE DE lAVm SEPARATOR CO. 



liio^ilwav. 



»«£. Madison >t. 
Chicaffo. 



INre are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 



or 



C. R. ELDER 



Fanners" is now ready for distribu- 
tion. 'The pamphlet is entitled 
"Lawns, their making and main 
tenance," and is written by P. II. 
KIwood. Jr., extension instructor in 
civic improvement. 

Miss Comstoek of the extension 
service lectured in lioston, on Wed- 
nesday undei the auspices of the 
Massachusetts state fe<leratioii t»f 
woman's clubs on •■Friends and Foes 
of the Household." 'This is the first 
of a series of six lectures planned for 
home makers by the home economics 
se<-tit»n of the state feileration, and 
will be lieKI the first Wednesday of 
each month except Decemlier, in 
Perkins li:ill, Boylslon street, Bos- 
ton. 

I.AKOSl'Ai'iC tiAKOKMNO. 

Mr. p. H. KIw<mmI, Jr., the new 
extension instructor in civic art has 
opened up a large line of practical 
work. Already he has more jobs on 
hand than mauy professional land- 
scape architects' ollices. He is mak- 
ing plans for a cemetery in .Atliol, a 
scIk>o1 groiimis in Hampden, an 
acatlemy grountls in Braintree, gen- 
eral civic improvement in 'Three 
Rivers, a town park in Sterling, a 
town park in and other iniproveiueiils 
in Georget«»wn and two new pl.iy 
grounds in Amherst. ProfiNSdi 
Waiigh is also giving consideral>lf 
time to this work. 

The clau ia civic art (landscape 
gardening 7) has tH>en making an ex- 
tra special stmly of packed business 
streets. The present controversey 
over the North Knd Creen in .Spring- 
Held will probably Iw entirely wttled 
hy the investigations and recommen- 
dations of the class which, Itesides 
getting out complete designs for the 
proper tlevelopment of the street, has 
made a set of large exhibition draw- 
ings showing many of the uhmI fam- 
ous packe«l business streets of the 
worbl. such as Bull street, Savanimh, 
(ia.. D. street, San Diego. Calif.. 
Inter tlen Lin<len. Berlin, and the 
Champs Klysees, Paris. Mayor Deni- 
soD «if .Springfield has .-irranged with 
Professor Waiigh to have these rlraw- 
ings exhibited in connection with the 
|tiiblic hearings on the .North .Main 
street improvements and in the 
.Springfield Piibli<' Lihrary. 

ALUMNI NOTES 
'h:',. — Vice-director Joseph B 
Lindsey of the experiment stjition 
has issued a bulletin c<)ntaiiiing a 
record of the amount ami cost of 
fo«xl c<»nsumed :iiid <»f the milk pro- 
duced by each cow in the station 
herd from IH'.'<; through I'.Ml.aml 
inaiiy other interesting •^tnfi-tK s. 
'The conclusion wlii<li he rea< lies 
from his own figures and from those 
derived from other sources states 
that under the present conditioiiH it 
is not a .safisf.iifoiy biisines^^ t<. ;it- 
tempt to pHHliice reasonably clfjui 
milk under the most ordinary coikII- 
tions for less the five or five and <»m- 
half cents per quart at the farm. In 



fact it is doubtful if practical busi- 
ness men would consider it as a oiisi- 
ness undertaking unless they were 
able t4» secure a price |ter <piarl for 
their milk at least 1(» to "iO jwir cent. 
in atlvaiice over production. 



WANTED A MAN ! 

We deal with merchants and far- 
meis. We want an otiiee man U> 
sell, to help advertise, to help in cor- 
respondence and to grow up to a re- 
sponsible position. If he was brought 
up on a farm, with some scientific 
aial newspaper training, so much the 
lietter. N<i l)onan/a in salary to be- 
gin with, but an active, interesting 
and basic oct npation with giMsl |h'o- 
ple and a great future depemling «mi 
the man. Athlress with the fullest 
of particulars, stating age and refer- 
ences whitli will be leganled as c«»n- 
fidential. '•President," Box '.'(»'.♦, 
lioston, .M.-I.SS. 



Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

f%cKi-:n». i-oii.iiu iiiti !s!sKUs 
.%M> III •ll'.K M.iMKHll. 



Hcrf. Mmiun. I.ainb. Vral, l>ork. I arii. Ham.*, 

Hacofi, Sauaaiir*, Pitultry , tiamc. HMttirr 

Cllce««. I KK*. IVran*. 

I trtlie \ M..rp» ^ !.v.i7.,'i. I \ I', lllj< k'tirtlH St. 

Il.cton I'rtikii'K III. MM". II1112I1I1111. .M.tss, 

N.ilwi- I'.iiillr I llif-.^ui' I'l.ii I ll<i-,tiiii. 

t iiMiiieti ' 



The Connecticut Valley 
Street Railway 



From Amhei^l, via Northampton, 
through the ILil fields, past the fiKit 
of Sugar Lc»af Mt.. alongside the 
famous i:l<MM]y ISrook battle ground 
to ( Hd l>eerfiel<i. iIkimc t<» Creen- 
field. Turners Falls and across the 
••Plains" to Lake Pleasant. Monta- 
gue and Millrrs Falls. 



.SO MIks of I rackaxe riodern 
Equipment train DiApatch- 
in)c System l-relxht aiid f-x- 
presA Service over entire line. 



Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



I;.,! .HI laiirr. I Hfl^ 

Sri. I'M IN I.vNi, litf.nr.u 

^l^vl I siiiKivi; ,iik\i ri H 
IKO IJUOAOVVAV. .NIAV NOKK 

<;r.,iru ani> c^oi.IvKuk 

IMNH ANI> KI.NIJM ,0. 
OOU>. IIIL.VBR AND BROWXB MIIUAL.M 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



E WELL'S 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUQS 
CARPLTS 

Largest assortmeni in New Kn- 
gland of S|M;cial Student I'urnishings. 

LOWKR K.XPKNSKS Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 



AND 



CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



cox SONS 

— ANO 

VINING 

:2 74 Madison Avenue, New York 

CAPS AMD GOWNS 

ilest Materials and WiKkmannhip 

WOODWARD'S 




LUNCH 



ij Main St., Masonic KIdg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



C/o/«(/ fffify from I A. M. lo 4 A. M. 



Toefll Mientka 

Shoes sniiieii and Pollstel 

Make old shoes look like new 

Neat, classy workmanship 
Op«n NnndAy Mala Mt. 

On war to P«it Oftcc. 



aky 



The College Signal, Tuesday, October 28, 1913. 



iNl 



TENNIS 
RACKETS 




At 



DEUEL'S 



AMHERST 

Chp Laundry 

High-Grade College Work 
LAUNDRY 



shirts. 
Collars, 


10 ISC 
2 i-ac 


Cuffs, • 
Plain wash. 
Same, rough dry, 


a I-2C 

48c per doz. 

• joc per doz. 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam t'ressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and i'ressing, I1.50 a Suit 



Kalfm ). BonmcN. A|{cnt, 7 North Cotttge 
KiiWAiiii C. EtiWAiii>s, Agent 

Put full name and address on laundry 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Loose - Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 

licfore buying elsewhere, see our assort- 
ment of pennants and banners 

CUKRAN ft DYBR. Propa. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations,violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300 



The Massacliusetts Agricultural Collefife 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty six teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 



Horticulture 

Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape hardening 

Pomology 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairyinig 

I'oullry Husbandry 

Agricultural Chentistry 
Fkronomic KiUoniology 
Plant Physiology and Pathology 
Agricultural tUlucation 



For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



Athletic IU>urd, 

The t'ullt'ge Sonatt', 

Fuutbull AH80<-iulion, 

Uaaebull Assoc-iutioii, 

Track Astiociutiuu, 

iluckey AHHo<-iutiuu, 

Teuuin AiiHociutiuii, 

Hide club, 

UuiHter DoiHters 

MuHicul AuHociution, 

Niucteeu Hundrutl Fuurteeu liuK'X. 

Nineteen liuuilred Fifteen lnd«>x, 

M. A. C. (Jhristiuu AHH«H'iutit>u, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Coufereui*, 

StfH-kbritlge Club, 



George 11. Cbupuiun, .Secretary 

I). W. .loueH, I'lt'Mitleut 

S. li. Freeborn, Miiiiuger 

a. U. Melii-an, Manager 

K. ('. F.<lward», Muuuger 

.1. 1>. Pellett, Manager 

R. K. .MucLuin, Manager 

J. W. T. Ix'8ure, Secretary 

I). J. I^ewia, Manager 

H. I>. lirown, .Manager 

K. S. Clark, Jr., Manager 

II. M. KogerH, Manager 

K. II. Powers, PreHi<leut 

l>. A. C'ulenian, President 

.1. I). Pellett, President 

N. 11. Dearing, President 



U^hen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



J A CKSON & CUTLER 



Barsalotti & Gentoso 

cigars Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresh Candy 

Ice Cream, Fruit, Soda, Etc. 

The Right Goods at the Right Prices 

Op«n till II o'clock EVERV night 

G«ra«r Amity Mod PI«»«»Bt 8tr««t* 



If yon wsnt to be 

NOMI> WITH TMK OIRL8 

you must hkve your clothes pres'je<l simI cloaofld 

AT BPSTIIXirS 

11 Amity St. MftrooD Store 

Preaaing and Cleaning a sptT.lalty 

MoMi liberal ticket svatem la town 
Tol. SOS- II 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of- 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



E. E. MILLET? 

JKVVKLKK AND OPTOMKTKIST 

L.enses ground while you wait 
CoLLKtiE Jewelry 
Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Cjuitar >t[,i^, 

AMHKRST, MAM4. 
Next to Fost Ufhce. 



STEAM FITTING. Telephme 5, . 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

P. W. Dance & Co. 



Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lkad Liuhts, &c. 
« Clifton Av«„ AMHkKST. MASS 



Wi-llClit «S8 13itMoii 

Catalogues of 

Poll «a '\;viiator €S<m»<u 

Areuut. Copy mailed to any addrr^s i<i... 
Students anii Athletes who want the ii-<: u - 
articles for the vaiious spoit>i sIkhiIiI .1 
tliov IjeHrin^ the Wright & Ditvin 1 : .. .1 ^1^ . 



Foot Ball 
Basket Bali 
Hockey 
SkaUs 




Skat'gSiMM 
Sweaters 
Jer.-»<r \ s 

Unifurms 
for all sporU 



Wright & Ditson (ioods are the .^t^ndaiU im 
all sports 

'Wf«i<;ia<'r As I >i'r ••<>.%' 

.^4 Washington St.. Boston, M.' 



M TERPSY PARLOR 

CLEANSING. 

PRESSING. 

REPAIRING 

Qaickcat borvic*, Heal Work. l.ow<->i 1 • 

All woik carefully done. Work cali'i : • 
delivered, (icnts' overcoats, suits, l'.lnt^ . 
coats. Ladiea* tine linen suita a specl^lt^ 

Teams wUI call every day at M A < 

Wn. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rear Nash Bl'k, Amherst. 



1*1 Nu >N 



CARS 



Leave AQQIE COLLEGE for HOL* 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



CARS 



Leave AiVfHERST for AOtllF. COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mln. pa«t ckI 
HOUR. 

SpMtel Cara at RawwaMe RatM 



AIHERST & SUNDERLAND SI. W d 



For a Daily antl .Sunday .NewspapC 
Vou .should Kead 



T H 1^ 

Springfleld Republioi 

While you are at eollege in \mhfr- 

It liitaMll nfTlie M. A. C. Newn 

The |{<-«l NporlInK Newa 

Full GfnerNl New* 

A J^trong KdltorUI Page 

Iiit«*reatlng Peatarea 

It I* a R«al Newapaper 

Daily, 3 cents ; 70 cent* a m mth; 1'^ 
a quarter. 
Sunday, 5 cents; 50 cents a juarte' 

Subscribe by mail or through the .A ih«"' ■ * 
dealer. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAE 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXIV. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, November 4, 1913. 



No. 8 



STOCK JUDGING TRIP I DEBATING SEASON OPENS, WEDNESDAY ASSEMBLY AGGIE LOSES TO TUFTS 



1 earn Finishes Well Among Other New 
Kngland Colleges, Missouri Winning. 

The M. A. C. sttx-k judging team 
h;«s receiitk returned froiu a trip to 
tin Nritionul dairy show, held at 
( liicago, oil (K't. 24. There were 
-ixteeu follegee entered in this oon- 
1. st, two more than hiHt year. The 
first award went to Missouri ; seeoud, 
K. iitui ky , third, Iowa. Of the three 
New Kiiglund folleges entereil Maine 
-' >o<| ninth. .MusHaehiiHettH tenth, 
uikI New llampHhire thirteenth. 

The highest individual score was 
tii:ide hy an Iowa student. .Students 
I loin .Missouri aud Nehraska took 
smiiid and third places, respectively. 
I wo New Ilumpshire students won 
first und second places on .lerseys, 
which iiieHns that each man will 
receive a i2(K) scholarship. A 
Missouri man was given first place on 
li.tUti-iiis, while first place onCluern- 
.wv.H went to u student from Pennsyl- 
vania. First on Ayrshires was won 
hy a Kentucky student? 

A new feature of this year's Dairy 
>how WHS that the lK>«ril of judges 
who passed on the work was com- 
p4M«t*d of instructors from the tliflfer- 
••nt colleges represented. It may l»e 
-M<\ ill all fairness that these instruc- 
tors disagreetl fully as much as the 
students. 

Considering the fact that we were 
"•mpeting against states where dairy- 
^ the main industry, Ma.Hsachu- 
Mitta raa<le a very good showing. 
"Aggie" was repre»ente<l hy (ieorge 
Fuller, William A Davis ami liay- 
U . Warner of the senior class. 



RIFLE TEAM 

The prtispects for a winning rifle 

ttani were never brighter. (i.F.IIyde, 

I'liiiltar, Whitmoie, Oertel, (lark 

"111 Wetherhee are left from last 

• ar's team. A large sipiad is prac- 

K-ing daily on the range and the 

-'Ores show championship calibre. 

Ilutih 'l.'t.Uowe 'If, and I'areis '1 7 are 

•il'-o sh(M>ting well. Regular practice 

'I the team will begin in a few days 

ii'l Captain Dunbar expects a large 

||iiu<l out to keep up the previous 

"onls of M. A. C. ritle teams whii-h 

INC always tlnisbed well l>olh in the 

ioor and indoor collegiate com- 



' li 'lis. 



Practice Begins for Triangular Debate 
with Rhode Island and Tufts. 

The Public Speaking council is 
arranging to have a triangular de- 
bate this seaMiii with Hhode Island 
and Tufts. This means two intercol- 
legiate teams instead of one. They 
wish to make these debates new 
victories on M. A. C's. growing list. 
This raises a vital (luestion : will 
the men of the college come out and 
make two winning teams? The trials 
for the teams come Nov. 21. ami the 
time to act is now : Fhere is plenty 
of material on the question for debate 
in the Library. 

The two teams chosen will debate 
foi the three gold medals offered in 
the annual college debate which this 
vear comes Iwjfore Christmas. The 
question is : 

Resolved, that the Ftderal Govern- 
ment should pass legislation securing 
greater conservation of the lives of 
industrial workers. 

Interest lu debating is rather dilll- 
ctilt to stir up at Ihst but it should 
be consideied, that the ability to talk 
while on ones feet is a gift that is 
envied by many men. '•R<K>8t < )ld 
Aggie." What lnHter op|>ortunity 
than in supporting a team that re- 
ceives the attention of as many se- 
rous minded peo|»le as any other col- 
lege activity. Show some life. 

COURSE REGISTRATION 
In order to correct the impreasioH, 
somewhat prevalent among the friends 
of tlie college, that few iimlergradu- 
atM are s|>ccializiDg in strictly agri- 
cultural subjects, the following list 
of elections for the current year, 
compiled from the registrar's records 
is printed. It shows that |Miin«»logy. 
as practical a subject as one couhl 
ask for, is easily the most |M)pnlar of 
the majors. followed,afU-r lands<ape, 
bv the very '-agricultural" majors of 
agriculture and animal husbandry. 

The list follows :— 

>eii 

Agriculture *^ 

Agronomy 

Animal Iliisliainlry 

Dairying 

Poultry 

Horticulture 

Floriculture 

Forestrv 



An Address on Socialism, Its Relation to 
College Men and Everyday Problems. 

The elementary principles of 
socialism were discussed in Assembly 
Wednesday by Mr. Harry W. Laidler, 
Setietary of the Intercollegiate 
Soiialist Society. Mr. Laitller gave 
a brief history of socialism, its <»rigin, 
l>eginnings, and extension thnmghont 
many of the <-otintries of the worhl. 
• Where," he said, " in l«7n there 
were two or three thousand men in 
the worhl voting the stxialist ticket, 
there are now lietween eight and ten 
million. Forty percent of the vtiters 
in (iermany cast a socialist ballot. 
Years ago when socialism was first 
intrtNlticeil into the I'nitcil Statea. 
|M>ople avt.itled it liecausc it was re- 
ganled as foreign ami lemp<»rary ; but 
it has increased rapidly. S<K-iali»in 
is the philosophy of history, criticism 
of s«Hiety, <»r it has sometimes l»een 
calletl an ultimate nieal. Ilthn's not 
Iwlieve in anarchy and common own- 
ership of personal property, but it 
(hKH iM'lieve that the wealth of the 
country that is iililiieed in the pro«liic- 
tion of intlividiial wealth shoiihl l»e 
publicly owned." 

After the atldress Mr. laidler met 
a niimbei of the stutlents in the 
.StK-ial Inion Uihiui. where plans 
were disi-nssetl for installing a chap- 
ter of the tntercotiegiata amuaiiBt 
society in this coll»-g«-. 



TIm' -^ight of the Amherst and Sun- 

i«'tiand trolley cars waiting at the 

l;<>ston & Maine station at 12-45 p. h. 

■-iinday night was some relief to the 

\)fgie men. Blessings oil the bead 

srjme considerate soul " for saving 

■ !i mile walk I Kven at that al)out 

' men got left anil were forced to 

• " ■X ii l . 



2 
12 
2 
2 
2 
3 
1 



Landscape CnnL'Tiiii^j H' 



Pomology 

Chemistry 

Kntomology 

MicidbioUogy 

Botany 

Agricultural Kd. 

Doubtful 

Total 



2«i 
11 
8 

1 
'A 
1 



Jun's 

1 

'.t 

a 

2 

4 

,1 

i<; 
ir, 

M 

;i 
4 
fi 
4 





1.4. 

24 
2 

i> 
4 
2 

m 

I 



:j2 

42 

i;» 

17 
4 

4 

1 



9ii W6 201 



CROSS COUNTRY NOTES 

.Manager K. ( . F>1 wards of Uic 
cioss-rountry U-am ann«»unees that 
arrHiigements have been inade 
iK'tween Prof. H F Nelligan and 
tra<k manager Donald H. Brown of 
Amherst college, and acting-Presi- 
K. .M. I^-wis and Prof. Curry S. 
Hiiks, negotiating for Massachu- 
setts, for a meet between the cross- 
countrv teams of the two institutions 
on .Saturday, Nov. «. 

" .Mr. Krnest M. Whitt;omb '04, 
of Amherst college has tlonated a 
magnifl'-enl trophy cup. H. imht-s 
high to become the permaiunt prop- 
erty of the college winning tli.- meet 
this year. His object in giving the 
trophy is to cf»ntinu»' uhI cxteml the 
athletic relations between the two 
colleges which ought U> be very nat- 
ural and friendly rivals." 

This meet will be very useful in 
getting the men into condition for 
the intercollegiate croBH-c«Mintry meet 
which takes place the following Sat- 
urday at Dartmouth college. It 
ought to give a showing of the rela- 
tive strength of these two teams in 
that run. 

Practise has been carried on stea«l- 
ily since the defeat at Brown, and 
with gootl weather conditions a good, 
fast run is anticipated. 



Teams Evenly Matched, but Medford 
College Wins, 14-0. 

Fighting for eveiy inch ami play- 
ing the game of their lives, the foot- 
ball team was defeated by the Tufts 
college eleven .Saturtlay on the .Soni- 
erviile fiild. The score. 14-0. can 
hardly serve as a comparison of the 
two teams, they were very evenly 
matched. In fact. Tufts was out- 
classed in defi-nsive I'lay. The 
Aggie line put up a stublM>rn resist- 
ance at all times and Tufts' gains iu 
that quarter were few ami small The 
Medford lH)y8 were superior in the 
use of the forwanl pass ami in tilTen- 
sive work. The Aggie olTense was 
go<Ml enongh at times to win any 
game, the forwards tearing big holea 
in their <qiponents line, but the final 
punch was always lacking. 

Tufts has a wonderful collection 
of football players but they were 
forced to g«» the limit Saturday. 
The speedy Westcott was iiailetl for 
a h»Ms or for a very sniall gain time 
and lime again Angell was practi- 
cally iMittled up. Parks, however, 
use<l the short forward pass with 
Ulling efftH-t, it lieing Tufts' princi- 
pal gr«>und-gaining play. 

For the Aggies, Melican playtnl a 
strong game at quarter. clxMising bis 
plays well and running them olT in a 
snappy fashion. His wor^ in run- 
ning back puts was always senaa- 
titinal. standing out in marki'd 000- 
tiast to that of the Tufts' backs wbo 
were naile«l as they caught the ball. 
The backflehl coiniMmed of Nisscn. 
Brewer and Darling contribnte«l 
many gmsl gains, while the liues- 
mni put up a ro<k-ribbed defense 
continually bteaking through ami 
nailing the runner for a loss. 

The first wore came in the first 
qiiartir after M. A. C. hatl lost the 
ball on her own 10 yanl line. On 
two end runs from a kick formation 
West<;ott reached the 7 yani line, 
carrying the ball over on the next 
plav, aiiolhtr iiid run. Parks kicked 
the goal. Tin- second touchdown 
was made in the latter part of tlie 
fourth ijiiarter. Parks intercepted a 
forwaid pass on Aggie's »0 yard line. 
A series of short f«nward passes and 
end runs brought the ball to the o 
yard line. An offside |)enalty placed 
the ball a yard from the line- Three 
times was the Tufts' attiuk hurled 
back, but on the fourth (h)wn Angell 
managed to i»iish the ball over. 
Parks ku-kid tli< >4'):il- 



HK.<I IJIUKTKK 

Tufts won the tf>ss ami chose to 
defend the west goal having the wind 
at their backs. Aggie kicked off 



I 



The College Signai. Tuesday, November 4 1913 



and recovered tlu' ball wlieii Tufts 
fiuiihled. Diuliiitr nuule three 
yunis throiigli tackle. Hrewer tried 
the other tackle f(jr two yards. A 
forward pass, Brewer to K<lgerton 
was good for eight yards. Brewer 
found a hole at right end. Nisseu 
failed to gain ; Aggie penalized five 
yards for offside. Standard inter- 
ceptetl a forward pass but fumbled, 
Jtiehardson recovering. Angell gained 
ft yard, but Westcott failed. I'arks 
punted (j(T-side, and the referee gave 
the bull to Tufts on Aggies .'{.Vyard 
line. Westcott made three yards. 
Parks tried a drop-kick, but the ball 
went wi«le. The teams lined up on the 
2(>-var«l line with the ball in Aggie's 
possession. Brewer didn't gain and 
Darling made a yard. .Melieau pun- 
ted f«> Westcott who was naile<l 
in his tracks. Westcott wa- unable 
to gain. A forward pass went out- 
Bi<le, Aggie's ball on <iur 2M-yai.l line. 
Baker made a yard. Darling reeled 
off live yards, and Nissen made it 
first down ut center. Brewer got a 
yar<l at right end. Darling Imcked 
tlie line for three yanls. Darling was 
unable to gain, and Meliean pnnteil. 
'I'he wind carried the bull high Idow- 
ing it back of the scrimmage line. 
Aggie recoveretl the punt, but the 
referee gave the ball to Tufts on ihe 
40-yard line. Angell hit left taikle 
for ftMir yar<ls. Parks made three 
yards ut the other tat kle. Westcott 
landed on Aggie's one yard line af- 
ter two of his wi«le end runs. lit* 
carried the ball over on the next play. 
Parks kicked the goal. 

Tufts kicked off to Darling who 
ran the ball back to the a.'i-yani line. 
Brewer made it Hrst down. Darling 
got live yards at taekle, but on the 
nevt play three men got through and 
threw Brewer for a K>ss. A forward 
pass was incomplete and Brewer pun- 
te<l outside on Tufts 35-yard line. 
After two rushes the ipiarter emied 
with the ball in Tuft's j)os.sessJon on 
lier own .'Jx-vani line. 



A forward pass was Incomplete 
and Parks got o(T a short punt whicti 
went out-side. Aggie's Imll. Three 
attempts failing to pnxluce a gain. 
Brewer punte«l to I'arks on his |(>- 
yard line. A series of short line 
plunges followed. A forward pass 
was incomplete and Brewer inter- 
cepted a >(■<(. iid pass, r.r.w.i made 
half a yard. Darling fumble.l but 
recoveretl back of the line, A prettv 
l»ass. Brewer to Jordan was goo<l for 
l.*i yanls. Another attempt was in- 
terceptetl by Volk. Tufts was unable 
to gain on the third down. .Strong 
recovere<la fumble. Brewersni.i.HJKd 
through right tackle for six yards. 
Darling ma<le first down at the other 
tackle. Nissen made three short 
gains at (t'litcr and the ball went to 
Tufts on downs. Kdgerton turned 
Angell back. Westcott made four 
yards and then first down. He 
struck a snag, however, at Edger- 
ton's end. Tufts was penalized five 



yards for offside play. Angell got 
four yards. V^olk fumbled, Angell 
recovered and was tackled for a loss 
by Bakei . A pass was incomplete and 
Parks punted to Dai ling who returned 
the ball eight yards. Of two for- 
ward passes, the first was incomplete 
and the second was intercei)ted by 
Parks. Strong recovered a fumbfe 
but the ball went back t<.> Tufts on 
the next play when Angell inter- 
ceptetl a puss. The half ended with 
the ball in the center of the field. 

TIIIKO «^IAI{TKI{. 

Darling received the kick-t.ft' and 
was tackled on our 1.0-yard line. 
Two plunges for short gains, and 
Brewer punted to Parks. An attempt 
ut a f<»rward pass was blocked, the 
liall rolling to the sitle lines where an 
Aggie man recovered it. A consulta- 
tion of the olHcials resulted finally in 
the ball being given to Aggie on the 
4()-yard line. Nissen made six yards 
at center. Darling pulled off three 
yanls and Nissen made at Hrst <lown. 
A forward pass was intercepted on 
Tufts l.')-yard line, and Aggie had 
lost a good chance to score. A 
series of short gains and Parks 
punted to Meliean. Brewer g«»t two 
yards at right tackle and reiuated 
with seven yards. Nissen made first 
down, then Brewer inatle a pretty, 
twisting. 2<>-yard run through the right 
side «»f the line. Aggie was penal- 
lze«l three yuids for offsitle play. 
The play known as formation A was 
tried and failed. Darling made four 
yards, and Brewer made at first down 
with seven yanls. Tufts intercepted 
a pass on her la-yanl line. Another 
g«KKl opportunity to score gone. 
Angell failed to gain. Wescott gained 
three yards and Angell got two. An 
exchange of punts left the ball on 
Tnfts 20-yanl line. Westcott was 
iinalde to gain, a forward pass was 
Ineoinplete, and another exchange of 
punts left the ball on Tufts iii-ynrd 
line. 




The College Signal. Tuesday, November .| 1913 



HERMAN'S U.S. ARMY 
SERVICE BLUCHER 

In Tan Willow Cull or 

Cruu Metal. A huud- 

soine.suiippy bhue 

ontheOrtliopeilic ^ 

la.>t, de^ig'autl by 

army surj^eons. 

Vou never saw 

a shoe like it 

for wear.com-^ 

fort and 

style. 

Single 
Noli; of 
Texas iin- 
scoiiredoak.i'ox 
t<H', sole leather 
•ounlers,every part 
inspected. I.iiiin^' of 
specially tested drill. A Kolld 
leather shoe that will give the 
w<«ar of the civilian (>hoe that 
sells for $<{. This is one of the 
shoes I'ncle Sam Imivs for his 
soldiers. IT'S A \V<>ICI.1> 
Ul^ATEU. See the Aruiy line. 




HERMAN'S U.S. 
,ARMY SHOES 




PRICE $4.00 



I«asts designed ],. 

AKiMY Snri 

{^eons. Miiteii; :s 

ur<.'tliel>e8ttli;it 

can be ubtaitii > 

WorkmanNliiji 

inspected 

and i^iiar- 

auteed. 



No, 968 

GARRISON 
BLUCHER. 

One of tlie inn«t popular 
In the Army Line. Mn.ic in Tan Wil- 
low Calf and CJiiii Metal. He.ivy 
sini:l« s<>I(>. !mh to. . M>li<l leiither 
thn>u);hiiut.Ahaii(lHuine><iiHp|>yH|io<>. 
t'oinf ill t(. M'*' tli«' liiif. Miimifartii!..! 

only by J ose ph .1. Ufrman ArCo., Bostou. 
PRICE $4.00 



All MlsBc^s «n<l ■vvl<ltl«M. «tt 



EIS SHOE STORE 



THE 

Hoover& Smith Go. 

6ie Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 

Pliiladelphla's Official Fraterniti Jeweler 

8PBOIALIST8 IN 
Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties. 
Ring's, Charms ..... Prizes Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals. 

Rings, Charms.-. 




Che 
PDeasant 

BmltK? St.. 
Bmbcr^t 

Telt-pli.ine 470 



roiirni (^uakter. 

I'arks and Westcott each made a 
yard, then Parks pimtiMl to Meliean, 
who ran tlu> hall hack live yards. 
Three rushes failed auti Brewer 
|>uuted to Tufts 30-yurd line, Wger- 
ton nailing Westcott as he caught the 
hall. I'arks sijueezed through guard 
for a yard. A forward pass. Parks 
to Bennett was gmnl fur eight yards. 
Schlotterheck threw Westcott for a 
five yar<l loss. Parks punted to 
.Meliean on his 20-yard line. Brewer 
made nine yards at tackle, Nissen 
gained first down. Darling in.ide 
two yards at tackle, then Psirks inter- 
cepted a forward pass on Aggie's 1<»- 
y;n<l line a series of short passes. 
Parks to Angell or Bennett lironght 
the ball to the .*>-yard line. An ofif- 
side penalty advanced the ball until 
it was on the 1-yard line. For three 
downs the line held, but the fourth 
rush just put the ball over. Parks 
kicked the goal. 

Meliean received the kick-off and 
ran back to the 2.'»-yard line. With 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass 

OrFK B Hours: 



■MSAKPAST 

LUNCHBON 
AFTERNOON TRA 

l>inner if arraniced for. 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 



Now at 13 Pleasant St. 



Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Keplaccii 
Fine Watch Repairing Promptly anrf 
Skilfully Done 



Satiif action Guaranteed 



A Chance to Save Mopey 

A $5.00 Safety Razor for $5.00 

But we give you a coupon which when signed with your 
name and home addres.s we refund you $3.50. It carries 
the Rexal! guarantee, " Money back if not satisfied." 

We carry a full line of 

Waterman, Oonklin and Moore's Fountain 

Pens, Stationery, Pipes, Tobacco 

and Cigarettes. 

Lig^ett's, Belle Meade and Green Seal Chocolates 



THE HENRY ADAMS CO., Dnigeists 

The REX ALL Store on the corner 



., ftw minutes to play the rejuuiuder 
„f the pcriotl was spent in trying out 
tin- forward pass. Five passes failecl 
Lfiiig either incomplete or inter- 
it'ptcd. The game endeil with the 
l.jill in Tufts possession or her 40- 
v;inl line. 

I In- summary : — 

M. A. c. 

re, Piaisletl, l>ay, Jordan 
It, .Schji'ttcrbetk 



Ti ^ 1^- 
St.iiikardje 

( ) i lOlUR'll, It 

liunston, Ig 
Ku li.irdsuii, c 
|„!<m, Klimer. rg 
Hmgliana, Melven, rt 
Sennctt. re 
|',nks, iJuevin, qh 
H.«lley, Volk, Ihb 
W- stiott. Proctor, rhb 
Ai»scll, Turner, fb 
Score— Tufts 14, M 



rg, Haker 

c, Dole 

Ig. Strong 

It, Jordan, Perry 

le, Kd^jeton, Day 

qb, .Mclican 

litb. Darling 

Ihb, Brewer 

lb, Nissen 

A <. o. Touch 



downs-Westcott, Parks. (,oals from 

l.iuchdowns- Parks 2. Umpire- II ul>- 

},.v6 of Amherst. Referee - Bra g ol 

-i.yan. Linesman- (i. \V. Hrown of 

I. A. .\. I line I .' iniiiiitf periods. 



NINETEEN-THIRTEEM NOTES 

M(||H> UV IIIK NINI-rrEKN-TIIIHTKKN 
M. A. • . < I.UK UK AMIIBK8T. 

The 1'.M:J men who :tt tended the 
liifts game held a get-tog<'ther Imn- 
.|ii.f at the liiited States Initel after 
thr game. There were I<! [tresent. 
Tin' chief topii- of discussion was 
til.' athletic field and an even *IOO 
wu> [dcdgeil making r.M3*8 con- 
tnl'iifion ?24n to date. Those [»res- 
eiit : L. A. lievan. II. A Itrown. N 
K (lark, C. K. Cristmau. II. W. 



Curtis, T. P. Dooley, H. M. (iore, ! 
G. K. Howe, A. .1. Kelley, B. .1. 
Kelley,.!. W. Losnre. W. I.. Little, 
<^ S. Lowry, Paul Serev, I). A. 
Sheehan and W. (i. Tucker. 

The "feed" wn.s voted the I>e8t ' 
ever and every man there decided to 
be present at the next lUl.'l "get- 
together" after the Sprinjiliehl <;ame. 
The following M.'l men were at the 
Tufts game Ixit unable to attend the 
gathering: L. F. Drury. .1. A. 
Mason, H. W. Kills. H. T. Hatch, 
.1. L. Mayer. ('. I.. Thayer and . I. 
VV. Covin. 

M,tt> IUM->. 

( iordon W. Klls, Asst. entoinolu 
gist, Alabama Kxperiment Station, 
Auburn. Ala. 

I.awreiHi A. Hev.ui. furnier. 
Nashua St., .North Leominster. 

Uernanl.J. Kelley. farm manager, 
.South Hamilton. 

Waldo (J. Tucker, instructor, 
I'eabody high sch(K>l. I'ealMMly 

"The ll»i;; (Jet-togethei" after 
Springfield game. Nov. l.'»tli. Doc. 
Fay in charge. 

i)ec. M, "imn night :••— Boston. 
Springfiehl. Chieag«>, Wtishington. 
I). C., lx)s Mochis. llon<dulu, etc. 

"Mike" Lyon visited «"o!k'ge last 
week with his bi«do<2y <las« from 
Wiirmms <'ullege. 



Kx-'ll. — Leslie iK Andeisoii is in 
the gnx'ery biisinesH nitli his f.'ither 
at Concord. 




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Mackinaws 



AND 



Sweaters 



This is Mackinaw atnl Sweater season. Koolhiill. Gull antl 
all other K;ill antl Winter sports call lor good .*^\veat^■r pro- 
tecti(»n. We have in .stock todax several hundred Macki- 
na\N.s in all grades. 



The fanuMis .*^llmnlil brand, ucll known in llie Nortliv\est 
and acknowledged to he one ol the he^t, Coat Sweaters, 
the Shawl C<»lliir. Coat Collar aiul the regular .shape 
Sweaters, all the be.st selling ctdors. 

iHii.oo to iH«^.o<> 



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•TTIE greatest joy that follows the 
* hardships of training, is the moment 
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dect maturity — disappearance of all 
harshness— leaving that rare degree of 
mellowness — superb flavor— ^ihe smooth- 
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old stufir At a!! dealers. 



Wi: SOLICIT YOl)l{ PATRONAGE 

In so far as «»iir iK-riefits .irr iinitiial. 

Till' AMHERST (.AS COMPANY 

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MflPRE'S ?259 






FOUNTAIN PEN 

Minimize your fountain pen 

-- troubh-H bv owrdnft a Moore's. C It Is the 

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' €L Its strenftth lies In U» vtry simplU Ity. Nothing 
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Adam*. < iishlim & r<.»ter. Srlllnft AftenU j^ -, 

IMI>KVONSIIIRKSiRKH BOSTON. MA.SS. •«^. 



UP 






The Collage Signal, Tuesday, November 4, 1913. 



m 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural Colleg^e. 



BOASD OF BDITOBB. 

CflESTKR K^WMRKF.KK 14. Kditor-in-Chief 
FKANK \V. HI KI.I. '15. ManaRing Kditor 

HAROr.D C. BI.ACK '14, Comp«-tition Kditor 
IIAROl.n-F. CI.AV'14. Assistant Editor 

S lUART B. FOSTKR '14. Athletic Kditor 

ERVINK F. PAKKKR '14, Alumni Kditor 

J. ALBRKT PRU K 15, Athletic Kditor 

GEO. E. DONNKI.I. '15. Depirtment Kditor 
EARLE S. DRAPER '15. Campus Editor 

TYI.ER S. RfKiKRS'ifi. Associate Editor 

CHARLES W. CURTIN'ift. Associate Editor 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

ERNEST S. CI. ARK. IR '.4. Mus. Managtr 
MAURICE J. CI.OlCiH 'If, Ass't Hus Mi{r. 
ERNEST F. UPTON '14. Advcrtisinu Manauer 
W. RICHARD SEARS '15 Asst. Ad» Manager 
CHAS. A. HUNTIN(;T(»N. J R '16. Circulation 

Subscription I1.50 pi-r yrar. Single 
copies, 5 cents Make all orders payable 
to Ernest S. Clakk, Jk. 



Tae College Signal. Tuesday, November 4, 1913. 



Cnt9f6d 



■a aaoond-claaa matter at Iha Amharai 



course Tliui-sday morning — fine ooly two veterans, Brewer and Little I 
weather for such work. I were lost by graduation while the 

The doors of the armory were a | freshmen class is e.\pect«d to pro- 
place of interest to all during the j vitle some good material. Of those 
latter part of last week. who were awarded hockey Ms last 

Several informal fraternity dinner j ■>'®'^''' t'ai)tain Jones, Hutchison, 
and theatre parties were held in Hos- i ^'e"""""' Archibald, Johnson, C'hi.s- 
ton on Saturday eveninir. olm and Fernald remain in college. 

The only vacant |)08ition is goal. 
In addtion to those mentioned there 
are several other gooti hockey 
men in college. Manager Tellett has 
arranged an excellent schedule and the 
outlook is exceptionally good. 



evening. 



Vol. XXIV. TuK.sDAv, Nov. 4, No. 8 



" Boost Old Aggia. 



»» 



SuNi>AY chapel will be resumed 
oext week, and during the winter 
the daily chapels have l)een reduced 
to two a week. This arrangement 
will lie agreeable t<» all concerned, 
and the reducti iiuudu'r of <lailv 
(Impels .should ease the miuds of 
those men who were worrying alwuil 
too many chaitel exercises. Tin- 
new schedule is nuicli Mp|>reciati'd bv 
the students. 



•'IJ^KKHrOld Aggie" That watch- 
ward was the guiding spirit of the 
men at the Tufts game, and now that 
the game i^s past, the idea is more 
lirndy lootml than before. The 
spirit shown by the students was 
only anotlier instance of the lovaltv 
which marks every one connecte<l 
with our institution, loyalty to her 
ideals and hir hopes for the future. 
The favorable comment brought 



The mass meetings of Wednesday I 
and Friday evenings weie character- 1 
ised by lots of the old Aggie "pep." 1 

('. L. Hill of the Hreeders' Asso- ! 
elation will give an athlress on the 
Guernsey breed, in the Chapel Thurs- 
day night. 

Acting President Lewis was called 
to the bedside of his father last week. 
The elder Mr. Lewis has been ill for 
a long time. 

Tufts considered the recent grid- 
iron struggle by far tlie hardest of 
the year. Watch the Aggies come 
l>ack in I'JH ! 

The presence of a large number of 
the fair sex in the Aggie bleachers at 
Tufts was rather markctL Alumni 
and "ex-men" weie also 8tiongl\ in 
evitlence. 

"Mickey" Klls M.l. vi8lto<l M. A. 
('. last week. He leaves s(M>n to ac- 
cept a |H>sition as assistant state 
entomologist at the state ex|H>riment 
station Alaimma. 

Professor Hart will conduct a con- 
ference on agrindtiiral education in 
Worcester in connection with the 
Worcester County teachers' associM- 
tion on Noveml»er 7. 

The Ik>ston iV^ Maine rolling st(K-k 
is some antiquated. We desist from 
further comment, re:ilizing the slight 
effect these words of truth will have 
on the said railroad ! 

The annual college debate comes 
before Christmas this year. The 
trials will l»e hchi Nov. 21. Prof. 
Smith offers assistance free of 
charge to those trying fm the col- 
lege teams. See him .' ! 

About L'o of the men electing 



QNITY CHURCH 

NOKTH I'l.K.ASA.NT St 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every sludrnt will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

KKaULAK HIMMY i>iKKVICe .%T 7 I* M 



Clark '15 Eldridge '14 

All Student Supplies 

M. A. C STORE 

BANNERS AND POSTERS 



CANOV 



TONIC 



Montaj^ue '15 



Hager '>(, 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest lim 
the state outside of Host 



m 



E. RUSSELL NORTON 

SALES AORNT 

Davenport Miller 
Vein Coal 

Best Qualhy Pennsylvania Coal 



Seeourljneof Drill Shoes 

$2.00 to $4.00 



MODERN REPAIR 
DEPARTMENT 



E.M.BOLLES 



ON VOdIt WAV TO P. O . 



BOSTON OFFICE 

85 Water .St. 



NEW yoKK OKFH K 

t Broadway 



alwut by the sight of those KMi men 

as they marche<l ilowii to the field I I..«nds<ape for a major s|>eut Friday ! CEORGC KorowiTZ 

was «me which will do a great deal I »nd Saturday morning inspecting Main .street. AmherM, Mas* 



toward advancing 
our college. 



the interests of 



CAMPUS NOTES 

Hack to work again ! One mightv 
sigb ! 

"On to Springfield" is the motto 



famous exanjples of landscape art 
and civic «lesign in Boston find sid>- 
urlis. Professor Harrison leil the 
"tour." 

Work on the ad<lition to Frencii 
hall has progressed rapidly oi late 
after a rather slow beginning. When 
completed it will double the present 



now. 

No more green button> will l>e dis-!*''*^ "'^ '''*^ luiildingand take c.-ire of 



played Sundays. 

Stanley W. Hall IC. of Saxon- 
ville, has pledged Kappa Sigma. 

Wa'.ter K. Dodge K',. of 1 it-neva, 
Ohio, has pledged I'hi Sigma Kappa. 

Hoberts MO assisted Coach IJridcw 
on the fcM)tball Held the past week. 



the rtoricultine and nuirket garden 
ing departments to goo<l advantage. 
! Plans for one big "feed" and 
I smoker after the Springfield game 
are in the air. No hotel in 
Springfield is able to take care of 
the large numl)er of men who are 



LOW RRICC TAILORING CO. 

Slll> MADK TO OKDF.K 
Suits CIraned. Pressed and I»ved, All kinds of 
KepainhK for Ladle* and tientlenien neatly d'^it- 
lli«h-srade wurk by fimt cla>s tailor. Wnrk 
calM for and driivertd. S«|| tickets foi pre'ssiiiK. 
4 sn I 'i FOK |i :;o 

Pnof*. 

Nash Block 
lei. 4J»-W 



Coolcp's l)OtCl 

Springfield, Mass., 

Solicits the patronage of the Stu 
dents of the Agricultural Colif ue 
to class dinners and individuaih. 



On your way to the Post Office. 



THE KATHERINE E. McCLELLAN STUDIO 

44 State St., Northampton, Mass. 

PORTRAITS — GROUPS — VIEWS 

Insist upon seeing our college work and prices before decidii _ 



expected to attend, but further ar- 
ri.e band i.layed for a^ «U'm«Kratic ......gements will be made if possible 

and announcement made in next 
week's Shinai.. 



rally in the town hall Thursdav 
evening. 

The Kennel club is going to in- 
stall a safe in the dog-cart. Mu.siness 
is picking up ! 

The drawing clans took a fresh air 



With the closing of the football 
.season and the beginning of winter the 
hockey team will come in to its own. 
The outlook this year is very good as 



Call or 'ri;Li;i'iioNE 1,^1 



K;i|'l'a Kpsilon has taken in the 
1: V iiL' new members : 

lyi.'i. 

.I,,lui Willard Huterick, of Melrose. 
|,,.iin Hianchard Damon of Melrose. 
Williniu Hegiiialil Tower «>f Shef- 

liol.i. 
Ill iiiaiiiin Wellington of Waltham. 
Homer Hethoven White of Melrose. 
Ik'ijjaiuin Vener of Krockton. 

(,,, l.iMil Knaptun <»f Lawrence. 
Kfgiiialfl Stewart Hunt <>f Hridg- 
watir. 
Aveittt .S. Sanderstin of C'entre- 

vilt.'. H. I- 
H :."i:ir\ member. Mr. .\rtliiir K. 

llaiTison- 



SIGNAL COMPETITION 

The fi»llowing is the standing uf 
the ("oinpetilors for assistant adver- 
i.«ln>j manager to dale: 







Am'i of 


t..t.ti 






New %dft 


< ledits 


K 


.1. S.-hedfele 


1 \'i 


\'2 \-2 


I. 


K. Fielding 




I J 1-2 


H 


W. Bishop 


1 


H 


I 


1. Ilalhawav 


. 


n 






W. |{. Sk 


^i;-. 






A-^'t Adv 


. Mgr. 



FREDERICK A. OBFR, ex-'72 

Kiedeiick Alltioii (Uter was l»orn in 
Beverly, Mas.s.. Feliniaiy 1.!. l>i|;i, 
the son of Andrew Kimball and 
Sarah (Ihnlltuk ) Ober. 

The public schools gave hiiii liis 
early training until foiirteeu year^ uf 
age. He received nonther aK^»i.xtall< e 
from sclnM>ls save that of a year 
(lx(;;i) at the Alassachusell.s Agri- 
cultural Cidlege. 

Mi.Olierwas a lineal descendant 
of Bieliard Ober, who settled in 
Beverly early in the Heventeeiith cen- 
tury. He early showed a fuiulness ; 
for field sports and natural liisii>i\, 
and while \ct a lM>y had collected miiI 
preserved samples uf nearly all the 

birds of New Fngland. and hatl uuted 

I 

their habits. So strong wan his | 
passion ill this direction that liei 
abandoned a lucrHtive tuisiness to Iw- 
come nil «>xploier and orniltiologiit. 
He was a charter meriihei of the F.\- 
plorer's Club, a torrespoiiding 
memlier of the New York Academy 
of Scien« . . 1 life member of the | 
American Antiquarian Sm-iety and 
the (leohigical ScM-iety of Washington 
He was a member aUo of the iioyal 
Areunum and I'liion Ix'agtie Club, 



I. M. LABROVITZ, Custom Tailor 

Fashions, Fit, First Class Work Guaranteed 1 

. — .rimcnt on hand <.i;Nl S I- U K.M.SH I \< ..S R. fl M.«n ("uil.^r* and I 
r>re»» Sh»r»«. ("Icantnis .ind I'ressii ^ I >l< l-.SS St 1 1 S 
TO KK.Nf Militiiiv Co'l.is , r.lovf^ 

AMIIFRS'I. MASS. 



11 AMII Y ST.. 



Teleplionc ;5o; AN 



** Keeping in Front " 

You fellows know what that means f 
We've been very successful in this 
regard with Fatima Cigarettes. By 
the way, these cigarettes were first 
sold in the college towns — and you 
agreed with us that they were good. 

Then we put out for the big race, 
io make Fatimas of nation-wide rep- 
utation, and today more are sold than 
any other cigarette in this country. 

No purer, or more carefully chosen 
tobacco grows than that in Fatimas. 
We purposely put them in a plain 
inexpensive wrapper — in this way 
we can afford quality tobacco, and 
twenty of the smokes for I 5 cents. 

Now your college crew is of utmost 
importance to you — so is a good 
cigarette, and it's your aim in life 
to keep Fatimas m the lead —right 
up to their good quality — right up 
lo where you first found them, and 
ill always find them. 

Success fellows ! You started this 
igarette on 'ts successful career — 
and you pull a strong oar all over 
this country. 




fATlN^ 

W TUPK1M1 BLtUB ^^ 

CIGARETTES 




"Oittinctitrl^ ffJi'^'^*^' 



The Weakest Link or Limiting Factor 

There are rtelds that tont.iin an al)undante of potash on analysis, 
but on which crops fail if thcv are not supplied with ,inu/ti{>/c |M)tash, 
and the same is true if •aai/ttHr phosphorus is lacking. 

We are all familiar witli the limiting factor in i rop produilion. 
namely, the weakest link in llie thain of fertility. One never knows 
when one has reached the limiting factor, the weakest link; one never 
knows when one has exhausted the avail.ible phosphorus or the avail 
able potash, or the av.*ilable nitrogen until ciop:; tail lo respond. .Mler 
a farmer has harvested a bumper crop he has taxed all the links in the 
ciiain of fertility, but which one is ne.iiest the breaking point he docs 
not know, therefore, if he is wise he applies at least all three of the 
leading elements of fertility in some shape, either in the form of stable 
in. mure, green crops or commercial fettili/ers. or all ombiind (which 
latter is the better plan\ knowini,' that any excess which he may have 
applicti will not be lost out of the reach of crops, if a rational system 
of rotation with deep-rooted and shallow rooted crops is pi.ictise<l, in 
chiding tover « rops. Moreover, these undoubtediv promote bacterial 
^tovvt'i in ilie soil, which, according to M.iU, mav be the limilinji fa» tor. 

Stu.h the J'ltutt l>n>,{ pfohlfm 

Af,tny have "an" answer 
"The" amwer will he varth while 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER COMPANY 
43 Chatham St., Boston 




. A. 




MEN'S STORE 



USE OUR NEW CASH DISCOUNT CARD 
AND SAVE FIVE PER CENT ON 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 



SOLE AGENT FOR 



THK GENUINE AND OKIGINAI. 



PATRICK MACKINAW 



8SICIC V%^1*XI><>W l»I>ilM..W 



A I 



O.A.3VCFI03Sr 'S 



.Ngcnt, K. S. Him .;, Kappa Sigma House. 



\i 



I 



The College Signal. Tuesday, November 4, 1913. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 4, 19 13 



The Hoiyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

j(ibl)ersof WroiiRhl Iron and ltr»ss I'ipr, Valves 
.»nd Kittin|{s for Steam, Water an<l (ia*. Asbestos 
and Magnesia Holler and Pi|)e Coveiinus. I'ipe 
Cut to Sketch, Mill Siipidies. Khkii eeis and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water lleatuiK. 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Hoilei ;iiid Kncit e 



I 



uiid a (.-loMC 
I't'iirv. 



friend of Cook imd 



Connections. 



Hulyoke, Maa*. 



The Teachers Exchange 

Ol Huston i.'o liiylilon St. 

Rfcommeniis Teachers, Tytors and Schools ^^ '"'** '"""*^' ^'^ Kainn<..int Avenue, eaeii ii|.ies.'nthig not less 

llackeiisuck. N. .1. He left a widow veai-hours of work, in 



m 



No 



C^^rp^n-tcr & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 

I, Cook Place, Amherst, Mass. 



KEvriKKMENTS. 

Applicants must possess 
He (lied .Ma.v .'Ust, liM.J, after a Hachflor's degree; evidence of p,,. 
lintiiring illness of ahont two years pu.ation in at least two siil.j.tts, 

tban tliiei. 
l»raii(Le!, 

and two children. j ^hich the candidate expects to t. adi, 

Mr. Oherwas an entertaining con- called majors; evidence of pivpau. 
versationalist, a gotnl citizen, a tion in at least two subjects. ,.;uh 
neighborly neighboi and a nuxlel representing not less than on. 
husband and father. 

lie began his explorations and 



Mini 



one-half year-hours of work, lalltii 
minors. Hotb majors and miiio^ 



travels in 1«72, when he went to | are to be selected fn.m the foll.nvin.- 



Students Attention ! ! ! 

We are ready at the start to furnish you with a fine 
line of Campus and Fraternity House Views, also Post 
Cards. Kodak work given prompt and careful attention. 
Kniarging and picture framing given our jjersonal at- 
tention. Sc<- (1^ .liioui (Iroups and Portraits for the very 
best work. 



Satisfaction Guaranteed, 
the Square Deal Studio 



Patronize 



\ ^^m 



KINSMAN'S COLLEGE STUDIO 

NasH DlocK. Amherst 



H. 



M. K<)(;ers, '15, Agent. 
H7 Pleasant St., 



Studio Phone 303-2 



GRAND SWEEPSTAKES TROPHY 



(1750.00 Sterling Silver Cup) 
roa 



BEST STATE EXHIBIT OF POTATOES 



Hi 

" ! 

$ 

is" 

i 




AT TNC 

New York Land Show 

1912 
WON BT 

TheL L. Cleveland Company 

HOULTON. M*. 

/^NE of the largest and most 
. reliable seed potato houses 
in the United States. Competi- 
tion open to the entire United 
States and Canada. Messrs. E. L. 
Cleveland Company also won the 
First Pri/.e for Best Coaoty Exhibit 
of Potatoes. (Silver Cup valued 
at $200.00.) 
The E. L. Cleveland Company use 

E. FRANK COE 



FERTILIZERS 



E. Frank Coe Fertilizers have 
been the business farmer's favorite 
for over fifty-five years. Why not 
follow the example of these lead- 
ing commercial potato growers. 

T-n •"till i« riwrt ■•The .Siitr-f nf A Prr^taMe Polatn 
< rt>p' "rlllrnhj an trnn.iank (■■ml;. Main* Hrmrr 
k rujiy U irni fi-^a aa rvi|H»tl. 



Florida t<> hunt for birds. lie was 
so charmed with this trip that he 
went again in 1874, deteimined to 
explore Lake ()kechol>ec and the 
Kvergla<le8. He made an <irnilho- 
logicnl investigation of the lesser 
Antilles. West Indies. 1m7«;-7« and 
188(», discovering twenty two new 
species of birds, and ad<ling tnany 
tyjM's to collection at Smithsonian 
Institute in I'loccetlings of which his 
results were pubiished. It is said 
this comprisi'd the greatest contribu- 
tion l»v one explorer to the historv of 
liird life. 

lie traveled in .Mexico ami Yuca- 
tan in I8«!, \hh:\ and |nh.-». 

Later in .Spain. S<tuth ,\n)erica and 
again in the Indies, to which Island 
he was conunissioner in I M!>l -'.»:.'. In 
\x\y.\, he had charge of bird exhibits at 
the Columbian Kxposition. For these 
8ervi<-es he was given a diploma and 
Itronze medal by the government. 

I '.(Hides iK-ing a traveler and lect- 
urer, .Mr. Ober wrote forty or fifty 
IxMiks, mostly of juvenile «'har»cter 
and many magazine articles. 

F. v.. KlMHAI.I. "fl. 



The Goe-Mortimer Company, 



51 CHAMBERS STREET. 
NEW YORK, N. Y. 



DEPARTMENT OF AGRICUL- 
TURAL EDUCATION 

The conunittee <»n " Certilication 
of IVachers '* held a meeting Monday 
afterniM.n at Professor Mart's «ilHce 
in the Neterinary S<'ience building. 
The following rules for the adminis- 
tration of recommending canditlates 
for teacher's certificates were 
approve<l : 

Kci-ommcndation for the «-ertilicate 
will be in charge of a conunittee of 
the faculty thru whom application 
must l»e made. Applications nuist 
l>e made in time to cofiipletc the 
academic and professional retpnre- 
ments at. or be'orctime of graduation. 
Heconunendations wdl be Imsed tm 
scholarship records, and inor:d lit- 
ness. In scholarship, the apfdicant 
ujust have attained grades which rank 



sul»ject8 : — agriculture, biology. Imji- 
any, chemistry, Knglish, French. (Jc,. 
man, history, mathematics, ptr^^i 
geography, physics, physioh»g\ 

The professional recpiiremenls .ii. 
the completion of courses 1, :'. . j 
I in agricultural education, 01 Uj«-ii 
etpiivalent. The certificate is issnil 
by the State Hoard of Kducatiuii hihI 
the college oflicials. It renders t|,. 
holder " eligible to teach in n liijih 
scIhs)I aided directly l>y the coinuiou- 
wealth." It is valid thruout thi- 
state, and nuiy be recogni/.ed ami 
made valid in other states by endurHf- 
ment. It is valid for two years. It 
may \*v renewed once for a peritid of 
two additional years. Two ve:jr8 of 
successful teaching an<l the com|i|p- 
tion of 8uch professi<mal stiidv a* 
m.t\ Ix- reipiiied by the llonrd »f 
Kducation. shall entitle the h<>ld<r to 
a permanent, or life, certificate. 



DEPARTMhNT NOTES 

A4iKOM>Mt. 

The St«M'kbridgechib, incimnertioti 
with the department of agroiirmiv. 
has entered a teiim in the iiniiiixl 
New Kngland intei-<.*ollegi)ite (•••n 
judging contest. The event thi>i visf 
is to )»e held in connection Miih 
Vermont State Fair at Windwu, \\ . 
and is to take place on Tliur- ' 
Nov. r. Massachusetts ttNik tui' 
two pluceslnat year, and tied fortbird. 

Miss Kthel Nash, n graditatt ; 
Ilyannis Normal s<'h«K»l, hns ^m^ 
chosen extension service ii!-' ; ' 
in agricultural education. tli< 
poiiitment to lake elToct .l:tiHi:ii 
first. .Miss Nash will help in ilir or- 
ganization of the lioys' an<i irii^- 
clul> work and will also assist in b 
economics »lemonstration.H. 

l>OMO|,<Mi> 

The Department has just st-nl 'Wt 
twenty collections of apples l" o'l"' 
colleges in exchange for »iniil;ii 
him in the fiest tliirtl of his class in I lections These go from Mnint •' 
those sulijects In- pro|>oses lo teach, Oregon and Washington ;iti<J fro™ 
including both majors and minors, .Michigan to Missouri. TIh aPf^'*"* 
I ami, in the professional courses, tlif tli.it ;tic n(ti\((l will be u- 
[applicant must Inive attaiiiecf an aver- class in systematic potiiology 
i age grade of -0 percent. The moral \ Tli.' candidates for the jiidj: ng'''"" 
fitness of the :ipplic!mt will be ju<lged p.uking teams for Hostoii an |Milt'"'' 
I'V his icpiitation and t liaiiicler as in all their spare time in trniiuiig • 
shewn toith in the v.-trious phases of ! are doing excellent work. I li»»rc sit 
his college life. Tin- certilicate will six c:mdi«l:itcs for each t' 
be presented at the time of graduation though the federation allo^v - i ; 
by a representative of the Hoard of of oiilv four men. 
Kducation. 



Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

I XCKKUS. IMUJI.TKY UKKS.SKKS 
.«.\l* HUTTKK .tlAKKKS. 



wimlKSAi.E i>i-:aiiks in- 



\\et\ Muttun. Lamb. Veal, Pork, Lard, Hams, 

tiatiun, SautaKe*. Poultry, Uame, Butter 

Cheese, bgca, Bcana. 

I .t!,,p \ Stores fj,;;, 57.34. I & ''3 Blackston*- St. 

1: .x«n. Cifkiiit; House, HriKhton, Mass, 

N iti^e I'oultry Dre$»inK Flant. (Boston. 

Creamarie* in Verniunt. 



JACK FARRAR 

Is back with us again. 
.Auk him for some of our 

FREE SPRING WATER 



DOG CART 



Those who know 
buy the De Laval 

« r>-Mnirryinrn — Hrcausp thry are rx 

I- ••■. Ill th«- liandhiiK of (ream and know 
•!i«»tite that th»- l>e I aval 
t anil WfAts longest. I hat 
.. .- , ,,. .,; ih<- World'* crraiiieri*« um! 
tti« l>e 1 ..iv.tl i-x( luMVetv 
»:«|...rl.-ii<-«.4l Italrymrn- I hf l)« l.aval 
' ■ ■ •>'r~.)l tavorita aiiiiing l>i|{ ■laii V 
i !•■> Kill)* that no othj-i <kpparat<ir 
■-.!1 uivp lliriii tuch satisfactory service 
• H.I l*f |ji«al I'lM-m -Whenever « man 
'.1^ us.-rl an old nimiel l)e I. aval de 
! purliawa later «t vie machine he 
> ■ I ibly Ikj>% another l>e I. aval. 

H. n Who InteatlKMlr— |l<»cause thev 

• ' •';;'• niajorityol {>e l.avalmachine<t 

lat they are u»ed l>y the heit in 

- ivrs everywhere; tli ■• """ «Mnd 

■■>■. !»-<.l in u«e. and that their k-I 

'-• -4iiiHe<l than titers of nth' it*. 

THE DE LAVAl SEPARATOil CO. 



!♦.; itro.^d»a\, 

\ > ', ,.,V, 



T^i E Madison St. 

Chii a({'>. 



Ihere are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

O O A L 



or 



C. R. ELDER 



Washington, I). C. to take part in 
the judging contest of the American 
I'omological society is still undecided, 
as full llnancial support is uncertain. 




ALUMNI NOTES 

'S"- — Charles L. Maisliall is man- 
ager of the Crocher farm in Canton. 

*04.— Jachary T. Hubert, presi- 
dent of Jackson college, .lackson. 
Miss., also profes.sor of psychology 
and of agriculture in that institution, 
receives a word of praise in an article 
accompanied by his photogiaph in a 
recent issue of the ('olU'ijt- .hnininl. 
for his excellent work in developing 
this colored college. 

'<>•'». — Harold I'. Toinpson was 
elected vice-piesident of the vege- 
tabli' growers of America at a recent 
session of tlmt i>rgani/.ati«m in Tol- 
etlo, Ohio. 

*08. — The engagement of Arthur 
.1. Farley to Miss K<litli H. .McLauiy 
is announced at New Brunswick, N. 
.1. Mr. Farley is assistant horticul- 
turalist at the New .leisey Kx|>eri- 
nient SUitiun. 

'10. — Announcement is made of 
the birth <»f a tlaughtt-r. I.iiiira VtMlin, 
to .Mr. and Mrs. John N. F.xeison 
oil .luly il. Kverson is now em- 
ployed as fertilizer expert by the 
Arkanssts fertilizer company at Lit- 
tle lUnk. Ark. 



'10. — The item concerning Samuel 
W. Meiidum printed two weeks ago 
should read : — Address changed from 
Matlison. Wis., to 22 W«K>dville 
St.. Koxbury. 

'13. — Herbert Brewer is at present 
coa(;h of athletics at Karneharneha 
sduMtl, Hawaii. He is now coaching 
12 teams in baseliall. These teams 
will play a series of interclass games. 
Taken from T/n h'ulmln Miilijet, 
Kohala, Hawaii 

'I't. — Albert T. Kdminster is teach- 
ing agriculture in the .Maine Wes- 
levan seminarv, Kent's, Hill Me 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



The Connecticut Valley 
Street Railway 



A FINE PROGRAM FOR SECOND 

CONCERT OF STEINERT 

SERIES 

Four greut siugera will l>e heard 
Wednesday evening Nov. 12 at the 
Hpringtield Auditorium in the second 
Steinerl concert. Kvaii Williams, 
the Welsh-American singer who is 
undoubtedly the greatest concert 
tirnor of this country t<jday, will be a 
great attration. No singer is in 
greater <b inaml in all jtarts of the 
I'nited States than Mr. Williams, 
and his appearance in tlii^ |iopiilar 
price series of concerts will In* a great 
satisfaction f«> musi<- lo\ers. 

Heinald Wcrrenralh, baritone, is n 
rising young artist whose great siic- 
cem thus far promises a national 
reputation for him. Miss Inez Itar- 
Imhit, soprano, and Mine. Nevada 
Van Her Veer (.Mrs. |{.,d .Miller) 



E W E L L'5 

STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New F41- 
gland of .Special Student Furnishings. 

LOVVKR KXI'KNSKS Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 



AND 



From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hattields, past the fool 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield, thence to (ireen- 
field. Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains" lo Lake Pleasant, Monti 
gue and Millers Falls. 



50 Miles of Trackage riodern 
liquipment Train Di.^patch- 
inx System HreiKht and Ex> 
pres.<« Service over entire line. 



(K>mplete tlie quartette, 
gruiii follows : 

S uitr Tinf H Md is Fr >/;«» (t.attohemel I'ucciBi 
Kva.n Witlianis. 

Kussian feasant !»««{(, 
I hou Alt a ( itiM. 
CoMie unl» the«e Vctloar hands. 

Mis» ln*« Harbour 
israfel. 
Alter, 
Tlw Miniitr*, 

Keinald Werienraih 
O'ttne Pri»on, 
l>n«n III the Format, 
Hbckbird Soag, 

M«w. Nevada Vaa Der Vaer. 
A SiMfit Flower t.'aMpbrll riiHoB 

MurmuFing /jtpUrtt, jenHcn 

Vevterday and Today, t:. ii. Spm»% 

Kvan William*. 
Stafidclien, 
I><'t lacer. 
I hf Hunt. 

Miss llarlxjur and Mt, Werrenratb. 
In a IVr\an (>ard»-ii (Sonic C^ycle 

(i»i Four solo Vrjif.ei), l.ua l^-hnianii 

(Word^ Mlectc<l Iruui the Nubaival of ( imar 

Khayyam.) 
MUs Inei liarbnnr. Mine Ncva<Ia V an i)fi \>^t, 
MetslH. Williams and Werrenrath. 



The pro- 



KachltiaMinuit 

Weiiigartiiei 

I. a I'lirue 

lliihii 

hlitar 

llriiiiaii l.ohr 

l'«ni/ii 

Konakl 

Scott 



Kei»s 

KuMnstPtn 

liuhn 



CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



cox SONS 

— ANI> - 

VINING 

72 74 Ma<li»oh AvciiiKT. .New Vorlt 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

iiest Materials aed Workmanship 

WOODWARD'S 




LUNCH 



»7 Main St., Masonic BIdg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



The question of sentling 



It-ail' 



Connecticut Valley Street Railyvay 
Company 



KaTaar.iaiiBu Ism 

Sti;i'IIf:n IvA.vk I"'<>i^cjich 

MA.'»ri7rA«!T«!HIN«» .IKWKI.KR 

IHO HWt)AI»WAY. .VKW VOKK 

<'i,iu \>ri> <M>r<i>F:«f !•; 

IM.N>^ A.N I) UlNliK Ut 
UOt.D. mi.vRH ami mmon'^k MNr(Ai.M 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Chttdoniy from r A. M. $9 4 A.M. 

Toefll Mientka 

Shoes siilQeii and Pollsteil 

Make old shoes look like new 

Neat, cla.<isy workmanship 
Op«a Sanday Main Nt. 

Ob war to Patt Ol&ca. 



4 



1^ 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 4, 1913 



TENNIS 
RACKETS 




-A.t 



DEUEL'S 



AMHERST 

Chp Laundry 

Hii^li-Gradc College Work 
LAUNDRY 

Shiru, • 10 15c 

Collars, • • 2 I ic 

Cuffs, - - J , -.c 

Plain wash, 48c per <loz. 

Same, rough dry. joc per doz. 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam I'rcssint;, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing. I1.50 a Suit 



Kalph J. BORUKN, Aitent. 7 North Cott«(« 

Put full name and address on laundrj 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Ix)ose - Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 

Hefore buying elsewhere, see our assort- 
ment of pennants and banners 

CUKKAN A OYER, Props. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green* 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations,violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300 



The Massachusetts Asfriculturai Collese 

Oflers courses of instruction in twenty six teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 



A student may specialize in the following subjects 



Horticulture 

Floriculture 

Forest I y 

l^indscape (lardening 

I'omolugy 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Uairyirng 

Poultry Husbandry 

Agriculiuial Clietnistry 
hkrononiic Knloinology 
Plant Physiology and Pathology 
Agricultural Fducation 



For complete catalo^^ and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST, MASS, 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



Athletic liourd. 

The College .Seiiat*', 

Koutball AHSoeiutiun, 

Husebull A.ssui-iutiou, 

Track Au.soi-iHtiou, 

Hockey Attsociution, 

TeuuiM AtMociutiuii, 

Ride club, 

Hoister iKMsters 

MuHieai Ansociation. 

Niueteeu Hundred Fouitreii ln<lex. 

Nineteen llumlred Fifteen liHlex. 

.M. \. C. Cliristiun AtiHociution, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridgu Club, 



(iCHge II. Chupinan, Secretary 

I). \V. .lones, I'lesideut 

S. U. Freelxirn, Manager 

(t. D. Melicaii, Manager 

K. C. Ivlwardn, Manager 

J. H. IVIIelt. .Manager 

R. K. MacLain, Manager 

J. W. T. Lesure, Stn-retary 

I >. .1. I.ewiM, .Manager 

H. \). iirowii. Manager 

K. S. Clark, .Ir., Manager 

II. M. Kogerri. Manager 

R. H. l*owerH, Pre-sideut 

i>. A. Coleman, President 

J. I). Pellelt, President 

N. H. hearing. President 



llhen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases. Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



J A CKSON & CUTLER 



Barsalotti & Gentoso 

Cigars Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresh Candy 

Ice Cream, Fruit, 3oda, Etc. 

Tht Right Goods at the Kight Price* 

Open till II o'clock KVICKY night 
C*rser Amily and l'l«*as«ot sirr«-t* 



If yon wsat to l>e 

MOMU %V1TH THK <ilKI..S 

70U nust have yourrlothen pren >4><l ami rieaned 

ATBPSTIIZIf'S 



II Amity Ht. 



Marot^n Store 



Preaslog anil Cleaninfr a npfrlalty 

MoHl lilieral ticket •ystein In town 
Tel. :io:{.i I 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UN I FORMS 

For college and milit.iry schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 



Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. 



Z424-1426 Chestnut St., 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWKLKK ANIJ OI'TOMETI Isi 

I^niie!, ground while you wait 
College Jewelkv 
Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar Sttinp 

AM UK KM', M .%!»!*. 
Next to Post ( iftice. 



STEAM KITTING, Teleph, i,ni)., 

GAS FITTING. TINNING. 

F. W. Dance & Co. 
PLUMBERS. 



Specialty of Repairing— 

Church Wimmjws, 
Memorial Winhows, 

LeAU LlliHTS, &c. 

« Clifton Ave.. AMHERST. MAs- 



Catalogues of 

Are out. Copy mailed to any addrr%s luli^k'. 
Student") and .\thletrs whowant the ml ^<j"' 
articles tor tlie vaiious s|>ort% shoull r 
thoM- Ivaring the Wright & Oitsun 1- 



Foot Ball 
Basket Bali 
Hockey 
Skates 




Skat'icShort 
Sweaters 
Jers«r> s 

Uniforms 
for all spurts 



Wright iV Oitson Cioods are tlir 
atltports 

M4 Washington St., It'. -.ton, S\ 



THE TERPSY PARLOR 

ci-e:ansino. 
preissino. 

repairing 

Uult'kfiit rM^rtlce, %%mmi Work, L,uwr>t rri'> 

Alt woik carefully done. Work calM tor 1; 
delivered. Uents' overcoats, suits. pant> ttJ. 
coats, ladies' hne linen suits a spcculiv 

Teams will call every day at M V i 

Wn. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rear Nash Bl'k. Amherst. 



Te! .No >H 



CARS 



Leave AQdlB COLLEUE fur HOI- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AQtilH COL- 
LECJE at 7 and 37 min. past efct 
HOUR. 

special Can at Reaaonabic H»M 



mm & SUNDERLAND ST. BY. Cfi 



For a Dally aiul .Sunday "^ -w'P'P* 
^ ou should Ke.iil 

Springfield Republicai 

While you are at eolleue i( • 

It hnHall or The M. A «' N< "- 

Thf Kc-nl S|iortlnK New* 

Full (ienerwl .N«-mo 

A NlronK Kiiltorlal l'Hi;f 

IntereslinK Keatiirfo 

It la a Keal Newniiaiitr 

Daily, 3 cents ; 70 cents a n "th ''■ 
a quarter. 
Sun Jay, 5 cents; 50 cents a .juarte? 

Subscrllie by in.iil or through the A thef'' 
dealer. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAE 



OV] ibi3 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL. COLLEGE! 



v. I.. XXIV. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, November ii, 1913. 



No. 9 



RICHARDS WINNER 



ON TO SPRINGFIELD 



SOCIAL UNION 



Massachusetts Cross Country Runners ^^l^ns for the Game, Football Spotlight. ^ Interesting Address by Mr. Shields on 

and Former Score* with Springfield. Wild Birds and Animals. 



Win Cup in Dual Meet with Amherst. 
Kunning tis strong as at the start, 



Now for the SpringlieUI game ! 



Mr. <;. 0. .Shields gave an iiiterest- 



l;„l.anl8 led the cross country team j <>f ^'ourse evc'ry Aggie man will he ittg leetuie on wil.l l.iriU antl wihl 
tn \iet<jry over Amherst, .Saturday 



there to cheei M. A. C. on to victory, 
afternoon bv a score of 22 to 36. At i Aggie has a team to be prou.l of and 
tbe tape he had a commanding lead I ^^^ "-ecord that our boys have made 



game at the KcKial Union entertain 

iiieiit on Saturttay evening. This 

was Mr. Shiehls' thirti apearance 



over Captain tolev who linished in ' tbis y<>ar gives us confldetKe that 1 here, the w„rth of his talks being 
.econd place. Heavens of Amherst ^imngfield's chain of victories will shown hy the repeated mvitalion fur 
., • , be br(»ken on Saturday. Kverv- him to ( ome again. The le«tute 



was third. 

The prettiest race of the afternoon 
was Iwtween Doggett and Ilersh of 
Amherst for fourth and llfth pla(>es. 
The Amherst man put up an excel- 
lent battle during tiie two laps on 
I'ratt field only to be nosetl out at the 
tinisli. Otte. Uaer and Uiissell iin- 
isbed in ortler while Nute. Stanford, 
CliiBolm and lUair br«>u<xht up the 

>.< ;ir. 

Ilie i^lartiiig line was at I'ratt field 
;iiid the runners went away shortly 
after 3 o'clock at a fast pace with 
the Aggie team in the lead. The 
rse led out through the north- 
»i -.tern gate, down Amity street in 
the direction of lladley for nearly 
two mid one-half miles and return 
hf same cotinie. The race fln- 
isucd on Pratt iieUI with two laps 
around the running track. For 
the first half mile the Aggie men 
ran well in the lead. iiichaids 
and C'oley started a sprint at this 
|ioint which the others could not 
fultuw. with l{ichards obtaining first 
place never to lose it during the 
rettiaintler of the run. lie ran the 
eoumeof .'>.4 miles in 28 min. .*n.l sec. 
considered very fast time for the 
distance. 

As u result cf the victory the team 
will be awardetl the trophy cup pre- 
sented by Krnest M. Whitcomb '04 
of Amherst. 

The runners finisbeil in the follow- 

iiig order: Kichards (.M), Coley 

(M), Heavens (A), Doggett (M), 

Ibish (A), Otte (A), Haer (M), 

l;i->.ll (M). Nute (M),Stamffml 

V 1. Chisolm ( M ) and Hiair ( A ). 

riie first six Aggie men to cross 

!'<•' tape will make up the team 

will' h will represent the college at 

iiinii:il New Kngland IntercoUe- 

l'" run to be heM over the Dart- 

iith I'ollege course next .Saturday. 

■* dillhut to forecast the result 

' '''*' '^KB'*^ 8land|»oint, ae it will 

in first appearance in intcrcolle- 

---I <Mintrv running. 



igai 
was illustrated with a good variety of 
sti>reoptican slides, (^uitc a large 
audience was present. 

.Mr. Shiehls intHMluced his lecture 
with a few statistics to show the ne- 



one turns out on this day. faculty, 

students, co-eds and "steiiogs." 

We are going to eat 'em up this year. 

and the spectacle will be one well 

worth seeing. 

The fine spirit that was shown at | oessify of legislation for the protec- 

the Tufts game must be, and will l>e, I tion of birds. The American people 

far excelled. Last year the long line ! |<»He over a billion dollars every year 

of Aggie men maiching to the liehl ; through the ravages of insects. Men 

kill yo'/ of the bird-life of the county. 
There are ten million shot gtins in the 
I nite«l States, and nine hundretl mil- 
lion catritlges are used in tliein each 
vear, eight hundred million of them 



brought forth favorable comments 
from the Springfield pajjers. I^et us 
more than justify similar recognition 
on next Saturday. 

If vou are ^hort of monev lK)rrow 



it, pawn your watch or do a little ; U-iug usetl in killing the birds. The 

prophecy is that if the l>ii<ls hhould 
l>e destrovetl, insects wouhl exter- 



work, but l>e at the game. The dis- 
tance is not ttjo great to walk if 
necessHiy. Cheer until you are | minate all of the trees in three years, 
hoarse an«l then get y<»tir second M| . .shiehl's made a stiong plea for 



wind. Show the team and coach 
Brides that you are behiml them. 
"IJoost <Md Aggie." 



Ihe work on the varsity tennis 
irt^ has been, discontinuetl becflufte 

the lateness of the season. The 
'tract calls for immediate work on 

|> as aqpn as the frost leavea 
' ground in the spring. 



the use of the camaia as a hunting 
wea|>on, an<l the pictures went fai to 
illustrate the value of the canuira as 
such. 

In the summary of the Tufts game jvir. Shields l<Mik his audience on 
appearing in the last insue of the .,|, iiiniginary j<»iirney into the big 
Signal, it was erroneously stated |>j,„.th West, lie told how buffah)- 
that Day replaced Ktlgerton at left |,„|,.h uix- made, how horses are 
end. The latter was very much in hroken or broncho "bustc<l,'" ami 
evi«lence throughout the four full (|„.„ Hhowed pictures of many of the 
I>eri<Ki8. conuuon biitls. .Many of these binis 

Never in recent years have the ^re ih»w extinct as the wild pigeon, 
prospects for a victory over Spring- L,r lH>ing badly tavaged .t- lln boh- 
field seemeil brighter than they are oliuks in the southern rice fieUls. 
tCKlav. The future physical direct- ': Xext the pictures oi manv wild aiii- 
ors are experts in the use of the for- ,pfj|g were shown. Views of gmtrled 
ward ptiss. but thus far their defen- ir^n-H at the limber-line of the wes- 
sive play has not been strong, and : tern mountains concluded the lecture. 

the same is true of their offensive — ^^^— 

play in straight f«M)tball. Since lh« A goodly si/.erl crowd of ,M. A. C. 
Dartmouth game, Aggie has yet to inen witnessed the Amherst- Worcester 
meet a team with a stronger defense, Tech football game at Pratt Field, 
and, with the ex(epti(»n of Tufts, a the finish of the tltial cross-couutry 
stronger otTense. The Holy Cross meet iKJtween Amherst and Aggie 
scores can hardly be taken as a com- corning towards the end of the first 
purison of the relative strength of , half, b'iclnuds jtnd C'oley of M. A. 
the two teams, because Holy (toss j ('. who finishe«l first and second 
has gone down the ladder consitler- : respectively were loudly cheered as 
ablv since our <i— <• victory. The j they entered the field. 
Aggies are extremely hopeful and '" 

are confident that this vear will wit- The Roister Doister pnslucticm, 
ness a reversrd of fortune. An "Comedy of Hrror.-." is progiessing 
added incentive to win is found in fMVornbly. Th. • ,.>t is already 
tin .tMt. iiM-i.t ..t on.' directly inter- pickcl and Hic-' men are rehearsing 
ested, that a victory for Aggie would for the first |>roduction to be given in 
resuFt in substantial ««mtributions Montague on the evening of Dec. :>. 

tnwird the athletic field. ^ ■"^■'^"" 

toward inc , (,„ to Springfield I Mr. Hrown has 

.Tolinson s drop-kicK nom i^iew , " • ^i. x u • ,w 

13 vard line was un- volunteered to ring the bell m the 



Haiiipsbire's 

[Continued on page sJ 



tdtsence of any students. 



NEW HAMPSHIRE FIGHTS HARD 

But Aggie Adds Anottier Victory by 
Score of 34-0. 

The most open and the fastest foot- 
ball game of the season was played 
against New Hampshire .State college 
Saturday, at .Manchester, and resulted 
in a :U to Aggie victory. With 
wonderful speed, strength and teuni 
management and by a brilliantly 
varied attack .M. A. C. scored two 
pretty field goals, four touchdowns 
and four goals from touchdowns. 
.New Hampshire played brilliant foot- 
ball much of the time and was in a 
|M>sition to score several times, but 
lost each opportunity on fumbles or 
po<»r passes. In spite of the one- 
sided score, the game was keenly 
contested. S|»ectacular plays were 
the <»rder of the clay. 

New Hampshire was very adept in 
the urn? of the forward pass during 
the first half of the game and by 
this means made large gains and sev- 
eral first downs. The Aggie team 
was rather weak on the defense but 
was strengthened in Ihe last half, at 
which time New Hampshire's passes 
seemed to Im- he:ived all over the lot 
in a vain attempt to score. Dark- 
ness in the finni |>eriod gave added 
zest to the chance of scoring c)n a 
fluke or forward pass so New 
Hampshire continued to use them, 
but to no avail. In this |)ericMl the 
darkness made the game a mystery to 
the spectators as well as to the play- 
ers. 

On the ofTense the M. A. ('. eleven 
was much superior in making con- 
sistent gains, partly I>ecau8e of ita 
greater weight favored by a moist 
field, atid to a great extent to the 
vari«ty of attack and the speed 
with which the plays were pulled off. 
The New Hampshitc team also had 
guite a variety of plays and made a 
mindter of substantial gains with 
them, the mf»st notable ones being by 
the use of double forward passes and 
lina plunges through center. 

Brac-kett was easily the star for 
New Huriipshire. He has played 
(piarter back for font years and has 
been tlie terror of all the teams who 
have tried to stop him in running 
back kicks. He made several spec- 
tacular runs and figured in most of 
the forward pass plays. With proper 
interference he wouhl probably have 
H( ((It'll. Westover, a former star of 
the Mant;hester high school was a 
sure tackier and good at carrying 
forward pASSCs. 

Of the numerous stars on the Ag- 
gie side, Captain Brewer undoubtedly 
deserves first mention. He made 
one touchdown, kicked one field goal 
and four goals from tou<hdowns, and 



'i 




f 



the College Signal, Tuesday, November ii, 1913, 



by big wonfJerful ground gaining 

helped in gvtfutg the other toueh- 

downs. .Johnson's fiekl goal from 

the 4.J-yurd line niude the biggest hit 

of the game. Darling and Nissen 

were big ground gainers and helped 

to push the Hiore up, Darling by 

twelve points and Nissen by six. 

Melican played a strong game at 

quarter and Dole sent every kickoff 

nearly down to the goal pcjsts. The 

subs, too, all put up a line game. 
New Hampshire opened the game 

by carrying the ball by a succession 
of forward passes and trick idays to 

MaKsachusetts' .'50-yard line, where 
th»' ball was lost on downs. .Massa- 
chnselts scored its fust touchdown 
within live minutes of play when 
l>arling broke away around right end 
for an iH-yard sprint. New Hamp- 
shire soon carrie<l the ball to Aggies' 
IH-yard line, but lost it on downs. 
Then there was a steady march f«>r a 
second touchdown. Brewer heaving 
a forward pass to Darling from New 
Hampshiie's Jive yard mark. 

Brewer kicked b<.th goals. Brewer j .ards and Darling l-'/vanls 
followed with a fiehl goal from the 
3.'J-yard line. Ma.ssaehusetts scored 



again when Nissen went through 

tackle for .'»l yards and a touchdtiwn. 

Brewer again kicked (he goal. Dole 

received :iii attempted onside kick bv 

Brackett in midlidd and punle«l to 

New Hampshire. The bail went to 

Ma88ucbus«it~ Mil til,. 2'»-yard line 

and Brewer wa.s sent across for the 

final touchdown. In the final periml | nearly two. .M.dican plunges through 

Johnm.u iHMHe^l a pretty goal from ! ,.«„(«, for two vnrds and first down. 



Nissen gains i.". yards through center 
on three downs. Brewer makes three 
yards through tackle. Nissen gains 
18 yards on three more line plunges. 
Brewer makes four yards through left 
tackle. Nissen makes another short 
gain and first down. Brewer adds 
two yards and seven. New Hamp- 
shire holds Aggie for no gain. A 
forward pass. Brewer on the five yard 
line to Darling in the end zone nets a 
touchdown. Dole punts out and 
Brewer kicks goal. 

Aggie kicks off to Brackett who 
runs the ball back to the ;i6-yard line. 
A forward pass fails. Brackett goes 
around left end for !;'» yards. 
Another pass fails. 

SKroNK «^l \i;ll 1! 

A iloublc pass, Hobb.H to Bissell to 
Brackett gains one yard. A forward 
pass, \V(K>dman to Parker gains •>€> 
yards. A forward pass is inter- 
cepted. Bra<kett is thrown for a 
loss of nine yards and Bissell for two 
more. New Hampshire loses the ball 
on down.s. Melican pulls off eleven 1 

A for- 
pans is intercepted. A paaa 
Brewer to Kdgerton gains l.'J 
yards. A forwanl pass is caught by 
New Hampshire. Brackett fund)Ies 
and makes no gain. Brackett goea 
thioiigh center for six yards. A for- 
ward pass, WtHNiman to Brackett 
gains seven yanls. Hobbs fumbles 
and loses llw ball. Darling gains 
three yards. Brewer five ami Niasen 



HERMAN'S U.S. ARMY 
SERVICE BLUGHER 

In Tail Willow VuK or 
Ciun .\Ietiil. A haud- 
soincMiappy shoe 
ontlieOrtliopedio ' 
last, desig'Dud by 
army surfjeons. 
You never saw 
a stioe like it 
for wear, com- 
fort and 
style. ^^^ 

Singlo 
soh; of 
T«'.\UH un- 
KC'oiiriMlouk.l'ox 
i<K.*, Hole leather 
oiinter»,every part 
iii.spected. Liniiiv' of 
spt'iially t«.■•^t^•d tliill. A h4did 
leatlier .Hlioe that will {five the 
wear of the civilian shoe that 
sells for.1«(. This i.s one of the 
.shiwH I'lich; Sam l>iivs for his 
Mtl'lierM. IT'S A \V<>|{|.1> 
BKATEK. Seethe Army line. 




HERMAN S U.S. 
ARMY SHOES 




PRICE 84. 00 



lAstN designed )> 

AKMY Siir- 

^eon.S. .Muterii, . 

urethebegttli.it 

an be obtain* ri. 

Workniauhh 

nKpeeted 

and ifuar- 

autee«i. 



No. 968 

GARRISON 
BLUCHER. 

One of the most popular 
in tlie Army l.ino. Ma.Ii- in Tan Wll- 
low Calf ami (iun ^letal. H«.a\ y 
siriulH s<il.', \m,x t.M-. Mtlid leather 
tliniuirlMMit . A liuiiilsorneMiiHp|>y sh«>«'. 

Coin.' in til v.. 111.- In..-. M;imif:i,tii-, j 

only by J osf n'i ^. UrrmapAlo.. Boston. 
PRICE $4.00 



ward 
from 



PAGES SHOE STORE 



THE 



Hoover& Smith Go. 



the 43-yar«l lln.-. llie liall was on 
New Hampshire's one-yard line when 
time was ealted. 

HU.sr yUAKTKK. 

M. A. ('. wins the toss. Dole 
kicks otr to BisHill. A forward 
pass from Brarkett to Westover 
nets 15 yards, another, Brisaell to 
Westover gains 15 yards more. 



Brewer is thrown for a lost of three 
yards. A forward pass fails. 
Brewer kicks a lield goal from the S.'l- 
yard line. 

Ilolihs rnns l>a<k the kiekofT to the 
40-yard line. A forward pass is 
inteicepteil. A second pass iscangbt 
by Niasen. Grayson makes an end 

_ . run of eight yards. Nissen goes 

Brackett makes a short gain a ronnd j through tackle for M yards and a 
eml. A forw.'trd pass from Brackett t«"*hdown. Brewer kicks goal, 
is canght l»y .Nissen on onr .'JO-yard i •*^<'ore -I t" '• 

line. A fumi>le is recovered by Darl- Aggie kicks off. A forwanl pass, 
ing. Brewer goes through right i Woo«lman to Parker is goo<l for six 
tackle twice for 8 yards. Nissen 



makes 12 yards through center. On 
the first down Brewer is unable to 
gain. A forward pass. Brewer to 
Mgerton gains '.» yaids. Aggie 
is again held r.»r no gain. Fourth 
down and one yard to go. Nissen 
goes through right gnard for eleven 
yards. Darling goes around right 
end on an 1H yard sprint for a touch- 
down. Brewer punted out to Melirjwi 
Brewer kicked goal. 

Aggie ki<ks off to Brackett who 
runs the Icill hjirk to tlie J.'i-yard line 
where In i~ lowned by E<lgertoii 



yards, another for three. Bissell 
gains eight yards for first <lown. 
W(KKlman gains one yard. A doulile 
and single forward pass are iK>th 
interceptetl. An onside kick is 
cauglit by Dole and a gain of eight 
y;inls \» made. 

rniK» •.•I'AKTKR. 

Brewer runs the kickoff ba«'k to 
the 'Mi yard line. Darling makes ('» 
yards, Nissen ."? and Brewer 5. 
Darling pulls off an end nin of 20 
yards. .Melican gains .'» yanls. 
Brewer punts to lltibbs. Brackett 
makes 1 vanl. Bissell goes through 



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Jewelers and Silversmiths, 

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PkUiiilpMa's Offtclil Fntirilti Jmlir 

8PBOIALISTS IN 
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Rings, Charms Prists. Trophies, 

Medals College Pins, Fobs. Seals. 

Rings, Charms.-. 




Cl)c 

Pl)ea$ani 

Bmitu St.. 
Bmb<rr£it 

Telephone 470 



E.B. DICKINSON O.D.S. 

Williams Block, Amhkrst, Mass. 

Orrirs Hours: 
Oto lia A.. Art, l.tSOt«->4SS*.&iI* 



HMBAKrAST 

LUMCHSON 
ArTEKNOON TEA 

ninner if arranged for. 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at ij Pleasant St. 



Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses Accurately Replacfd 
Fine Watch Repairing Promptly and 
Skilfully Done 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 



N<w ll!Uii|.shire fails to gain on the , tenter for .'i yanls. A forward pass 
first down. Woodman makes 8 yards I goes wild. Aggie is held on first 



between left guard and center. Bis 
sell makes seven yards through center. 
Brackett makes two yards. Brackett 
if* tliiowii for a loss. A forward pass, 
Brackett to Bi.ssell gjiins six yards. 
Brackett ( .irries the ball about four 
yard.^ Init fails to gain first down. 



down. Darling makes 2 yards. 
Brewer goes through a broken field 
for 2.1 yards and a touchdown. 
Brewer kicks goal. Score 31to0. 
Aggie kicks off. A pass goes 
wild. A pass. Brackett to Reardon 
is good for 12 yards. Aggie is 



A Chance to Save Money 

A $5.00 Safety Razor for $5.00 

But we give you a coupon which when signed with your 
name and home address we refund you ^.50. It carries 
the Rexall guarantee, •' Money back if not .satisfied." 

We carry a full line of 

Waterman, Conklin and Moore's Fountain 

Pens, Stationery, Pipes, Tobacco 

and Cigarettes. 

Liggett's, Belle Heade and Green Seal Chocolates 



THE HENRY ADAMS CO., OrugEisIs 

The REXALL Store 



ON THE CORNER 



The Collefc Signal, Tuesday. November ii. 1913. 



I . iiiilixed T) yards for being offside. 
Another puss is intercepted. A 
,; utile pass, Brackett to Hale to 
\\ , stover gains U yards. First down. 

\!H.tber pass goes wild. Aggie is 
. >iile again and penalized ."> yards. 

Iw.i forwanl passes intercepted. A 
Hiackett to Parkei forward pass nets 
;t yards. Forward paes incomplete. 
Aggie's ball. Brewer goes uronnd 
lijiht end for IM yards. Nissen gains 
■J yards. 

I ui Kill yi VltTKIt. 

Brewer makes 2 yanls. Brewer 
J. lint-' to the 2.'t yard line. Brackett 
makes <• yarcls. A forward pass is 
canght by Dole. Nissen makes 4 
vMids. Darling is held for no gain, 
liifwer fumbles and loses 7 yards. 
Johnson kicks a field goal from the 
43 yard line. Aggie kicks off to 
Brackett. A forward pass is iuter- 
cepte«l. A triple pass behind the 
line results in no gainw. Two yards 
are made on a forward pass. Ao 
onside kick is blocke«l and recovere<l 
liv .\ggie. Johnson makes •'• yards 
aroimd right end, llaaran makes 4 
vard^. .lohnson H. (Jraynon I. John- 
son ■-* and .Johnson I. The ball is' 
carrie*! to New Hampshire's one 

ird line. Time is called. 

The summary : 

\l \ < .SEW HAMPSHIKK 

l-Ugerton, Ic re, i'arker 

Perry, liaker. It rt, tiainea, Bowden 

lldwards. Wood, Ig rg, Corrlveau.Iiodgp 

I ii>lr, c c, Murdock 



Baker, Verbeck, rg Ig, Re.irdon 

.Schlotterbeck, rt It, Thompson, Huse 
Jordan, Day. re le, Westover, l5rown 

Melican, llaaran, ({b qb, Hrackelt 

Brewer, Jolmson, Ihb rhb, Bissell 

Darling, (irayson, rhl> llib, Hol)bs 

Nis.sen, John.son, Fuller, fb 

fb, Woo<!nian, Hale 

Score — Massachusetts j4, New Hamp- 
shire o. Touchdowns— Darling j. Brew 
er, Nissen (ioals from toucdowns — 
Brewer 4. Ooals from the field— IJrewcr, 
Johnson. Keferee -Mctirath of Boston 
college. Umpire— Foley of Amherst. 
Head linesman— Moore of Hrtiwn. Time 
— two 15 minute periods, one 10 minute 
and one 8 minute. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



EWELL'S 



Bin'Aiii.ianiin IMHt 

MAMOrACTl'KI ^'. .11 AVICI.ICIt 
IHO HK<Ji.VI»WA Y. Ni:\V V«>UK 

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Vclv<!t the finest leaf f ,m old Kentucky— 
agtd by time- -the only make-sure procMS. 

1 ne leaf hangs in the old warenouse foi- over 

2 vears — gradually changing from green to 
mellow — then you get the smooth, full flavored, 
good tasting smoke that the southern planters 
themselves Tike. Never a bite in »uch tobacco. 

Velvet I Dont forget! 



^ 




Mackinaws 



H 



i 



AND 



Sweaters 



This is Mackinaw and SweattT season. Football, Golf and 
all other Fall ami Winter .spoils call for jjf)od Sweater pro- 
tection. We havi- ill stM» k t<itl.i\ st'\fr.d huiulri'd Macki- 
naws in all grades. 



The famous Summit brand, well known in the Northwest 
and acknowledged to be one of the best. Coat Sweaters, 
the Shawl Collar, Coat Collar and the regidar shape 
Sweaters, all the be.st selling colors. 

ipi.oo to mT.iny 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



ScDool ana Colkse Pbotosraphers . . . 




LOCALLY: 5^ Center St., Northampton Mass., 

and South Hadley, Mass. 



Ma IK OrricR: 

15461 548 Hroadway, 

Sew Vurk ( ity 



Thrw .Studio offer the lieM skilled 
Mftiats and most complete 

equipment oblaiDable 



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WE SOLICIT YOl'R PATRONAGE 

In so far as onr betiefits are mutual. 

THE AMHERST CAS COMPANY 

Elvorything Ellectrical 



FOUNTAIN PEN "* 

Minimize your fountain pen ^^ 

r- troubleii by ownlnjl a Moore's. C It Is the >,^^ 

safest, soundest and most dependnbic pen known. 
Cltsatrenitth lies In Its very simplicity. Nothlnft 
flniky tojtetoutof order. C Vou can give your- 
self no better treat than a Moores Non-leakable. ,/^ .« 



For Salp by Dealer* Everywiiere 

American Fountain Pen Company 

AclaniH, CiiNhlntt & f<wler. Srlllnft Aftenta 
IM DEVONSHIRE STRKKT BOSTON, MASS. 



7, 



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Full 2 ounce tinn 



The ColUge Signal, Tnesdaj, November n, 1913. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Published every Tuesday evening by 

the Students of the Massachusetts 
Africulturai Colleg^e. 



BOABD OF KDIT0B8. 

CHESTKR K. WHEKLKR'14, Kditorin-Chief 
FKANK W. Bl'KI.L '15. Managing Kditor 

HA KOI. D C. BLACK '14, Competition Rditur 
HAROLD J. CLAY '14. Assistant Editor 

STUART B. FOSTER '14. Athletic Editor 

ERVINE F. PARKER '14, Alumni Editor 

J. ALBERT PRICE '15. Athletic Editor 

GEO. E. DONNELL 'i^, Department Editor 
EARLE S. DRAPER 'is. Campus Editor 

TYLER S. ROGERS '16. Associate Editor 

CHARLES W. Cl'RTIN'i6, Associate Editor 



BUSINESS OEPAKTMKlfT. 

ERNEST S. CI. ARK, IR '14. Bus. Manager 
MAURICE J. Cl.fH'CJH 'i^, Awt Bus. Mgr. 
ERNEST F. UPTON '14. Advertising Manager 
W. RICHARD SEARS '1$. Aist. Adv. Manager 

Subscription I1.50 per year. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable 
to Ernest S. Clark, Jr. 

cnlsrad as aaeono-ctua matter at tha Amhafat 
Omea. 



The College Signal, Taetdaj, November n, 1913. 



meetings. All those really interested 
in this luovemeDt, and desirious of 
joining, hand their names to Draper 
'15. 

Quite a number of men have an- 
nounced their intention of coming out 
for the college debate. However, 
more men are urged to hand their 
names to Mr. Smith of the Knglish 
Department. The debating team is 
worth trying for and deserves the at- 
tention of all students having the 



Vol. XXIV. TOESDAV, Nov. II. No. 9 



« Boost Old Aggie." 



'*On to Springfield :" Everyone 
is going down tlie river Saturday to 
back that team. It is u team to be 
proud of. but the boys must have the 
moral support of your pre»ence. 
your cheers, your nongs. Join the 
procession to tlie field, and show the 
people of Springfield your spirit and 
loyalty. "Ikxjst Ohl Aggie" and be 
at the game 



QNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant .St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

KEOl'LAK KlfNDAY iSKKVICK AT 7 F M 



E. RUSSELL NORTON 



SALES AGENT 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

(Notice* lor this coiunin should tie dropped in 
the Signal Office or handed to Earle S. Draper 
'is. on or before the .SatHrday preceding each 
issue. I 



Nov. 12- 



Assentbly. 
L. Doggett, 
A. college 



Not. 



■1-10 I-. M 
President I, 
Y. M. C. 

SriDgfleld. 
6-10 I-. V. HooraG South 

C«»llege. Italian club. 
6-30 P.M. Chapel. Mass 

meeting. 
14_6-l(i |.. M. Room G South 

College. Italian <'lub. 
6-30 I'. M. Chai»el. MaM 

meeting. 
Nov. l.** — 12-00 M. Spt'cial> li.u.for 

Springfield. 
Nov. 16 — 1»-10 A. M. Sunday chapel 

Kabbi Stephen S. Wise, 

Free Synagogue, New 

York city. 
Nov. 16 — 7-00 V. M. Room G South 

college. Stockbridgeclub. 
7-30 I-. M. Wil.ler Hall. 

Landscape Art Club. 
6-30 p. M. Mamlolin c'ub 

rehearsal. 
7-1 '» r. M. Glee club 

rehearsal. 
Nov. 19 — Assembly. I-|m i-. m. 

Chapel.' Dr. l{.,I.FlwKly 

Sept. Wofcester Social 

Settlement association. 



CAMPUS NOTES 

Make it GOO strong at the Spring- 
field game. 

Kverybody out for the mass-meet- 
ing this week ! 

Another victory antl another big 
score rolled up by the Aggie team. 

The usual Sophonjore class supper 
will be held immediately after the 
Springfield game. 

Now is the time to get behind the 

team, and cheer for Aggie at the | time and ability to handle it 
Springfield game. 

The rain storm Sunday night did 
a little damage on the campus, break- 
ing windows in North. 

Thanks for another improvement. 
The bricks on the stoop of East entry. 
North College, have been fixed, and 
consetiuently the customary puddle 
after a rainstorm is now lacking. 

Rev. W. H. Nichols addrcBsed 
the Stockbridge Club, Tuesday even- 
ing at 6-4.'), in Room D, South 
College. His to|)ic was. " Tlie 
College Man in the Rural Comm- 
unity." 

C. I.. Hill of the American Breed- 
er's association gave a very interest- 
ing talk on Guernsey cattle and the 
Island of (iuernsey, in the chapel 
Thuimlay night. AI»out 30(» were 
present to hear him. 

IIM'J seems to be much in evident^ 
on the campus. •• I)o<' " Fay, 
"Hans" RoehrK. "Znb" Zabiiskie. 
and " Mickey" Klls have been back 
for a day or two. "Cherry Dodge 
'12, also appearetl last week end. 

I>ohert? ex-'ic, is back in our 
midst as a freshman after spending 
the first part of the year at the Op- 
tometrical school of Columl>ia 
University. Broadway had no 
charms for him, which is strange. 

This year Professor Hicks and 
Assistant Gore are planning on hav- 
ing a series of intercla^s basketball 
games to be played »ii ceitnin <lateH. 
Credits in Physical eiiocation will f)e 
given to the players for every game 
played. 

The Italian Club elected an execu- 
tive committee of three, which is to 
draw up a constitution. The follow- 
ing olllcers were elected : — W. B. 
Dumas of Boston. President ; B. A. 
Gilmore of Acushnet, Secretary ; and 
M. H. Clough of Dedham. Treasurer. 

The following men have handed in 
their names as candidates for assist- 
ant manager of varsity hockey : 
E. A. Anderson, C. A. Huntington 
Jr., C. E. Hathaway, W. .1. Mahoney 
T. P. Wilcox, all of the class of 
11»H». It is hoped that more men 
will come out. 



Clark '15 Eldridge '14 

All Student Supplies 

M. A^ STORE 

BANNERS AND POSTERS 



CANDY 



TONIC 



Montague '15 



Hager ' 1 6 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We cirry the largest line in 
the state outside of Hoston. 



Davenport Miller 
Vein Coal 

I". Best Quality Pennsylvania Coal 



Seeourlineof Drill Shoes 

$2.00 to $4.00 



MODERN REPAIR 
DEPARTMENT 



E.M.BOLLES 



lON TOUR WAV TO P. O.J 



BO.STON ORKICE 

85 Water St. 



NEW YORK OKKK K 

I Broadway 



LOW price; tailoring CO. 

-Sins MADK To OKDEK 
.Suit<i Cleaned. Pmsrd and Dyed. All kindsof 
KepairihK for I.adics and Gentlemen neatly done. 
HiifhKrade work by fir»tcla<s tailor. Work 
called for and delivered .^ell tickets fur pressing, 

4 •« IT.-* FOR |i.^ 

GEORGE KOTOWITZ. Prop. 

MainStre«t. Amherst. Mais. Na>h Block 

( >n your way to the Post ( )flice. I el. 4J8-W 



Coolcp's Rotci 

Springfield, Mass., 

Solicits the patronage of the -^tu 
dents of the AgricuUural Colltge 
to class dinners and individualh. 



THE 



KATHERINE E. McCLELLAN STUDIO 

44 State St., Northampton, Mass. 



The (louhles tennis tournninent litis 
progressed as far as the finals. The 
deciding match will be played off in 
— ■ — ^— ■ ! the near future, the finals team being 

Homer H. Darling 'It; of Mendon. Archibald 'l.'i and (Jriggs '15 vs. 



was elected manager of the class 
basketball team. Alpha .1. Flebul 
'l.*) of Amherst, was elected manager 
of the Junior team. 



Draper '15 and Far well *17. 

The Cercle Francais is to be reor- 
ganized with a new and more liberal 
constitution providing for monthly 



PORTRArrs — GROUPS — VIEWS 

Insist upon seeing our college work and prices before deciding. 



Call or Tklkimione 131 



ON TO SPRINGFIELD 

[Continued from page i] 



,l,.ii(tidly a surprise to the Aggie 
supi" 'iters, most of whom were 
ijriiuinnt of bis ability in that line, 
'rwi.i' in the last four years a fielil 
,r,,iii has kept away the whitewash 
,.ii IVntt Field. This year it is ex- 
l„itt'tl that such scores will simply 
serve to swell the total. 



sale Wednesday. Kverybotly is 
asked to get their tickets iuiuiediately 
BO that jtrranjieintMits can be niado 
with an fstiinate of tln' iiumboi going. 
Six hundred at the game ! 



The program for Satiuday as 
:iii:iti«;o(l by Cheer-leadt'r Brown is 
as follows : 

A«-*tnible at Dog-cart at 11-15 and 
Hiareb to Boston iV Maine station at 
|l.;;o. The train leaves at 12-00 
»h;iii'. Miiiving at Spriuglield nf one 
o'clock .A parade will at oiici' 

H.sseHjble at the station with the baml 
•tt its head, and will march via Main 
Mii't State streets to the field. The 
center sections have been reserved 
fui the rooters alone an<l the "fuss- 
ers" are recpiested to take seats iu 
the adjoining sections. After the 
game the hotly will march back over 
the same route to the Cooley Hotel 
where the team will have its supper. 

The train will leave at ll-So from 
"^l-riiiglield. The naind trip fare is 
Ml ceota and the tickets will l»e on 



The editor of the Sionai., on curi- 
osity bent, has pulled «»ut from the 
volumes of the past a list of the 
scores mtule by Massachusetts against 
' .Springfi«'ld at sundry times. It 
was found tliat the fust recorded 
game between the two institu- 
jtions took place in the year 1«1»2, i 
j and resulted in a victory for Agjiie 
by the close seoie of 1H-1«;. 'ri,,. 
! recordsof no further games are foinni 
until \xW, and it is probable that no 
ganie^ took place in lln' iiit.i veiling 
jears. 'I'll.' lesidts of the games 
' played since that time are here 
recorded. 



1 «;>;» 


Mass. 


:u 


S. T. S. 





rjoo 


No 


game. 






lUOl 


Muss. 


10 


S. T. .H. 





r.Hij 


No 


game. 






r.MC! 


Mass. 


12 


.S. T. .S. 


(> 


I!»(»l 


Mass 


11 


S. T. .S. 





i;to.". 


Mass 


15 


.s. T. .s. 


<l 


r.Mit; 


.Mass 


:.'l 


S. T. S. 


4 


1907 


.Mass. 


.1 


S. T. S. 





liMIM 


Mas 


. 


S. T. S. 


5 



Wanted- A Man ! 

Wc deal with merchants and 
larmers. We want an otlice man 
to sell, to help atlvortisc, to help 
in correspondence and to grow 
up to a responsible position. If 
he was brought up on a lam;, 
with some scientific and iicws- 
|>apcr training, so miich the bel- 
ter. No bonanza in salary to 
h«'gin with, but an active, inter- 
esting antl basic occupation uith 
gootl people and a great luture, 
depending on the man. Address 
with the fullest ol p.u ticidars. 
stating age and u !> 1 « lu 1 s. u bii h 
will be regar<led as confidential, 
•• I*resident," Box 229, Boston, 
Mass. 



I. M. LABROVITZ, Custom Tailor 

Fashions. Fit, First Class Work C>uaranteed 

Large assortment on hand. CK.NIS h U K.MSH I .\(.S Ke»tM.iii CuUars and 
I)ress Stiirts, Cleanint; And I'res.iing. DKKs.S sm S 
T<) KIN!. Military CoUam and tllovcs 

11 AMITY ST.. T«kplione 302 w AMHERST, MASS. y 



F. A. SHEPARD 



MEN'S STORE 




" Keeping in Front ** 

You fellows know what that means ! 
We've been very successful in this 
regard with Fatima Cigarettes. By 
the way, these cigarettes were first 
sold in the college towns — and you 
agreed with us that th^ were good. 

Then we put out for the big race, 
to make Fabmas of nation-wide rep- 
utation, and today more are sold than 
any other cigarette in this country. 

No purer, or more carefully chosen 
tobacco grows than that in Fatimas. 
We purposely put them in a plain 
inexpensive wrapper— in this way 
we can afford quality tobacco, and 
twenty of the smokes for 1 5 cents. 

Now your college crew is of utmost 
importance to you — so is a good 
cigarette, and it's your aim in life 
to keep Fatimas m the lead — right 
up to their good quality — right up 
to where you first found them, and 
will always find them. 

Success fellows I You started this 
cigarette on its successful career — 
and you pull a strong oar all over 
this country. 




OUR NEW CASlI DISCOUNT CARD 
AND SAVE FIVE PER CENT ON 



SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Fumishingfs and Custom Tailoring: 



FATIM4 

aCARETTES 
20 for I5< 




SOLE AGENT FOR 



THE GENUINK AND ORIGINAL 



PATRICK MACKINAW 



»4lvlC WI.'VIXJW l>IJSI»I^^W 



•A I 




DisHnHtvefy fndiwidual' 



Agent, R. S. Bra<;o, Kappa Sigma Hiusc 



The Collefe Signal, Tuesday, November ii, 1913. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November 11, 1913. 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobl)ers of VViouj-lil Iron .iiul lii;iss I'ljif, \ alv^•^ 
and KittiriKs fur Meain, Water and tiat. A-iljestos 
and MaKnesiH Hoilt-r ami \'i\>e CoveiinKS, ripe 
Cut to Sketch, Mill Sii|ii)lies. Kni-it cers and 
Contractdfi for Steam ,ind Hot Uatt-t Mealing, 
Automatic Sprmklnr S\^t..iiiv lii.ilet and Kn^ire 
Connection!!. Hol\ukr, Mas*. 



T«f Teachers Exchange 

OJ Boston I >o Bi^ylstoH Sf. 

Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



1909 

r.ni 

I'M 2 



S. T. S. 18 
S. T. s. ]■, 
S. T. S. !•_> 
S. T. S. II 



MasH. 
Mass. 
Mass. 
Mass. 



6 

3 



NINETEEN-THIRTEEN NOTES 



KIUTKH 1!V TIIK. MSKTKKN-Tlllltrj.ts 
M. A. C. CI, fit OK AMIIKRM, 

•'(Jut-togftlier Han<iiiet" after the 
Si>riuglield game, Nov. 15. -Uf^. 



C^rp^n-ter St Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



|{\ this it shows tiiat in twenty-oin* 
Vfais out of thiite.-n gaiiu's phiyed, tor" Ftiy of Mo.json in charge 
Massachusetts has won eight and tied 
one. This year they will >yin the 
ninth. 



No I, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Students Attention ! ! ! 

We are ready at the start to furnish you with a fine 
line of Campus and Fraternity House Views, also Post 
Cards. Kodak work given |)rom|)l and careful attention. 
Enlarging antl picture fr.iming givt-n our personal at- 
tention. See us about Croups ami Portraits for the very 
best work. 



Satisfaction Guaranteed, 
the Square Deal Studio 



Patronize 



KINSMAN'S COLLEGE STUDIO 



j I^^L. 



NasH BlocK. AmKerst 

H. M. K<M'.ERs, '15, Agent. 
S7 Pleasant St., 



Studio Phone 303-2. 



GRAND SWEEPSTAKES TROPHY 



1 1750.00 Sterling Silver Cupl 
r OR 



BEST STATE EXHIBIT OF POTATOES 



AT THE 

New York Land Show 

1912 
WON BY 

The L L. Cleveland Company 

HOULTON, Mc. 

/^^NE of the largest and most 
. reliable seed potato houses 
ill the United Sf.itt-s. Competi- 
tion open to tlic entire United 
States and Can.Hda. Messrs. E. L. 
Cleveland Company also won the 
First Prize for Beit County Exhibit 
of Potatoes. (Silver Cup valued 
at $2()0.()(). ) 
The K, L. Cleveland Companv use 

L FRANK COE 
FERTILIZERS 



E. Frank Coe Fertilizers have 
been the business farmer's favorite 
for over litty-Hve years. Why not 
follow the example of these lead- 
ing commercial potato growers. 

Ton i»i»hl ii. .curt ■77,,, Sf„ri' f.f 1 I'ri^lliiMi- I'liUitii 
f.'mp" "rtil.'ntiT mi 4mo.iM»k luttriti, *l«lii« rarrni-r 
4 ."ol'* I. .''Ml fr'-^ »« r'-*(tn'.l 



Dec. •_'<;, "19i;{ Night." 
nkws itkms. 
La Pa/., Gllk ok Luwku Cai... ( i. 
It is over two weeks siiK.. 
sailed from Frisco for the Promise,: 
Land and we are not there yet. . 
Last week Prof. Frank A. Waiigh In our party are Crosby of Aiubers; 
attcml»Mi the .^)Oth anniversary of his i College, ''Casey" .Tones and invstlf 



DEPARTMENT NOTES 



I.ANI).MA|-K. 



alma mater, the Kansas State Agri- 
cultural college, and began work on 



. "Sam" Huntington mi-Hho.! • 
boat and when last heard of. 



the college grounds the plan of which I going to take a boat called •lUimi 




The Coe-Morfimer Company, 



51 CHAMBERS STREET. 
NEW YORK. N. Y. 



will endirace a period of fifty years. 
The extension work of the land- 
scape department has developed a 
large amount of practical work 
throughout the state. The students 
hav<- chaige <.f this work under 
stlpcrvisors. 

I i.oiii) I i.ri i:k. 

The tloricultiue department of the 
college \» to put up decorations and 
make an exhibit of chrysanthenmms 
at the annual exhibition of the Hol- 
yoke and Northampton Florists* ami 
(iardeners' ( lub to l>e held in Wind- 
sor Hall. Holyoke. during the after- 
noon and evening of ThursdHV, 
Nov. l.H. 

The alterations and addition to 
French Hall prevent the hohling of 
the retiular i hiysanlhemu^n show 
there this fall. 

IMITANV. 

Dr. (Jeorge E. Stone, head of the 
department of botany, has recently 
publi^ht'd two articles of lN)tli iMjpu- 
lar interest and scientilir importance 
In the Sepfcmlier issue of the /'ojm- 
^ '■ " )/.,/,. appeared his 
comprehensive treatise on "'The 
Power of (irowth in Plants " 
••Cement .\.piaiia" was tlie title of a 
very interesting article in tlieOefobcr 
issue of Thfi /'hint m„hl. 

r<iMoi .o«.^ . 

The ap|de judging and packing 
teams ih.'it will represent M. A. C. in 
the intercollegiate contest in Itoston 
have been selected as follows, jutlg- 
ing: U. ]■:. Nute. F. M. Ingham and 
A. F. Stevens; packing: A. L. 
Tower, A. F. Stevens and l{. F. 
.Nute. all members of the senior 
class. 

Arrangements have also lieen com- 
pleted to send a team to Washington. 
I). ( . to compete in the American 
Poiiudogieal society's judging con- 
i<-l. riiis has been nia<le possible 
'aigely through the generosity of W. 
II. PxiwUer of file elaiH of 'T.'). who 



.Imirez" sailing from San 1' 
Where he is n(»w no one knoHs. 

We sailed out of the Coldeii If 
two weeks ago Sunday in the 
ship ".lason" .... we had a iiiigbtT 
good trip down to Cuaynios. ooc 

week »>ut of Frisco Citavino* 

is some gay little town, now im 
state of siege with the rebels ou|\ 
seven miles outside and the Fetlfrsl* 
shaking in their shoes. Wlun 
got in. alfalfa was worth ^KK* a 
and chickens ?1 apiece. ... I 
only thing holding the rebels out ., 
the three I'ederal guulniati^ in tb 
harl»or ami the I'. H. S. Califnrnii 
and South Dakott, the last tw- 
threatening to interfere if the reUlf 
should iKiiubard the town . . . tbiog* 
down here have got every i«rteL 
moving picture and eowie o|Mtt 
stopped a mile for tragedy mu\ ' 
edy mixed. 

Around Topotobampo. tin jx>u 
we were bmml for they havt iitfn 
playing tag with varying titereM. 
When we left Frisco it n.nsiutii' 
hands of the Federals. The i«Ulf 
<lescentled anil cleaned out the IV<i- 
erals. The Fedciah got n\< a» far 
as .Mochis (our future home !iv tl^ 
way) when the reliels Iwal tliciii li)' 

ag.iiii In their haste 

away thi> time one of their gun 'a- 
went aground — Home e\eift"..i>t ■> 
can bet. 

At present To|K»lobamp<> i- m' 
and this boat, which is Fetleral. e:r 
touch there, so we are going on ■■ 
.Mazathan .... if the reln-ls emitr'il 
the r:iilroad we may be able to go "I' 
to .Mochi- iiy r.iil. 

We have visited .Santa Ry*:, 
and are now at La Paz, the cettt« o.' 
the pearl fishing industry heic 

SlMoN Mm. I, IK .lol ; 

Las Mwhis, .Sinaloa, Mexico 

DoMl forget that the <^ilt v Hon- 
will be 111 1.5 hea<Iquarter:< ■ 
.Springfield g;iiiie. Mc <! 



l>l M; Pi;nKKS»OR .S| \l,-. 

Vonis .,' (», ,. ;;o j,, ,cla-'"" '''""' '"'^""' 'l"i"ter tn 
tioii to contributing to send a team , (Jeoige /-alniskie. I'nd 
of the boys to Washington. I). C. to j l.oosfitKr the 191.'} athletic 
judge fruit i« <J;'lv n.oeived^ Kn-I^ij, ,,^., ,.^^„,^^_ „^ „ 
closed ph'ase hnd check f<»r ■*•»*. i.t id ' 

towards expenses, and we trust the\ ^'"" f«»"<'"'ng thirt. • 
will go and have a good time and win. ; pb-dgf*! their ten-sj.ot- 
If the apples which they judge , Coleman, Hoelirs. Colili :. 
-lioiil,! happen to be spijiyed' with j ^i^lXI now pledged. W. 
••Pviox ' so much the better. 

Yours trulv, ' •'^'"•*'"'" "^'""^ " 

»i- \, ,, ment of public parks, I 

" . II. How KI,K. ^, . . , , ' 

Springfield. 



.■h\ fii- 



iiiii-t'" 



Weather Forecast — Clear and colder. 



GET YOUR MACKINAW 

F^OK ^rmc I5IO c^^.vAii- : 

SPECIAL DISCOUNT ON PATRICK MACKINAWS THIS WEEK 



HRACC. '14. 



k i HOUSF 



Herman T. Roehrs and .losephj remind music 



I'lCKKKS. HOll.TKV l>KI-ssKKs 
.%NI» HI TTKK .M.%KKKs. 

« Hill I- S Air l)l-M I K". I N 

Hcri. Mutton. l.ainb. Veal. Pork. Lard, Ham.* 

hiiviiM Sauaaites, Poultry, (iamc. Butter 

cheeae, Bgf. Il«ana, 

I ^ ^1.5;.37.5'>. I it ''3 Blackstiiiie St 
racking; Housr. llnKhton, Mass 
.e I'oultry Dressintt FUnl, liostun. 
Cieamerifs in Vermont. 



Batchelder & Snyder Co. Cobbarem.w piactieing pomoiogists 

with headquarters at Grove St., 
Chico|»ee. 

Clyde F. Cristman, farm manager, 
SilverwiXKl Farm. Hedliston. 

( >8car <;. ,\nderson. iicittruetor. 
Vocational Agricultural .ScIuh.I, 
Sutton. 

The following I'.'!:; men were 
around ctdlege this week : Znbriskie, 
Uoehrs, iiutehings and Fay. Don't 
foiget to leave your canl with some 
lepresentative of the I'.M.'i .M, A. C. 
Club of Amherst, we want to know 
just what you are doing. 



WAFFLES 

Wednesday.s and Thursdays 



Oatmeal Every Morning 



DOG CART 




GADSKI IN NEXT STEINERT 
CONCERT 

WITH (fKOKHK II A UK Is A*«ri MAItlK 
r,%<!l.oVA. TlIK VIUHMST. 

«1ohanii:i *>adski. f»et>rge Harris, 



lovers of Mme. (Jad- 
ski'sachiexements in opera and con- 
cert. .She is totlay one of the leatl- 
ing sopranos ..f ilie .Metrop<»litan 

Opera (<>in|>an\ of New \ oi l> vi,,. 

j has sung in most of the great opera 
houses of the w»»rld. At no time in! 
her career has she been a great«*r \ 

} artist than at present. She i» a true i 
dramatic soprano. Her long expe- 
rience in opera lifts given her an ex- 
CH«ptional mastery of dramatie inter- 
pretation, but it has no! deprivetl her 

of tlie finished technic which niniit I _ ... 

, ^ , .to offer an alisolute lower price. 

Ire present wlieu a singer appears ini 

concert. Many n famous oiM>ra ; AMUrDCT niDlllTIIDr 
•Inper is smcWul on the stage Amntni I ^UnPIMU^t 

wh«i ill a concert hall would •lisplay 
«lefe<'t« of tt'chnie «»r iiit»;r|>rela»i»>n 
timt would •..■ instantly jH'rceive*! 
and pointed rtitt. Mme. i>adski is 
one of the few uie:il .m ; 
who can stand all test-.. 

.Marie ( aslova is still in her 'teens, 
nth. oiif lit the 



STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New l-Ji- 

gland of S{)ecial Student Furnishings. 

LOWFR KXPKNSFS Enable us 



ANr> 



and Marie Caslova. violinist, make 

the unusually distingiiishe«l trio of | ami yet AnguMt Spa 
artists who will appear at the third foremost (itMinan critics of the «lay, 
c.ineert of the Steinert series at the gaj,} „f Maiitr Caslova, when »l»e 
Springfield Auditorium, Nov. 11*. j played in lUrliii last ()cU»!>er, that 
It is hardly necessary at thia time to j ghj. ^„j,^ „jj„„ ||„. „|,„!,., f,no of the 

most tulent(>d and e<pii|*ped 

j violinistd of Aroeiica. This means ft 



Those who know 
buy the De Laval 



i«iinr» m.-n 



IWause they .ire ex 

' >t of cream and know 

th.^t til.- I>e l.aWMl 

'> lonce«t. Iliat 

N cri».in»eriej um: 



|<*«I l»al r.v men-. T he I)e Laval 

■'•.*) f;»V"»»'^ -1 '-^ *"■■ * -.fy. 

■ ;: 'A. !'■ ■,,, 

■ ■ .- . -u I, - '^ 

••III I*- l.»«ik| Uaera-Whtnever a man 

■ ' • tMi used an old moiiel I>e l.aval de 
' I'urclia^e a later <itvle maclunr hr 
'• tnivsanottiet I)e l.aval. 



, ■ ■ ■ ■ .' 1 -; n-t 

it liJieJ tlian user* »»f other >ieparatnrs. 

THE DE UVm SEPARHTOR CO 



, tiro.idwav. 
N. , Votk. 



21) E. M^ilison ."~i. 
Chi< a({o. 



Thp rnnnprtiViit Vallpv *^'^^"* •'*•"'• «rhen on,- takes into cmi 

iilG UUlliiUulluUl iClllGj si.i.r.ition li.e matured art of .Mam 

Street Railway 



I 

Powell, ;is :in instance of the rank 

behl by some American violininta, : 

sikI in this ease, by two women, the | 

one at the height of her powers, the 

other just entering u|»<»n what |»r«>m- 

ises to Im" an extraordinaiily brilli:iiit 

future. , 

Mr. Harris, tlie son of the former i 

I rom Amherst, via Northampton, ! |ttesi«|ent of .Amherst college, is one} 

through the Hatfields, past the foot i «f **«« y^'i'ifS''*" «'"f?''"« "^ "••'* S<-nerft- 

t ^. 1 £ »». 1 J u lion who.se intelligenee an«l imlustry 

of .Sugar Loaf .Mt., along!%ide the! ^ ^ 

j have placed him high among the nio»t 
famous lUoody Hrook battle ground j ^^^j^,,,^^ ^^,,,^.^^^ ^,^,.^,^ ^^j ^,,.^ ,,^^^. 

Hia voice is light and charming tenor, 
and he uses it with uncommon skill 



CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. nAR5H. 

cox SONS 

- AND 

V INING 

■-' 74 ,\|;idi»<>ii Avenue, ."ncw \ ork 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

l.rsi ,M4teriaU and W<»fkii)anshi|> 

WOODWARD'S 




Iheie are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 

or 

C R. ELDER 



to Old Deerficld. thence to Gr«o- 
field. Turners Falls and across the 

"Plains" to Lake Pleasant. Monta j »"•' i?'»<^' l"*^^.- He can always be 

, .,.,, ,. ,, relied uiMju to charm bv his fliiished 

gue and Millers falls , , ' 

:uid musK lanly performatiees. 

Fealiiren of the concert will l»e 

.Miss Caslova*s playing of the Briich 

C minor loncerts. and of pi^-ees by 
s.'iint-Saens nru\ Corolli ; Mni. 
(.:i.1-.Im • "Klaa's Dre;ui)'" 

lioni l.ohengnii. tlie I ' ■ ' i 

.from Tristan and l-olde. niii ^iinj;~ 
by Liszt and .S(liidMi| f : aii<l llic group 
of son;.;^. ti\ IIulTo Wolf, in a<ldition 
to o(ln;i i-iiti^i I ' M i--iiiit. Court- 
bind Palinei, hr. Ann-, wliii li .Mr 
FI;iriis«ilI sing, f ouipiefe juogranis 

Connecticut Valley Street Railway '"' "■• ^«" ren...n.,ng concerts i,. this 

•cries may lie had on reipiest from 
Company I M. Steloert & Si^ons Co. of ^priugiield. 



LUNCH 



»j Main .St., Masonic HIdg., 
Northampton, .Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



80 Mile* of TrackaKe riodcrn 
F.quipment Train Dispatch- 
Injt System Freight and llx- 
presA Service over entire line. 



ICE CREAM, 



C/osf(/ only from t A. M. lo 4 A. M. 

Toefil Mientka 

Shoes sijiDed and Pollsneil 

Make ol'i '<li'ifs look like ripw 

Neat, classy workmanship 
0|ien Suncliky Mala St. 

On way to Pcit Oflica. 



il 







The College Signal. Tuesday, November ,,. ,013. 



TENNIS 



The Massachusetts Agricultural Gollese 



Offers courses of instruction in twenty six teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 



RACKETS Agriculture, Horriculture, Science, Humanities 

I Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the lollowing subjects: 



and 




. E. E. HILLETT 

JKWKLKK AND OPTOMETklST 
Lenses ground while you wait 
College Jbwelmy 
Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and (Juitar ^ttir, 

AMHJKK.MT, MAhM. 
Next to Post Office. 



i%>t- 



DEUEL'S 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairyinig 

Poultry Husbandry 

Agricultural Clieniislry 
Economic Entomology 
Plant Physioldgy and I'alliology 
Agricultural Kilucation 



Horticulture 

Floriculture 

Fort'.stry 

Landscape (lardening 

Pomology 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

Ili^i^h-Gradt Collide Work 
LAUNDRY 



For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTBRFIELD. President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



STEAM FITTING, Telephone c^. 

GAS FITTING. TINNING. 

P. W. Dance & Co. 

PLUMBERS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



Specialty of Repairing 

Church Winixjws, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, &c. 

i Clifton Ave., AMHERST. MAss 



XVfli^iit db l>ltaio„ 

Catalog urs of 

Are out. Copy mailed to any address 
."^ludpntH and Athletet who want the f.ui 
articlestor the various tpoits should in 
thoie bearing the Wright & iJitson 1 tj . 



Shirts, 
Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash. 
Same, rough dry. 



lO-lfC 
2 I-2C 

a i-;c 

48c per doz. 

• 30c per Aqi. 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam I'ressini;. 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleanmg and Pressing. |, 50 a Suit 

RAtrH J. BoRf.sv. \«enl. 7 North Cotttge 

F.i.WAMi.C. Ki.wvKi.s. Agent 

Hut full name aad address on laundr> 



IWHERST BOOK STORE 

Loose - Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 

IJefore buying elsewhere, see our assort- 
ment of pennanu and banners 

CURRAN St DYER, Props. 



Athk'tic Hoard. 

'J "be Collegf .Senate, 

Football AsMK-ialion, 

iJaseball A.ssoriation, 

Track As.sofiatiou, 

Hoekey AsHoeialiun, 

Tennis Asnoeiation, 

Uille club, 

Koihter iioisters 

Musiical AMSociation, 

Nineteen Hundred Fourteen Index, 

Nineteen llumlivd Fifteen Index, 

M. A. C. tbristian Assjociatiou, 

M. A. C. Catholic flutj. 

Fraternity Conference, 

St<xk bridge Club, 



George 11. Chapman. Ntuiiarv 

1>. W. .lones, I'lesidenl 

.S. H. FieelMun, Manz^er 

ti. 1). .Mclican, .Manager 

K. ( . KdwanTs, Manager 

.1. J>. IVllett, .Manager 

U. K. MacLain, Manager 

.1. W. r. lA'hure, .SecieUiry 

H. .1. Ia'Wis, Mauager 

H. 1>. Brown. Manager 

K. .S. Clark, .Ir.. .Manager 

H. .M. Rogers, Manager 

K. 11. l'(»wers. President 

l>. .\. Coleman, Presitleut 

J. I). IVIlelt, PreHideut 

N. U. Dearing, I'retddeut 



Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Hotkey 
Skates 




5kat'K5h(Ki 
S westers 
.ferse}s 

Unlformf 
for sll gporu 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



U^hen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 
Blankets, Sheets. Pillow Cases. Comfortables, 
Tdwels, Etc. Also denims for 
that corner seat. 



Wright & Ditson Good* ar«- the -ui.dar., i : 
all sports 

U4 \V Ashington St., Uostoo, M.«. 

THE TERPSY PARLOit 

CLEANSING. 

PRESSING. 

REPAIRING. 

UulrkfBt M-rvlcr, Kfst Work, L»w>i 1-. 

All woik carefully done. Work call.Kl I.: . 
delitrered. (Cents' overcoats, suit«, p«M> «m 
coats. Ladies' tine linen suita a s(>cciaBy. 

Teams will call every day at M A ( 

Wn. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rmt Naah Bt'k, Amherst. 



TeL hfl idi 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



CARS 



Leave AQOIE COLLEQE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



CARS 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chy.santhemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300 



Barsalotti & Gentoso 

cigars Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresh Candy 

Ice Cream, Fruit, Soda, Etc. 

The Right Goods at the Right Prices 

Open till II o'clock KVEKV night 
C«r*cr Amity nod I'leMsmit .•ttrcrta 



If you want to he 

»<»MI» WITH TMK OIRI..H 

you must hare yonrriotheii |irei!;«.l and cleaned 

ATIIPSTIIZBr*S 

1 1 Amity St. Maroon .Store 

Pressing and Cleaning a ■pcclaliy 

Tel. a<n.|| ***"" l'''e«-»l H'ket syiitein In town 



Leave AMHERST for AOdlh COL- 
LEUE at 7 and 37 mln. past M<k 
HOUR. 

SpMW Can at RcM«naM« RalM 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UN I FORMS 

For toIicKe and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



AlHERSr & SUNDERLAND SI. 11 DO 



For a Hail 



ily and Sunday Nrwspapff 
You should Keati 



'r H K 



Springfield Repubiicai 

While you are at eollcge in ihei- 



It h»ii Hit »rThe .M. A. V.. >< w 

Tli«- Itot Sporllng »wii 

full <i<>n«>ral N*-** 

A strong Kdltorlnl I'Bge 

tnt«-r«-><itinK KeHtiirrn 

It In ■ KcRl Ni-HHpnpfr 

Ihiily, 3 cents ; 70 cents a <- 
a quarter. 

Sunday y 5 cents; 50 cents 

Subscribe by mail or through tli 
dealer. 



luartff 

, ... \.'»- 



-«P. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEIOEI 



r<Af?V 



I I 



Vol. XXIV. 



Amherst. M.iss.. Tuesday, November iS. 1913. 



No. 10 



CROSS COUNTRY RUN SOPHOMORE SUPPER SUNDAY CHAPEL SERMON 



[litercollegiatc Race Held m Hanover. 
Maine Wins. M. A. C. Finishes Well. 

.\l Hanover, N. 11 Saturday, eight 
iif the New Knglaiid colleges were 
i.*|ireHenteii by teams in the second 
aiHiual New Kngltmd Intereollegiate 
. •oss-eoiintiy run. The Iniverwity 
Maine was the winner, with l)art- 
iilh seeood, Colby third, .M. I. T. 
loiiith. Brown fifth, M. A. ('. sixth, 
AtiiherHt seventh, aixl Williams 
. ifrlith. Capt. Mareeaii of Dart- 
uiitulh finished fiiHt in '11 inin., 37 
see., for the 4.7 miles course. IJell 
of .Maine was second, fifty yards 
lii'hind Marcean. 

Conditions for the run were ideal, 
ttu-r*- being a sharp chill in the air, a 
clt-ar sky. and u real eross-eountry 

11 iM'. The hills and dales were 
numerous and harti to go over, nar- 
mw foot Itridges. pine needles, grass 
lields, and slippery paths were seat- 
ti-rtNl throughout the distniH-c. As 
the ninners left the fiehl the M .\ ( . 
team took the leatl and kept it for the 
first quarter of a mile. Here the 
Maine and Dartmouth teams forgtHi 
ahead and at the one-mile mark had 
things theii own way except for n 
wstlered Ctilby or "Teeh" man. 
The first bad hill served to kill olT a 
g<»o«l nund>er of riinneis and from 
here to the two-mile mark there was 
iHi change in position. < in the last 
steep hill where running was iiniKwsi- 
ble and crawling most feasible 
many men dropped back. Here at 
the tliree-mile murk Uiehaids eoni- 
ineneed to (Teep up from al»out 
thirtieth |K)sition to the group of men 
liiectly !m hind Mareeau. Then at 
the four-mile mark Mareeau left his 
t*-am-mate8 and the Maine aggrega- 
tion obtaining a lead which was never 
again threatened. From here on Rich- 
ards and Capt. (oley also had their 
ii.inds full for the pace was the hard- 
-' of the race. As they came on the 
vM Richards gave .Saltmarsh of 
Mart mouth and C<K)k of "Tech" a 

I'l splint in which the latter baiely 
won out. This gave Richards fif- 

■ mil jdaee. Ctdey beat out Heavens 
" a pretty race at the finish and in .«o 
ioing placed himself ahead of the 
'•ntire Amherst team. 

All item worthy of note is that 
li'iehards placed five seconds ahead of 
"lie tirst Urown man. This compaii- 
««» shows Aggie's improvement over 
fheir condition at Providence three 
rtCeks ago. The Aggie men placed 
»8 follows : Richards 1.'), Coley(capt. ) 
-"*' hoggett ;{;?, Russell 41. Haer 4r,. 
Viife. 

1 ive men on each team counted in 
It' score which gives M. A. ('. ir,:}. 
t'oiots scored by the different teams 
IContinued on page ;] 



AGGIE LOSES 



Held After Game m Springfield. Profs. | Delivered by Rabbi Wise of New York In Hard Game with Springfield, whose 
Hasbrouck and Mackimmie Speak. on Ideals and Idealists. Open Woik Provea too Strong. 

The sophomore class held its ban- Rabbi Stephen S. Wise, of the IM.iying gilt-edged 'cHitball through- 
quel in the Highland hotel, in Free .Synagogue, .New Y<uk City gave I tint. Springfield Y. .M. C. A. college 
Springfiehl, directly after the Spring- a stirring a«hli ess at Sunday Chapel 'defeated the Aggies Satiinlay on 



if 



fHNMIO 



i. IQ^Ii 3 i^ 3i 3Q Ji 4 i } 4^ .to Ak 40 « ip a< 'ia il %> S *^ 

J f< 




Tt UK («'««: 



riR»T MAi_r 






V 4.^ ^ ii ifi 25 13 J.S ifi 15 % 







A6Gie YAUW • 



SECOND MALF 



llel.l fr.HiH.'. Saturday evening. It '»" " I'lealn aii<l Idealists,'" a subject ; jVatt Field. 14 to 0. The Aggies 
was alten.le.lbveightv-three members purti.ularly interesting to college ,li,.,l h„.(l 
of the class, and was characterized "»•"• "«' ♦<'!"' ^ow the idealists are 
bv much spirit and enthusiasm. | confused with cranks, who are not 

The speakers for the evening were conHidered of any service to the 

1 Continued on page $] I [Continued on page $ J 



and put up a great game 
from start to finish, but they were up 
against a better and faster team. 
The Springfield boys showed them- 




\m 






f 



, t 



selves to J.e adept at the open style 
of |)li«y, .UKl the ideal weather condi- 
tions jrave them an.ple oppoiti.nitv 
to display their ability. 

Maivelo.isly executed forward 
imsnes a„.| Hplen.lid interterenee on 
eud runs, eou|)le<l with the l.rilliant 
'"•lividual work of the Springfield 
I'Hckfiehl formed a eon.lnnation 
whieh the Massachusetts men eould 
'■ot withstand, and, but for their 
''gl"i"g «|.irit and grit the score 
would have been larger. Time 
after time the Aggie forwards got 
through and br<,ke up Springdeld 
l>lay8 before they were started. The 
entire line from Jordan t., Iklgerton 
lit.-rally played their heads off, but 
there is a limit to hnman ability and 
endm-anee. 

The ball was i„ Springfiehls ttiri- 
tory throughout the first peri.xl. 
The Aggies received the kickotT and 
started a march down the field reach- 
ing the n:, yard line before losing the 
hall. During this (piarter Melican 
signaled for a fair catch when 
Meyers was forced to punt from 
I'ehind his own goal line, and Dole 
tried a kick from j)lacement. The 
ilirection was all right, but necessary 
steam to carry the ball over the bar 
was lacking. Springfiel.l opened up 
theii game in the sceomi periinl and 
from that time on their goal was 
never in .langer In that .,uarter 
Hfter .Springli,.hl had leceived the 
ball on Aggie's 40 yard line. Foun- 
tain tried a place kick. Ihe ball 
went wi.le and through |K>or head- 
work. Spri„gf|e|,| n.fovered on the 
I" yard line. Un four line plunges 
Ix>reDJt took the ball over for the first 
seore. The second score came hi 
the last <piarler. Schabinger hurled 
the ball DO yai.ls u, Fonntiuii on the 
Aggie i yard mark. Loienz cro«8e,| 
the line on the next play. 

The Aggie backfleld worked well 
and pulled off many g,HKl gains, hut. 
as in the Tufts game. «,,. unable to 
break through the oppon.uts defense 
consistently. Captain IJrewer was 

miswtl at left half, although (;rays<,n 
and .lohnson acquitte.l themselves 
well. The latter was exceptionallv 
gfxxl in the third quarter and reeled 
otr several g,K>d gains. Meli<an out- 
punted Meyers by fully i.i yards, 
getting off some pretty spirals.* 

In the third |>erhH| Kdwards, w1m> 
liad replaced Strong at left guard 
was injured and had to be car- 
ried from the field. It was th.mght 
BrBt that a leg was broken, but an 
examination at the Hampden hospital 
«l.owed that a ligament ba<l been 
badly torn. 

Springfield tried 1 1 forward passes, 
six were successful and netted a total 
<•!' M;.-, yards. The Aggies tried 
seven passes, none going to comple- 
tion. The game Id detail ; 



The College Signai. Tuesday, November ,8. ,9,3 



FIRST QUARTER. 

Jordan received the kick-ofT aud 
returned the ball to his 40 yard line. 
A series of steady gains on line 
plunges by Nissen, Grayson and 



Darling advanced the ball to Spring- 
field's ;i.-. yard line when they bracts I 
and got the ball on downs. Two 
attempts at the Aggie line being 
unfruitful, Meyers punted to Melican 
on his ii, yard li„<.. Aggie was 
penalized :. yards for off-side, and 
Melican punted to Fonntain who was 
nailed as he caught the ball on his 
•"»! yard mark. Fountain got « 
yards at right tackle. Meyers made 
a yard, then Schabinger made first 
down. Lorenz was unable to gain 
but Dickens reeled olT « yards at 
left end. Lorenz tried tackle for 
a yard and rei)eated making first 
•lown. Schabinger was tackled back 
of his line for a .". yard loss. Meyers 
fiiml)led but was lucky as I'eniiock 
recovered. A forward pass, the 
only ..ne trie<l in this period was 
incomplete, and Meyers punted to 
Melican on his 20 yard line. Meli- i 
can refurned the punt :. yards. 
Grayson and .Nissen made first 
down. Darling ripped off .'» yards 
ami Nissen followed with 2. Then 
Darling broke through left tai-kle for 
a ."J."* yard run, but unfortunately, tbe 
referee detected an infringeniLut of 
the rules, called the ball back aod 
penalized Aggie I.", yards placing the 
ball oil her .;() yai.l line. Darling 
went around left end for .". yards, 
and repeatiHl at left tackle for 4. 
.Melican puntetl to Schabinger on bis 
l.'» yaid line. Meyers and Foil itain 
could not gain and .Meyers dropped ! 
I>ack to punt. The pass was p<M)r 
and he was tackled for a loss. He 
triwl again, stamling back ..f his 
goal line and punteil to .Melican who 
made a fair c.itch on Springfield'a 3M 
yard line. Dole tried a kick from 
placement but it fell short. The 
ball was put in play on tbe tbe 20 
yard mark. Springflehl gained only 
.'{ yard^ in as many rnshes and Mev'- 
ers |>iinted to Darling on Aggie's ht 
yard line and the perioil was over. 

Aggie's ball 00 tbe scconti down. 
.Melican dove through center for a 
yard. Nissen trie«l the same sjiot 
for I yanls. A forward pass was 
incomplete. A secoiul pass was 
intercepted by Holmes. Ix>renz 
bucked the line for .J yards and Scha- 
binger made first down. Fountain 
found right end for .J yanls. Meyers 
fell back for a forward, but fumbled 
the pass. He ran l>ack picked up 
the ball and hurled it back into the 
line of scrimmage, a piece of head- 
work which saved him a 1.'. yard 
loss. After .Meyers failed to gain. 
Fountain attempted a place kick 
from Aggie's f.'! yard line. The ki«k 
went wide and Dickons rccf)vcred for 
Springliel.l <>ii the I.", y.-.nl line 
whence four line bucks by Lorenz 
carred the ball over for the first 
score. Schabinger kicked the goal. 
Jordan received the kick-oflf and 
returned it to the 30 yard line. I 
Darling lost 3 yards, then he and 
Grayson made 3 yards. .Melican 
fumbled a pass and the ball was 

I 



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PAGES SHOE STORE 



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Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
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PMIailfflplila's Ofnclal Fraternity Jewiler 

SPBOIALISTS IN 
Fraternity Badges. Fobs. Novelties, 

Rings. Charms Phxes Trophies. 

'**''■'• College Pins. Fobs. Seals. 

Rings, Charms.-. 




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LUNrNBOM 
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Opnca Houas: 

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Hroken Lenses .Accurately Replaced 
Fine Watch Repairing Promptly and 
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A Chance to Save Money 

A S5.00 Safety Razor for $5.00 

But we give you a coupon which when signed with your 
name and home address we refund you $3.50. It carries 
the kexall guarantee. "Money back if not satisfied." 

We carry a full line of 

Waterman, Conklin and Moore's Fountain 

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and Cigarettes. 

Liggett's, Belle Meade and Green Seal Chocolates 



THE HENRY ADAMS CO., DnigeJsts 

The REXALL Store on the cokNER 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November i8, 1913. 



,,ii'(l hy Holmes on Aggie's J51 

w,, I line. Fountain failed to gain 

:iii.i .Me vers fell on the bull when 

S( liul'inger fiiiuhled on being tackletl 

foi !i loss. Fountain made .'{ yaids 

and Springfield was penalized lA 

\:,iU. Sehabiiigei heaved the ball 

Iruiii the 40 yard line to Lorenz on 

thf -Ja yard mark. The Aggies 

limfe<l here and held Springfield for 

ttto downs. A forwnr<l pass was in- 

(tmiplete and Fountain tried another 

plare kiek which failed. Meliean 

rt'covering the liall. lie punted at 

oHce to Schabinger at the iiiid<|le of 

Ik field ami the latter by brilliant 

work reached Aggie's 20 yard line 

li«fore he was stop|»ed. Schabinger 

w;is thiowii for a l."» yard lo.sh, and 

Strong intercepted a jiass on his .'ir* 

vtird line. Johnson made 2 yards at 

light tackle. Nissen ran against a 

^toiie wall but Darling made 2 yards. 

\i;;:ip waw pen:dized !.'» yards for 

imldiiig. Johnson got a small gain. 

then .Melican punted fully (>0 yards 

to l-'otintaiu wh«i returned the ball to 

his 40 yard line. A forward pass 

«!i* incomplete. Frieillund received a 

xroiid pass and maile a nhort gain.) 

\ iloiible |)a8s, Dickens to .Sfhabing- 

iittted first down. Another f»>r- 

w:tnl was incompletr I oiintain 

!ii;nle '^ yards, then Fii<i|liiiid wiim 

''irt>wn for a hws on a ta«'kle around 

■ l:i\. Si'habinger made a pretty 

|i:t!HN to Fountain but the oval did not 

fiavel thf lefpiired di.Ht;iii<r .hkI jt 



was Aggie's ball. Darling made I 
yards at left tackle and a gain 
through center. JohiiMon lost, then 
Melican punted to Sehabinger who 
returned the ball t«. the .io yard line. 
Two forward passes failed. Meyers 
gained 10 yards thiough center and 
the half was over. S<-oie : Spring- 
field 7. Ajftlie 0. 

TillKIt <.*! Vlill.K 

Dole kicked off to .Meyers. Scha- 
binger was tackletl for 10 yard loss. 
lx)renz made .'J yards at center and 
.Meyers punted to Melican on Aggie's 
40 yard line. Four f*horf nishi-s 
made first tlown. Darling failed to 
gain but Sehlofterluck found center 
for I yards. .Schabinger Intercepted 
a pass. Fountain made 2 yards and 
Meyer.x tried center for 4. .Scha- 
binger reeled off 20 yards aroiinil left 
end. A forward pass wna incom- 
plete. Fountain went through cen- 
ter for '» yanls, then a necond pass 
was incomplete. .Meyers punted to 
.Melican who returned Ihe ball 10 
yanls to his .■{.'»yanl line. .Sehlottcr- 
lieck failed to gain. Johnson made 
three succcwiive trips around right 

(Contiatted ••n v»gr X\ 



Mackinaws 



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NKW >oWK 



«'t.|T|t A Nil <-OI.I.,K«il-: 
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2 years — gradually changing from green to 
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good tasting smoke that the southern planter* 
thef:)selves hke. Never a bite in such tobacco. 
Velvet I Don't forget! 



,119 





Sweaters 



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all other I'\tll and Winter sp<iifs call for ^ood Swtalcr pro- 
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naws in all grades. 

Ifjl-T.no to tf^M.<H> 



The famous Summit brand, well kiiovvii in the Norlhwest 
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the Shawl Collar, Coat Coll.ir ami the regular shape 
Swe. Iters, all the best st Iliiig coIt»r.s. 



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168 



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The Collece Signal, Tueaday. November i8, 1913. 







THE C OLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
A|;ricultural College. 



BOABD OP BDIT0B8. 

CUKSTER K. WUKF.I.KR'u. Kditorin-Chief 
FRANK W. in KI.I. '15. Man.iginK Kditor 

"^?.^l? V" J?.''!^!:*^ '■*• ^""^P*'''"''" ''•'*'•"' I" K'CHt (iiue for these "jimateur" 



Most of the sophs <iuietly slipped 
into dairy lunches for supper after 
their class banquet : HilC was cer- 
tain' v the goat of that affair ! 

Now that varsity football season is 
over, all sorts of ffx)tball games will 
be on the field. Saturday morning is 



HAROLD J. CLAV'14 
STUART B. FOSTER '14, 
ERVINR F. PARKER 'm 
J. ALBERT I'RICE'is. 
GEO. E DONNEI.I. '15, 
EARLE S. DRAI'ER '15. 
TVLER S. ROGERS '16. 



Assistant Editor 

Athletic Editor 

Alumni Editor 

Athletic Editor 

Depaitnifnt Kditor 

Campus Editor 

Associate Editor 



CHARLES W. CURr^N•|^ Associate Editor 

BUSIffESS DEPARTMENT. 

ERNEST S. CT.AKK. |R ',4. Hus. Manager 
MAl'RICE J. CI.(»L(;H 'is, Ass't Bus. Mgr. 
ERNEST F. IP ION '14, AdrertlsinR ManaRer 
W. RICHARU SEARS '15. A»»t. Ad*. Manager 

Subscription I1.50 per year. Single 
copies. 5 cents Make all orders payable 
to Ernest S. Clark. Jr. 



Entered 



M Mcond-ctaM matMr at the AmtMiw 



Vol. XXIV. TVE.SDAV, Nov. 18. No. 10 



«• Boost Old Aggie." 



The next issue of the Signal will 
appear Dec. 2. 



Thb thoughtful 11688 of 80me one 
at the |K)WLM station shoiihl receive a 
word of comtnendation from the 
Mtutients in the dorms. On the re- 
turn from Tufts ami aim after the 
.Springfield game, the lights were left 
on in lH>th N«»rth ami .South, and this 
was appreciated greatly by the men. 
We wish to thank the re8|»onsible 
|>er8on or persons. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

(.N'olicet for this column shou Id tie dropped in 
theSir.NAL Office or handed to Earle S. Oraiwr 
•15. on or before the .Saturday precedinK each 
issue. 1 

Nov. 19, |.|0 I-. M., Assembly. Dr. 
K. .1. Fl<»o«ly, Superintendent 
Worcester So<ial Settlement 
association. 

t>-lnp. M.. Italian club. Room 
G South. 
Nov. 21, 6-10 F. M., Italian club, 

Room fJ South. 
Nov. -.'.l. l»-i.-, A. .M., Sunday chapel, 

to be announced. 
Nov. 2j, 7-(Ki f. M., Stockbridge 
elub. 

7-;M)p. m., Florists and Gard- 
ners club. 

2«, 12-0(» M Thanksgiving 
recess begins. 



Nov 



CAMPUS NOTES 

Kleven tnen were awarded the M 
for fof)tball. 

Fully two thom^and pc<)ple cheered 
for Aggie at the Springfiehl game. 

This i- til.' .Hccoiid year that our 
ca[>tain8 have been tniable to plav in 
the Springfield gariM- because of an 



contests I 

Two new 19 11 calendars are for 
sale on the campus. Lincoln '15 and 
Whitney 'Ifi are the rival salesmen, 
and both have splendid souvenirs of 
the campus. 

Cheer up, we'll surely win next 
year— with eight varsity men back 
and ten substitutes ready to step into 
the vacancies, we ought to have a 
winning team. 

Now that the football season is 
over, interest turns to hockey. Man- 
ager Pellet has arranged an excellent 
schedule which will be ready for pub- 
lication shortly. Prospects are 
bright for a splendid season. 

The football team was given a sur- 
prise when they were taken to the 
Oaks hotel in Springfield on Friday 
noon. The purpose of this was to 
get the big game off their minds, and 
to keep us in mystery as to the where- 
alH.»ut8 of the team. 

The Amherst College Christian as- 
siM-iation is entleavoring to get Dr. 
Ooldwaithe. a graduate of M. A. C. 
to talk to them next week. It is ex- 
pected that our Christian association 
will co-operate with that in Amherst 
college if such an mcasion occurs. 

Mr. Canning gave a very Interest- 
stereoptican lecttne on "Kngllsh 
Gardens" m Fiench Hall Tuesday 
evening. The lectures held under the 
auspices of the Florists' and (Jarden- 
ers* club are well worth attendance 
by any one interested in such lines of 
work. 

Saturday evening. The Broadway 
theatre in Springfield was the scene 
of Spriugfiehl cheers and Aggie 
songs. Fully one hundred Aggie 
men j«»ine«l in singing the college 
song in the intermission between the 
third ami fourth act The show 
itself was rather a tlisappointrnent. 

The b..ard walk coming from the 
dining hall, along the ravine, is in a 
very poor state. In many places the 
woo<l has rotted away, leaving gaps 
large enough to cause serious sprains 
if one should get his foot caught. 
We are tired of "crabbing" over this 
matter, but something should be done 
before winter comes on. 

In nar,,i'i'.H MWkh/ for Nov. h is 
a cheerful, four-verse jjoeiu on the 
pleasures of outdwr life, entitled 
"Out O'Doors," by Mr. Willard A. 
Wattles of the l-nglish Department. 
Mr. Wattles has had eight jxwms 




The College Siinal. Toesday, November 18, 1913. 



THERMOS 

CARAFE 

Have a Hot Coffee in Your Room. 

Fill at the cart Stay hot 24 hour ^ 

Other styles for tramps. 

KEEPS HOT KEEPS COID 

DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



ONITY CHURCH 

.North 1'i.kasant .St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith. 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

KKtitLAK Kl NU.%V SKKVICK AT 7 I' M 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest line in 
the .state outside of Hostun. 



Seeourlineof Drill Shoes 

E. RUSSELL NORTON $2.00 tO $4.00 



SALES AGKXT 



Davenport Miller 
Vein Coal 

Best Quality Pennsylvania Coal 



MODERN REPAIR 
DEPARTMENT 



E.M.BOLLES 

I ON VOUR %VAV TO R. O.) 



BOSTON OFFICE 

8s Water St. 



NEW VOKK OFFICE 

I Kroarlway 



LOM^ fMtlCC TAlLOMtNG CO. 

M n.S M.\|)K T(» (»K|)KK 

\i""\^l'''!?''''-.''T"'«' ""<* '>y«<* All kinds of 
Kp|«irihK for Ladies and G^ntlenten neatly done. 
MiehKrHde work by first class tailor. Work 
called for and delivered .Sell tickets for pressine 

4 SI Its l-OR 1 1 50 

GEORGE KOroWITZ. Prop. 

Main .street. Amherst. Mass. Nash Hlock 

On your way to the Post < »ffice. lei. 43*- \V 



Coolep's r>otel 

Springfield, Mass., 

Solicits the patronage of the .'^ j 
dents of the Agricultural CoJir-f 
to class dinners and individually. 



I. M. LABROVITZ, Custom Tailor 

Fashions, Fit, First Class Work Guaranteed 



And 



llljllljr, ..,.^. v,i(^iii |nn:iiiE 

Saturday night was M. A. C. night r*"^^'**^*' '*>' ^ff^n'^r's, eight more hj 
in Springfield. The hotels, theatres, | ^''*' ^»''^'P''>t'f''»'' one hy the Sviar/ 
cars, and streets were filled with ' '**'''' ""*' **^'veral have heen copied by 
Aggie men. t^'e /^iti'miy iJitjenf. In addition 

Two mas.H-mee lings and a parade 
livened things up last week. Moon- 
light signal practice added a glimmer 
of mystery to all ! 



Large assortment on hand. (IKNT'.S FURM.SH I.\<;S. Red-Man Collar 
Uress .Shirts. Cleaning and Pressing. I^RK.S.S SUITS 
TO Ki:.\T. .Military Collars and (iloves' 

II AMITY ST., Telephone 302VV. AMHERST, MASS. 

THE KATHERInTeTmcCLELLAN STUDIO 

44 State St., Nortiiampto.n, Mass. 



the Springfield li^,mhlir,,u has piih- 
liHhed thirteen of his poems, and 
many more have been printed in other 
newspapers. 



PORTRAITS — GROUPS — VIEWS 

Insist upon seeing our college work and prices before decicli ;. 



SUNDAY CHAPEL 

[Continued from page 1] 

country. The idealist is opposed be- 
cHUsie he rouses men from their sleep 
and makes them see the error of 



evening ; he extended the da.ss greet- ' the meie pittance 



ingstoall former members of 1 ;•!(;, woidd apply to 

and invitetl them to all future class 

banquets. The committee consisted 

of H. (J. Mattoon, chairman, 11. H. 

Tarbell, K. ( Immderlaiii, I>. L. 

Smith and T. A. Rogers. .Music was 

furnished by Gixxlwin and Hlanpied, 

and the class joined in singing the 

college song, thus bringing to an end 

u banquet which wa« successful in 

every wav. 



field. 

George N. Danforth, pre.sident of 

tiaii ways. He is a seer of things to the class, was toastmaster for the 

cuiiif, not a prophet of things that 

art'. His God is the God of things 

U!* they ought to be. The visionary 

i.H often accused of being impractical 

ntid never accomplishing anything, 

but it is no wonder when so many are 

trying to prevent him. On the 

contrary, the idealist is the only 

really practical man. It was the 

^i^i<^nary .Jacob A- Hiis who brought 

tilt' filthy living conditions of the 

tiuoiueuts to the conscience of New 

York, and changed those conditions. 

Colonel Armstrong was an iikvilist 

wlio advocated education for negroes 

.111(1 finally brought ab«)ut the founding 

of Hampton Institute. He said " It 

is the business of America to make 
iiipossible |>ossible." 
.Mr. Wise said that it is better to 

tif too visionary than to be without 

iileals. Senator Piatt was a practical 
|i<i|itician without ideals, while Carl 
Nchurz was a visionary statesnuin. 
Itotli men are now dead, but .Shur/ is 
tli<- man whose memory will last 
tlu- longer. It is better to fail to 
uttnin the highest ideal than to give 
up the highest for something less. 
To Kib one of his i«leals is one of the 
gr< atest of crimes, for an ideal is a 
mail's most valuable |K>8sesNion. 
A man is only what his i.leals are, 
' - the fear of being little that 
ki'cps him from being great. 

-\merica is itself an ideal of de- 
iiMM-racy and when that ideal g<K'8, 
we go. The country may not fall 
entirely, but as a democracy it will be 
' Inclosing, Mr. Wise i|uoted 
n.iu Dante, "II thoii follow but thy 
>tar thou canst not miss thy heaven. 
It is yours and mine to have the ideal 
make ub strong." 



and also to be there with contribu- ' i„ the eves of the public. 

t.ons when help is asked from the Never to my knowledge has 

student body for the new athletic M. A. C. supported such a club and 



it seems to me that if many of the 
men who ordinarily work on the 
farm afternoons and Satunlavs for 



CROSS COUNTRY ROH 

[t'oiitinufil from page 3, 

are as foHows : Maine 10. Dartmouth 
44, Colby 6U, M. I. T. 7:>, Hrown 
124, M. A. C. 1«3, Amherst 178, 
Williams 208. 

As this was the first appearance of 
M. A. C. in the .New KnglamI Inter- 
collegiates, the showing made there is 
considered by Manager K<lwards and 
Coach Whittier a creditable finish of 
a suci'cssful season. A great deal of 
credit Ik due Coach Whittier, who has 
so willingly given his time and ellort 
in the development of this team. 



SOPHOMORE SUPPER 

ICnntinued from page ij 



Call or TKLiiriioNE 131 



I'rofessors Philip M. Hasbroiick and 
A Anderson Mackiinmie,and Charle.^ 
II. Gould. Impromptus were given 
hy " Cotton " (i raves, " Itob " 
Wlicoler and Stanley W. Hall. The 
"I'tt.., •• iJt; There," was tlu' 
- I" t of most of the talks. Pro- 
'-aor Ha.sbroiick brought out the 
f!«'» that it is well to be there, but t4> 

li' '• in the right way. Professor 
M . kjininie showed that " be there" 
' griifietl to be there on time, or to be 
-''»v lys ready. He also relate.l the 

I' ideiit that the motto of his clan, 

li has been handed down from 

to s<jii since his ancestors were 

.'crds in the highlands of Scotland, 
'- toujour prct"; this translated 

i'lly into Knglish is " I.e there." 

' "lie "Gould, the third speaker 

^•'•iiig, [lointed out several 

i ■ (^.1 where " be there " could be 

"i'lwl. The two principle places 

'in not letting the "triuuivirate" 
^ "- .oil. but be there in February ; 



COMMUNICATION 

(Coinmi)ni>.;>lion» lo Xhr .""ii.MAi coiKriiiing 
ntattrr!> o( x^neral iiit«rr»l are »rloin»-cl 1 he 
.Sm.mai is not to bt held responMble for the 
opinion* thill psptet^ed.) 

To TlIK KiMToU OK THE SlONAf., 

l)«'iir Sir : 

Considerabh' dissatisfaction seems 
to be felt among Aggie circles over 
the fact that the college is given s<i 
little notice in the Hoston and .New 
York papers. It is indee<i true that 
one can hardly ever run across news 
relative to the college in any line, 
athletic or otherwise. Practically all 
the eastern colleges figure to a more 
or leas extent in tli,> *'8|Mirting" see* 
tions of these papers and many of 
the papers devote certain porti«ms to 
college activities other than athletic. 
If it be possible for institutions 
smaller than M. A.C. t<» convince 
the big newspapers that they are of 
Biillicient importance to occupy space 
in those publications there is abso- 
lutely no re.H8on why Massachusetts 
should be left out. 

If one should undertake to analyze KnglamI Fruit Show last week. The 
the situation I think he would find |>»*l<int? team, consisting of |{ay- 
that the great majority of the colleges nioiid K. Nute. Arthur K. Stevens 



thus atforded, 
the big news- 
papers for the posititin of re- 
porter of Aggie news they wouhl 
realize considerably more than from 
manual labor and at the same time 
they would be iloing the college a 
vastly greater amount of giKnl. It 
galls a true Aggie man to pick up a 
paper ami see extended articles <leal- 
with the merits «)f other institutions 
and sec nothing at all lonceriiing 
.M. A. C. When it <Mcasionally 
happens that a Itoston paper deems 
it worth while to rejiort an athletic 
contcHt between .M. A. C. and some 
other institution the arti<le is usually 
a one-sided atTaii in fa\or of the 
opponent and Aggie is generally 
referred to as ".Vmherst." 

It is a simple matter to establish a 
press club and a very small amount 
of initiative on the part of the under- 
graduates will make |>ossible such an 
organization. It will only require a 
limited amount of time each day to 
report on the various items of inter- 
est at the college and the results will 
lie well worth the tiin • expended. 
What is more the pa|>eis pay well 
in the cane of an im|N>rtant game and 
will pay the traveling ex|K'tis4s of a 
re|M*rter to and from the s<ene of 
o|H>rationH. 

Aggie is just as ini)K>rtant and 
just as worthy t«» appear in the i«oI- 
unins of the New York and Itoston 
papers as is any other institution and 
it is the duty of the student Uxly lo 
facilitate all the publicity |H>8Kible. 
Advertising pays, it will help to 
'*M*Kw<l Old Aggie." s<i get in and 
IkMist. .Make it so that ."^I. A. C. 
will figure in the New York pjq>erB U> 
(be same extent aa diH's Dartmouth 
or even Yale and Harvard. 
Think it over. 

Yours very truly, 

A Mf.miok oi- Kakatio. 



HOCKEY CALL 

The first call for hockey candidates 
was responded Uj in very good shape. 
Not enough men reported, however. 

This winter two rinks will be 
available. That means that three or 
four teams can be working out at the 
same time. It means that every man 
who comes out will get his chance 
to learn the game, and his show for 
the varsity team. 

Kvery man who owns a pair of 
skates should come out for prelimin- 
ary practice. Before the big cuts are 
made in the varsity Mpiad, class 
teanm will be started. It is an easy 
jump from a g.Kxl class team to the 
varsity. If you can't play on the 
team that plays Yale. Harvard. 
Cornell and Dartmouth, let the 
• aptain tell you »o, later. Then 
show him up by playing on a winning 
class team. 

lliMkey furnishes the best form of 
winter exercise; so get your gym 
credits and help yourself at the same 
time. 

(Signed), I)KTr. Jonks. 



APPLE PACKING AND JUDGING 
TEAM. 

The college apple packing and 
judging team secured third place In 
the intercollegiate contest at the New 



INDEX ENTHUSIASM 

The footb.ill season ir> over. What 
<»f It .' just this : The /nJt'.x season 
IS o|x-n ! Forgotten that hadn't you ? 
Well, there's one mighty fine /pi,/fx 
coming. We've been keeping <|uiet 
.iliout it so far. but from now on you 
are going to hear from us .ill the 
time. There isn't time now before it 
comes out for us lo lell all the good 
things we know about it. V\c are 
willing to admit this, however: you 
will gel more value for two dollars 
spent for that if^i5 /n,fe.\ than for 
any book ever publisherl. Then that 
de luxe edition I Ooze leather cover 
with your name on it In gold letters, 
all for three dollars and a half! Can 
you l>eat that, either for a Xma» 
present, or for a keepsake .' Fresh- 
men don'i miss the op|M)itunity to 
start your series of Indfxfs with ihe 
best one ever put out. Take it from 
us you'll be glad some day that you 
saved a few cents a week from your 
s|)ending mrmey to invest in the 1915 
Indrx. Indkx Hoakm. 



in this secti<m of the country foster 
organizations known as press clubs. 
These clultHare composed of students 



At the banquet <if the fiMjtball 
team held in the (.'<M>ley house after 
the game Saturday, George Deady 
Melicati '!.'» of Worcester, was elected 
captain of the football team for next 
season. Melican prepare<l for col- 
lege at Worcester academv and was 



and Alfred L Tower 'II, were es- 
pecially handicapped by the equip- 
ment furni.she<l them. In former i a substitute throughout his freshman 
who are commissioned Ity the big years it has been the custom foi each ' year. Last year he played end but 
newspa|ier< to lepfirt all the iiiiportMiit *<'»'" to bring its own packing table this year was shifted to qiiarteiback 
occuneiKo :i I the (ollege which they and wrajipers ; this year, due to a J where he has played a star game all 
represent. The student (e|Kjrters "ew ruling, the association furnished j the year, 
are paid so much a line and as a j them. The large, heavy paper and — — ^— <l 

result of thi.s. the pafiers are con- '"akeshift tables and box rests pro- "Coddy" Aliearn 'O.'i, "Jock" 
stantly supplied with news from all viiled were alike unexpected and un- Noyes '0:«, and F>ldie Hiirke '10, 
the important institutions in the f»"''har. Stearns, Nute and Karl M. have visited the college the past 
c<»untry, the publi.nhing of which lnghram,compri8ing the judging team week. Ahearn, who was captian of 
scxjn creates a demand for that sort »'^' '» Washington, D. C. where <.f baseball and football in bis day 
of news and thus tends to inicase ^•'*^'y '"■•' t«»mpeting in the national lanie expressly for the Springfield 
the standing of the various colleges i inte^collegate apple-judging contest. ' game. 



( 



The Collece Signal. Tuesday, November i8, 1913. 



1^ 



H 



.} 



^1 



MUSICAL CLUBS. 

The MHiulolin and (ilee clubs have 
started out in good earnest to make 
for thenjselves a bigger reputation 
even than was earned during last 
vear's very successful season. IJoth 
clubs lost good men by graduation 
hist year, but there is plenty of ma- 
terial on hand with which to till the 
vacancies. The frehhrnan class of- 
fers some good nien for future places 
in the clubs. 

Tentative plans are under consid- 
eration for several new features in 
this year's season. A trip to eastern 
Massachusetts will probably be made 
during the Christmas vacation, last- 
ing six days i>eginning Dec. 2!K Six 
stops an; planned, and negotiations 
are under way for concerts in Kram- 
inghani, Ix>well, Arlington. Wal- 
tham, lk>stou and Fall River. 

The usual Kaster vacation trip will 
probably be repeated, taking in con- 
certs at Chicopee, Rutherford, N. .1., 
llaHbrouck Heights, .SuiTern, N. Y., 
Monroe, N. V., and Middletown, N. 
Y. Last year's trip brought out 
much favorable comment at every 
slop and so every place is expected 
to l>e l>ooked again. 

During the winter, short trips will 
be made to Turners Falls. .South 
Deertield and Templeton. Manager 
lirowu, through the assistance of 
(teorge Zabriskie '\'^, has in view a 
pOHsible surprise in the form of a 
joint concert with Dartmouth at 
Northamptou during February. 8uch 
an attempt has never before been 
made, and if negotiations now under 
way are successful, a very fine con- 
cert may be expectc<l. 

The Mandolin club has prospects 
of adding Ut their number three 
'cellos ami |>ossibly a guitar. There 
will also be a special string quartet 
consisting of a 'cello, two mandolins, 
and a violin. Music for this gioup 
has i)een chosen and is being worked 
up. 

Thefllee club has Mr. RIand again. 
He showed his wonderful ability last 
year and the club is very fortunate 
in securing his services. He has 
made five trips here this season and 
has improved the work of the club 
wonderfully. A quartet to take the 



FACULTY SUB-COMMITTEES ON 
STUDENT LIFE 

The following faculty sub-commit- 
tees on student life which have been 
announced for the current year, are 
printed so that men who wish to take 
up matters under these heads can 
consult the proper authoiities: 

Cleneral Student Organization — 
Hicks, Hurd, Sprague. 

Social Union — Lewis, Kenney, 
Quaife, Watts. 

Fraternities — Mackimmie, Cham- 
berlain, Osmun. 

Religious Work and Social Service 
— Chamberlain, Hart, Eyerly. Waid, 
Crane. 

Music and Musical Organizations 
McLean, Crampton, Ashley, Duncan. 

Student Clubs and Societies — Has- 
kell, Kyerly, McLean, Crampton, 
Clark, Prince. 

.Student Living (boarding. rooming, 
e.\penscs) — ^Hiird. Sprague, Ki-niiey. 
Watts. 

Student Publications — Lewis, Neal, 
H. I'.. Smilh. 



NINETEEN.THIRTEEN NOTES 

KIUTKI* IIV TIIK NINKTKKN-TIIIUTKKN 

M. A. C. I'LL'B OK A.miEB.sT. 

NKW-* ITKM.H. 

Herbert W. Headle, with deiiart- 
ment of public parks, Hartford. 
Conn. 

W. ('. Forbush saw the team trim 
New Hampshire at Manchester 
recently. 

"Ileinie" (ioo^lnongh. ex-'l.H, with 
Fiske Rubber Co., .Springfield. a<l- 
dress Y. M. C. A. 

Reyer H. Van Zwalewenburg,ento- 
mologist, federal experitiicnt station, 
Magaguez, I'orto Rico. 

Ralph T. Neal. agricultural in- 
structor, the Hampton Normal an<l 
Agricultural Institute, Hampton, Va. 

Norman J. Nichols, Yale Forestry 
ScIkk>I, Lake Place, New Haven. 
Coini. 

There were 14 "IJH;!" men at the 
"fiet-together" hehl at the "High- 
land" Saturday night after the gam«'. 
Following the banquet a lively dis- 
cussion was led by "Doc" Fay rela- 
tive to the different ways in which the 



towards "IDl.'Vs" i^lOOO for that 
Alumni Fiel<l and the campaign 
hasn't been opened yet. One thous- 
and dollars by the first of the year. 
Thirteen. Let'shear fioui you, boys. 
December 2C, is "1913 Night"— 
the "feeds" that are now planned are 
Roston, Springlitld. New York, 
Chicago, .Mayaguc/, Honolulu and 
Las Machis. if it is going to be 
impossible for you to attend any one 
of these start one where you are 
going to be about ( hristmas time and 
notify headcpmrters at once. "1:M;{ 
Night" Dec. >(]. 

Dean F. Baker— with Charles \V. 
Leavitt, ( ivil and Landscu|)e Kngi- 
neer. .'Jit Broadway, New Yoik, 
writfs that In- sinrly will be in e\ i- 
dence at Cliristnias either at Boston 
or .Springtiehl and that he would like 
to hear from home of the bovs, 
eH|»e(ially any around New York. 

"Kid" Bursely will take charge of 
the "i;»i:J Banquet" in Chicago, Dec. 
•ill. He has orgaiiizcnl a Chicago 
I'.M.l club of one with "full member- 
ship and all privileges attached." 
Ad.lre.sM. R 121-17.'.') Wilson Ave., 
Chicago, with O. C Simons & Co., 
Landscape (iardeners. 

George A. Mallett & Co.. Land- 
scape Architects. Tree Surgeons, I!<2 
Bunnell .St.. Bridgeport, Conn. 

.Sauniel Percy Huntington, tirand 
Isle, Vt. "The lo»t is fouml." 

.loliri s. Carver, Poiiltryman, 
Mall wall, N. .1. 

.los«'pli A. .Macone, Market Gar- 
dener, CVmcord. 



Tne Collefe Signal. Tuesday, November 18, 1913. 



Thomas Francis Hunt, 24-i'J CI m. 
ning Way, Berkeley, Cal., :is>i ^ 
superintendent agricultural ex teuMuii, 

N. I). Ingham, Templeton, ( 1 . 
horticultiuist jiikI agiieultiuist, di- 
rectly in charge of the plantini.' <,f 
fruits on the Colony Holding mm,,. 
pany's lands, conq)rising 2;i,(Mio 
acres. 

K. r. La(l<i, Baiigh A: Sons 1 ,, 
chemists. Philadelphia, I'a., i,.,i,n, 
address, 207 Cornell Ave., Sw utli. 
n)ore, Pa. 

C. W. Lewis, 4;i Lynde 8t.. 
rose, farm superintendent. 
Island hospital, Boston. 

.lohn F. Lyman. l.'Hi'* Hi*; 
St., Columbus, O.. aHS<K'iatf 

cheiiiisirv. 



Mil. 



.aii.l 
1.1... 



Iruit 



place of one broken up by the grad- ^lass could "B<K>stOld Aggie." The 
nation of three of the men is l>eing 
worke<l up, l»ut no selections have 
yet been made. Cobb, Griggs, 



French an<l Clegg formed last sea- 
son's group, the first three of whom 
have graduated. 

The oflicers of the clubs this year 
are as follows : Hutchinson, presi- 
<lent ; Brown, manager; (Jriggs, lib- 
rarian. The leaders are Clegg of 
the Glee club, Hutchinson of the 
orchestra and Brown of the Mando- 
lin club. Mr. Bland of ( alv.iry 
church of New York city, is the di 
rector. 



athletic field came in for a goo<l share 
of the discussion and eight tnore men 
pledged their ten*s|K>tH towards 
"1913's" contribution. After the 
"bull-fest" the boys attended one of 
.Springfield's largest theatres "on 
masse." 

The following thirteenites were at 
the game and later at the "Get- 
together." — Thayer, Strcetor. Ma- 
cone. IVIallett. Murray. Fay. Headle 
.M, Headle 11. Roehrs, Clark, Adams. 
Burbey. Gore and CobI). Mr, K. T 
, Coughlin, I'niversity of Maine, I'JLl. 
was the guest of honor at the ban- 



CLASS LETItH OF NINETEEN. 
FIVE 

R. L. Adams. 7.Jn O'Farrell St., 
.San Francis* o. ( .il.. attsistant gen- 
eral managei .MilUr A Lux, Inc 
Published "Field .Manual for .Sugar 
Beet Growers." 

<;. H. Allen. II. M. Newhall & 
Co., Newh.all BIdg.. San Fiau< isco. 
Cnl., ex|HM'ting and im|)orting. 

IL L Barnes. Interlakeu, St<Hk- 
bridge, farmer. 

F. A Bartlett. Stamf<ml, Conn , 
president and treasiuer Frost 1^ Bart- 
lett Co.. tree specialist, editor and 
publisher <»f "Tree Talk," vice-pres- 
ident and director Oasis Farm & 
Orchard Co.. Roswell, N. .M. 

H. D. Cosby, Rutlaml, farmer. 

Kstlicr C. Cushinan, 21 Brown St., 
Providence, R. L. assistant, Ann- 
mary Br«>wn Memorial. 

,1. .1. Gardner, Cniversity <»f Illi- 
nois, Irbaiia, 111., graduate student 
and instiuctor in |K>mology, 

Ralph P. (Jay. ^IC. Last Front St., 
Plainlield, N. .1., forester. 

W. B. Hatch. Nayalt, IM., siq)er- 
intendent, .secretary and treasurer 
l{. 1. Country club. 

C. S. Holcomb, 301 Pierce BIdg.. 



Kx-';)7.—E. D. Palmer of I'pland, '1"^'*- Anderscm, Zabriskie, Carver ; Copley .Square, Boston, teacher of 
Cal., has recently been appointed "'"' ^'""'7 were present at the game | voice. 

fruit inspector for the Mutual Orange I'tit were unable to be at the "feed. " j. ij. Kelton, .'5."» Pearl St.. Atii- 
Dtstributor Co. j The sum of 8380 is pledged already Isterdam, N. Y., teacher. 



fessor of .agrictdtura 
Ohio State iiniverstv. 

W. A. .Miinson. Littleton 
grower. 

K. W. Nfcwhall, .Ir,, 2t;o ( -di!., 
ilia St., San Francisco, C:il., farmt 

G. W. Patch, 104 Kingston St . 
B<istoii. purchasing agent. I'.i.m 
Diirrell Co, 

W. .M. .Sears. Stamford. (.,1,1,. 
sales manager, F|•o^,t A: Bartlett ( n 

A. N.Swain, 64 4 Tremont IU<lg 
li<j8ton, ilivision manager, Mun»i 
Whitaker Co. 

Monica Sanl>orn Taft, B..s L<i 
Sterling, general farming aril '- 
growing on I 7."i acre farm. 

A. I». Taylor, Ijui-Hoi TrenM.tr 
Bltlg . Boston, with Warren 11 M,: 
ning, l!ind.scape <lesigner. A, !• i 
lor. as.stH-iate. 

H. F. Tompsoii, R. F. D I \^- 
tlelioro, market gardener. 

B. Tupper, Venice, Cal., n.rttm 
L. S. Walker, 19 Pbilli|m St.. 

Amherst, chemist. Mass. Agriiiiltiirel 
Kxperiiucnt station. 

C. L. Whitaker, 17<» I:. 
New York. N. Y., Munson-Whitakw 
Co., (home address, 34 Soiitli lOti 
Ave., '^D. Vernon, N. Y. 1 

G. N. Willis. H2 Broomliiii K 
West Somerville, civil engih< < 1 »'.:;. 
the .Mass. Highway CoiKiMiMion. 
Address fiom .Msiy I to Doc. lis 
10«; Agricultural Bank Anin I' '• 
field and from Dec. 1 to .May 1. ''• 
Broomfield Roa<l, West Sorm rvillc 

F L. Yeaw, Roswell, Nt .* .Mexi- 
co, Oasis Rancn, general Mia(iagef(rf 
the Oasis Farm and Orchard 0<. 

KX-MK.MItKI<S. 

C. K. Brett, Thompson, ( onii. 

K. C. Bruce. !('. Avon St ( liftuii- 
dale, plumber. 

C. M. ( arter, Barre, floii-!. 

Rjiymond K. Huntington. IW 
Sixth St.. Cambritlgi . 
nian.ager, f<»reign a(K<Mi 
ger, I'iliiriiii l'ii},U,ii>i. 

Frank V. Iliit<hing.s, ^ 
Conn., teacher. 

William .J. ONeil, 1! ' 
Beverly, pattern maker ariii ii'lr"*'^'| 
of Manual Training at Nt" 
Industrial school for Deaf 

A. Russell Paul, Belvi 
commercial fruit growing. 

.1. C. Uicliardsoii. Ix)vv 
gardner. 



lirvfrij. 
N. .1.. 



ItNNIS TOURNAMENT 

In r«o close and well played sets, 

|(;rij;;,'s anti Archibald of the junior 

Iclass won the college tennis cham- 

J|)ion>hip in doubles on Tuesday by 

' rfe.tung Draper '15 and Farwell '17. 

I hf More was 6-4, S-6, 

riii> match marked the ending of 
u- first doubles tournament played 

\| \. C. for several years. This 
toriD- in excellent method of obtain- 
in;; tiain pr.ictice, and is considered 
h\ rn.iny to be a better means of 
dt-vi'oping material than individual 
playuig would be Forty men started 
1)1 ' first round and several good 
pbvcii were brought out. 

Ill (onnection with the tourna 
riK..;, Captain .\rchibald gave a 
>ti lis of three talks on the doubles 
^\\\w. and all those who attei ded 
le.itried the theory of this important 
side of tennis. The woik on the 
courts, which has l>een interrupted 
by tlie cold weather, will I e resumed 
in the spring. With good courts and 
the experience gained by the men 
thi« fall, (!apiaiit .\rchib.ild should 
be able to develop a credit.ible team. 



M. A. C. REUNION, WASHING- 
TON, D, C. 
Wednesday night, Nov. la, twenty- 
eight M. .A C. men — alumni and 
fatuity met for an informal dinner in 
W.ishington, D. C. This is the larg- 
est M. .A. C. gathering ever held in 
the capital city and the 'Old Aggie" 



spirit pervaded the atmosphere. 
Every section of the country from the 
Atlantic to the P.-»cific was repre- 
sented, and a number of our most 
prominent alumni were present, many 
of whom had not been together for a 
great many years, hour other alum 
ni were in the cit\ but notice of the 
dinner failed to reach them. They 
were F. S. Cooley 88, Gillnfrt '04, 
Griffin '02, and .Neal '12. 
! Following is a list <if those piesent: 
President Buiteitield ; Acting Presi- 
dent Lewis; \\. \\. Howker '71. 
Bowker Fertilizer to, Boston; Pres- 
ident Stone "75, Purdue; Director 
Win. P, Brooks '75, M. A < | xp 
Sta.; Prof. L. F. Taft '82. .Michigan 
A. ( .; Director B. L. Hartwell '89, 
K. I. Kxp. Sta.: Dr. K W. Allen ".Ss, 
and Dr. lieal '88, office Exp. .Sta., 
Washington ; Director |, L. Hill* 
•81, Vt. Kxp. Sta ; Dr. 11. J Wheeler 
'83. -^g''- Chem ( o., Boston; Pro- 
fessors Sprague. Fcx)rd, lluid and 
Waid, M. A C: Professor Jenks, 
Vt. .\. ( .; F. H. Kane. Ma.ss. State 
Forestry; Geo. A. Hillings 95, U. S. 
DA; Director S. F. Fletcher "96. 
Va. Kxp. Sta.; W. H. Hocjker 99, A. 
C. Monahan '00. H. L. Knight '02, 
Carlton Bates '08, and W. F. Turner 
'08, U. S. D. A.; ( I. 1. «es ... 
Oregon Agric. College H. J. Itaker 
'1 I, M. A. ( .; A J. Morse ex-'94. 

These men were attending the 
meeting of the .Association of ihe 
Agricultural Colleges and Kx[)cri- 
ment stations. 



Wanted— A Man ! 

\Vc dcai with nuTchant.s aiul 
farmers. WC want an olfice man 
to sell, to help advertise, to help 
in corresponilencc and to grow 
up to a responsible positicui. If 
he was brought up <»n a lam.. 
with some scientific' and news- 
paper training, so miuli the bet- 
ter. No bonanza in salary to 
begin with, but an active, inter- 
esting and basic occupation with 
good people .iiid a great future, 
depending on the man. Address 
with the fullest of particulars, 
staling age and relerence.s, w hich 
will be regarded a.s conlidcittial, 
'•President," Hox J2c), nosion. 
Mass. 



I 
I 




A. SHERARD 

MEN'S STORE 



in: 



ii'ii<f 



" Keeping in Front ** 

You fellows know what that nieansf 
We've been very successful in this 
regard with Fadma Cigarettes. By 
the way, these cigarettes were first 
sold in the college to%vns — and you 
agreed with us that they were good. 

Then we put out for the big race, 
to make Fatimas of nation-wide rep- 
utation, and today more are sold than 
any other cigarette in this country. 

No purer, or more carefully chosen 
tobacco grows than that in Fahmas. 
We purposely put them in a plain 
inexpensive wrapper — in this way 
we can afford quality tobacco, and 
twenty of the smokes for i 3 cents. 

Now your college crew is of utmost 
importance to you — so is a good 
igarette, and it's your aim in life 
to keep Fatimas m the lead — right 
up to their good quality — right up 
to where you first found them, and 
will always find them. 

•Success fellows ! You started this 
"igarette on 'ts successful career — 
nd you pull a strong oar all over 
^his country. 




Use our new cash discount card 
and save five per cent on 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Purnishing's and Custom Tailoring 



FATING 

CIGARETTES 




SOLE AGENT FOR 



THE GENUINK AND ORIGINAL 



PATRICK MACKINAW 



t^nn wi.viiow i>i**i»i.>w 



■A I 



TUtHncitn/lr htbrMhtJ' 




Agent, K. S. Brack;, Rappa Sigma House. 




The Collcfe Signal. Tueaday, November 18, 1913 




The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

jobliers of Wrom-lil Iron ;in<l Htass I'ipe, \alves 
in(l KitlitiKs for Steam. Water aiiil Ciat, Asbfstos 
and MaKnesia Boiler ami J'ipe LOverinRS. J'ipe 
tut to Sketch. Mill Supplies Kni-ii eers and 
Contractors fur Steam and Hot Water lleatiiiK 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Hoil.i and Fnuite 
Connections. . Holyoke, Mas*. 



The College Signal. Tuesday, November i5, 1913 



theTmers Exchange 



AGGIE LOSES 

rContinued from pa^e 3] 



O/ /)',///,)»/ 



Carp^n-ter & AAorehous^, 



PRI^TET^S, 



No I, Cook riace, 



Amherst, Mask. 



Students Attention ! ! ! 

We are ready at the start to furnish you with a rine 
line of Caininis and Fraternity House Views, also Post 
Cards. Kodak work jjiven prompt and lareful attention. 
Knlarging and picture framing given our |»ersonal at- 
tention. See us about (Groups and I'urtrait^ for the very 
best work. 



Satisfaction Guaranteed, 
the Square Deal Studio 



KINSMAN'S COLLEGE STUDIO 



Nash BlocK. Amherst 



U. M. RttcERS, '15, Agent. 
87 Pleasant St.. 



GRAND SWEEPSTAKES TROPHY 



end netting 1 yard, 27 yards and 

..0 a.m/j^.,, s . then ."» yanln. NiHsen plunged 

Recommenils Teachers, Tutors and Schools through tenter for .3 yards and 

lepeated for .'• yards. Aggie was 

penalized l'> vardH for holding, and 
Meliian punted to Fountain . who 
returned the hall 10 yards to his 10 
yard line. I.oren/. made .") yards, 
l)ut the ball was brought back and 
Sprin<;field penalized half the dis- 
tance to their goal line. Meyers 
punted to Melican on Springfield's 
4'.' yard line. Darling failed to gain. 
.John.Hon slippetl through right tackle 
for 3 yards. A forward pass was 
incomplete. An exehange «»f punts 
gave the ball to Aggie on Sjiring- 
field's i;» yard line. Darling made .1 
yards at center, .lohnson found riaht 
tackle for ."i more. Imt .Nissen failed 
to gain and Melican punte«l to Foun- 
tain who finnble<i biit recoveretl. 
**c!ialiinger received a |MK>r pass 
fr<»m center but managed to make I.^ 
yanls. I.«»ren/, found left tackle for 
*» yarils S<-iuibinger ma<le a yaitl 
an»l Meyers punted to .Melican on 
the latter'n i\& vard line In two 
rushes Johnson ma<lc *.• y »'<•«.•*»••- i 
ling made first ilown. and the pericnl 
was over with the ball on Aggie's 
•!« yard line. 

riHKTH VIAHTKK. 

NissiMi made 2 yards at center. 
Darling was nmible to gain Imt Joiin- 
son made fiist down. .b>hnsfm tried 



Patronixe 



Studio Phone 303-2. 



(f750.00 Sterling Silver Cup) 



roR 



BEST STATE EXHIBIT OF POTATOES 





AT THE 



New York Land Show 



1912 
WON av 



again and produced 3 yards at ijght 
end. Nissen got a yard at center. 
Springfield got the ball on a fumM,., 
Fountain failed to gain at left en,] 
On the next play, he received .1 p;,,, 
on his Hi yard line anti adviuueo 
\.'t yards. A forward pass iiicoiij. 
plete. Fountain tried a field goal 
which was unsuccessful again. M.;. 
ican punted to Schaliinger on tin- 4:, 
yard line, he returned the bull t., 
Aggie's 20 yard line. Foiuiiaii, 
failed to gain. Meyers lost 'A yard*. 
F'<uintaiu received a pass and naclie.l 
Aggie's 4 yard line. Loreuz cairid 
the ball over for the second -.,,„, 
Schabinger kicked the goal. 

Springfiehl kicked off to Niswt, 
who ran the ball back to the In vanl 
line. Crayson made ."» yards at 
right eiui. Schabinger int» icejiftMl 
a pass. Fountain made 10 yani*. 
but a pass failed. Meyers finHl.|,<i 
after a 10 yartl gain and Aggie 
recovered. A pas- «aN incomplet. 
Darling got 1 yards at right tackl. 
A pa.ss was incomplete; :iii..t|i.i 
was blocked and the ball weut 1 
Springfiehl on downs. A pnHH »,< 
incomplete, but on a ^'cond :ittetn|.t 
Schabinger hurle<l u beauty from tl 
l."» yard line to Fountain on A::. 

I'» yard mark. Aggie sto«Ml lim 

three rushes failed ti» gain. Kuim- 
tain received a pass «)n the )•' . 
line and crosseil the goal line. Tk 
touch<lown was not allowed, awl 
Springlicld was penalizetl b'l y»r<l. 
placing the ball on Aggie's .'.n y.ini 



The L L. Cleveland Company 

HOULTON. M«. 

^^NE of the largest and most 
. reliable seed potato houses 
in the United States. Competi- 
tion open to the entire United 
States and Canada. Messrs. E. L. 
Cleveland Coinpany also won the 
First Prize for Best Coaaty Exhibit 
of Potatoes. (Silver Cup valued 
at $200.00. • 
The E. L. Cleveland Company use 

E. FRANK COE 
FERTILIZERS 



£. Frank Coe Fertilizers have 
been the business farmer's favorite 
for over tifty-five years. Why not 
follow the example of these lead- 
ing commercial potato growers. 

Tan onclii i<, i-nit "The Sttity „f A Prnfiinhle Pntato 
Crxp" "rlllrnhy an trmi.lsok t«ilRt}. Main* farMrr 
A r»py U .fnl rrra an rrtin^.t. 



The Coe-Morlimer Company, " 



CHAMBERS STREET. 
NEW YORK. N. Y. 



Heart -to -Heart Talks 

With Aggie Men 

Py the Largest Rttailers of 
Apparel in j\e&? England 

With .some |)er)|)le .sports .st.irt with sprin- 
atid stop with .lutumii. You red-bloodt-d A^ui-^ 
nicii. however. n-Jize th.it outdoor sport is ino>t 
exhilarating during autumn and early winter. 

You j)lay footl)all and tennis till the snow 
Hies, You golf, blowing on your fingrrs and 
clapping your palms to your ears. You w.ai 
abbreviated undersuits from January to januarv 
and sleep with the windows flung wide open. 

We want you to know tha* we are 
COMPLETE OUTFITTERS FOR MEN 

with wonderful collections of every apparel need- 
apparel voicing loudly at this time the wint. r 
styles as brought out by the best designers of tu - 
continents— apparel that will keep you warm < n 
the bleaktst of blustery days. 

When in Boston let us outfit you complefiJs' 

JORDAN MARSH COMPANY 

Boston 



"■■ ' s 



Eldridge '14 

All Student Supplies 



M. A. C. STORE 



BANNERS AND POSTERS 



CANOV TONIC 



Montague '1 z, 



Hager ' 1 6 



Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

|-%(-KKICH. IMMI.TICV IIKI'^SKItS 
\SU HITTKK .lf.%KKUN. 

Rni Mullon. I.«mb, Vral. Mork. Lard. Ham*. 

Haion. Sausatcr*. foullrv, Oamv, Hullcr 

ChcffM. bgn*. bcana. 

tfffiij-.V stores n.55,57.5v. ' i ^ '<} HIackstonr St. 

Ii4>%tun t'ackiiit; Hous*-. Unchtori. Mass 

Salire I'.Miltty DresMnu HUnt, Moston 

• leameries in S'trritiuiit. 



WAFFLES 

Wednesdays and Thursdays 



< >atmeal Every .Morning 

DOG CART 



'line. Fountain made a fourth unsuc- 

I cessful try for a field goal. Melican 

I punted to Schabinger who fundded but 

recovered. Dickens nuidw .'• yards. 

Meyers could not gain but Sehabin- 

ger reeled off 10 yards. Aggie was 

penalized half the distan«e to the 

goal line. Aggie again braced and 

got the ball on ilowns. Captain 

lirewer, though unable to use his 

right arm went on for the last few 

minutes. Melican punted to Meyers 

on the 4(> yard line. ( bie rush and 

the whistle blew. 

The lineup : 

S|-HI.\(;HKI,I>. A<,(.1K,S. 



bell. Detiroji. le re, Jordan, I'laisted 
Hohiies, It rl, SchloUcrOcck 

Cooper, Koih.tckt r, |^ rg, |{.iker 

I'ennock. t t, Uole 

Mel. can, Ci>t>jK I, ij{ 

In. Strong, l-.av%.«fd», Verijeck, \Vuo<t 
Frit-dland, ri It. I'err) 

DickrUii, re lc, Kdgtiluii, Day 

Sihaljinger.qlt qt), .Mehtan 

Kountait), tbrkuner, Ihb riiii, l).4rling 
Meyers, ihb 

Ihh, <fr.»y»on, joltii.suii, liirwer 
I.oren/, fb |h, .Si.^sen 

Score— .Sptirighrltl i4,Agg!c»o roiicli- 
downs— Loreii/ 1. (.oaK Irtiin tuuih 
downK—SchuliiiiKer a. Kefrree An 
drewsof \ ale LJinpire -Cutts of Harv 
ard. HeadiincMnan — l>urmanof Colum- 
bia. Time— 15 minute period*. 



SEE AND 

TRY A 

DE LAVAL 



Those who know 
buy the De Laval 

• r. «Mi..r>nirii- (WauM- thry 4re ex 
III the hindlingof cream and kiio» 
'IK cx(»'ienfe that fhi- He l.a»*l 

' 'I'-'t an i w.-Hfv liingcNt. that 

• (^5 ot lh.> \\..rid% ct^^iii.-ries ij^e 

• Oe I .i»al«x( iu.,iveh 

f tiierlrnrvH l>»lr) men- I )m- l>e I.aTal 

' favorite aiiKingliiK daily- 

w that no nther separator 

.» •• .,,►,, ,uch satisfactory service 

oi.l l»e Lasai |i,,.r« -Whenever a man 

',4« M.-l in old model I »e I aval de 

\"' »-f a later style machine he 

• — another l)e I. aval. 

M... Who |iive»tl»M«.-ttecau«e thcv 

^ ";;•• m«)orltyof I)e I.ava I machines 

' they are used by the best in 

rseverjrwhere; thatthe> stand 

*; '•' ''*«;. and that their uMTsare bet 

■ satuhed than users of other separators. 

THE DE LAVAl SEPARATOR CO. 



Many of our student.n listeneil to a 
speech given by \h . <;. W Tiipper. 
Immigrant Kdu<ation Secretary of 
MasHaehiiwtts and Uhtxie Island, in 
Williston Hall. Amherst lollcge. 
His Udk was on the work tloiie by 
students auHing the iminigranlH in 
this state. Following this. .Mr. .shirk 
social service secietary of .M. A. ( . 
spoke on work alieady «h»nc in this 
line. 



The GonneGtlGut Valley 
Street Railway 



. Urn idway. 



J9 E. Madison St. 



Ihere are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 



From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the frrot 
of .Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous bloody Mrrjok battle grrjund 
to f)Id Deerfield, thence to Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
" Plains " to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 



50 Miie« of Trackajce .'Modern 
Rquipment Train l)i.<tpatch- 
InK System -FreiKht and Rx- 
presA Service over entire line. 



OF 



C. R. ELDER 



Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



WEDNESDAY'S ASSEMBLY 

President L. h. Doggett of the 
Y. M. ('. A. college, Springlicld was 
the 8|)eaker :it the assembly on 
Wcdnesdiiy. Ili.s sidijcct was "The 
.Mmlcni .Man's Ueligion." Ili.s pres- 
ence at the assembly wa.s ipiitc timely, 
foming just before the annual gri.l- 
iron struggle between his college and 
ours. lie wa.s it)kiiigly called a 
"spy" by Professor Hicks in his 
introduction, but President Doggett 
"got back" with a reference to a cer- 
tain newspaper story recently printed 
about Dr. Iiridc> "scout" work 
tlown at Worcester. President Dog- 
gett said in his ad<liess : 

".My subject may Ik* treated in 
three aspects. In the first place, we 
have the contrast of old views with 
the new in religion. The old were 
authoritative an*l dogmatic. Thcv 
viewcil the church in a narrow Hcnse 
and consithred the worhl as under 
the jMrwer of the I). \i!. In the sce- 
ond place, we have the prtN'esHes to 
which we owe the present tlay 
broader attitude. The scholars and 
critics hnve sipiee/.ed out all of the 
ohi superstition.^ Ihmii i.ligious 
thought. Science has gi\cii us 
knowledge ami taught us how to ode 
the world as prophe<ie«l in the Hiblc 
The HiM-ial awakening of recent year* 
has given ii'^ :in almost universid 
iirlian print of view. Athleliis are 
more thought of ihttn tln-y were. 
When .M. FraiH-is linished his great 
missionary work by d\ itig at the age 
of 44, he ncknowledg«M| Ihm miii io 
neglecting his ImmIv. And the results 
of the psychological investigations 
ha\e also lu-en faclois in l>ringing 
mImmH the present attitude. 

In the third place, what is the pres- 
ent day religion from the naslern man's 
point of view? It is the establish- 
ment of right relations between man 
and CJ«hI, and between man and man. 
Hurnes of New York university has 
define<| religion .1- tli, |...vy,.| th:it 
iiniries all of <»ur activities. Life is 
that orgaiii/ing |>ower by which the 
cells have i»een unified and made to 
work together. Heligir>n should 
attain the same end. Anyone who is 
working to make l»efter. broader, 
truer men is doing tiiie ('hristian 
work. It is the w<»rk of the church 
of toilay to keep up ideals. When 
men lose their ideals, expansion 
stops." 

After the arldress there was a 
mass meeting. Ernest M.Whitcornb 
'04 of Amherst was present and 
made a speech delivering the M. A. 
('.-Aiiiherst cross-country trophy 
over to .Manager Edwards of the 
trar-k tcjini. .Mr. Whitcomb had 
rjffercd the cup as a reward for the 
winning team. He said that he was 
a true believer in iithletics and con- 
sidered cross-country running a fine 
sport for showing up trin- athletic 
spirit. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Suaday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



EW ELL'S 

STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUG5 
CARPKTS 

Largest assortment in .New En- 
gland of S|)ecial .Studccl i'urnishings. 

LOWER E.XI'ENSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

AND 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. nAR5H. 



cox SONS 

— Anti — 

VININO 

7174 .Mailjfton Avenue. .New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

best .Vf aterials and Workmanship 

WOODWARD'S 




LUNCH 



2^ Main St., Masonic BIdg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



REBATE NOTICE 

The reliate at the Dining liall, if 
decifled upon will be given to those 
Who arc paid iu full through Nov. ;;m. 



ICE CREAM, 



Chted only from t A. M. to 4 A.M. 

Toefll Mientka 

SHoes smoeii ami Pollsteii 

Make old shoes look like new 

Neat, clas.sy workmanship 
*>!»••» Sonday Main St. 

Od way to Pctt Oftce. 



r 



lO 



The College Signal, Tuesday, November i8, 1913 



! 



Ah 



# 



TENNIS 
RACKETS 




The Massachusetts Affricultural Gollese 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty six teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may speciah'ze in the following subjects: 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWKLEK AND OI'TOME 1 ;<1 

Lenses ({round while you wait 
CoLLEUK Jbwklkv 
Violin. Banjo, Mandolin and (>uii,> •.•< 

AHIlKKiiT, MA.SK>. 
Next to Post Oftice. 



At- 



DEUEL'S 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husljandry 

J>airyinig 

Poultry Hust)anilry 

Agricultural Ctiemislry 
Economic Entomology 
Plant Physiology and Pathology 
Agricultural hklucation 



Horticulture 

Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape (hardening 

Pomology 



STEAM FITTING. Telephuoe »-. 

GAS FITTING. TINNING. 

P. W. Dance & Co. 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

nigh-Grade ColU^e Work 

LAUNDRY 

Shirt*, 
Collars, 
Cutfs, - 
Plain wa.sh. 
Same, rough dry. 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
l>ry Cleaning and I'ressing. 11.50 a Suit 



For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD. President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



10-15C 

2 I-2C 
t 1-JC 

48c per tloz. 
joc per do/. 



KAlfii J. RoRi.KS. Ai-enf.? North Cottage 
KiWAKi. t. KuwvHDs. .Agent 

Put full name and address on laundry 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Athletic Uonrd. 

J'he t'olli'ge Semite, 

Football AMSM-iiitioii, 

Biisehall Assotiutioii, 

'I'raek AsHociution, 

Hockey AniKM-iutioii. 

TeuuiH AtMociutioii, 

Hide club, 

Uuister I>oiiitcr8 

MuMieal At«soi.'iatlon, 

Nineteen Hundred Fourteen Index. 

NiueU'eu Huiulre«l Fifteen ln«le.\, 

M. A. C. t'hristiun Assuciuliun. 

M. A. t'. Cutholie Club, 

Fraternity Coufereuce, 

St^H-kbridge Club, 



(leoige H. Chapman, Secretary 

l>. \V. Joneti, I'l evident 

J. A. Price, Manager 

(t. D. Melieuii, .Manager 

K. C. IviwardH, Manager 

.1. I). Pellett, Manager 

K. K. MacLahi, Manager 

J. T. Oertel, President 

l>. .1. I>ewi8, Manager 

H. I). Brown, Manager 

K. S. Clark, .Ir., Manager 

H. M. KogerH, Manager 

K. H. Powers, PreHideut 

I). A. Coleman, Piesiileut 

J. 1). Pellett, President 

N. II. Hearing, PreHideut 



Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead LitiHTS, &c. 

t Cliiton Ave AMHERST 



MA.S-. 



Catalogues of 

Are Out. Copy mailed to any addr<-.~ i .. 

Students and .\thletes who want T! 

articles lor the vurious sports <,li 

those Ijf.iririK the Wright & Ditsi... . ,. 



Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Hockey 
Skates 




5luil'x5h<i« 
Sweater* 
Jer.se) • 

Uniforms 
for all sporu 



Wright & DitsoB Good* are tlie -<■> !i 
all sports 

Vh Wasliiiiuton .St , H.«t..n, V.- 



Loose - Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 

Before buying elsewhere, see our assort- 
ment of pennants and banners 

CUKRAN & DYER, Prop*. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green, 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations,violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall, These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPH0NE^3oo 



IPhen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



THE TERPSy PMOR 

CLEANSING, 

PRESSING. 

REPAIRING 

Uiilrliral »«<rvioe, K*«| Work, I, ..«..! ir . 

All woik carefully done Work 
delivered. (>cnts' overcoats. >uii 
coats. Lnidies' hne linen suiti a ^\* > : . 

Teams will call every daj at W 

Wn. FRANKLYN. Prop 



Rear Nash Bl'li, Amherst. 



Tel!«»,j»» 



JACKSON Of CUTLER 



Barsalotti & Gentoso 

Cigars Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresli Candy 

ke Cream, Fruit, Soda, Etc. 

The Right Goods at the Right Pricei 

Open till II o'clock KVERV night 
Cwrwcr Amity and PleMsat Htr««ta 



If yon want to be 

.MILII) WITH THK OIRI.H 

you muat have your clothe* pre*>e<l and rleaaed 

ATBPSTIIXlir'S 



II Amity .St. 



Marooo Store 



CARS 



Leave AOOIE COLLEGE fur HOL- 
YOKE on eacli HOUR. 



CARS 



Leave AMHHKST for A<lnlR COL' 
LEtiE at 7 and 37 mln. past mc» 
HOUR. 

SpMlal Cara at Raaaanablc «■!•• 



Preaaing and Cleaning a apfcialty 

_ . Moal lil>eral ticket aystem In tows 

Tal. 303'1I 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts .\gricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed^s Sons, 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND SI. 11 ^ 



Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. 



1424-1426 Chestnut St., 



I%iladelphia, Pa. 



For a Dally and Sunday se»Nif*' 
Vou should Keai. 

THIC 

Springfield Repoblicai 

While you are at college I \"ihfr*' 
It hnaall or The M. A. C. Kt^u- 
The Kent SporllnK Newa 
Fail General Xewii 
A .««trnnK Kdltorlal Page 
InlereHliDg reaturea 
It i« a Real Newapaper 

Daily, 3 cents ; 70 cerits .i '^nth ii^ 
a quarter. 

Sunday, 5 cents; 50 cent^ . quarter 

Subscribe by mail or through th' "ih'f' '"* 
dniler. 






C 
'it 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



MASSACHUSETTS AORICULTURAL. COLLEGE! 



rl.. 



XXIV. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, December 2, 19 13. 



No. 1 1 



INDOOR TRACK SEASON 

Start Soon with Interclass Relays. 
Schedule for Relay Team. 

riie indoor track season will soon 
(.iriipy the renter of the running 
Htage, and ulthuugh the real truiuiug 
vtill not cdiumeuee until after the 
t'hriHtiiias recess, the l>uard track it* 
already in position, and the relay 
men are getting ready to put on the 
!»|)iked shoes oo(« more. 

( aptain Nicolet is the only relay 
iii:m left fiom last year's team, hut 
Jk' i» counting on tlie college to pro- 
liuce the material for a s|>eedy tpiar- 
t<'t. (iood men are known to l>e in 
the freshman class, and they will 
liitve ample op|>ortunity to hIiow what 
they are good for. Manager F^l wards 
h»H arranged for the customary team- 
race with W. V. I. at the it. A. A. 
meet, alwo one with TiiftH at the 
South Armory, ItoMton, games. L. 
s. DickiiiHon '!<» will c«)ach the relay 
men. .Mr. Dickinson is an experi- 
iriini runner, and has deveU>ped 
g<MM| teaffis for the college since his 
graduation. With the gocMJ material 
at haiul, he should meet with equal 
Hiit'cess this year. 

Other plans for tiie season are i>e- 
ii)g deveiofMsti, and among the |>o8si- 
Itilities are dual meets with Holy 
(VoHs and Amherst. As a means 
towards developing relay men. Man- 
ager Kdwards is plannit.g a neries c>f 
weekly interclass races. Jf such a 
l>t.in is carried out it ought to work 
well, (iood men would l»e uncov- 
pred, and the varsity team would 
prohahly J>e picke<l largely from the 
results of these races. 



DEBATING TEAMS SELECTED 

On Friday evening, Nov. 21, the 
iiiinuul tryouts for the college del»at- 
iiig teams were hehl in the cha|Hl. 
IVofessors .McKimmic, IVinee and 
Smith acted as judges, p'ach con- 
'••ffaiit was allowed to s|>eak eight 
tiiinutes, "Resolved, that )he federal 
tT'iveinmcnt should pass legislation 
-'fining the conservation of the lives 
niie industrial workers," and con- 
^iderahle gotnl material was brought 

'Hit. 

As two teams are to represent .M. 
A. C, this year six regulars and two 
ii.ites were selected as follows : 
Uuiiforth "K;, Donnell'iri' (Jouhl '10, 
llarro<ks'16. Lincoln M.') and F. W. 
iJc-nl '11; nlternatCH, .lacksoti '17 
i Powers 11. 

It has not yet been de<ide<l 

'Uether there wjll be a triangular 

'wte with the International V. M. 

^. toUege and R. I. State college, 

' two seperate debates with these 

institutions. Owing to a con- 

"g schedule. Tufts will be unable 

'i taett uB this year as was expected. 



LECTURE SERIES 

Commences with Lectures by R. L. 
Bridgman on '"World Politics". 

Thursday an«l Friday afternoons 
Nov. 2(1 and 21, Mr. R. L. 
Itridgman an eminent author and 
publicist, gave the first two lec- 
tuivs of !i series of six to be deliv- 
ered liy him on World I'olitirs. This 
lectureship is impiirtant because it 
has just lieen established by the col- 
lege and the subject dealt with is ex- 
tremely interesting and lu-w. These 
lectures are the lirst to be delivere«l 
in the world dealing with the pluise 
of the world's politics whi<'h !»lTects 
every individual and nati«»n. Mr. 
liridgmaii i^ well qualified to speak 
u|M>n this subject as he has been 
studying deeply into |>olitics for tlie 
past .'SO years. During his lectures 
he emphasi/.ed the fact that the 
nations were slowly coming together 
and that the •'wi>rhl baby" so-to- 
speak, was gradually beroming c(»n- 
scioiiH of the vital tilings wiiirli .sur- 
roun<l it. 

In the lirst lecture Mr. Bridgman 
s|M>ke in part as foihiws : The 
subject " WorM Polities" has to- 
day licix>me »n« of Uie moat vitet 
issues of every nation. There are 
many great men, however, who 
laugh at and ridicule the idea, maga- 
zines, newspapers and (»ther litera- 
ture fail to give the subject any 
space. In spite of all opposition 
and all sentiment, this new idea con- 
tinues t<» grow and develop. World 
Politics is the lielief of the entire 
uiityof all mankiml as a {lolitical 
ImkIv. 

The present time marks an in* 
portMiit era in |M»Iitical affairs ImjUi 
as regards the past ami lime to come. 
All the |>ast ideas of fHilitics have 
convergetl to the present time and 
all future ideas will diverge from now 
on There have been many powei- 
ful influences working to bring the 
word together, the most important 
one being the frequent international 
meetings. 

Although cof.jperalion among na- 
tiiiiis laiger groups than twos was 
of ancient origin. in UKslern ages this 
idea of c«s>peration was stniwn by 
the calling of tin wotiderful Ilagui- 
confrrciKc in l^UU bv the C/.ar of 
Russia which paved the way for a 
second in r.Mi7. At the second Ilagu«- 
conference which was called by the 
Czar of Russia Imt suggested by I'res. 
R.M.-i \<!t. every nation on earth but 
two iiisignitici-nt ones were represen- 
ted. 

The most im|>ortant illustration 
showing that the world is approach- 
ing unity is the establishment of a 

[Continued on page aj 



HOCKEY PRACTICE 

Starts with Daily Drill for Squad on 
Floor and with Soccer. 

A call was re<'ently issued for 
htM-key candiilates. Fifty men 
answere«l Captain Jones' call forcan- 
tlidatcs. Many of the men are new at 
the game and have had little experi- 
ence, l»ut uiuler the guidance of the 
older players (hey are showing r:ipid 
strides in improvement. For the 
past two weeks the sqnail has la'en 
busy with siK'cer practice and ele- 
mentary shooting practice. The 
former is uiven principally to im- 
prove the wind <>f I In- mm ami con- 
dition them all around. Captain 
tlones did not consider that much 
couhl Ik> said regarding any of the 
men in detail. With so many can- 
didates in the lieUI every man out 
will have to fight for his place on the 
team. 

The sliidenl bo«ty will lia\r a 
chau(*e this year of seeing not only 
go«Ml varsity hockey but also ginsl 
class h«K'key. The spirit siMiwn even 
at this early date could not Im> much 
improvcrl u|Hm. and its continuance 
will assure class (•outests of a high 
<»rder. 



FOOTBALL REVIEW 



V 



FRESHMAN NIGHT 

"Freshnuin night" at the .SocinI 
I'liion proved quite entertaining las! 
.Saturday night No drauuis were 
attempted, but the shi»w consisN 'I "f 
piano selections, singing, readings 
and "lines." The committee in 
charge went to some trouble to get alt 
of their |K'rformer8 «in hand, an<l, 
moreover. «lecoraled tlic drill hall 
s«>mewhat. These decorations ctm- 
sist»M| of sundry |Hwt<'rs tt) Im* rejitl 
between the acts, A special wire 
had l»een strung from lloston and the 
retuiiiH of the llarvard-Vule game 
were given t<» the audientre as Vale 
4.'», Harvard <». 

In the altsence of printed prtj- 
grams, Nason intro<luced the"talent." 
I'adcrweski Freeborn was the first 
niimlter of the schednb-. He s<'euied 
<|iiite alaimcd by the close proximity 
fif the audience, tht'it' bein^ no raised 
stage. Itut he did well an«l in one of 
his seiectioiiH on the piano gave an 
excellent imitation of chimes. Buck- 
man next ilelivered himself of a few 
"remarks." his first selection being 
".Mary had a little skirt." 

Buckman an<l .s<liwat» were the 
next cuiiipany to appear on the 
boards. They <lid well, one feature 
being the explanation of a patent fly 
trap. Count It (Nason) next sang a 
long and rambling song the chorus of 
which iterated and reiterated the 
phrase "I'll kill him, I'll kill him." 

[Continued on page x] 



Shows Season's Records to be Satis- 
factory with Majority of Games Won. 

Although Aggie lost some of her 
most important games, there is not 
an Aggie man but hsiks back u|K)n 
the season as having been a success, 
t Mit of the seven games which were 
played, six of them being away from 
home, the team won four times 
and lost three. She won from Holy 
Cross r»-0, from I'nion 20-0. from 
Middlebury H.'{-0, ami from New 
Hanipshire State .'M-0, while she was 
ilefeated \'.\-'.\ by Dartmouth, I 1-0 
by Tufts and N-0 by Springfiehl. 
The seasim's total of points for Ag- 
gie was '.h;, and for her op|Minents 
•II. Most of her victories were by- 
high scores, while in her losses her 
op|Hments were umtble t«* run the 
numlK*rs up very high. 

The season's work was character- 
i/ed by superit>r line plunging, flue 
team work, g<Msl tackling, gcMsl punt- 
ing and splendid fighting spirit, while 
weakness in forwani passing and in 
interference waa aluo in evidence. 
The Middlebury game was the first 
chance that the student Inxly had to 
see ll'f» team 'n •"•tiou '|'l»f. splen- 
iliti work done was rather a surprise 
in spite of the title that previous 
s<H»res had tohl. The men saw a 
new spirit in the team that Couch 
Britles had somehow worked up. 
riie (ilayers ili«ln't stop when tack- 
led, riu-y ran. plunged and fought 
with a vim that always took several 
.Middlebury men Ui stop. And their 
fighting spirit was much in evidence 
in the games which resulted in defeat 
aiKl t<Kik away the sling of them in a 
great measure. None of the stmlent- 
IhsIv came home from the Tufts 
game or the .Springfield game feel- 
ing "sore" towartl the team. Not a 
bit of it. They eoiiWln't : They had 
seen their men work every second, 
and seen the hard luck that seemed 
to come at critical times. Kvery one 
is satisfied that the team out-played 
Tufts, and if it hadn't been for the 
strong wind that helped Tufts on her 
punts, no first s<'ore ever woidd have 
iK-en made. At the Springfield game 
the team was there every minute, 
running away from their opponents 
during the first quarter. But Cap- 
tain Brewer being unable t<» play on 
account t»f a chipped shoulder, and 
"Duke" Cuiran. the clever tackle, 
being down in his studies, the team 
thus handicapped was slowly ground 
down by the superior weight and 
training of the future Y. M. C. A. 
directors. 

Aggie's weak |Kjints are still her 
forward passes and her interferen*-*; 
of runners, especially in a broken 









■i 



\'^ 



field. At critical times a forward 
pass would alinoMt without exception 
prove illegal or l.c caught l.v some 
one on the other team. A long series 
of successful line-|)|iinges would of- 
ten have just this finish. And on the 
other hand for comparison, Spring- 
Held and Tuft.s both showed just 
enough class in the forward pass de- 
i»artment to clinch a victory. Al- 
though oiu- men showed steady im- 
provement in the hreaking up of the 
forward passes .luring the season, 
their opponents through repeated 
trials wo.dd pull oft enough success- 
ful ones to nuike u[.. And as f«,r in- 
terference it seemed quite good un- 
td one luul a chance U> compare it 
with that of Springfield. Manv 
times one „f o.n backs woulil 
niu the ball up well after a punt 
through his i,wn chver do<lging and 
8pee.lin.>... .oid ,„.t be.ause of in- 
terferem. . |:ut in praise of the 
team, it may Jk- .said the tackling at 
Tufts and Springfield was a great 
improvement over that of a year 
ago. The former college was clejirlv 
outcla-ssed in this respect, and it de- 
Iighfe«l nmny fans to see our men do- 
ing the breaking by Keveral tackles, 
while the Tufts meu were spilled in 
their tracks. 

Tho neasou startitl out with n loss 
U) Dartmouth by a score of \;',:',. in 
this game the team h.nd the "(ireen" 
.!-" until the laht five minutes of pl.iv. 
This was a vastly hetter showing than 
the 17-0 defeat by the same team last 
year. In ih.- >».•(•(. nd jiaine on the 
•chedule, Aggie .lefeate<| II<>|y 
Cross «;-((. Th,. H-eek before the 
Purple hati hehl Vale to a lO-o score, 
and it was nothing but sheer merit 
that can»e<l Ostergren to declare that 
we put up a slIlTer game than the 
"Blue" had the Satunlay previous. 
In the tliird game of the season. 
Union wa8 8wam|>ed I'O-O, tla. x^w 
Vork college only Iwing «langerou8 
for a short time In the third jieriwl. 
The Norwich game for Oct. Ih was 
cancelled so that the only home game 
of the season was that against Mi.l- 
<Uel.ury of \erm<mt. The game 
proved eaay, and in the iK»uring rain 
the varsity |.iled up a score of .84-0 
that «ould easily have been doul.led 
if the scrubs had not taken the field. 
At Tufts on Nov. I last year's de- 
feat of li-o u.-,sn.p<nt...|. ■ A l.irger 
crowd went down to the gan.e than 
ever and this year Tufts turned out 
a ranch larger delegation. The 
scrubs again t.K>k the field alter a 
8a>re of 30-0 ha<l been pile.l up 
against N<w Hampshire Stat, . .,nd 
the circunistauces of the Springliei<l 
g.-ime are still fresh in our memories. 
An abundance of material was 
brought out during tho year, the 
scrubs un<l the frcshrnen lovallv fur- 
nishing three and four teams everv 
night for the varsity to practice on, 
I he stu<lent body stood back of the 
team better than ever and turned out 
for the games in increasing numbers. 
The prospects for next year are ex- 
cellent anri 'on to Tufts. D.irtmouth 
anil Springfield " is the crv for next 
jear. 



The College Signal. Tuesday, December 2, ,9,3 



LECTURE SERIES 

fCoiitinued fioin inme i] 

universal |>o8tal system. The recora- 
mendation that the Hague confer- 
ences be continued marks the critical 
|>oint when the '• woHd baby" comes 
lir.st to realize its consciousness. 




The second lecture of the "World 
Polities" series was given in the 
chapel by .Mr. iJridgman Friilay 
afternoon. He spoke in part as 
follows : 

"The stu.ly of Worhl Politics is 
so new there are as yet no text boijks 
to refer to so that newspapers have 
to be relied upon for faj-ts and data. 
'I'he theory of world politics shouhl 
be su|»porfcd by people of diverse 
interest and ideas. It \h believed 
that the world is coming t<^ether in 
all ways and eventually war will be 
era.li.ated and nations, like individ- 
ualK,will settle their di.sputes by judic- 
ial means. In fact legislative, ju«lic- 
•mI :ind exe<utive world organs 
already exist in embryo." 

Here Mr. Hri.lgman gave a 
list of instances showing how the 
germ of world legislative, judicial 
ami executive id.as already ha<i 
developed. He mentioned among 
others the significance of the uni- 
versal postal and telegraph systems, 
the bure.Hisof weights and measures 
and agriculture, and conventions of 
vital ami international moment, deal- 
ing with war, naval affairs, safety at 
sea. and science. 

The rest of the hour .Mi. Hridgman 
spent emphasizing the imjHirtance 
of the .statistics enumerated and 
vUtavil the lecture bringing the fact 
Hint the truth of the instances men- 
tionetl must be recognized e%en by 
tlie most skeptical. 



HERMAN'S U.SJBMY I 
SERVICE BLUCHER 

In Tan Willow Calf .„ 

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inspected. I.ii.uijr of 
specially te>t.-d drill. A Solid 
leather Shoe that will uivothe 
**»"',"'.?''*' *Jviliaii Nh«»« that 
sells for^O. This i.s one of I he 
sIiM's I ncle .Sam huys for his 

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No. 968 

GARRISON 
BLUCHER. 

One of tlie most jM>jmlar 
in the ,\rmy I. in,., Ma.ic in Tan M'il- 
low Calf an<l Gun lllptal. Hea^ 
sinttle s.ile. Uiz t.M-. Hulltl IPHtht-r 
tlir<>ui;li<int.Ahiindsomesnap|tyHlio<' 
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PRICE 84.00 



PAGES SHOE STORE 



THE 



Hoover & Smith Co. 



616 Chcstnnt St.. Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 

Diamond Merchants 

PMtaitlpMi's Offlciil Fntintity Jiweier 




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Bmlts St.. 
ambem 

Telephone 470 



■PBOIALISTS IN 



Rings, Charms Prises. Trophi... 

'•***•'• Collete Pins. Fobs. Ssals] 

Rinjs, Charms.-. 



BKSAKPAST 

LVNCHSON 
APTBRNOON TSA 

Dinner if arranced for. 



Fraternity Badges. Fobs. Novelties, C C H V Pi P 



FRESHMAN NIGHT 

LContinued from pane 1] 



These wonls hecaiue »o impiessetl on 
the aiKlicnce that there was grave 
<l!Uigcr that eithoi Nason or the next 
performer would l»<. serioii.slv injured. 
lUtl the next artist proved Uj be a 
trembling old negro and the gentle- 
manlv insticts «.f the audience as- 
Herted themselvcH. It was Hender- 
H<>n who was thiH disgui.ted. lie 
gave two clever rea<ling8, one about a 
negro Hervant an<l a one-legged 
gwse. and another from .Mark 
Twain'.s - InniKints Abroad." 

Hiittrick and Kosh »ang He vera! 
• level dnet.s. TIh.j,- work was 
so clever that tli.y w.i, repeat- 
edly encore.1 and it was with difflcultv 
that the management convineetl the 
audience that the show wa.s over, and 
that an orchestra of pLano and violin 
would furnish dance music for the 
rornainder of the evening, (^uite a 
large audience was present at the 
show, and the major part of them 
indulged in the dancing, breaking the 
rules of the management and ragging 
constantly . The comraittee in charge 
of the affair was Kelsey, Buckraan, 
Gillette, Nason and Graham. 

I 



E.B. DICKINSON D.O.S. 

OBIVTAI^ ROOXIfti 

Williams Block, .Amherst, Mass 

Orrirs Hours: 
» tc9 IM A.. A«. 1.00 to A 1». IM. 



JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at J J Pleasant St. 



Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses .Accurately Replaced 
Fine Watch Repairing Promptly and 
Skilfully Done 



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THINK— IT— OVER 

Vou already know the superior quality of our Soda and Ice Crean, 
Now get acquainted vith our COFFER. We serve a.s well as se! 

GEORGE WASHINGTON COFFEE 

Unexcelled as an every-day beverage. Vou will, we feel sure, enj. 
stepping in for your morning Coffee. If you want a real treat con: 
yourself and bring your friends here. 

You are always welcome at 

THE HENRY ADAMS CO., OrusEists 



The REXALL Store 



ON THE CORNBR 



J 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December j, 1913 



Heart - to - Heart Talks 

With Aggie Men 

By the Largest Retailers of 
Apparel in New England 

Those raw. cold winds which blow across the 
campus, wnistle the approach of winter and winter 
sports. Ice wmII soon cover the ponds and the 
hockey season will start. Gym and indoor sports 
will follow. 

Many of you Ai;gie men will he in Hoston or 
vicinity for the Christmas recess, anil at this tim<- 
we ask you to conie in and get acquainted, if you 
are not already, with our Sprjrtinjj Goods .Store. 
whtTe everything imaginable for sports, indoor and 
outdoor, has been assembled. 

You will fi'id golf, hockey and basketball .sup 
plies, gym suits, shoes and all the ntces>ary acces 
sories. There is a fine collection of skates, sn< w 
shoes, skiis and other such winter sporting needs. 

And while here, just walk around our two 
mammoth buildittgs and see what a wonderful pla< ( 
this is. Vou will find all our Men's Apparel con- 
veniently locat< d on the street floor of our Main 
Store. Surpris«-s await you at every turn anrl it is 
a real pleasure to walk through. 

JORDAN MARSH COMPANY 

Boston 



Mackinaws 




THE 

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the issue Docs your smoking 
tobacco bite or doesn't it> 

Velvet is aged 2 years — which 
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Produces a fine flavor and a 
smoothness that smokers appreci- 
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Gentlemen — there is only one side 
to this smoke question— that's the 
smooth side — "Velvet.** Ask 
for Velvet at your dealers. 

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.til other Fall and Winter .spmis call lor goocl !<\\»-.iUm pro- 
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Thf famous Summit hrauil, wtll known in tlit- Northwest 
and acknowk'tlgtil to he »)nc of the ht'.vl. Coat Sweaters, 
the Shawl Collar. Coat Collar ami the ngular .shape 
Swc.Urrs. all tlu' best selling cohus. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



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troufilen f>.v owrilnft a Mowe'n. C, \X js the \j^^ 



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IW»OKVON.SHIRE.srRtET BO.S"l<)N. MA.S.S. •<^. 







The Coll«ge Sifnal, Tuesday, December 2, 1913. 



: t 




ul^ 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Published every Tuesday evening; by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural Colleg;e. 



BOABD OF BDITOBS. 

CHESTKR K. WHEELER 14. Editor-in-Chief 
FRANK W. IHEI.I. -15. ManaginR Editor 

HAROLD C. BLACK '14, Comp«>tition Editor 
HAROLD J. CLAV '14, Assistant Editor 

STUART B. FOSTER '14, Athletic Editor 

ERVINE F. l*AKKER'i4, Alumni Editor 

J. ALBEKT PRICE 15. Athletic Editor 

GEO. E. DONNELL '15. Department Editor 
EARLE S. DRAPER '15. Campus Editor 

TYLER S. ROr.EKS '16. Associate Editor 

CHARLES W. CURTIN'i6. Associate Editor 



CAMPUS NOTES 

forget that Infornml 



tlie 



BUSINESS DEPARTMKIfT. 

ERNEST S. CLAKK. |R '14. Hus. Manager 
MAIRICE J. CLOlrJH '15, Ass't Bus \1(jr. 
ERNEST F. I'PTON 14. Adyertisinu Manager 
W. RICHARD SEARS '15. Asst. \d». Manager 

Subscription I1.50 per yt-ar. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all ntriers payable 
to Ernest S. Clark, Jr. 



_ *"^J^ •• ••oond-c'M* matter at the Amharal 
Pmi Offtoa. 

Vol. XXIV. TuKSDAv, Dec. 2. No. 11 



« Boost Old Aggie.** 



COMPETITORS, ATTENTION! 

The coiii|>etitor8 for |)Oi<itioti8 on 
the HisiNKss Dki'aktmrnt of the 
Signal will confer with Manager K. 
S. Clark '14 at once, and without 
further notice. Tliii* miiHt not I»e 
deiaved I 



SIGNAL COMPETITION 

The present Htamling of tlie coni- 
|K>titor8 in the editorial de|mrtment 
of the Si<iNAi. iH as followH : 

White '1 .'>, in.im 

Farrar 'l'», 10.<; 

Pendleton 'i;», S.66 

MtC'uIIookMfi, 17.24 

(iiuissa 'l(i« If;.:) 

HarnK-ks'lfi, 14 M«; 

Kussell '!«*>. IHI.H 

Mooncy 'in, l(t.7t» 

Potter 'ir., 8.19 

Smith '17, lO.OM 

Lawrence '17, y.yi» 

Hoo|>er '17. 9.44 

F. W. Mavo '17, 6.39 

Buckman '17, 4.(!6 

W. I. Mavo. .Ir.. '17, 4.1(; 

Favor '17. 2.:i 

llailett 17. I. 

IIakolo C. I(la«k. 

Competition e«litor. 



Don't 
1 3th. 

Recently the Stockl>ridge club held 
a very enjoyable cider party in the 
Social I'nion room. 

Once more the rifle team is asking 
oin- Hupp«)rt to the tune of twenty- 
five cents a head. If the team does 
as well as it did last year, it will 
deserve all we give. 

Soccer practice every afternoon at 
4-()0 V. M. for the hockey men. Can- 
didates for the team will better their 
chances of making it Ity getting busy 
in this |)reliminary work, 

A)H)ut 20 men reporte<l f<ir basket- 
ball to the manager of the fresh- 
man team. There is plenty of good 
material in the class antl the pro.-^- 
pects for a winning team are very 
bright. 

The Roister Doisters are progress- 
ing rapiilly with '"The Cometly of 
Errors," but there will \te a great 
deal more practice before the first 
|)erformance, which comes early in 
December. 

The lK)artl track has been put np 
ami it won't \*e hmg before we will 
see the practice of the relay team. 
Manager l<xiwards is planning some 
iuterclasH races but no relay practice 
is planned until after Christmas 
vacation. 

During the last Wednestlay after- 
noon 

in |K»int of importa 
grey ^luirrd hy Company A. "Col- 
onel " Kokelund of the company in- 
ten<lH keeping it as the South Dorm 
mascot to rival, if |Nissible, the par- 
rot which oi'cupies that sacred |>08i- 
tion in North Dorm. 




The Collece Signal, Taatdaj. December 



«9«3. 



THERMOS 

CARAFE 

Have a Hot Coffee in Your Room. 

Fill at the cart Stay hot 24 hours 

Other styles for tramps. 

KEEPS HOT KEEPS COlO 

DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



UNITY CHURCH 

North I'lkasa.nt .St 

A Church home of the liberal Faiih, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

RKIilLAR Nl'NDAV NKKVICK AT 7 F M 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest line in 
the state outside of IJjj.ston. 



E. RUSSELL NOKTON 



SALES AGENT 



ring the last Wednestlay after- 
skirmish, thegreate»t capture i Dfl Veil DOrt MlUeF 

int of importance was a live I 

Vein Coal 



Besr Qualily Pennsylvania Coal 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

(Notice* for thi« column thmild be droi>|>ed lU 
the Signal Offioe or handed to Karle S. Draptt 
•15. on or before the Saturday precrdine each 
isfue.1 

Dec. 3—1-10 I'. M. Assembly. 
Acting President Kdward 
M. Lewis. Mass Meet- 
ing. 
Dec. 7 — 9-l.'» \. M. Sunday chapel. 
U. II. M. Augustine, 
First Presbyterian Church 
Hanover, N. .1, 
Dec. U — 7-00 V. m. Stockbridge 
Club. 
7-.'{() !•. M. Landscape Art 
Club. 
Dec. 10—1-10 V. M. Assembly, 
Mr. Flank H. Pope, 
Marlboro, Mass. 



COMMUNICATIONS 

(CommunKations to the .Signal concerning 
matters of general interest are wekoaied the 
SKiNAL IS not to be held responsible for tht 
opininnt thus expressed.) 

To TIIK Kl.lTt»K OK THE SloNAI., 

D'.ir >,,■ : 

The cadet hand has always l»cen 
much appreciated by the student 
iMHiy of M. A. ( . As an organixa- 
ti«m the band is still appreciated bv 
the military authorities, and certainly 
helps t<» enliven an athletic contest. 
Kven the veterans accept it as a sub- 
stitute on Memorial Day for the old 
fife and drum corps. 

The band certainly has its place. 
But in all seriousness, on practice 
days, is it not in the wrong chapel 
and in the wrong pew ? Will not 
those graduates working <,n their 
theses get • 'Alexander's Rag-time 
Rami" mixed, in rather close har- 
mony, with the seventh .andal verte- 
bra or the chemical action of cocoa 
shells on the mucous membrane? 
The seniors too, arc interested in the 
reference work assigned to them ami 
must wonder how concentration, as 
taught in Psychology, can be applied 
under present conditions. 

Is it not |K»8sible for the band to 
practice In the Drill hall when the 
companies drill outside:" At other 



Seeourlineof Drill Shoes 

$2.00 to $4.00 



MODERN REPAIR 
DEPARTMENT 



E.M.BOLLES 

(OM VOOn W/KV TO ^. o ) 



BOSTON OFriCE 

8s Water St. 



Sr.W YORK OFFK E 
I Broadway 



LOW RRICC TAILORING CO. 

Sins MADE Til OKDF.K 

*i""».< '"n«<'- P'f*«'<« and Djred. All kinds of 
KenainhB for Ladies and Gentlemen wa«'' -^ — - 
work bv tirst clavt tailor. 



lliRhKr;«(ie work hv tirst cla«<t tailor. Work 
called for and delivered iSell tickets for pressine 

4 HITS KOR $1.^ 

GCORGE KOroWITZ. Pnop. 

Mam street, Amherst, Mass. Nash Block 

I >n your way to the Post Oflice. Tel. 4i8-W 



Coolep's Roicl 

Springfield, Mass., 

Solicits the patronage of the .siu 
dents of the Agricultural College 
to class dinners and individually. 



I. M. LABROVITZ, Custom Tailor 

Fashions, Fit, First Class Work Guaranteed 

Urge assortment on hand. GKNT'S FUR.M.SMI N(;S. Red-Man Colbfs and 
Uress .Mnris. CleanmR and Pressing. DRKSS SUIT.S 
TO RENT. Military Collars and Gloves. 

II AMITY ST., Telephone 302 W. AMHERST, MASS. 



CHRISTMAS GIFTS ! 

A portrait is a tnost acceptable Chri.stma.s gift — 

Appointments made now can be finished in time 

Hiss McClellan's Stadio is tbe Place 

44 St.\TE StREKT, .... NORTHA.MPTON, >fASS. 



tiiiR' it might practice in the Dining 
tiitll making that institution still 
niui'- economical. Even the Jiidg- 
inj.' pavilion might be used. Some 
utht'i place oesides the chapel can be 
futiiid. 

Those who visited the new library 
at the Y. M. C. A. college, recently 
iiiiist realize the contrast. There 
ijiiiif reigned with a notice at 
ea< li corner reminding one that real 
Huik was being done. Our library 
is tivercrowded and inadequate to 
meet the demands put upon it. Hut 
through co-oi)erative effort can we 
not make it a bit more like a real 
lihniry ! Is this not another way to 
"iKMist old Aggie?" 

As Ai.rMM *. 



the fiiiggestion has been made 
recently that an '' Alumni night," sim- 
ilar to the college nights now in 
v<i}jue, be held at Draper hall some 
Nitturday evening of the current win- 
U't to start a campaign of binding 
more closely together the student 
IkmIv and alumni. It is the pur|>ose 
this short article to endorse the 
-iiji^estion. 

The student body at present know 
veiy little aUnit the men who have 
lift "Aggie" lieftire them and there 
If* little opjMirtiinity offered for either 
knly to acquaint themselves with 
the other. It is not imssible atCom- 
iiK'neeinent for at that time all atten- 
tion is centered in the departing class 
and their attemlant exercises. Par- 



ents and friends add to the confusion 
and the majority of the student body 
do not remain at Commencement 
longer than the compulsory military 
drill. 

Would not a democratic gathering 
at the Dining hall at a time when 
the hockey team played on im|>ortant 
game on the home rink and possibly 
when the Roister Doister or Glee 
club had a program to present in 
Amherst the previous evening, be 
feasible and satisfactory ? Make 
the gathering an annual affair, luher- 
tise it and the alumni are bound to 
come. Now, on the incoming tiile 
of growth and prospeiity of the insti- 
tution, is the time to ac<iuaiiit Aggie 
men with each other. Registration 
is fast forging ahead, student activi- 
ties are yearly improving and grow- 
ing but in matters of co-operntion 
and unified actions lietweeii stiutents 
and alumni. M. A. C. is far behind 
many colleges of her size. (Jive the 
alumni a chance to come and tell the 
young *'80<l-busters" how they mean 
tolKMMjt. Let the student InMly discuss 
the plan, ask the faculty what thev 
think of it, see if there is virtue in 
the idea and then •'Boost." 

Kakatm*. 



Wanted— A Man ! 

We deal with merchants and 
Airmers. We want an olHce man 
to sell, to help advertise, to help 
in correspondence and to grow 
up to a responsible position. If 
he was brought up on a farm, 
with some scientific and news, 
paper training, s^ much the bet- 
ter. No bonanza in salarx to 
begin with, but an active, inter- 
esting antl basic occupation with 
good people and a great future, 
depending on the man. Address 
with the fullest of particulars, 
stating age and leierences, which 
will be regartled as conlitlential. 
"President," Box 229, Boston. 
Mass. 



'0.{. — W. K. Tottingham has re- 
turned to his duties as a><sistant pro- 
fessor of agricultural chemistry in 
the I'niversity of Wisconsin after a 
year's study at .lohns Hopkins uni- 
versity. 



r. A. SHEPARD 

MEN'S STORE 



** Keeping in Front " 

You fellows know what that nneans \ 
We've been very succeuhil in this 
regard with Fatima Cigarettes. By 
the way, these cigarettes were first 
sold in the college towns — and you 
agreed with us ufiat they were good. 

Then we put out for the bisr race, 
to make Fabmas of natiqB-wide rep- 
utation, and today more are sold than 
any other cigarette in this country. 

No purer, or more carefully chosen 
tobacco grows than that in Fatimas. 
We purposely put them in a plain 
inexpensive wrapper — \h this way 
we can afford quality tobacco, and 
twenty of the smokes for 1 5 cents. 

Now your college crew is of utmost 
importance to you — so is a good 
cigarette, and it's your aim in life 
to keep I^alimas in the lead —right 
up to their good quality — right up 
to where you first found them, and 
will always find them. 

Success fellows I You started this 
cigarette on its successful career — 
«ind you pull a strong oar all ovef 
this country. 




Use our new cash discount card 
and save five per cent on 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 



f 



aGAftETTE5 
20/6rl5« 




SOLE AGENT FOR 



THE GENUINE AND ORIGINAL 



PATRICK MACKINAW 



t^nn vviivoow i>iMi»f^>vY 



•AT- 



"bUtHKUrwl^ MMdmml' 




Agent, k. S. Bra*.';, Kappa Sigma House. 



Il'iltf. 



The ColUfc Sifnal, Tuesday, December 2, 1913. 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of Wrought Iron iiiid Urass I'ipe, \'alves 
ind KittiiiKs for Steam, Water antJ (Ja*. Asbestos 
and Magnesia Holier and Pii>e Coverings I'ipe 
Cut to Sketch. Mill Supplies Kn^ireers and 
Contractors for Steam and Mot Water tieatini; 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Boiler and Kngire 
Connections. Holyoke, Mm*. 



The College Sigftal. Tuesday, December i, 1913 



T«f Teachers Exchange 

0/ Boston 1 20 fiiiylsliin Si. 

Reconnnends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



PRII^TET^S, 



No I, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Students Attention ! ! ! 

We are ready at the start to furnish you with a fine 
line of Campus and Fraternity House Views, also Post 
Cards. Kodak work given prompt and careful attention. 
Kniarging and picture framing given our personal at- 
tention. See us about (iroups and Portraits for the very 
best work. 



Satisfaction Guaranteed, 
the Square Deal Studio 



Patronize 



KINSMAN'S COLLEGE STUDIO 



Nash DlocK. Amherst 



H. M KtK.ERs, '15, Agent. 
87 Pleasant St.. 



Studio Phone 303-a. 



GRAND SWEEPSTAKES TROPHY 



(9750.00 Sterling Silver Cup) 

roR 



BEST STATE EXHIBIT OF POTATOES 



AT THE 

New York Land Sbow 

1912 
WON SY 

The L L. Cleveland Company 

HOULTON. M«. 

^~\NE of the largest and most 
. reliable seed potato houses 
in the United States. Competi- 
tion open to the entire United 
States and Canada. Messrs. E. L. 
Cleveland Company also won the 
First Pri/e for Best Coaaty Exliibit 
of Potatoes. (Silver Cup valued 
at $200.00.) 
The E. I.. Cleveland Company use 

L FRANK COE 
FERTILIZERS 



E. Frank Coe Fertilizers have 
been the business farmer's favorite 
for over hfty-five years. Why not 
follow the example of these lead- 
ing commercial potato growers. 

\»nntht\mmt'rhvSl,H~fi,t A Prnfllahlt Potatn 
f.rtifi" "rlll..|,h)f an «r»».laali launt;. Halii* tmrmrr 




The Coe-Mortimer Company, 



51 CHAMBERS STREET, 
NEW YORK. N. Y. 



SUNDAY CHAPEL. 
The l{ev. Robert Goldsmith of 
New York city delivered an interest- 
ing sermon at the last Sunday chapel. 
His subject was " The temptation of 
every man," and he read for his 
8cri]>ture lesson the stories of the 
temptation of Christ and that of 
Peter. He said that the temptation 
which comes to every man is to deny 
his ideals. One notion of progress 
is that there is always a flootl time 
and an ebb time. Another idea of 
it is that progress makes definite 
headway. Three things must go 
about to cause the steady onward 
march of progress. First, there 
must be something behind that spurs 
us forw ard ; second, there is a duty 
within (hiving us; and thiid. there is 
something in front that beckons to 
us. As in the latter case, the ideals 
of a race act like an immense mag- 
net and draw forward. 

There aie certain times in life 
which severely try a man's ideals 
Peter was o\ ercome by these trials. 
They are found in every generation 
and are (1) reverses. (2) ridicule, 
and (3) routine. Cmler reverses, 
Peter followed Christ lasily in pros- 
perous times, but in the times of ad- 
versity denied him. It was the 
same with ritiiciilc. Routine diti not 
apply quite so much to Peter, but is 
a great trial in our daily JIfe. Carrv- 
ing one's ideals into all <iomestic 
drudgery an<i work tests them ex- 
ceetlingly. 

Pleasure is one of the great 
temptations. .Tcsus with his in- 
tellect couhl easily have made 
a reputation in lesser thing.>,. 
but he withst«N»d all and came 
through without a failur*'. lie was 
not intensely practical nor wh(»lly a 
tlreamer, but a C(mibinatif>n of the 
two, a practical idealist Many men 
as the man in the story "The Master 
Hiiihier" forget the ideals of this 
youth .ind later, in old age, in trying 
to return to them, slip from the tower 
and fjdl lower th.-tn iver into the 
ipiarry. 



THE «M" MEN 

The Athletic association at 
recent meeting voted to awn 
following men the football "M' 

Captain H. W. Brewer '1 1 

Manager S. H. P>eel>orn li 

W. S. Baker '14. 

A. M. Kdgerton '14. 

H. J. Wood '14. 

H. Nissen '14. 

G. I). Melican '15. 

S. A. Dole '1.'). 

U. Darling 'IC. 

P. B. .Jordan '16. 

E. A. Perry 'Ki. 

L. Schlotterbeck 'Ifi. 

W. Strong '17. 



APPLE-JUDGING TEAM AT 
WASHINGTON 

The apple-judging team, consist- 
ing of Arthur K .Stevfcn.s. Karl M. 
Ingham and Raymond K. Xnte '11, 
came in seventh in the recent inter- 
collegiaie apple-judging contest held 
in Washington, Missouri sending the 
winning team. As frequent substi- 
tiition.H of varieties were made, the 
eastern teams were somewhat handi- 
capped by their lack of familiarity 
with the western apples. In one 
ease a whole plate of Arkansas Black 
was exchanged for one of Winesap, 
which it greatly resembles, while 
single 8ul)8titutions were numerous. 
Considering their limited ac(|uaint- 
ance with many of the vaiietie.s. the 
team came out well Pieliminarv 
practice work in judging will be giveii 
the juniors during the coming winter 
and spring, so that next year's team 
will have a chance to become more 
accustomed to the different varieties. 



OFFICIAL BOARD MEETING 
An im|>ortant meeting of the oft. 
cial lK>ard of the MassaehnsMtts Ag. 
ricultural club was held nt I)fa|« 
hall last Saturday. The olliem f(» 
next year aie : Krnest Russell, Hsd- 
ley,-, president ; ^UIward F. Parsow, 
Nortli Amherst. vice-pi.>i,|^„; 
Roger K. Peck, Shelburne 1 dl^ v^ 
retary : Wallet ( lark, Granbv. trfw- 
urer: Kenfred A. Roote. K.-.f^tliam^ 
ton, chairman of the execntix.- (..m- 
niittee. These }>ersons hold (AVuvU 
virtue of high achievement in suoit 
agricultural enterprise. The m 
who made the highest score last \m I 
and continued to carry on »<»mt' apj. 
cultural activity this year \>m-inm 
president for next year. Hie ow 
who ma<le the next higlu hI m-trr 
l>ecomes vice-president, Ihn^v nb. 
won third, fourth, and fifth \A$m 
l»ecome secretary, treasiirtT. in] 
chairman of the executive < uniiiiittw 
resiK'ctively. All are subject fotlr 
same condition, i. c. contimiiiijr to 
carry on some agri«-ultural eiiti-rprwt. 
Luncheon was served in th? gwK 
(lining room. The followitij' re[«- 
sentatives were present : W. D 
Ilurd. director of the Kxlension Ser- 
vice : W. R. Hart, prof.sv.r of iji 
rictdtural education: (> A. Morton. 
aswxriate professor of Ajiritiilturii | 
Fxliication ; ami K. H. KorlmA 
director of Corresponflence rwi^M 
After the luncheon each of tin- !»! 
gave a brief account of tin workd 
his special enterprise during the fnit 
sumnier. The dry weather wm i 
disturbing factor in every < nse. TV 
meeting then adjourned t«> tliv fro* 
steps of the dining hall where spk- 
tiire was taken of the onirets mtUd 
in a group almut basket^ <>f cofs 
potatoes, and miscellaneous vfp- 
tables. These three classes repfr 
sent the chief activities in which tk 
members present are enga^'ed. Pf* 
feasor Morton then explninf.l - 
of the future plans of the -luh a/i' 
which several points of infcrestoi 
the campus were visit. 1 iff"" 
departing for home. 

NINETEEN-THIRTEFN NOTES 

KIUTKK HT TIIF NINKTKl ^ IIHI'IT^ 
M. A. C. < Llll "I ' ' R-T. 

"1013 Night"— I)e« '•• 

The Boston barKpiet i^ •> I" 
at the I'nited Stales n't*' 
o'clock. Please notifv (t"M' in ' 
that arrangements may !> maflf' Z 
you are going to be withi' l""wil'' 
or more of one of these (> Is '•"^'^ 
ber YOr are coming. I \>n V''^ 
is nearer, notify Zahri'^ • "^i ■ 
field, notify Thayer or i ay ; ' 
cago. Bursely and remei tprtodfOf 
a line to some one of t' «•■ i"f° " 



I ..Ue. 15 



Eldridge '14 

All Student Supplies 



M. A.jC.^TORIE 

BANNERS AND POSTERS 



CANOV TOMIC 



t.i^ue 15 



Hager '16 



[Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

V\i KKKS. |>«li;t.TI(V l>|{l'.NSKK.S 
»M» HI ITKK «l %Kt':KS. 

rt Mill V;,ALE I.I-. VI t KS IN 

JHrrl Muttun. I.ainb. Veal, Pork. Lard. Hami. 

Ha<.un. SausaKe*. Poultry, (lame, Butler 

Cbeeae. Bgt*. Bean*. 

|MttK.«-.\ >u,itrs \\.y-.S7.i'», I & I.; Rlackaton*- .St. 
• Itotlon I'iickiiiK Mouse, BriKhton, Mass. 
.S.tlwe I'liultry nrest^infc Plant, Ito^ton. 
Cie«m«ries in Vermont. 



WAFFLES 

Wednesdays and Thursdays 



( I 



»lmeal Every Morning 



DOG CART 



you are going to he there, also 
remember that if it is too long a walk 
from where you are, start a banquet 
all your own, let us know where it is 
to be held, and we will lMM»m it. 
"Bill" Angier ought to sUirt one 
down in Texas. "Mickey" KIls and 
Ralph Howe ought to bunch up to- 
gether with ".limmie" Holden Pack- 
ard and Neal and organize the South 
Atlantic and (Julf states into a 19i;J 
"trust." Dec. 2G, "1J»13 Night. 

ATHI.KTlr KIKLO. 

We have got $43(t pledgetl. l;i|.{. 
Begin to save up tiiat ten tlollars 
NOW. Remember we have got to 
produce the gtxMls .s<m)ii and the 
goo<ls means ^IIMMi. nothing less ' 

The 11H3 New York supper will 
be held at H v. m. Dec. 'i*; at Reiseu- 
webers' restaurant. Nth Ave. mih! .'»« 
St., New York. 



SEE AND 
^RYA 



The Highland Hotel 

C«»r««r ot Millman and Itarnes Stieet^. Ihfpp 
bktckittroni the I ni.,n l>f|H>t. is • modern lim 
lelry run on tlie |-.uro|>e.<ii I'Uu It is ;uil .1 ■itrp 
Ironi .Main >lrefl..«wdv froiti tlie noi>t- anii du»t 
and v^t in the cenlei of the lm<,ine^s di%tiict. 

It* room* are well (u-nished and comfottalile, 
liavinu a telephone and hot and cold tunning 
water in evny r.M.iii. I'liies 91 and uu loonm 
with luth (aiMKle) ei.AO and up. 

Itsexcellent ciiiMnt- anj well venli' •' ji; 

room makes a meal a pleasant men 
thinR of the hiKltesI ijuality. well ^....««„ and 
served in the best possible manner. 

^^lay.it the HiKhland Hotel onc« and you will 
^iili.-ipate sta\iiiK there again. Mu»ic rt^^rv 
evrninj{. 



ALUMNI NOTICE 

The Western Alumni of the Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural college will hoKI 
their annual reunion and in/nrnnd 
banquet on Friday evening, Dec. Tj, 
at seven «j'cloek. The meeting [dace 
will be at the I nion League club, (»'.> 
Jackson Boulevard. Chicago. All 
alumni, uutlergraduatt^s, ex-men, pro- 
fessors or any men connectetl with 
the college who are in or near Chicago 
or «ho are attending the Inter- 
national Live St«>ck show Nov. 2'J to 
Dec. t;. are eordi:t||y invited to 
atteml. 

Cius. A. TiwKij., See*y. 

8I.'» .Steinway Hall, 
Chicago, III. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may he found at 



D. H. SIEVERS, 



•sprliiKtW-lil, Mmkk. 



Tliose who know 
buy the De Laval 

t r. aitierymen — Hecause they are e«- 
l-r;. in the handling of cream and know 
^'^ 1 ng esiwrience tJiat the I)e I.aval 
^^ '' l>*a nest and wears longest. I hat 
•i ^. " f^ "'' ""* ^Vorld's creameries use 
>'■- i>e I^»al««tlusn'el>, 
K.iperieiKvd Oalrymen-The I)e La»al 
u Uie universal favoritt among big dairy- 

7' .'' *""• *•'»• "" "'•'*' separator 

»'ii i!l»e them such satisfactory service 
<H.I l>e latv.l t'aera -Whenever • man 
1^ used an old model I)e I aval de 
■ purchase a later style machine he 
bly buys another De I. aval. 
Mm Who Invenllnte-Because the* 
• ireemajorityol De I.ava I machines 
■ Mat they are used by the Ijest in 
i*»-rs everywhere; that thev stand 
■1 use and that their users are bet 
'•'1 than users of ■>ther separators. 

THE DEimi SEPARATOR CO. 



'-..dway, 

t ork 



21 E. Madison .St. 
Chicago. 



HIgllUlMl Mulel. 



StK I'll K.N Ij.\.N-K FiH.lJKW 

MA.MITrA'fl'HIXi JKSS-KI.KH 

Il«» IIK<»,\I»W,\ Y. NKW VOKK 



<n.,irii ,\>ri> vtUA.VAiK 

ooi.n. vir.vr.H *«rit mhovak Mm%Uki*- 



The Connecticot Valley 
Street Railway 



Iheie are seven good reasons 
why rOU should buy 

O A L 



C 



Ot 



C. R. ELDER 



From Amherit. via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., along.side the 
famous Bloody Brook battle ground 
to ( )l(i l>eerrield, thenre to (ireen- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant. Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 



50 Miles of Trackage ilodern 
Equipment Train IMspatch- 
Injf System -Freljcht and Ex- 
press Service over entire line. 



Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



'LAST CONCERT OF STEINERT 

SERIES 

The final concert of the Stelnert 
Series will Iw given Wednesday, 
Dec. If), in the Auditorium, .Spring- 
fiehl. Two of the greatest aitists of 
the Metro|>olit:in Opera Company, 
.Marie Bappold, soprano, and Her- 
bert WitliersptMin, basmj, will Ih« 
heard in thi>« eoiiiert, as will also 
Felix Fox, the In illiaiit Bor,toii pianist. 
Thia concert with aili'.l.s of such dis- 
tinguished reputation will he a inemif- 
rable <Hvasioii for iiiiiHi<- lovers of 
Springtiehl. 

Mr. WitherKpiMtn became I'rimu 
Basso of the .Metro|»olitan Opi-ra 
House iu I'.Mix niHl v\:i- i... nth en- 
gaged for Uiree years muu!. He 
ranks as one of the greatest singers, 
and one of the U«st exponents of the 
art of Bel (auto. Sehumann-lleink 
calls him the greatest Imim iu the 
world. His voice is of witle range 
and varied resources in t«)ne coloring. 
He is etpiully well-known as a con- 
cert singer, nml has UHired the 
United States, Canada and Kngland 
many times. In one season be sang 
in UM concerts. 

Mroe. Marie Happold is one of the 

three or four leatling sopranos of the 

Metropulitan Opera House. 'i'he 

lieauty of her voice, her methtxl of 

singing together with a iK-rsonality 

thrit appeals inatantly to a iliscrimi- 

nating audience, have won for this 

prima donna a unitpie place on the 

lyric stage. she has sung at the 

Mefn>|M»lilan < >per:i House iu New 

York since l'.*o.'» IUIh; every year 

but one which she spent in luirope 

singing at the leading opera houses 

on the continent. 

F'elix F"ox is one of New Kngland's 
Iwst known pianists, and has traveled 
extensively in America, playing in 
reeit;ils, ( lijiiiitiei ( ori'ci Is. and with 
well-known orchestras. His |mi for m- 
ances everywher*- are acknowledged 
by th«' highest authorities to Ih- bril- 
liant, forceful and authoritative to a 
remarkable <legree. proving that he 
is an artist worthy [<< lie considered 
with the greatest. 

Revised programs for this notalde 
concert can be had from .M. .Sleinert 
db Sods Co. of Spriugfleld. 



EWELL'S 

STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPLTS 

Largest asHortmeni in .\ew Kn- 
gland of S|»e(ial Stude'it I' urnishings. 

LOWKR K.XI'KNSKS Enable us 
to offer an ab«M>lule lowei price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 



AMD 



CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 




cox SONS 



— ANI» 



VINING 

:i 74 Madison Avenue, New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

l'.< St Materials and Wurkraani^hip 

WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



fj Main St., Ma.sonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Closed only from / A. M. to 4 A. M. 

Toefil Mientka 

Shoes sniiieii aoii Polisteii 

Make old .shoes look like new 

Neat, classy workmanship 
Op«B Hnntlsy Main St. 

On wajr to Pett Oftca. 



' » 



'1 



The CoUege Signal. Tuesday, December i, 1913. 



TENNIS 
RACKETS 




—At— 



The Massachusetts Agricultural Gollesfe 

Offers courses of instruction irv twenty six teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may speciah'ze in the following subjects: 



DEUEL'S 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

High-Grade College Work 

LAUNDRY 

Shiru. ,o-,3c 

Collars, - . . a lac 

cutts, - - . . a I-2C 

Plain wash, - • 48c per cloz. 

Same, rough dry, - - 30c per doz. 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
nry Cleaning and Pressing, I1.50 a Suit 

Ralph j. Boa urn. Atcent. 7 North Cott«ce 
HuWAKi. C. Kl.WAHiis, Agent 

Put full name mmI addresA on lanodry 

AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Horticulture 

Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landiicape Gardening 

Pomology 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Uairyimg 

Poultry Husbandry 

Agricultural Chemistry 
Economic Entomology 
Plant Physiology and Pathology 
Agricultural Education 



For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERRIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELKK AND Ol'TOMETKIST 
Lenses ground while you wait 

COLLKGK JeWBLKY 

Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar .Stru., 

AMHKKitT, MAKM. 
Next to Post Office. 



STEAM FITTING. Tetephow »-, 

GAS FITTING. TINNING. 

P. W. Dance & Co. 

PLUMBERS. 



Specialty of Repsiring— — 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lead Lights, &c. 

< Clifton Ave., AMHERST. MASS 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



Athletic lk>ard, 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Baseball Assooiation, 

Track Assix-iution, 

Hockey AsHcK-iutioD, 

Tennia Aasociation, 

Rifle club, 

Hoiater Duiatera 

Muaical Aaaociation, 

Nineteen Hiuidred Fourteen Index, 

Niuetceu Hundred Fifteen Index, 

M. A. C. CbristiaD Aasociatiun, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

^itock bridge Club, 



George H. Chapman, .Secretary 

I). W. JuucH, Pieaideut 

J. A. Price, Manager 

G. D. Meiicau, Manager 

E. C. I'kiwarihi, Manager 

J. D. Pellett, Manager 

K. K. MacLaiu, Manager 

J. T. Oertel, President 

\). J. I..ewi8, Manager 

H. D. Brown, Manager 

K. S. Clark, Jr., Manager 

H. M. Rogers, Manager 

H. H. Powers, President 

D. A. Coleman, President 

J. D. Pellett, President 

N. H. Dearing, President 



Catalogues of 

P»ll Ae Wlaiter OoocU 

Are out. Copy mailed to any address tulnw 
Students and Athletes who want the real, stu*- • 
articles for the various sports should inM»t u:*,! 
those bearing th« Wright & Uitson 1 rade Mm 



Foot Ball 
Basket Ball 
Hockey 
Skates 



Skat'x5lioei 

Sweater* 

Jerseys 

Linifurmi 
for all sporii 

Wright & OitMb Goods are the Maadard ! 
all sports 

"VWMIOMT St oiTaaox 

J44 VVuhingtoa St, Bostoa. M.- 




THE ffltPSy PJUtlOR 



Loose • h&A Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 

Before buying elsewhere, see our assort- 
ment of pennants and banners 

CURRAN ft DYER. Props. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



U^hen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
materia] and we have excellent roses, 
carnations,vio]ets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



REPAIRING 

Quickest bcnrlo*. Heal Work, Loweal Krln 

All woik carefotfy done. Woric called (or uK 
delirared. (>en(l# overcoats, suits, paatt u< 
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Teams will call every day at M. A C 

Wn. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Raar Nash Bl'k, Amherst. 



Tel. No 3«H 



CARS 



Leave AOOIE COLLEQE for tlOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



CARS 



Barsalotti & Gtontoso 

CIgara Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresh Candy 

Ice Cream, Fruit, 5oda, Etc. 

The Right Goods at the Right Prices 

Open till II o'clock EVERY night 
C*raer Amity aad Pleasant Streets 



If 70a want to be 

SOLID WITH THK OIRLg 

70a must have your clothe* pressed aad cleaned 

AT BPSTIIIirS 

11 aBitt7 St. MarooD Store 

Pressing and Cleaning a apfcialty 

- . - « . Most liberal Ucketayetem In Iowa 
Tel. 303-11 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNI FORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 



Leave AMHERST for AQUIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 min. psft mcI 
HOUR. 

Special Cars at ReaseaaMe RstM 



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Makers of " Gold Medal Uniforms 



Z4a4-X426 Chestnut St. 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



For a Daily and Sunday .Newspapf 
You should Read 

Springfield RepuMicai 

While you are at eoilege in .\mhei>! 

It has all of The M . A. C. New* 

The Beat Sporting News 

Fall General New* 

A Strong Kdltorlal Pa^e 

Interesting Featurea 

It la a Real Newapaper 

Daily, j cents; 70 cents a r mthJJ* 
a quarter. 

Sunday, 5 cents; 50 cents a quarter 

Subscribe by mail or through the "h«"' ^'^ 
dealer. 









THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



Dfr 1 1 ^'^^ 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



\0L. XXIV. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, December 9, 1913. 



No. 12 



LECTURE SERIES 

: .luinucs with Third and Fourth Ad- 
dresses Delivered During Last Week. 

( )n TliursdHV and Friday afternoons 
Ml. Hiidgiiian gave the third and 
fourth lectures of the series on W«nld 
1'. ■lilies. He held closely to the 
fftftK which he had dealt u|>on in his 
I' rvioiis lectures. 

lie said in part: There is devel- 
• -jiiii^', sli>wly Imt surely, the iilea of 
Wt.rld i'olitics. In fact if alreatlv 
e\ist«i. although soincwhut oSiHcnre ; 
it is continually gaining ground and 
rlu' germ of a world judicial, execu- 
tive and legislative departments is 
.vi'fi now discenialile. I'lKloubtably 
the great revolution of I 77r, and the 
Civil War of the Inited .Slates wonltl 
have been averted had the idea of 
world unity been firmly established. \ 
Some people believe that a worki ! 
federation might be possilile but, 
although ftiiidMiiieiitly the worM is 
one. I hi' iijea of a world fe<lera- 
tioii is wrong. A vivid illustration 
■showing how im|>ractil>le siuh a fed- 
tiatioii would be is seen in the his- 
lorv of .Mil I'nited States. The 
fedei.itiun of the states guide«| by 
the wonderful leadership of (leoi^e 
Washington. was liehl t<»gethei [. , 
llinnigh the war of the rebellion, but 
at the close of the coutlict it grew 
wm'fiijly weak and nearly fell apart. 
IMHcoutentment was everywhere evi- 
•l«m and Shay*s Rebellion was a tli- 
Ki I result of the trying times. As 
l<»ng as the idea of state mivereignty 
• \i.stetl and their |iower put almve 
!!iat of the National Congress the 
f"lttation was constantl\ <iii Uie 
|"'iiil of crumbling. It was seen 
Uiiit if a state could come in or go 
fMit as it pleased a union was im- 
p«»»sible. thus a federation of states 
without a nationjil sovereignty was 
proven a failure ; in the same way 
World union without world sover- 
« Kuty would be a failure. 

The l«lea of a woH<l unity with the 

i'l>'«' clirniiiafion <.(' ^liite rights 

''■' be a benelii to all mankind. 

I I"- Civil War sliowe*! that in <.ider 

^*r a nation to exist, sUite rights 

ust be put aside for national su- 

t eiiiity. The theory of world sover- 

-iity is just beginning to tiawri upon 

people and its aim would i»e to 

•ill tnankind into one big bio- 

"<1 for 

ixi pursuit of happiness. 

n a world sovereignty was estab- • ,. , , ■ i„, i„« 
, * ' inlield IS ?<loping. 

■*iiHi every nation, state and person i- p. 1 ■ .,.. 1 

• Kiel ' lOl e I 



REALITY 



Alumni Field Seems Well on Its Way with Nearly Three Thousand 

Dollars Pledged by Student Body. A Review of 

History of the Field. 

After over Jo years of agitation 
the efforts to secure an athletic field 



for M. A. ('. were brought to a head 
at last Wednesday's assembly when 
the entire undergraduate Itody showed 
that they were back of the undertak- 
ing by pledging %'l,hV,t.'>i\ which has 
since been increased to ?2,r.ll 0."». 

Acting president 1/ewis was in 
charge i»f the meeting. He stated 
that in his estimation there was no 
better way of ''H«x»stiiig Old Aggie" 
than to do all in one's power for the 
athletic field, and he ofTered his 
hearty co-operation at all times in 
the campaign to raise money fur the 
field. 

Dettnmr W. Jones, president of 
the senate, then t<M>k ch.-trge and 
called ii|M)n Prof. ('. S. Hicks, head 
of the department of physical eiluca- 
tion. Kver since his ctinnection 
with the college. Profes.Hor llirks 
has l>een working to make an athletic 
field possible. Ill :< strong and f(»rce* 
ful address, .Mr. Hicks broitfcht out 
pressing need of better uthletic 
facilities anri the service that every 
man wouhl be doing for the college 
by iMHMtting the undertaking. l*i't>- 
fesHor Hicks said that immetliately 
after the mass meeting he was going 
to Chicago t«» adtlress the Western 
Alumni ass«K'ialioii and if he coiihl 
show tli.it ImmIv that the iiHti at 
Aggie wanted a field bud enough to 
sacrifice some of their money aKl 
time, he felt sure of bringing home a 
large c<mtribiition. 



comiiioii between the two classes. 
<lore then challenged 15117 to tieat 
llM.'i's |>letige of 91()U<I and showed 
that the field means more to the 
fieHhiiieri tlian to the other «-la8»es 
in that they will receive the most 
benefit from it. 

At the ch»8e of the meeting the 
members of the Senate distributed 
pleilge cards which were to be filled 
out and handed in as the men left 
tfic cha|>el. Kvery man in the room 
showi^l his loyally by siibscribing as 
much as he was able. 

When the pledges were totaled It 
was found that the sum of |!2(;n.().'t 
ha<l l»een pleilged ; *t.J.'J2.(M) of which 
had l»eeu paid. The following is 
the list of pledges by classes. 



an. 



HOCKEY SCHEDULE OUT 

Eleven Games Arranged. Dartmouth, 
Amherst and Springheld at Home. 

Dec. r.l — Williams at Williamstown. 
20— Kenssetaei I'olytech at 

Troy, N. Y. 
.'I—West Point at West Point, 

N. Y. 
I<| Dartirioiith at Hanover. 
It — Harvard at Hostori. 
17 llulv ( losa at Worcester. 
21— Internatioiml \. M. C. A. 

College, at Springfield. 
31— Amherst at Amherst. 
4 — Darlimmth at M. A. C. 
7— Cornell at Ithica. N V. 
M-l. Y. M C. A. College at 

M. A. C. 
in -Open. (Possibly M.I. I". 
alM. A.C.) 
Manager Pellet expects to get a 
game wilh M.I. T. for the .Innior 
Prom. 



Feb. 





I'ltHlKPd 


I'4ld 


Ii»!4 


94 1 1 .(M) 


$m7.7."i 


i'Jl.'i 


$4iilt.58 


$.>•;. iH> 


i*M«; 


$477H7 


WA.I2 


11M7 


*ll.*HI.6.'i 


•121.15 


Cnclnssifieii, 


• 12.00 


$2.«MI 



The average pledge per man was 
found to Ih' . 

I'JU, $4.20; 191.1, $4,24; ll»ir., 
#4.10; 1917, |I.'».6M. 



SOCIAL UNION 
The college enj<iye<| a real and iin- 
arciistomefl treat Sotarriay evening 
in the form of a concert by the I 
Krnesl f iatuble eoiH'ert fuirty, given 
in the chapel under the aiispiies of 
the Social liiioti. It is not often 
that really g<HMl music is heard at our 
end of the town, and on that a«count 



Track manager IvIwukI-., thi- imxIi,i„ .„.....„-. „„. .1. ..1 1 • . , 

" I liie c«mcert was douhiv appreciated. 

speaker, lolrl of the great need at ' 



Aggie «»f a track. At preiwnt there 
are no opportunities hera for track 
work fitlier than cross country, relay 
r'nces and the little in<loor work that 
can be done in the I)rill hall .Man- 
agei I'if. i.-.m of the Football a88f>- 
ciatioii foll>>wed. and olTered the men 
a plan by whieh they could save two 
and one half dollars in railroarl fares 
Chriftlnias vacation. IJ<»yd (». 
Davies forcibly luoiiuhl out 

the jiii'^*mu' iH-ed of .1 if.-ti base- 
ball diam'did. W pr»',sent tht col- 
lege has iio fitting place to In ing a 
mutual gain in friend- 1 ^^^,,, j^, .^ home game. The onl 

field is not large enough and the 



fall 



The concert consistcil of s«-lections 
by Krtiest (Gamble, basfM) canlante. 
i->iwtn M. Sehonert, pianist, and 
Miss Verna I^eone Page, violinist. 
Kach member of tlilN trio Is an artist 
of no small ability, and their work 
showed great talent crunbinerl with 
long years of study. 

T%e program waa shared eipially 
by all three Mrtists and was varieil in 
a way calculated to satisfy the tastes 
«»f any audience. It is a far cry from 
Li.HZl to Annie Laurie but lK»th were 
erpially well-receive. 1. .Mi*<> Page's 
rendered of that f.-unoiiM h.illad was 
Hiirli as one seldom hears. P^verv 
iMiiiihti of the progr:im was <'xecuted 
ill a finished iiiannar. an<l richly 
merited the liberal applause which 



particularly ad 

r.norsv -l,;! /'T' ^"^t ""l'' ''^•^"^'''^^ •'"" ^"'^'"•"" '''"' ^""""'^ ' f«"o--' «very appearance, 
-neisy -would end". Through ^j^,, ^^ •„,„„., ,„,,p,,^. ^^^.ech. He ^ 

xistenceof a world court si tua- ^^,^, j,,,.,„ „,,,t ^.^^ «, they were | a looks as if o.n athletic field is 
*aftll''h'^^ •*'^^"'" ^'*''^'^'** ^^" fre^hiM.M to til. iimlergraduate Ixxly ' going to materialize. The largest 
W. .Oe usofon aettled. The ^ ,,,,.5 ^g,.p f,e„|„n^.f, t^, the alumni. ',. lass contribution came from the 



' -.'(Uofitiiiued -on i 



In this lyny. there was something in freshmen. 



JUNIOR PKOM 
I p to now. the .liiiiior Prom com- 
mittee has not bad luiii-h to say alMtut 
their plans, but from now on consid- 
erable is going t<i l>e heard aUtut 
ihem. 'i'hey are rapidtv l>eing 
pushed forwartl to completion and a 
bigger anil Itelter piotn than ever is 
assurtnl. Ml. ll.'irriN<m, instructor 
in landbcaiM' ganlening. haa agreed 
to serve as a faculty-memlier of the 
e«>mmiltee ami his gcMMl tnste and 
experieiue will prove a great aid. 
The prom seas4m will last from Fri- 
day noon Feb. t:i to Sunday noon 
Feb. 15. A hockey game with 
M. I. T. and a concert by the musical 
clubs will be the attractions on Fri- 
day and .Saturday after iKxms. The 
Roister Doisters will give their play 
«m Saturday evening, probably at the 
Academy <»f Music at Hamp, if the 
academy can be obtained. 

Hut the •big noise," the Prom it- 
self, will (ome on Friday evening. 
The Drill li.tll will be beautifully 
derN»rste<l in itnitatiori of a summer 
garden. This will ap|>ear in excellent 
contrast with the February weather 
oiitsid'' i'lrgobiN, lattice-work, vines 
and blufiming fiowers. all liariiionizefi 
in beautiful color •schemes, will 
appear, while the orchestra will 
occupy a sirmmer-hotise in the midst 
of the jjnnlrii. Tlic Philharmonic 
f»rc 111 <li)i of Springfield, which plaved 
such wonderful music at the 1914 
Prorn. will officiate again this year. 
All in all, the plans that are Iwing 
laid are such th.it will guarantee a 
good time to all those who attend. 
In order to make this supreme func- 
tion of Aggie's social life a success, 
a large atteiulance is to be clesired. 
The c(mimittee wants a representa- 
tive galtiering of thtf entire college. 



fi 



The College Sifnal, Tuesday, December 9. 1913. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 9, 1913 



• 



HISTORY OF THE ATHLETIC 
FIELD MOVEMENT 

In un inU'iview in regard to the 
history of tlie uthlelie field rrofessor 
Brooks sail] : 

"The first step iooliing toward 
securing an atiiletic field in the Mas- 
sachusetts Agricultural college was a 
petition to the Trustees about 1892, 
asking them to set aside an area 
surticient for the purpose on some 
part of the college estate but no def- 
inite locution was chosen. This 
petition was favorably acted upon, 
but after most careful investigation 
it was found that there appeared to 
be no suitable area t»f sutlicient size 
in any part of the property. Mean- 
while printed appeals had been sent 
out to alumni which had elicitetl 
fairly generous responses as some- 
thing like 81200 or $1500 was 
pledged. In view of the fact that a 
suitable area could not be found on 
the college property, and of the fur- 
ther fact that subscriptions and 
pledges were more generous than had 
been anticipated, it was felt t<» be 
not only desirable but feasible to 
purchase property for use as a Held. 
The decision to undertake this ren- 
dere<l it necessary to form a cor|K>- 
ration which should be legally capa- 
ble of buying anti holding property, 
and transacting sJich bu>«iness a« 
miglit l»e necessary in conne<'tion 
with fitting and ci|uipping the field. 

The first corporation. foi ined 
under the statute laws of tlu- state, 
did not provide for the issuing of 
stock certificates. As it was felt that 
stock certificates would be a conven- 
ient form of receipt for money 
received and would also furnish a 
basis for voting |>ower in cor|>ora- 
tion meetings. reincor|»oration was 
deemed necessary. This step was 
taken in .January. \W)2. It was pro- 
jHwed to call the field Alumni Fiehl 
and it was lio(>ed that the alumni 
would both purchase and equip the 
field. The name adopted foi the 
new corporation was. therefore, the 
Massachusetts Agricultural College 
Alumni Athletic Association. 

From the time when it was first 
decided that the college property did 
not afford an adequate location for a 
field, search was made for a suitable 
property conveniently locatetl. Nu- 
merous properties were looked ov^r 
and in order to natisfy various doubt- 
ers of the fact that the college did 
not afford a suitable location, differ- 
ent parts of the college grounds were 
looked over again and again. Trus- 
tees as well as alumni being taken 
into consultation. The outcome of 
all these various studies made on the 
question of locality was invariably 
the same and it was finally decided 
that the best and really only suitable 
location was the one to the south or 
south and east of the Veterinary 
building. 

Negotiations were very early en- 
tered into for the purchase of prop- 
erty belonging to the Q. T. V. fra- 
ternity, and Ihe fraternity uaselflaUy 



allowing college spirit to dominate 
fraternity spirit, agreed to sell. Hut 
it was found that there was a clause 
in the deed transferring the property 
to the (^ T. V. fraternity which i)ro- 
hibited the use of the land as an ath- 
letic field. This proved an insuper- 
able obstacle, and there seemed to be 
no practical way in which this restric- 
tion could be removed. It has 
finally been removed by the purchase 
by the college of the farm to which 
the Q. T. V. property originally 
belonged. As this farm belongs to 
the college there is no one to object 
to the use of the Q. T. V. property 
for athletic purposes. 

With the growth of the college, 
the conclusion is irresistably forced 
upon those interested in the field that 
the area west of the road which was 
considered when the movement 
began is not sufficient. It is in many 
ways the I)e8t location for a football 
field, but the fact that the public 
road cuts it off from the area t«> the 
east, which will be needed for base- 
ball, tennis courts, etc., has seemetl 
now to those considering it, to ren- 
der the latter more expedient rather 
than the place «)riginally selected. 

The Massachusetts Agricultural 
College Alumni Athletic .\s8ociation 
now has at interest alK>ut ?14U0, 
rhe death of some of the largest 
share holders renders it difficult to 
secure the representation of a suffi- 
rient amount of stock to constitute a 
legal meeting, in accordance with the 
provis«j of its liv-laws, but efTorts are 
now lieing made to secure the trans- 
fer of these stocks to graduates or 
former students of the college, such 
persons being only eligible to own 
st<K'k ; and when these efT<uts are 
successful, as they doubtless will be, 
it seems certain that the corjioration 
will vote to devote its funds to the 
service of athletics. Whether this 
vote will be to pool its funds with 
the general fuiiils or to provide some 
one feature of the field it is impos- 
sible at present to say." 



HERMAN'S U.S. ARMY I 
SERVICE BlUGHER 

In Till! Willow Calf or 

dun Metal. A haiul- 

bomt^, snappy bhoe 

ontheOrtliopoilic 

lust, desiguetl by 

army surjfeons. 

Yuu never saw 

a shoe like it 

for wear.com^ 

fort aud 

style. 

Singh 
holu of 
Texas un- 
»coiir«'d<>ak.i'<>x 
toe, sole leather 
•ounter8,evcry part 
iu-spected. I.iuinir of 
sptHiallv U'^tod drill. A Solid 
leather shoe that will give the 
wear of the civilian shoe that 
sells forJHO. This is one of the 
shoes I'ncle Sam huys lor his 
Kolfilers. IT'S A \V<>I{I.I> 
B1:^ATEU. See the Arm y line. 

PRICE 84.00 




HERMAN'S U.S. 
ARMY SHOES 




Lasts desig^ned > . 

AK3IY Sur- 

geons. Materi. s 

ure the best til. .t 

can be ul>tain< li. 

Workmansli {) 

Inspect*- (1 

and puar- 

antee<l. 



No. 968 

GARRISON 
BLUCHER. 

One of the mort popular 
in tlie Army Line. M;f'«' >" Tan W II. 
loiw <alf aii.l C;uii Mi'tiil. !(e;i>Y 
single !«'!<•, Im>x t'" . »«ll«l iPHthtr 
tlin.ujrlK'tit.AliHnelHoinesnappyKlio*'. 
<"oin»» ill l«> »»>« tlif lii>f. Mttliuf:i<"Iin.-il 

Josen'i .1. Ufrnian&'Co.. Bostim. 



by 



PRICE 84.00 



PAGES SHOE STORE 



THE 

Hoover & Smith Co. 

«i6 ChMtnvt St.. Philadelpbis 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 

PUaiilflU's Qfflclil Fnterilti Jtwelir 

SPBOlALItTS IN 
Fraternity Badgei. Fobs. Novelties, 

RiDKS. Charms Prises. Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs. Seals, 

RinfS. Charms.-. 



Pbcasant 

Bmttc St.. 
amtxret 

TclephoM 470 

•RBAKfAST 

LUNCH BOM 
ArTHRNOON TSA 

Dinner if arntnged for. 




E.B. OICKINSOND. D.S. 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass 
Orrics Hours: 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now Bt 13 Hl«*»»"» St. 

Oculists' Prescriptions Killed 

Hroken Lenses .Accurately Replaced 
Fine Watch Repairing Promptly awl 
Skilfully Done 



SstMactioa Guaranteed 



Several frattrnity initiation ban- 
(liiets were held the post week. Bctu 
Kappa Phi held theirs on Fri<lay 
night nt tlTe Hotel Warren, Deerfield. 
Alpha Sigma Phi had their Ijanfjiiet 
at the Plymouth lun, Phi vSigma 
Kappa at the Draper, on Saturday 
night. The Theta Chi initiation ban- 
quet was held on the same night at 
the Prospect House, Amherst. 

Saturday afternoon, a livi-ly game 
of football was played between the 
"Traction Engines" "Sulky-plows", 
the "Traction Engines" winning out. 
liesides the track teams and the 
former "White Rats," many new 
te.-xms are being formed and almost 
any alternoou sees a lively game in 
progreBB in the drill hall. 

The entrance condition exams were 
held last Saturday. For the sake of 
the class we hope all the men were 
guccessfttl. 



THINK— IT— OVER 

You already know the superior quality of our Soda and Ice Cream. 
Now gel acquainted with our COFFEE. We serve as well as sell 

GEORGE WASHINGTON GOFFEE 

Unexcelled as an every-day beverage. You will, we feel sure, erj .y 
stepping in for your morning Coflfee. If you want a real treat c-nie 
yourself and bring your friends here. 

You are always welcome at 

THE HENRY ADAMS CO., Drugeists 

The REXALL Store on the corner 



Heart - to - Heart Talks 

To Aggie Men 

By the Largest Retailers of 
Apparel in New England 

The whole thouj^ht and spirit of you men Js centered 
upon the Christmas recess, no doubt, for you soon are 
to pack vour bags tor the refreshing Yuletide vacation. 

The thought and spirit of our .store is of Christmas, 
as well. Christmas goods are pouring out over our 
counters in endless profusion. Cf>untl'?ss numbers ot 
the millions of gilts that pass out of our hands are for 
MK.N, for here in our twcrmammoth buihhngs are 
grouped more practical pi^sents for Men and Young 
.Men than in any other New England store. 

Some of these gifts are destined to tall into your 
hands and we want you to appr^.iate them. The quality 
and exclusiveness of our merchandise is unsurpassed, 
and gilts with our name stamped upon them show the 
acme of good taste and distmction. 

In giving as well as in receiving, we want you to 
look to us for all holiday wants. 

JORDAN MARSH COMPANY 



Boston 



Mackinaws 



AND 




Sweaters 



This is Mackinaw and Sweater season. Football, Golf and 
all other Fall and Winter sports call for good Sweater pro- 
tection. We have in stock today several hundred Macki- 
naws in all grades. 



The famous Summit brand, well known in the Northwest 
and acknowledgetl to he one u\ the best. Coat Sweaters, 
the Shawl Collar, Coat Collar and the regular shape 
Swe.iters. all the b«st sfliing colors. 

HJIl.OO to mTA^t^ 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



School ana College Pbotosrapbers . . . 




THE 
SMOOTHEST 




lOCALLY' ja Center St.. Northampton Mass., 

and South Hadley, Mass. 



Main OrFicB: 

1546 I S48 Hrc.adway. 

New York < ity 



These Studio* offer the best skilled 
4rtiBts and most complete 

equipment obtainable 



WE SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 

In so far as our betiefits are mutual. 

THE AMHERST (.AS COMPANY 

Elverything Electrical 




A CHECKMATE to your «mole 
that bites and bums! Velvet the 
sdected tender middle leaf —aged in the 
leaf over two year* — producing a mfUowneMthM 
only the measured pace of lime can encompan. 
A flavor and smoothness tremendously good I 

Pipe smoking with Velvet is a revelation — 
proving that time only can make tobacco what 
we would all have it — smooth. 

"Your Movel" 

At all dealers. 



r" XO Jj^tr^Jfye^^^"^ (^- 



I'l.i'wai'wi l^< ano 



_^ FOUNTAIN PEN 

Minimize your ^"""^S n if fiH <^ 

^ troublea by ownlnft a Mfwrcn. C It •« »be .^^ 
Mf«.t 7?unde* t and most dependable P«n kn.Mj'n. 
ftSl?i'enfttn« in It. very Bitnpllclty. Nothing 
flnlky to ftet ou t of order. C You can g ve your 
.Th no llctler treat than a Moore's Noo-leakable 

For Sale by l>«aleT» E»erywher« ^ 

American Foanlain Pen Company ../ 

IM DEVONSHIRt STREET :: BOSTON. MA.S.S. >^^^ •^f>t^ 



The ColUge Signal. Tuesday. December 9, 19 » 3- 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOABD OF BDITOBB. 

CHESTER K. WIIRF.I-KR U. Editor-in-Chief 
FKANK W. lUEI I- 'li. ManaRing Kditor 

HAROLD C. BLACK 'u. CompctUion Editor 
HAROLD }. CLAV 'u. Assistant Editor 

STUART B. FOSTER '14, Athletic Editor 

ERVINE F. PARKER "14. Alumni Editor 

1 ALBEKT l'RICE'15. Athletic Editor 

GF.O E DONNEIL'i?. I>epartment Editor 
EARLE S. DRAPER '15. Campus Editor 

TYI FR S. RfKiERS'ifi. Associate Editor 

CHARLES W. CURTIN'i6, Associate Editor 

BUSINESS DEPARTMBWT. 

ERNEST S. CLARK. IR 'u- '«"» Manager 
MAl'RICE J. Cl.orr.H 'iv AsVt Bus. Mgr. 
ERNEST F. Uf'TON "u, Adwertising Managei 
W. RICHARl>^E AKS'i5 Asst. \dy Manager 

"subscription I1.50 per yt-ar. Single 
copies, s cents. Make all orders payable 
to Ernest S. Ciabk, Jr 

Entered M ••cood-ctaM nwtter at «h« AmhetW 
0«nce. 



of all men. We cannot urge it too 
strongly on the men to take advan- 
tage of these lectures. 



Vol. XXIV . TuBSPAV . Dec. 9. No. 12 
" Boost Old Aggie." 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

[Notices for this column should be dropped in 
theSuiNAi. Office or handed to Earle S. Draper 
•15, on or before the Saturday preceding each 
issue. 1 

Dec. 1()— 1-1(» IV M. Assembly. Mr. 
l<rankH. I'ope, Marlboro. 
Dec 13—3-00 V. m. Hockey. M. 
A. C 2nd team vs. Wil- 
liston academy at M. .\. 
C. Hink. 
4-00 I'. M. Informal at the 
Drill hall 
1V(.. h_J).15a m. Sunday C'hai)el. 
Rev. Samuel A. Kliot, 
President American I'ni- 
tarian Asoocialion. 
I)e^.. i(;_7-()<i V. M. Stockbridge 
Club. 
7-30 I'. M. 
Club. 
Dec. 17—1-10 y. m. 




THERMOS 

CARAFE 

Have a Hot Coflee in Your Room. 

Fill at the cart Stay hot 24 hours 

Other styles for tramps. 



KEEPS HOT 



KEEPS GOLD 



DEUEL'S DRUG STOBE 



Landscape Art 



Assembly to be 



nnnotinced. 



The first pin in the eampaijin for 
an athletic Held has been tireil. The 
call for fun<l8 from the students met 
with a spontaneous* ros|M)nse. and not 
only linancial support, but unlimite<l 
moral stipi»orl was given to the move- 
ment. This Ibid has for years l»een 
a dream, and now the opportunity 
has come to make this dream a real- 
ity. The spirit of the motto of the 
year, "lto«»st Ohl Aggie" was never 
more manifest titan on that day. as 
each man willingl> and entlmsiastic- 
ally pletlged his part toward the sum 
uecessary to complete the field. 
However, it is to the alumni and 
friends of the college that we must 
look for the bulk of the money. Men 
of Aggie, this is the best ciiance you 
will ever have to "B<M»st*'. Will you 
get beneath aiul help? We. who are 
Aggie men of the undergraduate 
iKxly. know that you will. Our rec- 
ords in athletics deserve it, the rela- 
tions which we have with other insti- 
tutions demand it. It is going to l>e 
a reality next year, and you -Sons 
of t)ld Maj's'chusetts" are going to 
see that the uecessaiy support is 
given it. 



UNITY CHURCH 

North Pi.kasant St 

A Church home of the Jil>eral Failh. 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

KKOllLAK SUNDAY SKKVICK .4T 7 I' m 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest line in 
the state outside of Boston. 



CAMPUS NOTES 
A gooil chance to boost old Aggie 
— dig deep and help supi>ort the new 
athletic field. 

The last informal of the year I'.HS 
comes on Saturday. Knough said- 
it will be a gootl one ! 

A brief organization meeting of 
the Kpiscopal stmlents was held 
after chapel on Monday. 

A new system of Hible classes, 
which is n«»w underway, will liegin 
directly after the winter recess. 

A large nund»er of Aggie alumid 
returned to collejie the past week for 
the various fraternity banquets. 

With almut ?2'»<M> pledged by the 
student iHwIy. pro8i>ecl8 for a new 
athletic field were never brighter. 

The Roister Doisters will give the 
first protluction of the Shakespearean 
Comedy. "Comedy of Krrors" In 
Montague on Friday evening, Dec. 
12. 

A game for the second team 
hmkey men will be played on the 
college rink this Saturday, with Wil- 
liston academy, if weather conditions 
permit 



See our line of Drill Shoes 

E. RUSSELL NORTON $2.00 tO $4.00 



SALES AGBNT 



Davenport Miller 
Vein Coal 

Best Quality Pennsylvania Coal 



MODERN REPAIR 
DEPARTMENT 



E.M.BOLLES 

(OM VOliW %»/AV TO ^. O.) 



BOSTON OFFICE 

85 Water St. 



NEW YORK OFFIC K 

I Broadway 



A FisK opportunity has btt>n pre- 
sented to the men this year, in the 
course of lectures which are being 
given by Mr. Bridgman Stich a 
thing as this has been neede«l, and 
the trustees have added a greatly 
appreciated feature. The subject 
of this year's course is one in which 
every live and up-to-date man mtist 
take a great intere>*t. The coinse 
offers ideas which are up to the min- 
ute and no one can afford to miss the 
lectures. It is not too much to sup- 
pose that within the life of some of 
us "World Pence" will be an accom- 
plished thing : in fact, if the move- 
ment increases as rapi<lly in the next 
decade as in the past, it is evident to 
oven the skeptical, that many of us 
will live to see the true brotherhood 



Get out your running suits ! The 
iMiard track has been set up on the 
south side of the drill hall, and will 
be a scene of activity after the Christ- 
mas holidays. 

Prof. Hobert W. Neal contribtited 
the leading article in the November 
Leiiffet, the odicial perimlical of the 
New Kngland association of teach- 
ers of Knglish. 

Next Tuesday. Dec. Hi, P. H. 
Smith of the experiment station will 
speak to the Stockliridge club about 
Agriculture in Kurope. All those 
interested in this are invited to 
attend. 

Miss Helena (ioessuiann addressed 
the Catholic club of Smith college on 
Wednesday evening Dec. 3, her sub- 
ject being •' The Saints in the iOth 
Century." A reception was tendered 



I.OW RItlCC TAILCMtlNC CO. 

SI ITS MADE TO ORDER 
Suit,( leaned. Vre^ 1 I>ved All kind, of 

Kepair.l« for Lad. "."'""triroT %Vork 

IliBh-urade work ... ,m v. class tailor. worn 
calfed for and delivered. -Sell tickets for pressing. 

4 St'lIS FOR f I W 

GEORGE KOTOWITZ. PROP. 

Main ."Street, Anihet^t. Mas* .. ^'»"*l'?iP*^'' 
On vour way to the I'-M < »fficr. Tel. 43^V. 



Coolcp's Rotcl 

Springfield, Mass.. 

Solicits the patronage of the Stu 
dents of the Agricultural C olUu'' 
to class dinners and individually 



I. M. LABROVITZ, Custom Tailor 

Fashions, Fit, First Class Work Guaranteed 

»,«H r|. \ IS KI'RNISH1.N(;S. Ked-Man Collar* anrt 

I aree a.ssortment on hand. f.l-N t ^ ^^ ■ » hpms SIHTS 
^ Dress Shins. Cleaning atid Pressing. DRhSSSLIl^ 

TO KENT. Military Collars and Gloves. »« \<iS 

II AMITY ST., Telephone 302 W. AMHERST, MA» 

CHRISTMAS GIFTS ! 

A portrait i.^ a most acceptable Christmas gift- 

Appoinlmt^tUs made now can be finished u tini< 

Miss McClellan's Studio is tlie Place 



44 State Strekt, 



Northampton, >Iass 



The College Signal, Taesdij. December 9, 19 13. 



■^j;,, (;(H>.siiiaiin at the close of her 

le( tnre. 

Another dean's list has been posted 
and still the same number of sophs 
uii.i freshmen are down. Only five 
fiiou- weeks and then the 1st senies- 
t, i will be over. This means that a 
link' midnight oil ought to be burned 
l.y a few. 

!• i« up to every freshman to get a 
i;»|.i //«/<•.»• to start his collection of 
,l...,^. year books. Kvery upper 
-man will tell you the advantages 
.f (luing this, and especially so when 
vou can start with a book that is so 
.iijicrior in every way. 

••Dick" Powers and "Hilly" Stioug 
t|jf iiuiiibers of .M. A. C. ret-ently 
■ It'itt'il l'» attend the social serviee 
fuuveution, will leavr litwtoii l).c. 
2^, at i o'clock for Kansas City, 
arriving there on the 2 1st. Koflcrick 
IKhU "l.'" will accoiiipMiiv them as he 
es|>ects to attentl. 



A new iiiii)ruvi"uu'nt has l>ctu made 
<m the campus, in the line of steps on 
the cross-walks. .Such innovations 
are always welcome by the student 
hotly. 

Fellows in the doiiniloiie^ would 
like to have lights lighted a little 
earlier from now on. Ht-tween 3 and 
4 o'clock 1'. M.. on clou<ly days it is 
impossible to study because of dark- 
ness, thus inconvt'iiiencing many stu- 
dents. A little extra light at that 
time means a lot in the way of con- 
venience. 

A cordial invitation is exteixled to 
M. A C. men td attentl the Am- 
herst- Weslryan debate in College 
hall Fritlay evening ut >* o'eloek. 
The question for discussion will be. 
Kestdved : — "That liiited States 
vessels engaged iu coust-wise trade 
should pay the same toll in paMsIng 
through the Pati:iina eaiial a.s all 
other vesstds." 



WHEN CONSIDERING FERTILIZERS 

la cj in_-cii f • wi I y »iir s u Ih;s and exi)ertii» -nls, don't fail lu .K(|u.iint 
vjiirself with t\: .vrvl^rful pr»ducin4 and siil nouri-hing properties of 



V\ rile lor booklets 
on •' Soil Fertility," 

•• I he tiras.* Crop." 
"I he Apple." etc. 




One Dollar Inveated ' 
in HuhharJ's lione 
Base hertillzera 
buys as much plant 
food as $1.70 to 
$I.MO in low grade 
fertilizers. i 



THE ROGERS ti HUBBARD COMPANY. Niddletown. Conn. 



«>m< 



itnil \l<,ik». I'fxl Iniiil. (••nil. 



w 



" Keeping in Front 

You (eiiows know what that means I 
We've been very successful in this 
regard with Fatima Cigarettes. By 
the way, these cigarettes were first 
sold in the college towns — and you 
agreed with us that they were good. 

Then we put out for the hia race, 
to make Fatimas of nation-wide rep- 
utation, and today more are sold than 
any other cigarette in this country. 

No purer, or more carefully chosen 
tobacco grows than that in r atimas. 
We purposely put them in a plain 
inexpensive wrapper — in this way 
we can afford quality tobacco, and 
twenty of the smokes for I 5 cents. 

Now your college crew is of utmost 

importance to you — so is a good 

( igarette, and it's your aim in life 

to keep Fatimas in the lead —right 

;> to their good quality — right up 

where you first found them, and 

1 always find them. 

' I ess fellows I You started this 
'ireite on its successful career — 
<i V ou pull a strong oar all over 
' 5 country. 




FATING 

CIGARETTES 




TUtttnciirel^ btdirKJual' 



the: keiy 

Successful crop growth rests, as we all know, primarily on a 
rich soil-that is, available fertility or avinhihle f<l,itii J\>t>,l. \\ hen 
the available plant food is exhausted, then it must be supplied in 
one way or another in order to secure satisfactory returns. It is a 
I ,i>e of give and take. The crop says in effect, " Feed me and 1 
will feed you," and while it is very exaeling in its demands, yet it is 
generous in its returns Supplied with less than half a grain of 
.ictu.il plant fooJ to each pound of soil, it will return a million or ten 
million-fold in food foi man and bcist. Thus it is obvious th.it 
living^ growing crops, like living, glowing animals, must l>c sup 
plied with food, either from natural sources or by the skill of man. 

'I*o aid in supplying the need of "plant footl " is the reason 
lor oiii existence. 

Study the Plimt Ftuui f>rohlrm 

Sifm,- ,'f ,'ni piihliittth'Hs III ;\ 
htlp you •:• -:- •:■ 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER COMPANY 
43 Chatham St., Boston 




. A. SHERARD 



MEN'S STORE 



U 



OUR NEW CASH OiSCOUNT CARD 
AND SAVE FIVE PER CENT ON 



SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 



SOLE AGENT FOR 



THE GENUINE AND ORIGINAL 



PATRICK MACKINAW 



isa 



1! 



»4i^H wi:vi>c>%v i)i«i»f^.rW' 



•AT 



Agent, R. S. Bragg, Kappa Sigma House. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 9, 1913- 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 9, 1913 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 



TheTMERS Mm. 



JoMiersof WrouRhl Iron and Brass I'lp*, \alve» 

and KittiriKS for Steam, Water and Ga*. Asbestos 

and Magnesia Holler and I'lpe CoveiniKS, I'lpe j 

Cut to Sketch. Mill Supplies. Kn«ii eeis and j Of Boston 

Contractors for Steam and Hot Water Heatins. I j t l T..4.,. ..•! CftkAAlc 

Auton.atic Sprinkler Systems. UoHer and hn«ir e RgCOminenllS TeaChBfS, TytOfS aDll SCDOOlS 

Connections. - • Holyoke. «•»•. 



i^'O li<i\lilon St. 



C&rp^n-ter & Morehouse, 

PRINTET 




No I, Cook Place, 



J 



Amherst, MaM. 



Students Attention ! ! ! 

We are ready at the start to furnish you with a fine 
line of Campus and Fraternity House Views, also Post 
Cards. Kodak work given prompt and careful attention. 
KnlarKtng and picture framing given our personal at- 
tention. See us about Groups and Portraits for the very 
best work. 

Satisfaction Guaranteed. Patronize 
the Square Deal Studio 

KINSMANS COLLEGE STUDIO 

Nash BlocK, Amherst 



H. M Ro«.ERs, '15. Agent. 
87 Pleasant St., 



Studio Phone 303-2 



I GRAND SWEEPSTAKES TROPHY 



i,|7S0.00 Sterling Silver Cup) 
roR 



RFCT STATE EXHIBIT OF POTATOES 




AT THE 



New York Land Show 



1912 



WON »Y 

TheLLClevelandCompany 

HOULTON. M«. 

f^NE of the largest and most 
^^ reliable seed potato houses 
in the United States. Competi- 
tion open to the entire United 
States anil Canada. Messrs. E. L. 
Cleveland Company also won the 
First Pri/c for Best Gmrty Exhibit 
of PoUtoes. (Silver Cup valued 
at $2nO.(X). > 
The E. L. Cleveland Company use 

L FRANK COE 
FERTILIZERS 

E. Frank Coe Fertilizers have 
been the business farmer's favorite 
for over tifty-five years. Why not 
follow the example of these lead- 
ing i-omniercial potato growers. 

>».. »nrh. <» ".t IHv \t.,ry;t .\ I'rn/HaMe Pntafn 
( r;p- "rlllan hr in «r««-.«A IMntj, il.lM hr-rr 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATION 

No better evidence thiit the Chris- 
tian Association is alive to its 
responsibility could be given than the 
report of Mr. Sherk at the meeting 
Thursday night. He spoke of the 
foreign work which is beiug carried 
on by the ussociation in Thorndike 
an<l Three Rivers. Eight fellows go 
down Tuesday and Thursday even- 
ings and teach English to classes 
uggiegnting l.'»'> Polish mill people. 
The Hoys' Club work is also pro- 
gressing rapidly, and Mr. Sherk is 
busy planning an organization of all 
the clubs in this section. It is hoped 
that representatives from these tlif- 
ferent dubs will be able to meet here 
in convention next spring. A pro- 
gram of farm demonstrations, sports 
und lectmes will be followed out, 
closing with a religious meeting on 
Sunday evening, at which some noted 
Mpenker will a<libcs8 the boys. 

The North Iladley club is now 
being organized and will afford a fine 
opportunity for college men to do 
work. AVilliamsliurg is to have a 
Iwjys' club under the direction of 
Aggie men, and all fellows able to 
<l.. lM>y wout work have here a 
chance to show what they can do. 
Chestertiehl and Worthington, back 
in the hill>. arv asking for men to 
carrv on work in those tt)wns. 

The M. .\ ( ( brislian a88o<'ia- 
lion is this year covering not only 
its own territ«»iy but that of Andierst 
college si'H well, for the latter h:th 
lurne«l practi<ally all it"* ^^rk over 
to thin college. It is up to us to 
make g«MMl, and we can do so only 
by having the co-operation of every 
n>an in college 

Chri.-.tian ii»s«Kiation meetings 
will begin luTenfter at fi-JU) Instead 
of ti-4.'.. 



LECTURE SERIES 

I nnlinurd from p.>ge i J 



The Coe-Mortimer Company, 



51 CHAMBERS STREET. 
NEW YORK. N. Y. 



utreiiglh of ii world jw^wer would l»e 
through the moral strength and per- 
smtslon of each nation. 

The ipicstion of the size of a world 
IkmIv. whether a large one of six 
hundred men as the Parliament of 
England or a snudl one such as our 
Senate, would arise. It would seem 
that the latter woid<l be the more satis- 
factory, as a snjall Innly of uieti can 
umlerstand each other better :tnd 
such an assembly would not be cum- 
bersome. A large body of men of 
diver.**e opinions ami interests couM 
not be in 8U<h close harmony as a 
small group who thoroughly under- 
stood each other's feelings. 

If the idea of world sovereignty 
,.xi>tr.l. lb.- minds of the people 
I North. South, East and West would 
I change. There would be one 
I Fatherlan<l. one Hag. one creed, one 
race, one language nn.l <.nc liberty. 
iTheie would l>e but <>uv justice and 
I the entire world would live in per- 
feit pence and (piiet harmony. 

In Ihe fourth lecture Mr. Hridg- 
man Kpok<- sis follows : An interna- 
tional fact that it would be of ad- 



vantage to take up soon thi .ugh 
world legislation would be th:.t no 
nation shall conquer any more lerri- 
tory. The world has progress, d 9^, 
far at the present time that no tiition 
would dare to stand out and 8a\ tlmr 
they wanted to c<mquer another i„r 
territorial gain. The reasons whv 
nations continue to increase their 
armament is l)ecau8e other nations dd 
so. (iermany increases her n«\v l,e- 
cause England does and Fraiit . fol. 
lows suit so as not to be lieaten .»j 
her traditional enemy. 

In IDOl) a petition dealing witli 
national peace was circidated tincmgl, 
the faculty of M. A. C. and also at 
Amherst. The president of M. A.t 
and ten professors signed it. as diil the 
majority of the Andierst faculty, it 
was also signed and backe<l ii|) 1 v 
influential judges and political Itai 
era throughout Massachusetts, the 
western part of the state being e«i«><- 
iully interested. The i)etition state* 
that the I'nited States will not go to 
war to increase her territi>ry liy (on- 
(juest. In the pri>gre8s of this l-il! 
thn.ugh the Congress it passeil tli 
connnittee of foreign affairs and w 
brought before Congress. Altlioii^ 
for two sittings it was not taken 
up, due to more pressing busini>- 
the moment, it is expected thsl 
will l>e passed at the next conveuing 
of C«u>gres8. 

The United States has a pi» « < uti 
in this case for Brazil had in thvi: 
constitution thai they would 1- 
annex territory and this is u ww 
precedent for the other nations • 
follow. In a recent s|)eecli inM.ie ij 
Presiilent Wilson in the Soinh be 
stated that the I'nited States "i!i 
not take any more soil by corjqii"' 
He is of course backed in this o|')[< 
ion by the sentiment of hi** p.i' 
Eord llaldane of the Uritisli r.<ri* 
raeiit hat", also expressetl in imMv 
that 8U<h is the policy of (*r> 
Britain. Why will not (Urmsoj 
and the tithcr countries take « timiUf 

stand? 

As to the changes of Loorni' 
lines under a world unity sysleni tbe 
same principles would exist »>> 
alrea<ly noted in the case of Ma^* 
chusetts and the Inited Stati-s. Tb' 
world woufd be divide<l ho that «<* 
territory or state would be ;» niotial 
gainer the same as was s.en 1'^ "^ 
division of Maine from .Mas^cbi 
setts in 1 «•-♦<> where each wa»Hhle» 
progress better with the srimrstioB 
As at the present time no law»»f* 
broad enough to cope with ^ucb m^ 
portant matters as intt 
transportation, this is a riKiil<r •"' 
the world legislative bo.lv «ill '"*' 
to take up. 



•HH —Willis S. Eishcr li '- "'"'•■ 
been elected Principal of i" 
Street (Irammar Schmd. '''"•*''\'^°^; 
H. I. For many years Mi. r" 
has been eminently sn. ■ est-f"' ^^ 
principal of the Lincoli -c*"^' 
Melrose. 



I 



• :rk'lS 



Eldridge '14 



All Student Supplies 



M. A. C STORE 

BANNERS AND POSTERS 

CANOV TONIC 

Montague '15 Hager '16 



Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

r\<'KKKS. l>Oi;i.TI(V I>KKss|.;KS 
,4M» HtlTKIt .M.^KKKS. 

WIKILKSAI B |iKM>RS I N — — 

Bccl. MuttoB, Lamb, Veal. Pork, Laril. Ham.*. 

Hacon, Saucagc*. l>oultry, Oame. Butter 

CIm«*c, EgK*. Beans. 

oftce & >tores 53-5!.S7.5<J. ' & "3 Blackstonc St. 

Hotton. Packing House, UriKhton. M»s». 

Niti« Poultry Dres»inK Plant, Itoston. 

Creameries in \'erniont. 



Why Bise Early 

For Breakfast? 

(let your meals at the 

DOG CART 

Commotation Dckits, $1.10 for $1.00 



SEEAND 

TRY A 

DE LAVAL 



Those who know 
buy the De Laval 

< r> i*mrr|rni<>n— H«caNM they are e«- 
'^ lithe handling of cream and know 
I .nn ex{>rrience that th." I)e Laval 
■ :« cleanest and wear« longest. I h;it 
• why ttW of the World's creaineriei li- 
ti'» De (.aval exclusively. 
I':i|>rrlrnrr<t Italryrarn- The Del^val 
it the univer<al favorite among big dairy- 
■i-n. They km^w that no other separator 
"ill give them such satisfactory service. 
oi<l l>« l^val llarra -Whenever a man 
'.''<> has used an old mn<1el lie I aval de 
' )■ '^ to purchase a later style machine he 

» itubly buy< another De I. aval. 
Mrn Who InventlKatr— Hecause tliev 
'i. t a large majorit y of De Lava I machines 
■' M*»; thst they are used by the best in 
r. everywhere; that ihe> stand 
•■. inA th.it their usersare het 
. .^1 •- i tlian uvrs 111 .it her separators- 

THE DE UVAl SEPARATOR CO. 



lUo-idway, 
Sew York. 



nt E. Madison St. 
Chicago. 



NINETEEN-THIRTEEN NOTES great number of the browntatl moths 

in M.iiisoii at the present time." 

'•lyi.J SKSIIT." 

The New York banquet at Keisen- 
weber's at O-.SO instead t)f8-0(). 

The .Springlield ban<nu't at The 
Highland atC-au. 

The Boston baiupict at the Cnited 
States at fl-Od. Robert Parsons ami 
W. C, Whitman. ex-llUM iin'ii and 
now attending .Mass. Institute of 
Technohjgy have signified their inlen- 



[ 



EI>lTKIi BY TIIK. NINKrKKN-TIIIKTKKN 
M. A. ('. i'l.UB OK AMIIKKST. 

J. Wan en Covill, Ass't, Business 
Manager, J. I. Bailey Co., Mercantile 
Business address, C'tl Washington 
St , Boston. 

Erank 11. CuUey, Howard univer- 
sity scholarship in tlu- (ira<luate 
.School of Landscape Architecture — 
address, .Suite 1'), Trinity Hall, Cam- 
bridge. 

The following clipping appearetl in 
the Monson news of the Springtiehl 
JiepiihUcau : — "H. S. Eay, the hx-al 
superintendent for the suppression of 
the browntail niotli. wishes to assure 
the pro|iertv owners that tliele is no 

The Highland Hotel 

Corrvr of lliUiii.iii and lt.un<s '^tift-t',. three 
blocks from the I'nion De|M»t. i> a iimdein ht)S 
lelry run on the Kiiti)i>e,(ii PUn It is |ust 4 stefi 
from Main .•»treet. away iKiiu the luiise and dust 
anil vet in the center ol the hiisiness distilcl. 

Its rooms are w<fll furnished and comturtable, 
liaving a teleplione and hot and cold ruiiiitiiK 
water in every riM>m. f'lices SI -mil up. io<*iiis 
with l>ath (single I •I..1U and up. 

Itsexcellent cuisine anl well veiitiLited dining 
room makes a meal a pleasant iiieiiKirv-.very 
thing of tin- hlght-Nt <{U.tlitv. well Kiiiked and 
served in the liest postioU' manner 

Stay at the llighl.tnd lintel once .uid vuu will 
anticipate staying there again. Music every 
evfning. 

D. H. SIEVERS, 

HIjlhlaiMl lliil'l S|,rli.K«lf l.l. Mi»-». 



Stki'hk.n Kani; l^u.ciK. h 

!MANrr*«-nMi.N«» jkvvki.k.m 
IHO MK<>.\I»\V.\Y. NKW VOKK 

C'l.l'H V.NI» tHUA^K*iK 
ooi.n. I* ft. view awn nmnnmm »• «?•••.»• 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Suaday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



tion of being at the Boston feed. 

•'WKIUUNO BHEAKKA.sr." 

.Sunday morning, Dec. H at S-;J0, 
at DiapJr Hall. Host :— the •'I'.M.r* 
.M. A C. dull i»f .Vmherst. (Jiiests: 
All I'.>1;5 mwn and former members. 

"11)13 ?ltMK) ATHI.KTH HKI.I» KDNH." 

By the time you get to this notice, 
191.'}, you will have reatl alMiiit all 
there is to know alMiiit the athletic 
field cam|)aigii, except perhaps con- 
cerning our latest competitors. The 
class of r.MT. the undergra<luate 
freshmen, have gone on recoul as 
challenging the class <*f l'.M.'J, the 
"Alumni EriHlunen" to rainc nu»re 
money for that Held than we will. 
They have got 2(M) men to tmr BX>, 
ami have just pleilged something like 
$IiyO. but the next step is the get- 
ting in <»f the real coin. We starleil 
the ball-rolling, let's finish the j«ib. 
It's oui niovr. ilig up, ThirteeniteM, 
and prove that we are still there. 



The Connecticut Valley 
Street Railway 



lliere are seven good reasons 
why TOO should buy 

GOAL 



Erom Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields. past the f<K>t 
of Sugar Loaf Mt., alongside the 
famous Hloody Mro<jk battle ground 
to Old Deerfield. thence to (Jreen- 
field, Turners Ealls and across the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta 
gue and Millers Ealls. 



50 Miles ol Trackajce Hodern 
Equipment Train Dispatch- 
ing System- Freight and Ex- 
press Service over entire line. 



EWELL'S 

STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUQ5 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWKR KXPKNSKS Knable us' 
to oflFer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 



Of 



C R. ELDER 



Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



ALUMNi NulfcS 

"T.*.— Uev. Henry Hague has 
retHivered from the severe illness 
from which he HufTerfHl. 

Kx-'94. — C. L. Thompson, address 
M'.lM MonadiKM'k BiiiUling, Sau Fran- 
cisco, Cal. 

•00. — Uulph l>. (lilltert ami .Mil- 
foni H. Clark 'f»7, were seen anaind 
the campus recently. 

•(M)— Arthur F'. Frost and Frank 
A. Bartlett of tlie Frost «t Bartletl 
Co., Staiiif«»rd. Conn , have recently 
started the publication of a quart4Tly 
journal <levoted to the planting, cure 
and treatment of trees and landscape 
forestry. The name of the publica- 
tion is Tr€f Talk. 

•()7. — .1. T. Carutlni^ in Inad of 
the department of agronomy at Fisk 
university, Nashville, Tenn. He has 
a •'.■ri. .lolin f^uincy. now seven 
iiionth.*^ <j1«I. 

'10.— Frank H. Palii.ige has re- 
signed from the Kamahamelia scIkmjI 
and is now engaged in the pineapple 
business. Atldress, Hnskii Maui, 
Hawaii. 

•1(1 _Uri .Iiine L'», a daughter. 

Hachel Phix-be Beenjan, was born to 

Mr. and Mrs. Francis .S. Beeman of 

Ware. 

•|(). — On,. ,,f the women's club in 

Ware, offered a .up to the dairy 
selling milk in lowii, who.se milk 
Bcoretl the highest at the recent milk 
show in Springlield. Beeman Bros., 
K. S. B.riiian '10 and B. S. Beeman, 
M. A. C. short course '07, won the 
oop, with a score of 94.86- 



AND 



CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 




cox SONS 



— ANt> 



VINING 

7a74 Madtwin Avenue, New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

Hest Materials aod Woikmanship 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



if Main St., Ma.sonic BIdg,, 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Cloitd only f rem t A. M. Ic 4 A. M. 

Toefil Mientka 

snoes snineii and Pollsheil 

Make old nhoes look like new 

Neat, cla.ssy workmanship 
Opan Nnndajr Main St. 

On war to Past Offica. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 9, 1913- 



TENNIS 



The Massachusetts Asricuitural Gollese 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty six teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

RACKETS Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects: 




-A.t— 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELER ANO OPTOMETKIST 

Lenses ground while you wait 
College Jewelkv 
Vtolin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitai >tr n<* 

A.MIilCK^T, MAhM. 
Next to Post Dfhce. 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairyinig 

Poultry Husbandry 



Horticulture 

Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape hardening 

Pomology 



DEUEL'S 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

High- Grade College Work 

LAUNDRY 
Shirts, - • lo-isc 

3 i-«c 

a I-2C 

48c per doz. 

- 30c per doz. 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Sleam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and I'ressing, 11.50 a Suit 



Agricultural Chennstry 
Economic Entomology 
Plant Physiology and Pathology 
Agricultural Education 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 

KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

amherst, mass. 



STEAM FITTING. Tetephone «-, 

GAS FITTING. TINNING. 

P. W. Dance & Co. 
PLUMBERS. 



Specialty of Repairing 

Chukch Windows, 
Memorial Windows, 

LeAO LUiHTS, &c. 
♦ CUaonAve.. AMHERST. MASS 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



Collars. 
Cuffs, - 
PUin wash, 
Same, rough dry. 



K.ALi'H J. HonutN. Agent, 7 North Cottice 
KiiWAKii C. Ei>WAiii>». Agent 

Put full name and address on laundry 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 

Loose • Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 

liefore baying elsewhere, see our assort- 
ment of pennants and banners 

CUKRAN A DYER. Props. 



Athletic Board, 

'J'he College Senate , 

Football Assoeiulion, 

HiUMiball Assoeiatiou, 

Track AsaociatioD, 

Hockey Aasociution, 

TeuDitt Aasociatiou, 

Hide club, 

lioist«r UtHalern 

Musical AHHociution, 

Nineteen Humlrcd Fourteen Index, 

Niueteeu Huiidretl Fifteen index, 

M. A. C Christian AHSociutiou, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Coufereuc«, 

SUxk bridge Club, 



Cataloijues of 

I^ctll ^le V\rii»tor C>«>o<la 

Are Out. Copy mailed to any addr^-^s 
Student* and .Vthletes wlio want the i>-a\. -^ . 
articles for the various »port<s should lnM^•. 
those bearing the Wright & Ditson 1 la ;- M. > 



George H. Chapmau, Secretary 

1). W. .lones, I'lesideut 

J. A. I'rice, Manager 

G. 1). Melicau, Manager 

E. C. Kdwurds, Manager 

,). I). I'ellett, Manager 

K. E. MacLain, Manager 

J. T. Oertel, Prehident 

1>. .1. Lewis, Manager 

H. 1>. lirowu. Manager 

E. S. Clark, .Ir., Manager 

H. M. Kogers, Manager 

K. H. Powers, Pre»i«k'ut 

1). A. Coleman, Presitleul 

J. 1). I'ellett, President 

N. H. Dearing, Presideut 



Foot Ball 
Basket Bail 
Hockey 
Skates 




Skat'gSboM 
Sweaters 
Jer.se>s 
Uniformt 
for all sporU 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



U^hen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables. 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



Wright »V Ditson (Joods »rf the -i. u 
all tports 

U4 VVasliington J^t., Bostoii. »ii» 

THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CI-E>^NSINO, 

PRESSING. 

REPAIRING. 

Unickeat l»«r»l«», lte»t Work. Lowr.i Pt"' 

All woik carefully done. Work called iotm 
delivered. Gents' overcoats, suitv P««t» »" 
coats. Ladies' hne linen suits a specialty 

Teams will call every day at M. .A < 

Wn. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rmi Nash Brk. Amherst. 



rel .V'' Vi 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



CARS 



Leave AGCIIF COLLEOB lor HOL 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



CARS 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300 



Barsalotti & Gentoso 

Cigars Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresh Candy 

Ice Cream, Fruit, Soda, Etc. 

The Right Goods at the Right Prices 

Open till II o'clock EVERY night 

Oracr Amity •nd I'lesMnt Street* 



If jou want to be 

SOLI 11 WITH TMK OIRI.S 

yon must have yonrclothcn prt* le.l and cleaned 

ATBFSTBZN'S 



11 Amtty »t. 



Maroon Store 



Leave AMHERST for AOUIE COl- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 min. past tui 
HOUR. 

SpccM C«r* at RmmmM* RalM 



AIHERSI i SUNOtRLANO 81. BK- 



PrMHlng and Cleaning a sp.-claliy 

MoKl liberal ticket ayateni In town 
Tal. 30.1-11 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia. Pa. 



For a Daily and Sunday 
You should Kea ' 



Newsp***' 



-I' H tC 



Springfield Reptibliai 

While you are at college >n \mhtr^- 
It hHnNllorThp MA C.X '• 
Tli«> B«"iil Sporting New* 
Full Clenertil New» 
A Strong: KdllorUI I'nite 
Inlerenllni^ Feature* 
It I* a Keisl Newnpiiper 

Daily, 3 cents ; 70 cents 
a quarter. 
Sumiay, 5 cents; 50 cer. 



,nth. 



quar«' 



Subscribe by mail or through t 
dealer. 



, v.«>- 



OFC Z\) 1913 



'^f f I 



THE COLLEGE SIGN^^-^" 



V . XXIV. 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEOE 

Amherst, Mass.. Tuesday. December ib. 19 » 3- 



No. 13 



BRIDGMAnTe^URES ^nB^KE/B^.Ili;^^lES^~THE"RO.STER DOISTERS WESTERN ALUMNI BANQUET 

"*"* — — __...„ _:»: I7ti^:i> Orel 



Thursday and Friday. Rules lor Conducting the Interclass First Presentation of Shakespeare's 

T, ..l„.l two lecture, of ll,e ».ru-. /M- /. •n,c.,..ne, «t pni.c. ll,,. I^,i»l,.r l.oi.ler. ..lH-m..l tlu'.r 

, . . , le .M . ■ ■■W..rl,l •-..li- »l,Hll .....M, W....,K.»,l,,v. :.. 1 , .in ,!>■ ».■»..... Vr,M, ..„iu • 

; • .rallv. I. bv 11. I.. llii'lK- »b..ll .-...muu. .very We,l„e«.l„.v .M,til ,er, .,K.c.e,«ful ,h,k1,„^.,ou "f 1.« 

;::„,. ^;r i;r;i;r M... ^ .... a» ..^... ••-■i^,,-;:;-;:-.,: ::::";:,::-tr if :,.^r'r ;: 

..■n,e .0,1.1 i» lK„n„l .0 l.e g,e.. ,v ,,„„„ -v....k : 1> . .1..... - • . -» - " ^'•^.. .„,,,„ .^ ,„ ,„. .„„„,„,„ 



(., i.ffUtcd by the adoiitioii of u world , Feb. 1 1 
guvcrniiunt <;reat advances will j Huh J. 



rii.- diaumlUMl.il. \^ t(. 1..' congnitu- 
latetl on this i».rform:imi* bet-auHe 



I ,„„,U.. ..,.1. .. long .. nation. !„,„ye.l..»el,eve„i„B.tl,. l,r.t ««".« I ^,/'-';: ^J .-.^ 1. « Vl"."- 



riiiniin at peace, the world in general , to be called at 7-00 v. m. 

will teml to develop « better, liner j^^^^^ ;j y,^^,\^ j-jhsh shall pbi.v 

.pmlity. If, however, wars are ^ j,|,.^.^. ^,.„„,.^ „•„!, ,.,„.|, „f the oilier 

vv;i_'.d. the pio|;re88 of civilization !>* ^.l^^^^,^ j,, thf folh.wing order : 

at nUd. The moral etTect of war 



mwo all kinds of nations and people 

h extremely demoralizing. For an 

pli. take the elTeet i.f the Hoer 

« 1 on Kngbiiid; there f.dlowed a 

notabb- innease in murder, in pan- 

IhtIhui. ami in drunkenness. liv 

, n,\. this residling condition of 

ii> «;i8 attribute*! to laboi con- 

aiiioii- prcvaKMit at that time, but 

tliiH «a.s not the true caiihe. It wa» 



Senior VM. Fre«bman, 

Junior vs. Sophoii»»re, 

Senior vs. Sophomore. 

.lunior va. Freshman, 

.Se«i«)r vs. .lunior. 

Sophomore vs. Freshman, 
•n.is order nball Ih- rqieatcd until 
a reqtiireil nuiidM-r of gumea In eora- 
pleteii. 

h'.,i, I. riie 'lii**** «•»'*•'' **'"'^ 



only one man ever having played 
with tb»' Koisler Doisteis before. 
Moreover, this is the ebib's llrsl 
attempt »l Shakespearian drama, 
ami the work of the men in this line 
speaks well for I be ♦xeelleiil ami 
painslukiugenortsof the eoa«h I'rof. 
II. K. SmlUi. Professor Smith has 
given his time freely, ami the men 
appreciate it fnllv. All tb.- men di.l 
well for a lirsl performance; and 
the work of t amplHll. lale. ami 
WiU'OX was parlicularly go^wl and 
k€|il the atidlence in agcK**! humor. 
After the play lhe«ollege onhestiu 



war 



,„t tlK. true .-an.e It .a,, ." • ■ ,,.,.,„„;,.. of I „,vi,|„l ,„„»i,.'f... »n .nt..rn„.l.l»n..e. 
.„.t l,a.l tbe ....1 effeet on '^-■^^'iJ:^^,^ ,1,.,, .,„ „„. ' 1,,.^ , e.iate.l .., 



Ii. people, and an especially demor- 



;i I . /. 



ing effect oil tlie sobliers. iuliuene- . l.%»k«Vtmi 



,.i, 



iiig them to crime. This coiiditi.Mi , lege 
ii.. due greatly to the glaring headlines /^»/ 
Mvl exaggerated stories publishetl 
Uv tlie newspapers. It is not a well- 
vh.wn fact that just previous the 
^l.iuish war in 1 «'.»«. the <^^«*P" 
i:, U.nt of Spain sent an ollicial mes- 
,-. to the Initeil States, saying that 
Spain would grant all demands if 
t ,. luited States wouUl promise not 
tu .. • war. But President Mc- 
KiiiiiN was so arouse<l, and (Nmgress 
1. excited by the yeUow journals 
that no heed was paid the message. 
.^Miged by the modern standards of 
t hristianity there is not a I'hiistian 
nation on earth at the present time. 
In the next place, the seho«»l-<hil- 
<^Ti-n of to<lay are not taught as much 
..It war as those of the past, and 
militiuy feeling is nowhere near 
!» strong as it used to be. The ever 
nasing feeling of brotherhood, 
wliicli is likely to grow immensely, 
i^ grt-atly to prevent war, for 
is only a test of courage and 
iigth. and it is well known that 
_'is have as much courage as 
/-•il jHMSons. It is also tnie 
.! tlicif Is in niMiiy cm-o u nioncy 
. , wliirl, is h;ick of l;'iU'- inami- 
iories of war sn|>plie8, whieli 
lies a feelingof war. The annnnl 
debt of the nations amounts to 



uiyliip •'• tut 

,. In the event that two 



shall declare the game forfeited to 
ll„. op|M»sing team. In case Imtb 
l..ams fail to appeal ..ne k«t game 
»hall Ih? sciuetl againsit eaeh. 

Huh 7. The ollleials shall Iks. 
mutuallv agreed n,K.n by the two | 
,lass managers and rep<.rtetl toj 
the Chairman .»f the Committee of j 
.Managers at least 4H hours before: 
the time of contest. | 

/,'„/, >. Kach manager shall hand 
i„ In lb.- I'hvsical F^buation depart- 
,„,„t a list of all men in his 
vlass taking pa.t in practices and 
..laving in games the Satunlay each 
week in wliub th.' prmtiees ami 
games are held, in ortler that cretl.t 
be given for IMiysieal Ivbication. 

U„h '/ The following nights are 
appointed Km the use of th. gymna- 
sium fol l'i:'*t''''' • 

'r,i,.-,d:iN >.in..i and Sophomore, 
•ri,msd;.v : .Iiinioi an<l Freshmati. 

, ... 11.., I.i^t I'MllIf of tll« 

/l ' 



i I Voi»' 

If the .Montague performance is » 
H..,. ,. .n tiie eveu. .»-. .^-^ prophecy of what is eomingMlie^'a- 

elasses shall have the sttme I--- -"V" l'"^^ T ""'TIiv uk " ^ 
tage the classes thus tbd shall- deU-r- iter Do.ste.s '-^ve I . .lay .mrnu^ 

-— ---'•> '••-i^:w'^Ck:;;d'Ne"':r:/"i?..: 

^1;rrin..as.onetea.n.al.^ 

fail to apiH.ar at the "H--^-^-"^ f "^ ;;" J,, suffern, N. V.; I>ec. 
on the scheduled date, the referee '^^ ^j^^^;^.,^,, ^. ^ . ,^^. ^j, Mid- 

dletown. N ^ ri»«y return thiist- 
,„as . s. Ill time to .iij^iy the holi- 
day atlioiiH'. rbiMe will be I'.lin lb.- 
partv. including an r.rclu'stra coni- 
p.,s.'dof I'orl.i. Hragg. Tarbell and 
Ciishing. and till..- managers I.»-wis. 
Ilddreth and I'routy. The mem- 
I bers of the caste will be the same 
ithatmad<- the MunUgne trip. 

I t M I; r' As II . 

, ^ 1 I . I , Nir.hoU'1" i' 

1 ' .F.WIn«ftPI 14 

I . (. II (.-!.•'. ^ 

' •"!'■ . . .J - ,jcu.e I- l» KeUey'i; 

,'l*^n"';;;".trs:';r;«,n« ^^•eo« .nd .l-,m,l..o 

te/;::^t;;r-:t:.'......u..ro:.U;^...«^, 

Xn«.lo.am.- ^' 1, Lincoln ,4 

M.fch.nt. a cr.-m... ". «"«■-. '■ ^ Hu.kn...n .7 
I'imh a .r.,.»,lm4,t«r. V l>*Mentt '17 

/fciinli .. 






M l>. < arntilwll 14 
< H Wilbiir'17 



Scene, l*'* '"*" "' l-l''"^""' 

Tl.^ action of tb- i.Uv it cwt.nuott*. 



The h..<K«'.\ !4a""'i 



scheduled for 



.iebtof the nations amounts to /;./■/- J^" ^;,;;,;,;:;;\,„: a„. ^^;;;;,,; ,,, ,;,,„,.,led bcauseof 

..sands of millions of 'hilars, and 1 series si a >e^,^^^^ ,^^^^,,^ „m cm.liti f the u'e. The llrst 

surely would save much money m ; niial Soi-itom ^ ^^^^ ^_^^ ,,i:,y its first game of the 

nd if war were done away with Ball game. ^^^^^^^ ^^ ^^^^ ^^^^^^ ^.^^^ Williams at Williams- 

' ' ■ \, I town, Dec. ID. 

[Continued on page 8J I 

[Continued on page SJ I 



Alumni Field Proposition Elicits Great 
Enthusiasm. Suggestions Offered. 

The atlilnde of the Western Al- 
umni assoriation, as observetl by Prof. 
Ili.ksin his recent trip to Chicago, 
gives us every reason t.» be eiieoiii- 
:ijr,.,l over the pM)speets for a new 
aUiletic Held. The alumni baiapiet 
was comparatively small in numbers 
but it was great in enthusiasm. Dr. 
Paige representing the college, re- 
ported • m the progress made tluring 
,|u. vear ami told of Aggie's future 
,levelt»pm»'«'t- Aside from the forty- 
llvi. minutes eonsume.l in transacting 
routine business, all the evening from 
„i,„. i„ quart.r of ..ne was spent in 
.tmsi.lering the prop.»sition of a new 
athletic Hehl for M. A. C. When 
any IkmIv ..f business men will give 
that much time t.. the disiussion ..f 
Aggi.-s athletie nee.ls they are cer- 
tainlv in earnest ami may l»e de- 
,H.mUMlup.mtogive their sup|H»rt to 
Ihe.ampaign f.«r the liebl 

lN..f. Hi.ks .li.l not go bef.>re iho 
Western Alumni to solicit f nnds : 
that is against the rules of their or- 
ganization. Mc did, however, ex- 
plain th- plana for the fl«*W und waa 
tagerlv cpiesli.med as t4J all the tie- 
tails of its devebM»"««'»l-^»»«' «'*** "' 
buil.ling, time me.le.l f..r construc- 
tion an.l the maiiagemeni an.l »- 

Irol ..f the «cld after it is built. 

The iilea .»f the Chhago M. A ('• 
men is t.. form a nucleus whi.h shall 
gain the inlert'st of other alumni 
thn...gh..ut the West. The chairman 
suggestetl that fiimlssli.mhl In; stitrtetl 
by tliflferent groups of abnnni ami 
that the mon.y raised by each aaiK»- 
,.iuti..n sh.>ul.l be cre.lite«I to that 
group, as w. 11 as U. the varices clas- 
hes represente.1 by the eontribuU>ra. 
There i- ■ « rlain t.i l»c a large ami 
geiienms response from the Alumni 
assm-iali.ms all over the .-..untry, fol- 
lowing the suggesti.>n8 of the Weat- 

ern Alumni. 

No <Mie thing 'lid "lore to stir up 
active inter.st an.l enthusiasm at the 
banquet than the telegram telling of 
lb.- loval HupiM.rt given by the Aggie 
„„.„m»w In cMdleg.'. The opinion 
generallv expresst-.l at the meeting 
was that if lb.' students themsidves 
wer.' rea.ly an.l gla.l t... subscribe so 
uiu.h toward their athletie fiehl. they 
must m .-I it and ii" -I i' badly. It 
also gax.- tlu- m.ii, many of wli<.m 
graduate.1 wh.-nUu' ..dlege was small, 
some i.lea of th<- large number of 
students h.i« at ih.' present tim.-. 
There was no ipiestion at all of our 
neetl for athletic facilities, but only 
of the time refpiir.'.l before Alumid 
Fiel.l will be a reality. Th<! wli.ile 
tone of the meeting was most opto- 



f| 



i 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December i6. 1913 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 16, 1913- 



li 



I, 



/ 



luiHtie and if the other uhiiiuii sliow 
the suiiif kind of spirit, there is little 
doidit liiit that inoiK'V will he forth- 
coiiiiiig to insure the Imilding of the 
athletic field, fully eciuipped. 



l'@ 



COMMUNICATION 

(Cummiiriii atioiis to the mc;nai, cuiu einiiiK 
matters of (jeneial iiitt-rest ait* welconied 1 lie 
SiiiNAi. IS not 1(1 be held respmi'-ibi'' i"r tlip 
opinions tliiir, expiesae<i.) 

KinTOR Coi.LEOB Signal: 

l)r,ir Sir: 

i am UH eager as any other aluuiiuis 
timt Aggie shall have a good field for 
athletic:*. Nut 1 aiu not enthusiastic 
over the |ilan as proiiosed in the cir- 
cular letter of the Joint Coniinittee 
• in IntcrcolUgiat- .' thietiea, and it is 
luy lielief that there are many other 
nhnnni t<i wluuu this |>r(>|>osition has 
uot been ••sokl." 

The joint committee on intercol- 
legiate athletics i8com{>o8«»d of twelve 
members, of vvh<)m two are electeil by 
the AsHociate Alumni, five consist of 
the president of the college, his ap- 
|tointees and the I'hysii-al Director, 
the remaining Ave lieing the student 
managert;. Athletics ami the athletic 
Held are then viitnally under the con- 
trol of the jircNident of the college 
That the evident intent «if this reor- 
ganization is i-.-lnt\vn I'V tin' 
flguros. It would then seem that the 
«rs|K>nsibility for the control of ath- 
letics having bicn acceptctl. tliis car- 
ries with it the resjHinsibility of pro- 
viding a suitable place to carry on the 

The ahiinni are aske*! to eontribute 
about ? I •_',<»(>«» for laying out and 
efpiipping an athletic ti»dd ; but their 
representatives constitute a minority 
on the comniitee that has this «»bjiM't 
iu hiuid. Have the alumni then no 
interest in the athletic fiehl other than 
Ui provide the ntoney with which to 
builil and equip it r Personally I 
don't feel that wtiy about it. 

There is still one phase of the 
problem which has not Iteen eonsiil- 
ered at all. This is the question of 
muintainancc. I doubt if athletics at 
M A. C are on a self paying basis 
and particularly is it certain that 
ntbietics cannot be expected to main- 
tain the fiehi. The aliiinni will 
naturally be the ones to whom the 
committee will have to look for the 
money for niuintainance. 

But this Is not the worst thing 
about the plan as proposerl. Many 
of the alumni will rememlier and 
snrely all the students and faculty 
know the «'ondition of the land on 
which it is projwsed to build the ath- 
letic field. In .lidy last. I took oc<a- 
sion to walk over this land and even 
after the weeks of dry weather one 
had only to dig down in the ground a 
few inches t«> strike water at that time, 
and this was on the higher part near 
the road. Nearer the brook one 
woidd have to wear nibViers to keep 
his feet dry even at that season after 
a long spell of .bought. A number 
of vtai-- ago when the I). G. K. fra- 
ternit\ -.laited to dig a cellar on the 
highest part of this lot they found so 



much water at a depth of three feet 
that a drain 200 feet h»ng had to be 
dug before the work could be contin- 
ued. If this was the condition on 
the highest |»art of the lot what must 
it be nearer the stream? Not so 
very long ago the lowest bid for 
ditching ami grading this land includ- 
ing the lot west of Lincoln avevnue, 
siilllcient for a baseball diamond and 
football field, was S;i.'),000. It is 
necessary only to study the contour 
lines on the sketch to get some i<lea 
of the amoinitof work connected with 
grading under the present plan. 

It is essential that a baseball fiehl 
be very «lry early in the spring, but 
the plan as propoHe<l ()rovides for the ; 
baseball diamond at what is now the | 
lowest part of the field, where the i 
soil is a heavy clav almost inpervioiis 
to water, so that there is standing , 
water the year around. Kven after j 
grading, what woiihl be the condition 
of a baseball iliamond here in the 
early sjuing'f It d^es not nee«l any 
great amount of imagination to prose 
to you that such a fiehl would be very 
late. 

The present campus in front of 
-South dormitory is on a gravelly 
knoll that has almost |>erfect natural 
drainage. Thi^ has always been dry 
very early in the spring. This knoll 
continues with this same type of soil, 
southward past the Drill hall and the 
X'eterinary I^dM»rat*iry and lakes in 
the I'lt west iif l/mcobi .ix tinie and 
south of the \ ttvrinaiy Labratory of 
ab«nit three and one half a<res, at 
present owned by one of the frater- 
nity cori>oration«. There has been 
so much sai«l as to why the lot west 
of Lincoln avenue should be use<l f<»r 
the athletic field, that it reipiires no 
argument from me. It is in<lee«l sur- 
prising that this lot has U'en left out 
of the plan now without any explana- 
tion. IJoth President Butterfield and 
Piofessor BriH>ks. .i^ w !1 i> other 
ineml»ers of the college, have empha- 
sized in the past the need of this lot 
for athletic fiehl purposes. In the 
I'.Hjy Index ^ Professor Brooks writ- 
ing on the athletic field said, "A 
careful stu^ly of dilTerent hn-ations 
led to the tfuiclusion that the lot 
King south of the Veterinary Labora- 
tory seemed, everything considered, 
is Not suited to the use in vit w." 

Why try to build an athletii' tield 
on land so little adapte<l to the pur- 
|)ose when there is an adjoining prop- 
ety so much better suited, and which 
is available? Phe committee, tin 
:ilnmni and the students do not want 
;i white ele|iha It on their hands. 
The college needs an athletic field, 
but as the future of atlihtii-' :it M . 
A. C". depends so much on the kind 
of athletic field, we will do well to 
provide the very best that is available. 

O. B. Brigos. 1900. 
Baltimore. Md. 
Dec. U, 1913. 



HERMAN'S U.S. ARMY 
SERVICE BLUGHkiR 

In Tail Willow Calt .r 

((iiu 3Ictiil. A huiul- 

s<»ine,siiain>y shoe 

oiillieOrtli'ipi'dic 

List, de^i^fiu'd liy 

ai'iiiy surgeons. 

You never saw 

a shoe like it 

for wear.euin- 

fort uuil 

style. 

Slnglo 
.volt* ot 
T<'\a> iiii- 
seimrcdoak '"X 
to,', Mdc U'allicr 
«ou liters,!' very pari 
iii>pcct4'd. I..iiiii;r 'f 
speeiuUv toteii tlriil. A solid 
leather shoo tlint will yivethe 
wear of the civilian slio«> lliat 
sello I'oP'i^O. 'I'liis is one of the 
siioes t iiele Sam lm>st«>rliis 
s' I Iters. IT'S A \V<HJLI> 
JUilAlTIIt. Seethe Aruiy line. 




HERMAN'S U.S. 
ARMY SHOES 




leasts (U'si^'iji 

AKMY Snr- 

{Tcons. Mat. 

arethchest ;,i 

can lie ulitai^ i 

Workman hip 

Inspected 

uiid uiiar- 

and e<|. 



No. 968 

GARRISON 

BLUCHER. 

Oti« of tlin most pojmlar 
in the Army Line. Ma>'«' iri Tan Wil- 
low <rtlf aihl <iuil >Ietal. II. r\ 
siturli" f*<'l<", Ihix !•••■. s<>li«l l«'iitli)'r 
tlir<>titr1i<>nt..\liaiHlsoiiiesiin|>|>> ^Imm. 
Ciiin- ill to s'l' t'lf It''-. M:iiiuf 1 ■ 

ohIv bv JoM")') .*1. Utriuiio &*('«.. i>4ivtoD. 



PRICE $4.00 



PRICE $4.00 



PAGE'S shoe: store 



THE 



Hoover & Smith Go. 

6i6 Chestnut St., Philadelpliia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 

Philadetphla's Official Fratemitf Jewiler 

SPEOIAUISTS IN 
Frmternity Badges, Fobs. Novelties, 

Rings. Charms Prizes Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals. 

Rings, Charms.-. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass 

Orrics Hours: 
t»t«> IU A.. At. t.tt«>t«>Al*. At. 




lb* 



PDeasant 

Bmitt? St.. 
Bmhcrrt 

Telephone 47^ 



i.um Meow 

AKTmNOtiN TRA 

Oinnrr if arranged f'>r 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at ij Pltasant St. 



Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses .Accurately Keplacd 
Fine Watch Kt-pairing Promptly and 
.Skilfully Done 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 



'in. — K. ,1. Fiske is un inspector 
in the Department of Kntoiiiology of 
the lusnlar goverumeut, Porto Rico. 



THINK— IT— OVER 

N oil already know the superior quality of our Soda and Ice Ci.am. 
Now gel .icquainted with our COFFKK. We serve as well a- ^ei 

GEORGE WASHINGTON COFFEE 

Unexcelled as an every-day beverage. Nou will, we feel sur. 
st<pping in for your morning Coffee. If you want a real treat - i"e 
yourself .ind bring your friends here. 

You are always welcome at 

THE HENRY ADAMS CO., Druggists 

The REXALL Store on the corner 



Heart -to -Heart Talks 

To Aggie Men 

li\ the Largest Retailers of 
Apparel /// ^ezc England 

The whoU- thought and .spirit of you nun is ccnteivtl 
upon the Clnistma.s recess, no doubt, lor you soon are 
to pack your ba^s lor the refreshing Yuiftide vacation. 

The lhou<;lit and spirit of our stoir i> i>t Christma^. 
as well. Christmas goods are pouring out o%'er our 
counters in endk-ss profusion. C'ountl-ss numb.M- -t 
the millions of gills th.it p;iss out ..i ..m hniil^ai. i.r 
MKN. for hen- in om luo mammoth binldmgs arc 
grouped more practical presents for Men and Young 
Men than in any <Jlher New England store. 

Some <,f these gills arr destined to fall into your 
hands and wc want you to appreciate llu tn. The qu.dity 
and e.xclusiveness of our merchandise is unsurp.isned, 
and gifts with our name stamped up.>n them .show the 
acme of g<»od taste and distinction. 

In giving as uell as in receiving, we want >• ^ 
look to us lor all holiday wants. 

JORDAN MARSH COMPANY 

Boston 



■ li ! 1 1 



TOBACCO 

S^E the si: cr full cf glee plpinj; up! See 
the ploe .all of Velvet helping out! 
Velvet, the !.'n. - J Wf— a^cd over Iw. years— 
ton-d dowr — sdiuwed— fit for "Prcxie 

IjjmseU. \\r -Jons : ineUninatcani.ars..- 
n- « — \ixvr- ■. "\ rei?., smoc^ncss a.'id 
dr :lop tho ? . : ".Sati ^ooi. When 
cxaras. loov f - J uncftainty is 
tip^— a tin ci .'civet v/Il Help 
Concentration and study i *> 
'• 1! At all dealers. 



Maekinaws 



AND 



Sweaters 



This is Mackinaw and Sweater season. Football, Golf and 
all other Full and Winter sport.s call for g«»nd S^^ - '. i pm- 
tection. We have ni sto* k t.ul.,\ s.s.ial huiulied Mackl- 
ii.i\\> in all gi.ulis. 

The famous Summit brand, well known in the N.-rlhwest 
and acknowledg..! i.. be ont- of the he >. C'o.a Sweaters, 
the Shawl Collar. Coat Collar ami the legular .sliape 
Sweaters, all llie best .Ht-Uing colore. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



School and College phoiographcrs . 



• • 




/ Csr-Al LV' 5J Center St.. Northampton M»i.s . 
LOCALLY. 5 ^^^ g^^^^ Hadley. Mas.. 



Main nr¥ur: 

1546 1 54K llr«»adway. 

New Yw^k City 



. sitirlios offer the l>e»t skilled 
.ift St* and mcwkl romplrle 



eqoH»ni 



' • linable 



v//^S-, 



If 



\Vi: SOLICIT YOU! I'ATROXAGE 

In so far as mir IjenefUs arc mtitual. 

Till' AMHl-ltST CAS COMPANY 

Fvervth irig Electrical 

MCDRE'Slii' 

^^^_ FOUNTAIN PEN "** 

- 'MiniiTil/.e your fountain pen ^ 

For .Sal- by !>«»•« K»«T«»'«'« 7 /iP-^^ i 

American Fountain Pen Company <'vX\\> 

Itlt OKVONSMIRfcSIRKU »"^' - 



One ouncr hart, 
Br conveiiieiiC i '>t 
cigarette wncaers 



TOBACCO 



ipi 



The ColUge Signal, Tuesday. December i6, i9i3- 



m 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 16, 1913. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evenJng by 

the Students of the Massachusetts 
A^cultural College. 

BOABD OP BDIT0K8. 

CUKSTKR K. WIIRKI.KR U. Kditor-in-Chief 
FRANK W. BlKI.l. 'i5. Man;iRinK Kditor 

HAROLD C. BLACK '14. <omp«'tit ion Kditor 
HAROLD I. CLAV 14. Assistant Kditor 

STUART B. FOS'IKR '14, Athletic Kditor 

ERVINK F. PARKKR'u. Alumni Kditor 

J. ALBKKT PRICE 'IS. Athletic Kditor 

GEO. E. DON NELL '15, Dep.irtment Kditor 
EARLE S. DRAPER '15. Campus Editor 

TYLER S. ROf:ERS'i6. Associate Editor 

CHARLE'^ W. Cl'RTIN'ift. Associate Editor 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

ERNEST S. CLARK. IR. '14. R"» Manager 
MAURICE J. CLOIGH '1;, Ass't Bus. Mijr. 
ERNEST F. I'P TON '14. Advertising Manager 
W. RlCHARDSEARSi; \-t \lv M.inager 

Subscription I1.50 per yt-ar. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all oulers payable 
to Ernest S. Ci.akk. Jr. 



tntarad M Meond-dMi temm at the AmlMfai 

Peal Omt». 

Vol. XXIV. Tuesday. Dec. i6. No. 13 



«• Boost Old Aggie." 



The iinsignetl coiniininicntion ap- 
pearing in anotlitT colinnn, from '* an 
alumnus." nee«l8 to be i»retty thor- 
oughly aiiah/«Ml by every reatler. 
wore especially the alumni. The 
writer is dissatislie*! with the present 
alumni column in Tin: Si<;nal antl 
well may he l»e. but who. let ii.s ask, 
is responsible for the hu-k of ma- 
terial ? 

We will answer that ipiestion by 
naming the party. It is none other 
than the aluuiui InMly itself. If 
members of the alumni sit and wait 
f«ir the news to come to them, and 
never help by sending in a few notes 
the columns eannot improve It 
Beeins to us that "Thirteen" ha?* given 
a challenge U> the other classes. 
Will you let the Freshmen -'Iteat you 
out. alumni? 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

fNotlces for thi* column should be dropped in 
tl»eSlr.NAL Office or handed to Earle S. Draper 
•15, on or tiefore the Saturday preceding each 
issue. I 

Dec. 17 — J. 10 r. m. Assembly, to 

be announeed. 
Pec. 19— r>-(M) p. M. Winter leeess 

begins. 
j^n. .") — i-io !•. M. Winter recess 

ends. 



CAMPUS NOTES 
Vp to date. :il>out fifteen fellows 

have fallen through the ice ! 

Monroe GifTord Tarbell "N of 

Brirafield has pledged Theta Chi. 
At Wednesday Asseutbly, a very 

interesting talk was given by Frank 

II. Pope of M-.uIboro, state auditur- 

elect. 

The new football sweaters have 
api>eared on the campus. The block 
M has been lediiced in size, and is 
now nearer the right size than ever 

before. 

Six sophomores— A nder.soii. Har- 
ris, U.ithaway, Huntington, Ma- 
honey and Wilcox— are working out 
for assistant manager of varsity 
hockey. 



Remember this : the second de- 
posit of the M. A. C. Athletic Field 
fund is due .Ian. 7, 1U13. Kxtra 
money over the amount pledged will 
be greatly appreciated. 

At Sunday chapel the speaker was 
Hev. Samuel Kliot of liostou. presi- 
dent of the American Fnitariau asso- 
ciation, whose sid)ject was "The 
Value of Antagonism." 

The October-November issue of 
the ManhtiHiltl CoUeije Mmjaziiif con- 
tains an article entitled "Hinal Soci- 
ology at the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural College," by Fiederick W. Head 
•14. 

The tiist ict' iiDckcy practise w;is 
helil Oil Fritlay. The ice was rather 
thin and the "tH-ean wave" effect of 
the ice seemed to forewarn a swim 
for the hockey stpiad. No catas- 
trophies, however ! 

The fourth debate of the semester 
in l*X'onomic8 I took place Wetlnes- 
day on the ipiestion : "Kesolved that 
the I'nited States government shoidd 
subsitlize American ships entering 
into foreign commerce." 

Several fraternities hehl their ini- 
tiation liampu'ts the past week. The 
Kappa .Sigma fraternity held their 
bauiiuet at the Prospect Ilou-se. Am- 
herst, on Friday night. The Kappa 
(lamina Phi fraternity baiMpiet was 
at the Rose Tree Inn, Northampton, 
on Saturday night. 

( hisholm mihI Moses 'hi were 
electetl to serve as assistant man- 
agers of varsity football next year. 
I'nder the new system these men will 
serve as assistant managers during 
the next season, and at the termina- 
tion of that periotl a vote of the stu- 
dent body determines whi«-h man 
shall l>e manager. 

On Tuesday evening, Dec. 1». a 
very interesting lecture by Mr. Kl- 
wo<k1 of the Lands<ape <lepartment 
on "Some Kssentials of a Landscape 
Architect" wa> delivered before the 
Lantlscape Art club. A number of 
interesting slides were shtiwn at the 
close of the lecture. About thirty 
attentle<I. 

Mr. Canning of the Horticulture 
department gave the first of a 
series of three talks »m "Hardy Per- 
ennials" <iii We<lnesilay cMtiing. 
The other two lectures will lie given 
early in the new year, and the sub- 
ject will be fully discussed from 
every standpoint. Mr. ( anniiig is 
an authority on such a subject and 
should have an ai)preciative audi- 
ence at each lecture. 

All men out for hockey and desir- 
ing to pinchase skates can obt;iiii a 
discount on them when purchased 
through the Athletic department. 
Call at the physical directoi's otlice 
and obtain a retpiisition, and the 
skates can be fitted individually in 
Boston. Kveryonc intending to pur- 
i chase skates during the Christmas 
\ vacation must obtain an oidcr from 
Mr. Hicks in order to get the college 
discount. 




THERMOS 



Have a Hot Coffee in Ycur Room. 

Fill at the cart Stay hot 34 hoi 

Other styles for tramps. 



KEEPS HOT 



KEEPS COID 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



ONITY CHURCH 

.\0KTH I'l.K.\s.\NT .St 

A Church home of the liberal Faith. 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

KKCil I.AK SI NI».*V SKKVItK .%T 7 I* HI 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest line in 
the state (Uitslde of lio-i :; 



Seeourlineof Drill Shoes 

E. RUSSELL NORTON $2.00 tO $4.00 



SALKS ACiKNT 



Davenport Miller 
Vein Coal 

Best Qiiaiiiy Pennsylvania Coal 



BOSTON OFFICE 

85 Water St. 



KF;W YOKK OFFICE 
I Broadway 



l_OW PRICE TAILORINO CO. 

St IT> MA UK T<i OKI)F.K 
.Suits Cleaned. Pressj-d and Dyed. All kinds of 
Kepainhe for l-adies and Gentlemen neativ done. 
ili«h-Kradp wmk In tirst cla»s tailor. Work 
called for and delivered. Sell tickets for pressing. 
4 SUITS mu li.^o 

GEORGE KOrOWITZ. PROP. 



MODERN REPAIR 
DEPARTMENT 



E.M.BOLLES 



(OM VOUM «VAV TO P. O.J 



Main Street, A inlierst, M.^^5 

I In vour wav to tlie Post ( )flfii • 



Nash Block 
|.l ,'>i-\V 



Coolcp's Rotci 

Springfield, Mass., 

Solicits the patronage of th'* - 
dents of the Agricultural < o. ,.t 
to class dinners and individually. 



I. M. LABROVITZ, Custom Tailor 

Fashions, Fit, First Class Work Guaranteed 

Large assortment on hand. (.KN I '.S KU KMSU I N(iS. Ked-Man Coil.i' 
I )ress Shirts. Cleaning and Pressing. DRKSS .SlITS 
TO KKNT. Military Collars and Gloves 

U AMITY ST., Telephone 302 W. AMHERST, MASS. 



CHRISTMAS GIFTS 1 

A portrait i.s a most acceptable Christmas gift — 

Appointments made now can be finished in m* 

Miss McGlellan's Stodio is tlie Place 



44 



St.\tk Stri.i t. 



Northampton, .^ '^ss 



RIFLE TEAM VICTORS 

Outdoor Team Again Wins Trophy, j 
Indoor Team Leads Eastern League. 1 
Til.' ici'oit of the National Board 
If.,, ihi' promotion of riHe practice iu 
|tu the I'nited States for 191 .J- 14 has 
Kias \mn received and contains many 
liimtters of interest about the M.A.C. 

Irirte team. 

Dif ri'iisonsforthe disqualification 

Lf the llurvard team are given and 

jlhe cham|)ionship of the eastern 

[league awarded to Aggie. 

riii- rt|»ort of the indoor meet is 



r 



and West Virginia university teams 
to shoot off for tlie championship. 
This was done the week ending May 
3. Again the West Virginia boys 
distinguished themselves and again 
broke the ct)llege record, with the 
fine score of wx as against Har- 
vard's 975. 

The score of tlie Harvard team 
made against the Massachusetts 
Agricultural college was protested 
by the latter team on the ground that 
the Harvard team used long rifle car- 
tridges instead of short as called for 
in the rules. The charge having 
been acknowledged by the captain of 



"Notwitlistanding the fad that 
the West Virginia team won the 
championship and broke the college 
team record, their average was only 
sixth in the average score for all 
matches. Here the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College team was easily 
the lesider. The general averages 
were as follows, the first sixoutof JJH 
teams : 

1. Mans. Agricidtural college UalM 
i. Harvard I niversity 949.0 

3, Iowa State University 946.1 

4. Mass. lust, of Technology 938. « 
f». University of Minnesota 933..''» 
<). University of West Viiginia 9:<2.7 



6. C. B. Rvdell, Univ. of Minn. 189.2 

7. G. G. Haalam, Mass. Tech. 1H9.2 

oeTI»OOK !<KASt)N. 

Ten university teams took part in 
the ninth annual competition for the 
intercollegiate chanipionship. The 
shooting was done on home ranges 
under the supervision of Army and 
Militia oftiicers. 

The winning team proved to be 
that of the Massachusetts Agricul- 
tural college with a record score of 
82;') otit of a possible 900. The hold- 
ers of the championship trophy, tlie 
Harvard university team was second 
with a score of 791. The highest 
individual aggregate was made by C 



it 





MA63/iCHU6ErTS-AGRlCULTUR/^L-COLL£G£-' 
PLAN FOR ATHLETIC r/JLD 



Aorembf l9li 



ill i':iit as follows : \ 

There were 2x college and univer- 1 
I «ity leiiros entered and these were j 
divided into two leagues. At the 
-•■ of the matches it wjis found 
that ill the eastern league Harvard 
I hat! a clean score of 13 victories. 
In the weHtern league West Virginia 
i' :iiic| lowti State university 
tied for first place, each having lost 
one innlch. 

'" ihe Hhoot off between these two 

-ities the West Virginia univer- 

'it\ teum won. The result of this 

' ■ Miadc it necessary for Harvard 



ARE YOU OOINO TO "BOOST'"? 



the Harvard team, who plead igno- 
rance of the rule, the executive com- 
mittee of the National Rifle associa- 
tion of America threw out the Har- 
vard score and gave the champion- 
ship of the eastern league to Massa- 
chusetts Agricultural college. The 
Aggies were also given permission to 
, shoot a score against the .me made 
! by West Virginia in its shcKjt off for 
!the chami.ionship with Harvar.l. 
1 The match wan shot by this college 
I the week ending Jnne 21 and resulted 
i in a score of 9.V2 : so that the final 
championship retsult was not changed. 



Some very fine individual slnxiting 
was done by the members of the 
teams. Captain A. F. Fxlminster of 
the Massachusetts Agricultural Col- 
lege made the iKmsible 2(M>. K«ln»in- 
ster also has the honor of leading for 
the individual average, having won 
this distinction in 1912 as well. The 
Massachusetts Agricultural college 
placet! the first f«iur men in individ- 
ual averages. The averages of the 
first seven men were as follows : 

1. A. F. Kd minster, M. A. C. 194.0 

2. .1. F. Oertal, M. A. C. 190.0 

3. K. S. Clarke Jr., M A. C. 189.7 

4. K. H. Dunbar, M. A. C. 189.6 
.'(. P. (i. Ingham, 

Iowa State Univ., 189.3 



B. Rvdell, I'niveraity of Minnesota 
team,' with 140. The score of the 
w inning team iu detail was as follows : 

MAi^SAt IILSETT8 AOKK lUJRAI.rOM.KOK. 

200 300 .^UOTotjil 

K. W. Dunbar 44 4r, 4;« 1.39 

.I.T. Oertel 44 4.^ 49 138 

A. F. Kdminster 45 46 47 138 

A. F. MacDougidl ^'^ 4'. 19 137 

W. C. Forbush 43 45 49 137 

H.G.Brown 43 45 48 136 



262 272 291 



82.'» 



The next three were : 

Harvard Uni. 2.vJ 2.*G 2H3 791 

Geo. Wash. Uni 236 246 265 747 

Uni. of Minn. 238 246 259 743 







The College Signal, Tuesday, December i6, 191 3. 



The College Signal, Tneadajr, December 16, 1913. 



COMMUNICATIONS 

(Communications to the Sic.nal concerning 
matters of Keneral interest are welcomed The 
SliiNAi. IS not to br held responsible for the 
opinions thus expressed.) 

ElUTOK OK THK SkjNAI., 

As I have read the Sionai, from 
week to week I liuve wondered how 
long it would \w before 8onje aluni- 
DU8 made the inquiry that i am now 
making. It is just this : Where are 
the alumni notes? 01 stated in 
another way, is the class of llil3 the 
only cue that interests M. A. C 
men? I congratulate I'JlIi on their 
spirit un<l self-assertiveness — but as 
1 see it the .Sicnai. is not fulfilling its 
mission unless as full anil general 
alumni notes are published :is can 
possibly be secured. The Skjnai, to 
many alumni is their principal nieauH 
of keeping in touch with the college 
and its graduates. If anyone doubts 
the scarcity of notes concerning the 
alumni let him look through all the 
issues of this year and convince him- 
self, and also be convinced as to the 
advisability of previous Signal 
boards subsiding after graduation, 
although they still stay at college for 
graduate study. 

1913 are undoubtedly the salt of 
the earth but are far from Iteing the 
only class that interests the alumni 
as a whole. 

Yours for "Old Aggie." 

An Ai.fMNUs. 



T<» THK Kl»IT»»K of TlIK SKiNAI., 

The letter from *'An Alumnus" 
o^iens for discussion an exceedingly 
broad and interesting subject. Per- 
sonally 1 am inclined to consider the 
■ituatioD to which reference is made 
as a credit to the class of 1913 rather 
than as a criticism of the SitiNAi.. 

It is a diiticult matter for the Si«i- 
NAL editors to obtain alumni notes ; 
perhaps they ate not doing their best 
in this work, but the fact remains 
that it is impossible for them to 
pro|>erly e<Iit an alumni section with- 
out the cooperation of the alumni 
themselves. 

The logical source of information 
regarding the alumni is within the 
individual classes, and some member 
of the class must be relied upon to 
furnish notes to the Sionai.. If all 
classes were to supply material simi- 
lar to that coming from 1 !>().'», iyO«, 
11»13, and others, there would be 
enough copy for a full page of 
alumni notes in each issue of the 
Sional, and I assume that the edit- 
ors would be glad to assign that 
amount of space to an alumni section. 
Yours sincerely, 

Halpii J. Watts '07. 



To TiiK Kditor ok The Signal. 
Dear Sir: 
It has been brought to my atten- 
tion many times In the last two years 
that we lack courses in plant breed- 
ing at this institution Trained agri- 
culturists the world over are expected 
to know the principles of plant 
improvement from the selection of 



the best soil to the selection and 
breeding of the best seed. Practical 
agriculturists have long recognized 
that animals can be greatly improved 
by intelligent breeding, but it is only 
within the last century that it has 



lover of outdoor sport and served as 
president of both the Megantic fish 
and game association and the St. 
John's river salmon club of Canada. 
Mr. McLeod was married to Miss 
Lola McC'onncl. daughter of Wash- 



come to be recognized that plants ington .1. McC'onud of (irecnsboro, 



can be improved in the same way 
and it is claimed that at least \0'/c 
could be added to the aggregate 
value of the world's plant products 
by more general attention to this 
important subject. 

Professor McLean evidently real- 
izes the iiee<l of knowing the prin- 
ciples of heredity in animal hus- 
bandry. Ills course in (Genetics is 
liroad enough to lay the foumlation 
for both animal and plant luectling. 
Hut the men specializing in the 
various branches of Horticulture are 
prevented fiom taking the ctmrse 
because of conflicts. The scheilule 
committee seems to think that the 
fundamentals of heredity arc far 
removed from horticulture. 

Men majoring in pomology and 
floriculture have expressed their 
desire for a gcMxI man to teach them 
the principles and meth<H|s of plant 
breeding We do not have to go far 
from home to find one. Dr. .SUaw of 
the Kxperiment station certainly is a 
capable man and with the consent of 
the trustees might be induced to take 
up the work. The men in floriculture 
especially, are <-omplaining of this 
fault in the curriculum. Cornell, 
Michigan, Wisconsin and nniny of 
the big agricultural colleges lay great 
emphasis upon their work in plant 
breeding. Can we longer afford to 
be without such a course in our 
curriculum. ^. 1,. i. 



WILLIAM A. McLEOD '76 

William A. Mcl^eml of the Arm 
of McI..e(Ml, Calver, Copeland and 
Dike, Itoston lawyers died Nov. 
2, at his home. Pine Hill, Dedhnm. 
Horn in Providence. U. I., March 
IS*. IM."»(i. lie wiis (lesceiided from 
the Macleoils of Skye, a family 
prominent in Scottish history for 
many generations. He was gradu:itc<I 
from M. A. C. in IMTfl and from 
Hoston nni versify law scluMtl in 1M71>. 
While in M. A. C. he was elected to 
Phi Kappa Phi and belonged to 1). 
(J. K. 

Mr. McLeoil was senior partner of 
McLeotL Calver. Copelan«l and Dike, 
with odices in lioston aixl Washing- 
ton. He won a country-wide repu- 
tation as a patent lawyer especially 
in connection with textile, shoe and 
electrical machinery inventions. Mr. 
McI.«od was also connected with 
other business concerns, among them 
the Mason regulator company and 
Liberty trust company of Boston 
and the Florence Manufacturing cora- 



N. C, .lunc l.'». 1HK2. His widow 
and four children. KIdon, .Cameron, 
Helen and Kvelvn McLeo<l, survive. 



STOCKBRIDGE CLUB NOTICE 
TO 1915 

All members of the stock judging 
corn judging, apple packing and judg- 
ing teams, (oiiipetiiig with teams 
from other New Kngland colleges are 
re<|uire<l to be iiieiiil>ers of the .Stock- 
bridge dub before the end of the lirst 
semester of their junior year. 

This is rc(piiretl because the vou- 
tests with other New England col- 
leges arc run by the New Kngland 
Ke<leration of Agricultural .Students. 
At .M. A. C. the Stoikbridge club is 
the ImkU' that represents the N. K. F. 
A .S. Students <»f the 1-year course 
must be members of the Stockbri<lge 
club in order to b«' on teams repre- 
senting the college at inter New Kng- 
land contests. There were chances 
for ten different men to take part in 
these contests this year. You can 
make a team, (ietout and try for 
it. 



NINETEEN-THIRTEtN NOTES 

KliITKIi IIY TIIK MNKTEKN-TlllltTKEN 
M. A. V. CLflt OK AMIIKKST. 

MKXK AN NKWs. 

S. Miller .lordon — '/r liiited Sugar 
Cos., I^>s Mochis, Sinahia, Mexico. 
Via Nozales. "Have fliially reaclie«l 
my destination. The country all 
through here is rel>el and the Fe<l- 
erals hold only (iuaymos and Maza- 
than. As long as the Federals keep 
away from here, we are satislieil 
The rifle-pits an«i spent i'.hells of the 
fights are all over town and yon don't 
have go more than ten miles from 
here to find half-burned corpses by 
the roadside. All is quiet now and 
as this is the only big outfit now 
operating on the West coast, laborers 
antl their families are flocking in 
from every direction to earn a living 
here. We are now employing close 
to 2,000 men. We are not planting 
many tomatoes until we know 
whether the railroad through to the 
.States will be in operation this win- 
ter. "Casey" Jones is in charge of 
all the live stock ami machinery, 
some outfit, t<x), while I am in charge 
of all the tomatoes being planted and 
am director of the experiment station 
started here last year. Altogether 
we are kept pretty busy. I am in 
the 9a«ldle from 7 a. m. until .'» v. m. 
Conditions are rapidly becoming nor- 
pany of Northampton. j "">'• the grub is fine, and the mem- 

He was a member of the Boston i l>er8 are a fine bunch." 
Athletic association, Dedhaiii coun- | nkws item.s. 

try and polo club, Boston Atheneum, j Willard Hasey, with Foster Shoe 
New Kngland historical and geneal- I Co., Medicine Hat, Alberta. Canada, 
ogical society and a life member of | Kalph W. Howe, entomological 
the Bostonian society. He was a I assistant, Delta Laboratory, Tallu- 



lah, La., studying the cotton u| 
weevil. 

Glover K. Howe, travelling f,^, 
Loose-Wiles Biscuit Co. .\(i(ire^| 
14 Diiiham St.. lioston. Care of Mr, 
Meachaiii. 

W. Stuart M(jir, instnictui, [. 
deavor academy, Kndeavor. \V,v 

(Jeorge W. Barber and HttlM-rti 
Hutchiiigs with A. W. Dodi;,. (■]., 
iSi Co., tree specialists. 

Herbert T. Hatch is prim i[i;tl ,•■ 
Wrentham state school. Wrcntiian 

Kverett H. C<M»|)»-r is '. •! 
entomology at the ColU'iji 
culture and mechanic art> in \ 
Carolina. 



ALUMNI NOTES 
'•J2.— Milton H. Williams «,> :, 
winner of the biie ribl)on on tu 
eighty ear exhibit and the (•: ., 
exhibit yellow dent corn, at the (ori 
show held last wesk in Springtielii bi 
the Massachusetts state lM»ani of 
agriculture. 

'y4. — Perley K. Davis won tL« 
grand sweepstakes prize for the t«>; | 
corn, a blue riblwn on an eighlv ei* 
exhiltit and two blue ribbons ou tei 
ear exhibits of yellow flint < urn, »t| 
the Massachusetts corn show Ui$ ' 
week. 

''.>(». — Allen B. Cook, mauugcr u' 
the Pope estate in Far mi ng ton, Coot; . 
has recently uiiearthc<| the iietrifiri 
iKines of a mastodon, the ancestor if 
the elephant. Nearlv every U^u^-nt 
tlie iKxiy has l>een found and what * 
very unusual one tusk has aliMj liern 
found. 

■'.•7. — Philip H. Smith protiiiru 
paper describing the resennli woiii 
l>eing done at the experiment statH« 
in the analysis of milk, fertilizeri* tsd 
soils, at a meeting of the C«iuue<-tirti! 
Valley section of the American ibem- 
ical HiH'iety, Saturday at ilif Higt- 
land Hotel, .Springfield. 

'(•I. — I'arkman F. Staples i« »»»• 
aging a farm in Holliston. limJHU.L 
F. Barnes '0'.» is manager of Fise 
Crest farm ami ( lyde K.Christm.nn'!' 
is manager of .Silverwoo<l fmniof 'ht 
same place. 

'08 —A son, Haymond D. Jr., w«» 
born to Raymond I). WhitinHrsiiin 
August. 

'OM.—.L Robert Parker and f:iaiii.v 
have returned to Montana nfter 1 
short visit in the Vas[. h|mii? s 
Amherst and at the home of li 
ents in Connecticut. 

'|(t.— K. Fariihain Damon. : llr*^" 
I'pland, Cal. 

'10. — Walter R. ( larke i.s to !< 
extension instnict<»r in agroMomy »'• 
the different extension school* tn i* 
in session about the state this v\nW- 

•11.— Robert 1). Lull n. - -t- i 
the campus .Saturday. 

'12.— Stephen P. Puffer ml Mi?J 
Ruth Kellogg of Amhei>t «f« 
recently married at the home of ^* 
bride in Mill Vallev. Ihcv reside in 
North Amherst. 



lift' 

coll. 

\h-\ 

all 

v:ii, 

(jui' 

(,' 

I" 

li • 

iiit' 
ini !' 
(•h;u 
ll>. 



otiegians interested in social 

~ arc invited to attend the 

iiiiial convention of the Intcr- 

-irtte Socialist society, to be 

n New York city, Dec. 2lt, 30 

) . Among the speakers at the 

:> sessions will be Morris Ilill- 

.1. li. Phelps Stokes. Hon. 

sv l-ausbury. formerly a mcm- 

! (lie British Parliament. The 

itllegiate Socialist society, 

■■to promote an intelligent 

r-.t ill socialism among college 

and women." has more than HO 

lU'fs ill the pioiiiineiit colleges of 

(iiuntiy, and a large number of 

III chapters. 




LOCATION OF THE ATHLETIC 
FIELD. 

I .1 those who are not entirely fa- 
niii :ir with the loeatioii of the ath- 
l.tK tield, the following brief de- 
Miijition may In? of service. The 



field will be hx'ated at the south-eas- 1 
tern corner of the campus, and will 
be bounded on the west by Lincoln 
Avenue, and on the east by the brook 
that flows into the college pond. , 
The nothern boundary line starts' 
about l.''tO feet north of the Vetinary 
lal»oiatory on the oiiposite side of 1 
Lincoln Avenue and runs almost di- 
rt'i'tly east to the brook. The south- 
ern boundary is the i>roperty line and 
extends from a point on Lincoln Ave- 
nue nearly opposite the old Kappa 
Sigma lu)iise U> the brook. The en- 
tire field is on the eastern side of 
Lincoln Avenue as the public high- 
way makes it impossible to use tha 
land lying lu-tween the \ flinaiy lab- 
oratory and tile dill Kappa .Si^ma 
house. 



'10.— R. S. Kddy recently under- 
went an operation on his knee. He 
has left the hospital, but will be con- 
fined to his home for some time. 



This Is Your Need 

The fertilizer iiuUistry is l)asc<l on all the si lenccs lli.it rel.iii' 
I. ) soil and crop problems; on geology, which tells of the formatinn 
and coinp(jsition of soils; on chemistry, wliiili siiows the needs of 
crops and how they can be supplied ; on bot.iny. which tells of the 
structure of crops and habits of growth, .iiul. (inall\, on bacteiiol 
ogy, a comparaiively new science, which tells of the soil bat tciia, 
or "yeast of the soil"— the lower orders of life, without whiih 
crops cannot thrive. This l.ittcr science, which we are just begin 
ning to develop and understantl, is completely overturning our pre 
conceived notions of drainage, tillage iiiul tlie telations of plant 
fooil injiredients to crops and soils. 

riius it will be seen that the man who 1- < .mying on the fcrii 
li/er industiy today and tlic farmer who is nioie or less de|)en(l 
eiit on that industry for a part or all of his plant food must ea< li 
be more 01 less f.iiniliar with these subjects to meet the needs ol 
inoilrin ,ind successful farming. 

Stutiy the i'lant luuui f^rohUm 
Can we helf> \i>u ' 



^ 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER COMPANY 
43 Chatham St., Boston 



WHEN CONSIDERING FERTILIZERS 

!•! i:.>iinecti>> I \\'\\\ y >ur s udies and experiments, don't f.iil to ac(|uaint 
vo.irself with til' .VJudjrful pr^iducin^ and sjil nourishing properties of 



\%rite for booklets 
on •• 5oll l-ertlllly." 
• I he lirass Crop," 
•■ I he Apple," etc. 



.»H!«!lill*k„ 






^^tKlWXff^ 



On« Dollar invested 
In huhhard's Bone 
liase l-ertilizers 
buys as much plant 
food as $1.7(1 to 
$1.90 In low Krade 
fertilizers. 



THE ROGERS % HUBBARD COMPANY, Middletown. Conn. 

out)'.- Mflll %>Olka. I'orllNllil. I allltl. 



" Keeping in Front ** 

You fellows know what that means ! 
We've been very successhil in this 
regard with Fatima Cigarettes. By 
ihc way, these cigarettes were first 
sold in the cdlege towns — and you 
agreed with us that they were good. 

Then we put out for the big race, 
to make Fatimas of nation-wide rejv 
utation, and today more are sold than 
any other cigarette in this country. 

No purer, or more carefully chosen 
tobacco grows tham that in r atimas. 
We purposely put them in a plain 
inexpensive wrapper — in this way 
we can afford quality tobacco, and 
twenty of the smokes for I 3 cents. 

Now your college crew is of utmost 
importance to you — so is a good 
cigarette, and it's your aim in Kfe 

> keep Fatimas m the lead — right 
up to their good quality — right up 
t^ where you first found them, and 

ill always find them. 

.'juccess fellows! You started this 
^'igarette on its successful career — 
'id you pull a strong oar all over 
» is country. 




W TUWIISH BLEND ^ 

QGARETTES 




'DlstincH'^ MJwidtuJ' 



F. A. SHERARD 



MEN'S STORE 



Use our new cash discount card 
and save five per cent on 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring* 



IMPORTANT : 

Ihf most iiraclital present tc» give your hroiher ox lister is oiu- o( the 

famous- 

Patrick- Duluth Mackinaws 

Sold at Cost at Campion's the Next 10 Days 



$6.50 Mackinaws for $4.00 
1 $9.00 Mackinaws for $6.50 

$10.00 Mackinaws for $7.25 
I $12.00 Mackinaws for $8.00 

200 Suits and Overcoats to be cleaned up at cost 

No goods charged at the above prices. 

CAMPION -" TWO COLLEGE STORES 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December i6, 1913. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December 16, 1913 




|! 



¥ 



The Holyoke Valve £ Hydrant Co. 

/<)bl)ers of Wio'ijjtit Irmi iind llmss riii*-. \ alve>. 
ind KittinK'' for Steam, Water .iiiiHiaN. XsLh-sIos 
and Magnesia Holler and l'n>e (."ovciiii)'*, ripe 
Cut to >ketch, Mill >ii|. idles. Kiiijit eets and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water Healing. 
Automatic SprinkltT Sv>f»*iiis. Uoilerand KuKl'e 
Connections. Holyoke, Mas*. 



T"Jeacher8 Exchange 



0/ Hoi Inn 



I JO li"ylitoH St. 

Recommends Teat tiers, Tutors and Sclioots 



PRINTERS, 



No I, Cook Place, 



AiiihfiM, Mass. 



Students A.ttention ! ! ! 

We are ready at the start to furnish you with a fine 
line of Campus and Fraternily House Vitws, alsio Post 
< ards. Kodak work ^iven prompt and careful attention. 
Knlarj»in»; and picttire framing {;ivrn our |»ersonal at- 
tention. See (In .dxnii (Iroiij.s and Portraits fot the very 
best work. 



Satisfaction Guaranteed, 
the Square Deal Studio 



Patronize 



KINSMAN'S COLLEGE STUDIO 



Nash BlocK. Amherst 



H. M. RiMiERS, '15, Agent. 
87 Pleasant St., 



Slu»li« Phone 303-a. 



GRAND SWEEPSTAKES TROPHY 



it7M.OO Sterlinit Silver Cupi 
FOR 



BEST STATE EXHIBIT OF POTATOES 




AT THE 



New York Land Show 



1912 

WON ST 



The L L. Cleveland Company 

HOULTON. Me. 

/^^NF, of the largest and most 
reliahic seed potato houses 
in the United States. Competi- 
tion open to the entire United 
States and Canada. .Messrs. K. L. 
Cleveland Company also won the 
First Prize for Best County Exhibit 
of Potatoes. <S;!..r Cup valu<-.i 
at $2(K).()0. t 
I he K. I-. Clevelan«l Conipanv um* 

L FRANK COE 
FERTILIZERS 



E. Frank Coc Fertilizers have 

hecn the business farmer's favorite 
for over fitt\ -five scars. \\ ;iy not 
follow tlie ex.impic of these lead- 
ing commercial potato growers. 

\nH aiirhl in inA 'f he Sti>r\tif A I'rnflliihlf P>>l,ltii 
friip" «rlf(fiih_f an %r.tM>(fMHi I «untr. Main* fBrw^r 
I rit|i. I. »i-Ml fr.-c on r' <(i'r.) 



The Coe-Mortimer Company, 



51 CHAMBERS STREET. 
NEW YORK. N. Y. 



I LECTURE SERIES 

; Continued from p»K» 1 1 

Tlu' w(»i-l<l eoiirt is the remedy for 
v\:ir:ui(l it.s disnMti'ous eonseijueiiees. 
If a w(»i!(l eoiiit were estahiished. 
the llious:iii(b of uiillioiis of dollars, 
instead of heiiig wasted, eoiihl then 
l>e so spent as to add to the happi- 
ness, prosperity, wealth and civilixa- 
tl<»ii of the world." 

In the si.xth and linal lecture Mr. 
Hridgiiiaii told of the development of 
hHokwurd nnti«>n.s. lie said in part : 
"For the promotion of the peace of 
smaller and weaker nations of the 
world, an International Hiireaii of 
Assistance would he of service for 
the settlement of such disputes as 
tile Mexican situation. This c(.iiit 
v\<>nld lie made up of representatives 
«if all nations and would decide eases 
relatiii|r to suiallei countries. It 
would have power to make a potn 
goveiiitnent yiehl to the people's 
demands, or make the people who 
rise in rehellion ai-cept the terms of 
a strong and forceful {roveinment, 
as the case might he. Inder this 
arrangement, hackwatd nations will 
rise rapidlv. It woidd l>e ;i world 
movement of educational, political, 
and iiioial henelit to weak nation.^. 
The coming world •government is 
hound \ti he a tlenmcrncy. for the 
day of kings. emper<>i> mh.I . v:ii> is 
passing. The greaHst |Kmers are 
yielding ami Uw? |M>iror of iiohility is 
hroken forever. All nations will he 
on tipial teinis, and there will lie n«i 
discrimiuation UMween races of dif- 
ferent colors. A constant .idvance 
will result. 

Woild lMi>iness ami worhl <-itizen 
ship will he develo|H-<l, and world 
Kovereignty Mill protect investments. 
Life, liiierty and the pntsnti nf h-ip- 
puiesM* will Ik> the resii I of the worhl 
sovereignty. K.xpatriatiim will lie 
|K»s»ihle and legal, hut it is unlikely 
that any migration would Ik; over 
whelmingly. hecaiise of the inal»illy 
ve in huge niimhers. Tin- 
naitiial lesiilt wtiuM tie a repressiim 
of lehellions for the far reaching 
»leveli»piiient of freedom and hap- 
piness. " 

As a summary of the six lectures. 
Ml r.iidgmaii said: "The suhjeet 
of world polities is the greatest polit- 
ical sul.ject on earth. The Hague 
omfeienee of i;»o7 was of treinentl- 
I oils Importance in lieginning a move- 
ment for world aoveieignty. Oni of 
the Hague court will grow the legis- 
lalive department of the world ; the 
judicial <lcp:irlnicnt will he lepie- 
-ciilcd I'V a woild court; linally will 
fiiiiii' the (\i('iili\f (lcp;ntment 
'Ini'lcil into till iiiij>t iiii|H ,i t.iiit parts 
in a manner .similar to the I nited 
>tat«'s caliilict. and presided over hy 
,in excciitixc paid I'V the world, 
elected li\ the world and -civing the 
world. " 



I BASKETBALL SERIES 

[Continued from page i] 

tion to these rules shall he dei 
: hy the t ommittee of Class 1! 
Hall managers. 

Signed Comniittce of Class l'> 
Hall managers 

j K. H. I'ov^KUs, Chairman, I., 

.Senate. 
¥4, W. CiiHi.sTiK, Manager \\i\A. 
A. .1. Fi.KBUT, Manager lt»I.'». 
II. C. Daki.ino, .Manager IHIC. 
(.. T. Oi.iVKU. .Ji!., Manager I'.t; 
II. M. floiJK, Physical K<lucati«)i. 
partment. 



i<le<l 



,-jje 



!_'. l.oiiis W. (Jaskill is now 
« iiiployed hy the Wok oi,)- state 
hospital as superintendent of the 
eioiinds an»l tonservatoi ies. 



1 1.. 



LAST INFORMAL OF iqij 
Replete with all that g«a'S to iiiafc^ 
U|i a "giMxl time ", assisted hy ideal 
atmospheric conditions, and attetidH 
fry an unusually large numlier. tl«> 
Inforn.al season of l!»l:i, At-'gie"* 
greatest and hest se.-tson vet. i'nde<l 
in a hia/.e of heaiity .Satunlay ni;:Iii 
when the final Informal of the \v\» 
was staged. ( harming weatlier,auil all 
latest dance music, contrihiitetl t<> tin 
thorough enjoyment of the • ^ • . 
The hall was skillfully decoralia 
with the lasie that has chaiacteristi^i 
former Informnls. In the centre, flic 
orchesti.i u ■« partially concealer . 
a dense hedge of pal 1118 ami titfcier 
(lotletl plants. From a |ioint dip 
aho\e the orchestra hroad in: i 
streamers stretched to everv com 
the hall, while on :ill font nail 
the customary pennants and hni; 
of almost every cirllege and insliin 
in New Kngland. 



iqi3 NIGHT DtCFMBi H .6 

l». \V H(»we fHMids In the follnwini 
notice: — "Think |N>rliaps two m 
three Thirteenlles can get togetlarut 
Atlanta. (Ja. for 'MV night. \V. :ir. 
going to try anyhow." 

That's the «ild spirit ! (her fiff»Tii 
have already written in lli 
going to lie at the United Slati - 
Hosion -Hig" .Sam ami "Ln 
Sam :>re planning a feed at "Nomii 
Farm." (Jraiid Isle, \'t. |{eni« miff 
in Springliehl. it's the Highland ftwl 
in New ^ oik. it s ReisenwelM 
the feeds are going t<» start iHimru 
n and •■.-.'U». 



RESOLUTIONS. 

W'lnrins, It has pleased ••'■•' 
His infinite wlwloin to take ante 

Himself the fallni of oiii i • 
friend and hrother. ( harlos Jluii 
(•onhl. he it 

lii unhtil. That we, the mein' • i 
the Theta Chi Fraternily. d. 
to our liiollifi oiu sincere >> 
in this his hour of sorrow . n 
fiirlher 

tlt'siil i<il , That a cop\ of 
lesolniions he sent to oiii 
Inotlici. that a cop\ l>c lih 
rocords of till' Fraternity, an i 
<-opy lie piihlisiird in the * i ' 
.S|(,\ \|. 

HvvMoMi p. W \rKi i;. 
Pllll.ie F. WlllTMolM. 
DoNAI.O S. |)|\sMo|iK. S 



) 1 



15, Eldridge '14 

All Student Supplies 



A. C. STORE 



BANNERS AND POSTERS 



CAMOV 



\i litaiiue 15 



TOMIC 



H.Tj.;er '16 



FACULTY LADIES TO ENTER 
TAIN 

riu ladles at the college are ar- 
ranging for an entertainment ami 
will have the freshman Uj^.j.,! ^.V4.„„,g f„r all regular students 
i'rofessors Mackimmie , which will piohrdily t:ikc place Friijay 

evening. .Ian.. lUlt. The nature- of 
the entertainment has not heen dis- 
closed hut to judge from the prepara- 
tions something ipiite novel may he 
expected. 



Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

I'iCKKKS, l'Oll.l|{% OKI ss^iKS 
\SU IHITKK H %KI'.Us. 



WH"! I SAI F. \>y 111 KS IN 

Hcri. Mutton, l.aimh, Vral, I'urk, lard. Hams, 

Baiiin, Sautagva. Poultry , (ianMr. Ilultcr 

ClM«««. Kgs*. Hran*. 

ofliieA, Stores ;?.5:.57,i<<. 1 & '■'} Mlack<t'in>- St, 

ISinton. l'4clniiic MouMf. liiit;hti<n. Ma««. 

N.it|/« t'aolttT I)r**'»inK t'l.»nt. Iloston. 

Cfeamerifs in \iTiiu)iit. 



BIBLE CLASSES 

Heginning immediately after the 
winter recess, the M. A. C. C. A. 
will take up the study of the Hihle. 
Mr. Watt 
class, while 

and Sprague will have the upper- 
classmen. This year the plan Is well 
organi/ed, and should work out well. 
Kach Instructor will have type- 
written sheets to accompany each 
lecture ; they intend to go through 
the work very thoroughly. Professor 
I Mackimmie will take up the life of 
Paul, while Professtrr Spiague's topi« 
will lie "Klhic-s of the New Testa- 
\ ment." This course is as gcwMl as 
[any offered in college a- it hroadens 
tlic student in ni:in\ \\a v^. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Suuday Papers 
with a full line of College Stipplies 
may be found at 



Why Rise Early 

For Breakfast ? 

< ict yotit meals at the 

DOG CART 



Cominutation Tickets, $1.10 for $1.00 




D E LAVA 



Those who know 
buy the De Laval 

' ' ' iiiirr.'iiui'n — lti!>r»u<ie thirv jrr «•»• 

■ tii>- I.An'IliiiL of rr<-.«m and know 

• til.- l>e l.«*4l 

< longfd. I hat 

^^'> ijt llie \% ijlid s creaiii<'i»'S ii>>'- 

'!• I,a*4l »x.;lmi velv . 

I a l»«lr>«iirii- 1 ' ' vil 

Uvrtiile 4II1I.I . \ 

, =.:.,.w ttiat no otiii : :,..:-.;')i 
vc th^m *uch satisfactory service. 
" I Or i.atMl larra -Wlienever a m,)n 
'. I in old mi><;cl |r<? !..ival He 
Mur Ij4*ea later *tvle machine lie 
<blv bu>H another l>e l.aval. 
*' ■' Wh«» Invc'aflKiiie — |t)>CAii<<- 

■ 'if De l.a/alniai liiii"- 
usrd liv the l)est In 



The Highland Hotel 

Carter of Itllliiian and llariies Streets, three 
bloc ks froni the rt.ioii l><'|i<>t. ■'> ■ HHMiern hos 
ii-lry run on III- l'ui";..Mii I'l.iii. It is just ■ sIh|> 
from Mum Miert, .(«.i> li>'iii the muse ;iui) dust 
and yet in the ceiitet ol the business distoct. 

Its riKim* are w.'ll fu'nished .md o<mi.»rt.ilil<'. 
liavinK a tele^ilionc .ind hot and tohl runnuiu 
watet in evei y room I'rites •! .tnd ix\> ■ i uoiiis 
with bath iMiiitle •! Ad ana up. 

Its excellent ( iiisim- anrl •ell crentiLiled dintnK 
loom iii.ik-s .»iiie.4l ,1 (dea&.ilil iiieniiir> - eveiy 
tiiiiiK of the lii4li.-.t qu.tlit\. well cooked and 
»er»#d in the best posslhle ni.»nli«f, 

st«v.<t the ninhl.»nd lloirl wice and you will 
•te •ktaviiiR there again. Music ewwy 

D. H. SIEVERS, 

HIchlttud U«ltl. si.rlimHeni. Vlm>». 



Stkimikn IjVNK F«»i-«iKW 

l.so IlKO.v liw A N . NKW YOKK 

c^r-irn \ n i. f«ii..i,.K«iK 

IMNH A.VI> KIN* is* .* 



The Connecticut Valley 
Street Railway 






THE DE UVAl SEPARATOR CO. 



: 1 1 1 'I w 
Voil 



E, M idisiin 
Chicago. 



Ihef are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 

or 

C. R. ELDER 



Fiom Amher.st. via Northampton, 
through the Hatfield.-*, past the foot 
of .Sn^ar Loaf Mt.. alongside the 
famou.N Hloody Hrook battle ground 
to ( )ld Ileerfield, thence to (Ireen- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 

Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
i-ne and Millers Falls. 



."^O Miles of Trackage Hodern 
Kciuipment train IH.^patch- 
ing System t-reljfht and Kx- 
pres* 5er\ Ice over entire line. 



KAPPA LPSILON AFFILIATIONS 

Kappa Fp>il<iii. which was formed 
last s|iring as a non-fraternity organ- 
i/atit>n, has joined the Nati«mal Fed- 
eration «>t' ( oinmons Cliihs. This 
frdiiiii'ii u:i-^ istalilished six years 
a^;o at \\eslc\aii. although a liuniher 
of eonim<uis cluhs hatl lieeii in evist- 
emv huig Irefore that time. The 
Fetleration consists ol eointiauis 
eluhs from the folhiwing five col- 
leges :Wesleyan. Ctdhy. Tufts. Inion 
and Syracuse. Kappa F.psiioii mak- 
ing the sixth 

The CoiniiMjns eliih is a fraternal 
orgnni/.ation for lUMi-fralernlty men 
ami founded on the principles tif 
hrotherliood and fellowship. It is 
purely a tleiiiocralie orgaiii/.ation and 
lielievea in giving every man a fair 
chance. It regartis neither race, 
creetl, nor <!«dor and helleves in the 
cipiality of all men regardless of 
rank or position. It is not in any 
way antagonistic to fraternities nor 
it It ill I'. ^> '^ > political institn- 
tloD. It ill, however, tlic i-'..iiltof 
an inevitalile evolution of collage 
life. F<»r tin' last live years, the 
.Massachusetts Agricultural college 
ItHM ex|>eiient«d a, trewenihrus in- 
crease of iindergnidiiHte students and 
with this increase has come. In 
almoist the same proportion, an in- 
crease of non-fraternity men. lie- 
cfiui^e of this situation, Kappn F.psl- 
h>n was foiiiHletl anti framed on Uik'S 
similar to the etunmons cluhs in 
other instlliithuui in order to encour- 
age the "ileuMMialic spirit of «dd 
Aggie." This great movement is 
In its childhiKNl now hut Is rapidly 
spreading and will s<x>n he a nation- 
wide institution. This organization 
is of value to ^\ggie hecause of its 
demor-ralic and srwi.il ideals and not 
only does it Irenefit the non-fraternity 
men hut should henefit the whole stu- 
dent Irodv. 



Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



ALUMNI NOTES 

10. Hiaiall, Clowes, Hayues and 
Waldron have Ireen visiting friends 
around collt<.'c. t lowt - i~ nt |iiesent 
testing for tin- KxperiiiKni sfiificn 
and Waldron is returning to I'eiiii. 
.State college after a si\ moiitlis" 
leave of :iliscnie. 

"Id. II I.'. Fl:mci-. has li If .New 
Ilavi'ii. ( onn. to lake chaise of the 
LandscMpf <i:iidtnin<; Department in 
the School of Forestry at Syracuse 
university, and is :it present engaged 
on a survey of the street tree 
problems of New York city. 



EWELL'S 

STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUG5 
CARPETS 

L.iigest assortment in New Kn- 
gland of Special Student Furnishings. 

LOVVKR KXPKNSES Enable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

ANO 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



cox SONS 

— ANO — 

VINING 

72 74 .Madison Avenue^ New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

Itcst Materials and \Vorknian.ship 

WOODWARD'S 




LUNCH 



17 Main St., Masonic BIdg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM. 



Closed only from r A. M. to 4 A.M. 

Toefil Mientka 

Shoes Sinned anil Pollslieil 

Make old shoes look like new 

Neat, classy workmanship 

Op«)n Miinrimjr Main St. 

Un war to P«it Ofiica. 



till 



\ . • 






pi 



inTOi 



^1 



\'. 



. If 



lO 



The College Signal, Tuesday, December i6, 1913. 



TENNIS 



The Massachusetts Afifricultural Gollefife 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty six teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

RACKETS Agriculture, Hordculture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 




-A.t— 



DEUEL'S 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

High-Grade Collegf Work 
LAUNDRY 



Shirts. 
Collitrs, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash. 
Same, rough <lry, 



10-15C 
1 IJC 
3 I-2C 

48c per du2. 
- 30c per doz. 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

.Steam 1're.Hsmg, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, #1.50 a Suit 



K^ii-ii J. BomiK^. A«ent. 7 North Cottace 
Kkwanh C. El>«rAi(l><i. Agent 

Put full name and address on laundry 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Loose - Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 

before buying elsewhere, see our assort- 
ment of pennants and banners 

CUKRAN & DYER. Props. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green* 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations,violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hail. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300 



A student may specialize in the following subjects 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairyimg 

Poultry Husbandry 



Horticulture 

Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 



Agricultural Chemistry 
Ecoiionuc Entomology 
Plant Physiology and Pathology 
Agricultural Kducation 



For complete catalog and illustrated tx)oklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



Athletic lioard, 

The College Seaate, 

Football AHSociulion, 

Bubiibull AHtioviatioti, 

Track AsHociution, 

Ho«.'ki'y AsHiM-iiitioD, 

Teuiiia At>8oc-iution, 

Hide club. 

Roister Duisters 

Musii-ul AsHociatioii, 

Niucteeu Huudrutl Fourtoeu ludox, 

Ninetocn Hundred Fifteen index, 

M. A. C. Chrititiau Aasuciatiou, 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fruternity Conference, 

Stoi'k bridge Club, 



(ieorge H. Chapmau, Set-retary 

I). W. Joues, Pte^ideut 

.1. A. Price, Manager 

(J. D. Melii-an, Manager 

K. C. Kdwards, Manager 

.1. I). IV'llett, .Manager 

K. K. MucLaiu, Manager 

J. T. Oertel, President 

I>. J. I^ewis, Manager 

H. I). Hrown, Manager 

K. S. Clark, Jr., Manager 

H. M. Huger», Manager 

H. li. Powers, President 

I). A. Coleman, President 

.1. I). IVIk'tt, President 

N. U. Deariug, Prestdeut 



U'hen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



Barsalotti & Gentoso 

Cigars Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresh Candy 

Ice Cream, Fruit. Soda, Etc. 

The Right Goods at the Right Prices 

Open till II o'clock EVERY night 
C«racr Amity and PI««aaDt Mtre«ts 



If 70a want to be 

SOLIU WITH THK OIKL8 

you must have yoiirrlothea pn^nxvi an<l cleaned 

ATHrSTBIlV'S 



II Amity .Ht. 



Maroon Store 



Pressing and Cleaning a upeclalty 

Moat libersl Ucket syatem la town 
Tel. 303-II 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts .Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1434-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



E. E. HILLETT 

JEWELKK ANii OI'TOMtTk VI 

Lenses ground while you wait 
CoLLEr.E Jewelry 
Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Ciuitat riri; 

AMHKK.^T, MA»». 
Next to Host Office. 



STEAM FITTING, Telephone 5^4 

GAS FIT I ING. TINNING, 

P. W. Dance & Co. 

RLUMBERS. 



Specialty of Kepairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Winoows, 
Lead Lk.hts, &c. 
( Clifton Ave.. AMHERST, MAS.S 

Catalogues of 

Prsll Ac Wltitex* liloocia 

Are Out. Copy mailed to any address < "IVi;. 
Students and AthletfS who want the 1 en I u . ■ • 
articles for the various sports should iii~. ■ 1. r, 
those bearing the Wright & Uitson I'raiif M.i:. 



Foot Baii 
Basket Baii 
Hociiey 
SkaUs 



5kat'K5lioes 

Sweaterii 

Jer«e>s 

Uniform!! 

for all !>port« 

Wright & Oitson Goods are the .-t-mdatd foi 
all sports 

J44 ^Vashington St., Btist< 




THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CLEANSINO. 

PRESSING. 

REPAIRING. 

Quickest is^rvioe. Heat Work, Lowmi I'riir 

All woik carefully done. Work called ! 'i ir.. 
delivered, ('tents' overcoats, suits, \>*i\\s r.: 
coat*. Ladiea' hoe linen suits a spccialtv 

Teams will call every day at M. A ' 

Wn. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rear Nash Bl'k, Amherst. 



Tel. No >j < 



CARS 



Leave AOUIE COLLEGE for HUL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AQOib COL- 
LEOE at 7 and 37 min. past each 
HOUR. 

Spaclsl Car* st Bs— awsbla Rates 



AMHERSI & SUNDERLAND SI. RY. d! 



For a Daily and .Sunday Newspaper 
You should Read 

'1' M K 

Springfield Republicao 

While you are at eollege in Anmerst 

It hnii all of The M . A. €;. News 
The IteM Mpnrtinc New* 
Full fteneral Nfwn 
A .Strong Kditorlal I>aKe 
Interestinft Peatiires 
ItlsisKeal Newspaper 

Daily, 3 cents ; 70 cents a nuM 
a quarter. 

Sunday, 5 cents; 50 cents a qt: I'^r 

Subscribe by mail or through the Aroh >*t ^^' 
dealer. 



JAKS-19M 



liiil 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



'»?»,! 



MASSACHUSETTS AORICULTURAL. COI-LEIOE: 



V< XXIV. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, January 6, 1914. 



No. 14 



FIRST HOCKEY VICTORY RIFLE SEASON OPENS 



Williams by Score of 8-i. Team 
Shows Excellent Form. 

1 lie Maroon ami White hockey 
III. II scored on Williams at Williams- 
tt.wn to the tnne of 8-1. The game 
wu!^ played on Weston Field. Wil- 
liams showed a great burst of speed 
:ii tlif lieginning of the game, liut 
the Aggie players were m*ver oiit- 
. hissed during the rest of the game. 
Til. V seemed to lie slow in getting 
lit) 1. 1 way throughout the game. 
Iliiiiliinson and Jones e.\oelled get- 
ting three goals apiece. Cutler and 
C'lmklin excelled for the purple. Gil- 
Utti- shot the o ily goal for Williams 
mar the end of tlie game. I 

The lirst tally for M. A. C came 
uflir si.x and a half minutes of play, 
vitien Hutchinson scoied on a pretty j 
pasH from .lones. A little later he 
I again on .lohnson's pass, and 
juiothtT goal Wy .lunes came at the 
ttii of the half. , 

III till' second half Williams shifted 
iIr' lineup, but it made no material 
ilitlereuce. Hutchinson ami .lones; 
l.oili scored in rapid succession. Af- 
ttr a inixup in front of the goal, 
K«<rnald |)iit the puck into the net for 
Miiutbor talley. The final goals for 
.Aggie were scored by Johnson and 
.lones. Just after the next face-off 
iIm" Williams score was made on a 
pretty try from the center of the 
rink. 

riic line-up : 
M \. c. 



First Match with Purdue. New Class- 
ification for This Year's Schedule. 



For some time the practise on 
the indoor rifle range has been open 
to all who wish to try for a position 
on the team, and in this manner 

Captain Dunbar has been getting a i lint drawing card, and large anti 
line on the new material. As a re- ; appreciative audiences were the 



DRAMATICS TRIP 

Four Performances of the " Comedy of 
Errors by the Roister Doisters. 



Another succesful trip was under- 
taken by the Roister Doisters this 
year. The play, Shakespeare's 



'jC'omedy of Krnirs" proved an excel- 
lin 



suit he has been able to cut the s«iuad 
to twenty-three men. including the 
members of last Year's team who are 



rcKult. The trip, although shoiter 
than last year was an unqualiru*! 
success. The caste left for Uiither- 



still in college. At the beginning of foul, N. .1 early «>n (he -'oth, and 
each season all of the men start on the lirst performance of the trip was 



the name ffK>ting, and so a new man 
has even opiM>rtunity to make gotnl 
if be |>o8Hesse8 the ability. 



given in that town the same evening 
The hall was extremely well filled, 
and everylMHly appeared to be well 



Despite the fact that five men were ' pleased Dancing was indulged in 
lost by gra<luation, the oullo<)k for a by the young people after the 



winning team is very bright. Cap- 
tain h^lminister, Foibush, (iriggs, 



performance. 

At Suffern, N. V. the next night. 



Headle and .McDongall will all l>e \ Saturday, the high h( hool was the 
greatly misse«l, as any one of them scene of the play, and although with- 
couhl lie depended on to turn a gootl out scenery, the acti<»n of the play 
score, lint Captain Dunbar lias a accorded the caste an ovation. Tin 



nucleus around which to build a 
championshi|> (e:iiii. ( Imkr. Hyde, 
Oertel, Wetherbee and Wliitmore, all 



menil>ers hati Sunday to themselves, 
and most of them were to be seen in 
New York citv. The rest was brief. 



WILLIAMS. 

g, Rogers, Cole, 

p. McNamee 

cp, Conklin, Ktwers 

r, (iillette 

c, Culler 



Huluick, g 

.Neeilham, p 

Archibald, cp 

Junes r 

Htitcninson, c 

I- f rn.tld, Chisholm, rw 

Iw, Moody. Conklin 

, , f Curtis, Brewster, 

J^^Hison.lw Iw,^ p^y^,,^ ^,^^^y 

1 ore— M. A. C. 8, Williams i. (ioals 
11 ichinson 3, Jones 3, Fernald, Johnson, 
'•li'ftte. Keleree— J l^eacock of Filts- 
ti-li| (to:)l umpires — H.tdficld M.A. C, 
l.cster .Michler, Williams. Time — 15- 
' iiite periods. 

SECOND TEAM HOCKEY 
SCHEDULE 

\ schedule has l>een arranged for 

>fc<>nd hockey team, which, 

!i short, includes several goo<l 

The game arranged with 

\^ ston for Dec. 13 was cancelled 

•*e of weather conditions. The 

if the 8che«lule is as follows: 

' i'> — Yale Freshmen at New 

Haven. 
' 7— Williston Academy at Kast- 

hnmpton. 
' 2— V^erraont Academy at M. 
A. C. 



of whom represented the college last for on Monday they again moved on. 
iM>ason. I this time to Monr«»e. where the 

The two-league system haa lieen i audienre, although rather small, was 
abolishe«i, ami a new system of ; fidly appreciative of the efforts of 
classes has l-ttii e8tabliahe<l, which the players. On Tiies<lay, the scene 
places every college team in the of prewntation was Middlelown, and 
Cnited States in a class determined here the final performance was given, 
by that team's record for last year. Dancing was in order after each |)er- 
Mass. Agricultural c«»llege, Minnc- formaiice. and the very ctllcient 
sota, Mass. "Tech.", Harvard, Mich-! orchestra coro|K>«ed of I'orter. Tar- 
igan Aggies, Princeton, Iowa. Nor- l»ell and Bragg was tleclared to l»e 
wich, California, Nortii (Georgia, ^ excel'ent. 

West Virginia were the twelve high- j The caste was the same which 
est teams last year and make up played at Montague, and the inter- 



Class A this year. 

The new men are all shooting well 



pretatioB of the parts improvetl with 
each new performance. From the 
for this time in the season and many entrance of the Duke an<l oM .Kgeon 
show promise of developing into ex- t<i the exit of the twin Dromios. the 
cellent shots Besides Captain Dun- j interest never flagged and laughtei 
bar the following men were retained prevailed. The female parte were 
onthewiuad: 1914. Clarke, Nissen, unusually well taken, and a great 
Oertel ; r.M.'i, Donnell, Hotis, Hyde, deal of favorable comment was heard 
I.ane, Macy, I'aimenter, Upton, ^ in regard to them. These parts were 
Whitmoie ; 1'.n<;. Aiken. (lunn. Hunt, \ taken by Campbell '14, Wilbur M7, 
Rowe, Wetherbee; 11)17, B<M>th, an<l Rogers '!.'». The more notice- 
Mack, Taries. rorter. and I*yne. In able among the other charactera were 
a match just before the vacation, Wilcox '10 as Dromio of .Syracuse 
the candidates for the term shot 'J.'iO. an«l Cale '!'» us Antipholus of F^phe 



The two teams which were pitted 
against each other shot as follows: 



No. 1 
Paieis, 
Macy, 
Parmenter, 
Donnell, 
Porter, 



No. 2. 



18r> Fvane, 

17M Hotis, 

|H4 I'pton, 

1h;^ Mack, 



I'Jl 
1H7 
1«1 
17;". 



sus. The remainder of the cast weie 
all very gotxl. 

Manager [..ewis* elTorta were 
largely responsible for the success 
of this trip of the Roister Doisters, 
and he is to be commende<l. 
It is sure that the remainder of the 



WEST POINT DEFEATED 

By Fast Work of the Maroon and White 
Hockey Men. Score 5-0. 

The Ajigies eiicoiinteretl the Army 
at West Point Satiinlay in a luickey 
game and were easily the victors 
to the score <»f five to nothing. The 
game was played on l-ush Reservoir 
in a rink somewhat under noimal sIkc. 
The ice was in fair condition but 
water HiKKleil the edges of the rink 
and seri«Misly hampered the carrying 
of the puck during the last periml of 
play. The water skirmishes, how- 
ever. prov»d entertaining to the 
spectators. 

The game starletl «)fT with a rush 
and. after a few dashes up and down 
the link, the puck was kept well 
around the Army's goal. Shot after 
shot missing the goal. Fernald 
replaced Chish<»lm at right wing 
when the period was half over. 
Archibald started the swring for 
Aggie by caging the puck «»n a long 
shot from the left «»f the net. John- 
son aildeil another |M>int when he 
neatly shot the second goal. West 
Point, due l<i HarriH' g«xal woik, 
rallied for a moment when Neetlham 
followed up one of his long ruabca 
with the third goal. HutchinsoD got 
the fourth goal and the storing stopped 
when Fernald shot one into the net 
after a pretty bit of team play. The 
peri«Hlen«led immediately afterward*. 
The aeconil |»eri«al of play »>egan 
with Chisholm again at right wing. 
The ice was getting soft with water 
flooding along the edges of the rink. 
The put-'k s«'esawed up and down the 
ice. The Army seemed to have new 
life and forced the play. Team work 
however, was lacking and the indi- 
vidual play of Harris and Roycc couhl 
not break through the Aggie tlefenae. 
The Aggies could not get started aa 
effectively ^luring this perio*l, but 
West Point's efforts to score were in 
vain. Buttrick took care of all shots 
that came his way. Capt. Jones and 
Hutchinson showed their usual stellar 
work io carrying the puck. F«'rnald 
agairt replaced Chisholm when the 
period was half over and McNeily 
took .Mangan's place for the cadets. 
The game ended without further scor- 
ing. Line-up : 



1 74 season will be equally as successful 



—Myron F. Geer and Miss 
Aiineda Wheeler were married 
ngfield, Nov. "i."). They reside 

Longfellow Terrace. 



17<". Pvne, 

These results will not, however, ; as the first part 

wholly determine who Captain | — ■— "i^"""! 

Dunbar will pick to shoot in the first i '04.— Mr. and .Mrs. Fayette D. 

match against Purdue. Couden announce the birth of a son 

Sergeant Shiiver will be on hand at their home in South Bend, Wash., 

Dec. 4. 



WKST POINT. 

g, Strong 

p, McLean 

cp, Brundred 

c, (Capt.) Harris 

r, Royce 

Iw, Crawford 



[Continued on page 4] 



M. A C. 
Buttrick, g 
Needham, p 
Archibald, cp 
Hulchinson, c 
Jones (Capt.), r 
Johnson, Iw 
Chisholm, Fernald, rw 

rw, Mangan, McNeily 
Score— Aggies 5, West Point o. (ioala 
—-Archibald, Johnson, Needham, Hulch- 
inson, Fernald. Referee— Lieut. Pur 
don. Timers— Cadet Rees and P. H. 
.Smith. Time— 10 and is-minute period.s. 



\1\ 



\ 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 6, 1914 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 6, 1914- 



i k 



COMMUNICATIONS 

(Communications to the .Sfgnal concerninit 
matterii of Keneral inteiest aie welcumed. 1 he 
Si(iNAi. IS not to be held responsible for the 
opinion* thus expiessed.) 

Amiikkst, Mass., Dec. 30th, liil.'i. 

KUITOK C'<»LLK(JK .SiGNAI. : 
Denr Sir : 

There appeared in the Collkuk 
Skjnai, of Dec. lOth u cumniunicatiou 
from (). H. Hrigg« of the chiss of 
I'JOy iu relution to the " Joint Corn- 
niiltee on Intercollegiate Athletica," 
and the new athletic field over which 
it will have control. Please allow 
ine to answer this communication 
through the columns of your paper 
in onler that the readers may under- 
staml that what we arc trying to do 
is believed by the commiUee to be in 
the interests of the college in its 
largest sense, including both alumni 
and undergraduates. 

Mr. Hriggs' lettter emUKlies the 
following assertions : 

1. That the Joint Committee on 
Intercollegiate athletics is a control- 
led Ixnly and, therefore, the alunmi 
througii its representatives on this 
committee have no voice in the man- 
ugemeut of athletics or iu the admin- 
istration of the new field. 

To be perfectly frank this asser- 
tion is partly true. Through their 
action iu cteating this ix>nimittee the 
trustees lecognized intercollegiate 
athletics as a legitimate college ac- 
tivity, and as such they, through the 
president of the college as their rep- 
resentative, are responsible for the 
proper conduct of all athletic s|x>rts. 
The .Joint Committee on Intercolle- 
giate Athletics stands in exactly the 
same relation to college authority ns 
does any other department of the in- 
stitution It is neither desirable nor 
practicnl to have it otherwise. This 
being true it is not logiral that a ma- 
jority of the committee shoulil be 
those who are under the authority of 
the trustees 'f An alunmi committee 
(K>uld only be advisory as are such 
committees in other institutions, a 
student committee might need the 
guidance of men of larg»- ex|)crience, 
while it is |>o88ible for a faculty com- 
mittee to lack the united 8up()ort of 
alumni and students. (nder the 
present formation of the committee 
all are representeil and problems can 
be consitlered from the ^tandpoint of 
alumni, students and faculty. This 
bfMly is responsible for its actions to 
the trustees only, except iu the mat- 
ter of the length of the playing sea- 
sons and eligibdity rules over which 
the faculty rightly has the jurisdic- 
tion. 

Four of the present committee are 
alumni and the matter of the new 
athletic field is left to a sub-commit- 
tee consisting of two alumni mem- 
bers and one undergradiuite with the 
physical director serving as an ex- 
ofllcio meml)er. 

The ahunni are asked to contribute 
to the construction of the athletic 
field because this is probably the only 
way that money can be obtained for 
the purpose. It is very doubtful if 
the necessary funds could be had 
through state appropriation, although 
the need of the field is injperative, 
for the fact remains that as badly as 
we need the field a new library, a new 
chemical lal)oratory and various other 
buildings are needed as much and 
should be given the preference in the 
legislative budget. Then again there 
is probal)ly nothing to which the leg- 
islature would be less likely to ap- 
propriate money than to an athletic 
field owing to the difflculty of mak- 
ing such a body of men appreciate 



the value of athletics in the college 
work. 

The undergraduates have confi- 
dence enough in the present organiza- 
tion to have pledged over 83,000 of 
the necessary 812,000. They are al- 
so getting out and working with the 
pick and shovel without remunera- 
tion. They are on the spot and 
know conditions as tiiey are. Can- 
not some of this loyalty and enthus- 
iasm be transmitted to our alumni? 
All that we can ask is that the alumni 
contribute out of loyalty and love for 
their alma mater and we can assure 
them that it is our firm belief that 
their interests will be conserved as 
well under the present organization 
as under any fonii of organization 
that could be devised. 

•2. That athletics at M. A. C. 
are not on a paying basis and the 
committee will have to look to the 
alunmi for the maintenance of the 
field. 

The first part of this assertion is 
only too true. Aside from the fact 
that we need a running track, a bet- 
ter baseball diamond and a few other 
things, that is just the reason why a 
new field is needed. The cost of 
maintenance will be much more than 
offset by the paid admissions that we 
now loose. Kach student now pays 
8h annually for the support of athlet- 
ics which will probably be reduced 
when the field is completed. In any 
event there <"an be no reason why 
the alumni shoultl be called U|>on for 
the cost of maintenance. In an in- 
stitution like ours much of the work 
can be accomplished with teams and 
men regularly employed in other work 
alMiUt the grounds at less cost than 
where all of the help must be hired 
from outside. 

.'{. That the o<ist of uonstructiou 
will be exorbitant and that the field 
is not suitable and cannot be drained. 

The estimate for grading, of 83.'»,0(M) 
as given by Mr. Briggs for grad- 
ing the present lot and the lot west of 
l^incoln avenue included not only this 
but involved a more ambitious plan 
since abandoned of moving Lincoln 
avenue to the east, removing the old 
D. (i. K. or Kappa Sigma house and 
gra«ling much more property than the 
two plots menti<metl. The site of 
the new field has been carefully gone 
over by such competent persons as 
Warren II. Manning, the landscape 
architect, the building committee of 
the trustees, Mr. Harrison, instructor 
in landscape architecture, Mr. Dick- 
inson, superintendent of grounds and 
Professor Haskell of the department 
of agronomy. At the request of Pro- 
fessor Haskell test holes from .'» to (> 
feet deep were dug on various parts 
of the lot and he has already planne<l 
a drainage system which he believes 
will be ample. 

Mr. Hriggs sUites that '^a number 
of years ago when the I). G. K. fra- 
ternity started to dig a cellar on the 
highest part of this lot they found so 
much water at a depth of three feet 
that a drain 200 f«et long had to be 
dug before the work could be contin- 
ued." The writer has it from an 
authoritative source that the old 
trench which can be seen leading off 
from this cellar hole to the southeast 
was dug to conduct a sewer pipe to 
a cesspool and not to get rid of sur- 
plus water as he slates. The reason 
that the location was abandoned was 
that an opportunity presented itself 
for the society to purchase the house 
which they occupied until a few years 
ago and was n6t due in any way to 
the condition of the land. 



[Continued on page si 



HERMAN'S U.S. ARMY 
SERVICE BLUGHER 

In Tim Willow Ciilt or 

<iun Metul. A haml- 

bome.snappy shoe 

on theOrtliupedic [ 

lii-^t, desiifned l>y 

army surjfcons. 

You never savy 

a shoe like 

for wear.com-^ 

fort and 

style. 

Single 
Nolu of 
Texas uu- 
scour<>(ioak.i«i.v 
<>e, Kole leather 
coun(ers,ev«'ry part 
inNpeeted. l.Iiiin^'' of 
specially testi'<l drill. A (M»lid 
Icjither shoe that will uivethe 
wear of (he civilian hhoe that 
Kells ror$<i. This is one of the 
.sh<M>s I'nehi Saia iaiys for hi.s 
KoMlerH. IT'S A >V<>KI.1> 
UKATEIt. Sec the Aruiy line. 




HERMAN'S U.S. 
ARMY SHOES 




Lasts designed v 

AltMY Sur. 

t^euns. Mutcri, s 

arethehesttl it 

an be ubtaiix <|. 

Workinanbl. p 

inspect* d 

and ifua r- 

auteed. 



No. 968 

GARRISON 

BLUCHER. 

One of the moAt popular 
In the Army Lin.-. .Mtt.If> in Tan Wll- 

low Culf ami Cillll MflHl. I{e:i y 

Kini;l« «>1(>, )h)X ti"-. Hollil ieatlicr 
tlirou^hftiit. AhHiKlsumesnapityHliu.'. 
('«in*i ill tt> !"•« tlie line. Manuf;)i-tiiri'.i 

OBJy by Josfn'i .*!. llermai &('«., Boston. 



PRICE 84. OO PRICE 84.00 

PAGEl'S SHOE STORE 



THE 



Hoover & Smith Co. 

6i6 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 



Ptiiiadelphla's Official Fraternity Jeweler 

SPBOIALISTS IN 
Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prises. Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

Rings, Charms.-. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass. 
Orrici Hours: 




Pheasant 

Bmitc St.. 
Bmbetet 

Telephone 470 



SREAKfAST 

LUNCHSON 
APTEMNOON TEA 

Dinser if arranged for. 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 



Now at 13 Pleasant St. 



Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Kroken Lenses .■Accurately Replaced 

Fine Watch Repairing Promptly and 
Skilfully Done 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 



THINK— IT— OVER 

Vou already know the superior quality of our Soda and Ice Cream. 
Now gel acquainted "vith our COFFEE. We serve as well as scli 

GEORGE WASHINGTON COFFEE 

Unexcelled as an every-day beverage. You will, we feel sure, enj'>y 
stepping in for your morning Coffee. If you want a real treat come 
yourself and bring your friends here. 

You are always welcome at 

THE HENRY ADAMS CO., DrugElsts 

The REXALL Store on the corner 



Heart -to -Heart Talks 

To Aggie Men 

By the Largest Retailers of 
Apparel in New England 

The whole thoujrht and spirit of you men is centereti 
upon the Christmas recess, no doubt, for you .soon are 
to pack your bags for the refreshing Yuletide vacation. 

The thought and spirit of our store is of Christmas, 
as well. Christmas goods are pouring out over our 
counters in endless profusion. Countless numbers ol 
the millions of gilts that pass out of our hands are for 
MEN, for here in our two mammoth buihhngs are 
grouped more practical presents for Men and Young 
Men than in any other New Kngland store. 

Some of these gifts are destined to fall int(» y<»ur 
hands and we want you to appreciate them. The quality 
and exclusivtness of our merchandise is unsurpas.std, 
and gifts with our name stamped upon them show the 
acme of good taste and di.stinction. 

In giving as well as in receiving, we want you to 
look to us for all holiday wants. 

JORDAN MARSH COMPANY 

Boston 



TMEi SMOOTHEST 
TOBACCO 

SEE the ringer full of c!ee piping up! Sec 
the pipe full of Velvet helping out I 
Velvet, the (inctcf leaf — ^agcd over two years — 
ton d down — mclio'ved — fit for "Prexic 
KunseU. T irr. c ilone can eliminate all harsh- 
ness — ^brinf r.bcut reai smoothness and 
dcr :;iop ih3 ta. '.2 that's ^ood. When 
exanis loon, up snd uncertainty is 
v^ -a tin ci Velvet v.all help 
con ntration and study — it« 
smc th! At all dealers. 



Maekinaws 



AND 



Sweaters 



This is Mackinaw and Sweatt-r sea.son. I'oothall, Golf and 
all other Fall and Winter spoils call for good Sweater pro- 
tection. We have in stock today .several hundred Maeki- 
naws in all grades. 



The famous Summit brand, well known in the Northwest 
and acknowledged to be one of the best. Coat Sweaters, 
the Shawl Collar. Coat Collar antl the regular shape 
Sweaters, all the best .selling colors. 

H^l.OO to HHT.oo 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



School and College PhoiograpDcrs . . . 




I r%nAIIY- 52 Center St., Northampton Mass.. 
l.(^^^i.i.r. 3 ^^^ g^^^j^ Hadley, Mass. 



Main Offick: 

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New York City 



The»e .Studio* offer the IhtM >killcr1 
artiftls and moi>t complrtr 

equipment olttainahle 



Wi; SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 

In so far as our benefits arc mutual. 

THE AMHERST GAS COMPANY 

gx/ervtHIng Ellectrical 



WA^. 



If 



Fol' 0^ 

lUL. 



One ounce bags, 
Pc, convenient for 
cigarette amokera 



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MCPRrSI^ 



NON-LKAKABLK 



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Minimize your fountain pen 

r- tTout>Ie<i l>y ownJnft a M«»"f« -J *„V '* * „ 
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« Its strenftth lies In lt» very slmpMcliy. ixoining 
flnVyJoftetout of order. C You can ft ve your- ^ 
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For Sale hy D««le" Everywhere v.'/ ^ 

American Fountain Pen Company 

Adam.. <;o.hlnft & Foater. S'"'"*^.f f""'' .„, 
IM DEVONSHIRE .STREET :: = BOSION. MA-W. 



The College Signal, Tue&day, January 6, 1914- 



The College Signal, Taeadaj, January 6, i9i4> 



i 




THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Africultural College. 



BOARD OF 1DIT0B8 

CHESTER K. WH EF.I.KR '14. F.ditor-i 



FKANK W. lU'KI.I. '15. Managing 

HAROLD C. BLACK '14, Competition 

HAROLD J. CLAV'14. Assistant 

STUART B. FOSTER '14. Athletic 

ERVINE F. PARKER '14. Alumni 

J. ALBERT PRICE '15. Athletic 

GEO. E. DONNELL '15, Department 

EARLE S. DRAPER '15. Campus 

TYLER S. ROGERS •16. Associate 



n-Chief 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 



CHARLES W. CURTlN'i6, Associate 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

ERNEST S. CLARK. jR '14. Bus. Manager 
MAURICE J. CLOLT.H '1;. Ass't Bus. Mgr. 
ERNEST F. UPTON '14. Advertising Manager 
W. RICHARD SEARS '15. Asst. \dy. Manager 
CHAS A. HUNTINGTON. JR. '16, Circulation 

Subscription #1.50 per >ear. Single 
copies, 5 cents. Make all orders payable 
to Ernest S. Clark, Jr. 



will be moved to the center of the 
pond, so us to make the artificial 
lighting available. 



Entered ■• eacmd-deaa matter el the 
Peel Ofttae. 


AmlMrM 


Vol. XXIV. TuR-SDAY, Jan. 6. 


No. 


14 


«• BoMt Old Aggie." 







AtiAiN, the hockey team is on the 
ice, and our Ik>vb are keeping up the 
goo<l wt»rk of the last few years. An 
excellent bojjinning has l>een made, 
and the balance of the Hcason must 
be successful, for we have a bantl of 
fighters, men whose efforts are effect- 
ually aiding to "Ijoost Old Aggie." 



TiiK result of the efforts of the 
Roister Roisters this year has proven 
that classical draiiin can be interpre- 
ted fuccessftilly here at Massachu- 
setts. Dramatics is a branch of col- 
lege activity which is continually de- 
veloping along broad lines, and it 
should have the hearty sup|K)rt of 
all the undergraduates. The club is 
most fortiiuatc this year in having 
Professor Smith for a coach, and it 
is due to his untiring efforts that the 
performances up to this time have 
been so successful. 



CAMPUS NOTES 

"Bill*' Hasey 'l.'t has returned to 
college to take a post graduate 
course in entomology. 

Don't forget that the next student 
deposit for the M. A. ('. athletic 
field is due Jan. 7, 1914. Don't be 
afraid to dig deep. 

Our midwinter associates, the 
Shorthorns, have begun to arrive. 
All indications show that thcie will 
be a record breaking number this 
year. 

Track cantlidates have been called 
out. Practice starts today. The 
first relay race is .Ian. 24 at the 
Coast Artillery meet with Tufts in 
Boston. 

The hockey team has started off 
vvell — it looks like a successful sea- 
son. The Harvard game at the 
Arena on .Jan. 14 will lie a big game. 
Everyone who can get down should 

go- 

The new hockey rink has been 

erected. As soon as weather condi- 
tions and ice warrant it, however, it 



TO ye STUDENTS 
of M. A. C. 

Ye ladyes of M. A. C. crave 
your presence at ye rwelftn 
NigKt entertainment to oe giv- 
en in ye Drill Hall on ye 
evening of ye nintli day of 
January at eignt o clock. 



SOCIAL UNION 

The attention of the men is called 
to the concert to be given by the 
Fuller Sisters in the Chapel on Sat- 
urday evening. This entertainment 
is part of the Social Union series. 



A ««BOOST" 

"Nnt the least of the signs of 
promise is the apparent purpose of 
Harvard university, Wellesley college 
and Ik)ston university to magnify 
professional education. Nothing is 
more significant in hopefulness than 
the new professional attitude and 
activity at Harvard. Wellesley col- 
lege's new kindergarten building 
emphasises this noble feature of edu- 
cation at a giXMl time. Scarcely less 
significant is the noble leadership ot 
the .State college at Amherst. She is 
already dominating agricultural edu- 
cation in the state in such a way as 
to vie with kindred institutions in the 
Middle West and Far West. 
Through her summer school she is 
annually reaching more Superin- 
tendents of the state than does any 
other State college or university in 
the country. It really looks as 
though Massachusetts has a noble, 
inspiring, statewide, uplifting college 
at the head of the public school sys- 
tem." 

Dr. A. K. Winship, before the 
State Teachers' association, Itoston, 
Nov. 2".». 

RIFLE SCHEDULE 

[Continued from page i J 

early In January to give the team his 
able assistance as coach again this 
year. He is coming up from the 
Marine ctirps target practice grounds 
at Cambridge, Maryland, and will 
stav three weeks. 



The following is this season's 


schedule : 




Purdue, 


Jan. H 


Minnesota, 


Jan. l.'> 


Mass. "Tech" 


Jan. 22 


Harvard, 


Jan. 2I> 


Michigan Aggies. 


Feb. .') 


Princeton, 


Feb. 12 


Iowa, 


Feb. 19 


Norwich, 


Feb. 26 


California, 


March ."» 


North (leoigia, 


March 12 


West Virginia, 


March 19 




nn 



CARAFE 

Have a Hot Coffee in Your Room. 

Fill at the cart ' Slay hot 24 houi 

Other styles for tramps. 



KEEPS HOT 



KEEPS COLD 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



•09.— The birth of a son, Richard 
Chute Potter, Jr., Nov. 21, is an- 
nounced by Richard C. Potter of Ber- 
wvn, 111. 



QNITY CHURCH 

North Flrasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

RKGirLAK SITNDAV SKKVICK AT 7 T M 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest lim in 
the state outside of Boston. 



Seeourlineof Drill Shoes 

E. RUSSELL NORTON $2.00 tO $4.00 



SALRS AGF.NT 



Davenport Miller 
Vein Coal 

Best Qualily Pennsylvania Coal 



boston office 
8s Water .St. 



NEW YORK OFFICE 

I Broadway 



LOW PRICE TAII-ORING CO. 

SLITS MADE To ORDER 
Suits Cleaned. PreMrd and Dyed. All kinds of 
Rppairihe for I.adips and (lentlenien neatly done. 
iliBhur-ttlP woik !)> lirst class tailor. Work 
called for and delivered. Sell tickets foi pressing, 
4 SlMTS vein f I so 

GEORGE KOTO^ITZ. Prop. 

Main Street. Amherst, Mast. Nash Block 

On your way to the I'osi Office. Tel. 438-W 



MODERN REPAIR 
DEPARTMENT 



E.M.BOLLES 



(OM VOOR «WAV TO P. O.) 



Cookp's Roicl 

•pringfleld, Mass., 

Solicits the patronage of the .^ u 
dents of the Agricultural ColK-i:e 
to class dinners and individuail) 



I. M. LABROVITZ, Custom Tailor 

Fashions, Fit, First Class Work Guaranteed 

Large a.ssortment on hand. (;ENT'S FURMSHIN(;S. Ked-Man Collar)^ and 

Dress .Shirts. CleaninR and Pressing. DRESS SUIT.S 

TO KENT. Military Collars and Gloves 

11 AMITY ST., Telephone 302-W. AMHERST, MASS. 



CHRISTMAS GIFTS ! 

A portrait a most acceptable Christmas gift — 

Appointments made now can be finished in tme. 

Hiss McGlellan's Stodio is tlie Place 



COMMUNICATIONS 

1 ContiniMd from page a] 



let 



I hat the Q. T. V. lot Is a bet- 
1,. lion for the field than the one 

selet' 'I. 

\\'\\e the surfuee of this lot is 
s(>nK"l»at better than the moist spots 
on '' pr<»po8e(l site, it is not large 
eiiou- I for a suitable lieUl unless c-ar- 
rie.l ' • the west far enough to encoun- 
t^.i I'f same t'oiulitions that prevail 
ou Use eastern sitle of the proposed 

site. 

W. do not doubt Mr HriggH' sin- 
cerity and trust that he. as well as 
(itliti^. *'•<* ^** ""* understan«l the 
sitiiuiioii thoroughly will feel free to 
call "i'on the foniiiiittee at any time 
fui information. 

jh. miUl autumn htts allowed us to 
iiijik.- :i start on the Held and with the 
tinitt<l support of the alunuii the liehl 
.|ioul<l Iw practically completed by 
another autumn. 

Yours very truly. 

Pim.ip II. Smith, 
Chairman of Field Committee. 



X 



KdITOKS, CoLLKdE SlONAI 

Dear ' Sir : 

1 have at hand your issue of 
Dec. lit, in which is contained an 
article by (). B. Hriggs 'O'J, legard- 
ing drainage and other problems on 
the proposed new athletic Held. I 
trust that you will pardon a few 
words in reply. 

All students and faculty members 
living on rhillipH, Fearing and adja- 
cent streeets will testify to the cor- 
rectness of Mr. Hriggs' statement 
reganling moisture conditions on the 
fieUl in ({uestion. The soil, however, 
even on the lowest part of the field, 
is very far from being the clay which 
he assumes it to be. Professor 
Hicks of the joint committee has had 
test holes dug in several places, all 
of these going deep enough to pene- 
trate several feet beyond the limit of 
the grading. In none of thewe holes 
were appreciable amounts of pure 
clay found, although in three there 
WHS sutlicient silt and clay to fill the 
sand matrix and make movement of 
water very slow. The wetter |»art of 
the fiehl is underlain bv a Hemi- 



WHEN CONSIDERING FERTILIZERS 

Id t()iinecti<»» with your studies and experiments, don't fail to acquaint 
voiirself with the wonderful producing and soil-nourishing properties of 



Wrne for booklets 

on ••Soil Fertility," 
•• The (irasA Crop," 
" the Apple," etc. 



.Mf-KIL1114»— ^ 



DasCL ,^ 



'■UTII 



One Dollar Invested j 
in Hubbard's Bone 
Base f-ertlllzera 
buys as much plant 
food as $1.70 to 
$1.00 In low grade 
fertiiUers. 



THE ROGERS tt HUBBARD COMPANY. Niddlctown, Cobb. 

oittif wntl IVorka. I'orllHiiil, <'<>iiii. 



(t 



Keeping in Front 

\'ou fellows know what that means I 
We've been very successhil in this 
regard with Fatima Cigarettes. By 
the way, these cigarettes were first 
sold in the college towns — and you 
agreed with us that they were good. 

Then we put out for the big race, 
to make Fatimas of nation-wide rep- 
utation, and today more are sold than 
any other cigarette in this country. 

No purer, or more carefully chosen 
tobacco grows than that in r atimas. 
\v'e purposely put them in a plain 
inexpensive wrapper — in this way 
%ve can afford quality tobacco, and 
t venly of the smokes for 1 3 cents. 

Now your college crew is of utmost 
importance to you — so is a good 
rigarette, and it's your aim in life 
f ^ keep Fatimas m the lead — ^right 
u(i lo their good quality — right up 
I" where you first found them, and 
Will always find them. 

Si: cess fellows! You started this 
ciij irette on its successful career — 
an J you pull a strong oar all over 
th • country. 




FATING 

CIGARETTES 
20>Srl5< 



44 State Street, 



Northampton, ^' ^s- 



L 




'TUtincHre^ huUrithMal' 



This Is Your Need 

The fertilizer industry is based on all il>c sciences that relate 
to soil and crop problems; on peolojiy, which tells of the formaliun 
and composition of soils; on chemisliy, which shows ihe iuhiIs of 
crops and how they can be supplied ; on botany, which tells of the 
structure of crops and habits of growth, and. finally, on bacteiiol- 
ogy, a comparaiively new science, whiih tells of the soil bacteria, 
or "yeast of the soil"— the lower orders ol life, without which 
crops cannot thrive. This latter science, which we are just begin- 
ning to develop and understand, is coniplett-ly overturning our pre- 
conceived notions of drainage, tillage aiul the telations of plant 
food ingredients to crops and soils. 

Thus it will be seen that the nian who is carrying on the ferii 
lizer industry today and the farmer who is more or less depend 
ent on that industry for a pait or all of his plant fo(»«l must ea< h 
be more or less familiar with these snbjeits to nmt the m 1 tK ut 
modern and successful farming. 

Study the Plant I'ooti problem 
Can we help wmt 



. 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER COMPANY 
43 Chatham St., Boston 



F. A. SHEPARD 

MEN'S STORE 



Use our ne^v cash discount card 

AND save five per CENT ON 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

FumishingB and Custom Tailoring' 



IMPORTANT ! 

I'he most practical present to give your brother or sister is one of the 

famous 

Patrick- Dulutli Mackinaws 

Sold at Cost at Campion's the Next 10 Days 



$6.50 Mackinaws for $4.00 

$9.00 Mackinaws for $6.50 

$10.00 Mackinaws for $7.25 

$12.00 Mackinaws for $8.00 

200 Suits and Overcoats to be cleaned up at cost 

No goods charged at the above prices. 

CAMPION - TWO COLLEGE STORES 



^c '■ 



The College Signal. Tuesday, January 6, 1914. 



The College Signal. Tuesday, January 6, 191 4 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

jobbers of Wrought Iron and Brass I'lpf. \'alves 
and Fittings (or Steam, Water and (ia*. Asbestos 
and MagneMa Holler and I'ipe CoverinRS. J'ipe 
Cut to Sketch, Mill Supplies. Knyireers and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water Heating. 
.'\utoniatic Sprinkler Systems, Holier and Kn^ire 
Connections. Holyoke, Mm*. 



theTuciiers Exchange 



120 fitnlilon St. 



0/ Boston 

Recommends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



C^^rp^^■ler & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



m 



No I, Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Students Attention ! ! ! 

We are ready at the start to furnish you with a fine 
line of Campus and Fraternity House Views, also Post 
Cards. Kodak work given prompt and careful attention. 
Enlarging and picture framing given our personal at- 
tention. See us about (Jroups and Portraits for the very 
best work. 

Satisfaction Goaranteed. Patronize 
the Square Deal Studio 

KINSMAN'S COLLEGE STUDIO 



Nash BlocK, Amherst 



H. M. RcK-.KRS, '15, Agent. 
87 Pleasant St., 



Studio Phone 303-». 



•^ 



GRAND SWEEPSTAKES TROPHY 



(9750.00 Sterling Silver Cup) 
roa 



BEST STATE EXHIBIT OF POTATOES 




AT THC 

New York Land Show 

1912 
WON BY 

TheLLCIevelandCompany 

HOULTON. M«. 

/^NE of the largest and most 
^^ reliable seed potato houses 
in the United States. Competi- 
tion open to the entire United 
States and Canada. Messrs. E. L. 
Cleveland Company also won the 
First Prize for Best Couty Exkibit 
of Potatoes. (Silver Cup valued 
at $200.00.) 
The E. L. Cleveland Company use 

E. FRANK COE 



FERTILIZERS 



E. Frank Coe Fertilizers have 
been the business farmer's favorite 
for over fifty-five years. Why not 
follow the example of these lead- 
ing commercial potato growers. 

Ifnti *n(lii 11.1H.I ■The Sitiry nt A Prt)0luhlr Potam 
frtip" "rlti-nbj •» «r,",,i»«ili l««iilr, ■■!«• f»r»»r 



The Coe-Mortimer Company, 



51 CHAMBERS STREET. 
NEW YORK. N. Y. 



itnpervious hardpan. It is this hard- 
pan which brings water to the sur- 
face those times of the year when the 
soil is naturally flushed, and which 
:it present holds water underneath 
even the season through. The soil 
itself is very well suited for the pur- 
poses of the field. 

As a drainage proposition, the 
prol)lem is perfectly simple. From 
the northeast corner of the field, 
north along the brook to the stone 
bridge, there is a full of about three 
and a half feet. The channel of the 
brook can very easily be widened 
and deepened from this |)oint to the 
bildge, a distance of about 100 
yards, giving a free outlet for the 
draimige of the athletic field, and 
protection from all except the high- 
est of rtootls. The main drain will 
run from this |)4>int southwest, fol 
lowing the natural hollow there found 
and receiving lateral drains from the 
west. The U)tal tilinir re^piired will 
lie al>out 5000 feet. The cost, deliv- 
ered f. o. b. Amherst, will be in the 
neigh* H>rho<Hl of $250. Part of this 
tiling will be laid in very shallow 
ditches to Iks covered later by the 
»»fill." and part in trenches about 
three feet <leep. From the attitude 
of the student ImmIv, I feel safe in 
saying that there will be do very 
large lal»or cost in connection with 
the installntiim of the system. In 
fact, the money cost to the alumni 
may not be as large as the lal)or and 
time cost to those now in college. 

.lust a won! al>out the alternative 
field whi«h Mr. Briggs suggests. ^ I 
shall hfive to take issue with him 
regarding its l»eing on a •'gravelly 
knoll that has almost perfect natural 
draiuiige." The ohi !>.<;. K. cellar 
lit)le is on this knoll. an<l none will 
dispute Mr. Hriggs' assertitui that it 
is wet at all tin»es < >n different 
parts of this tiehl there is a growth 
of scrubby wilhiws. indicating moist- 
ure underneath. To the west, on the 
slo|M', there. -ire springy s|M>ts, which 
must come frouj this field. Where 
the Held comes to a jMiint. just 
south of the f«»rmer Kappa .Sigma 
(I>. (i. K.) house, water Bto<Ml on 
the surface last spring, until late in 
the season. This alternative field 
has certain manifest advantages. 
whi<'h are re«-«»gnlzed by the joint 
committee, but U-tter drainage is not 
one of tbeae. The cost of the neces- 
s.iry lateral drains would l»e as great 
as on llie propose<l (icid. while the 
fost of leading the collected waters 
to a suitable outlet wotild be much 
greater. 

Certain memWrs of 'Oh may remem- 
ber when, as juniors, they installed a 
drainage system <m a part of the 
plot of land lying easterly of the drill 
hall mid north of the proposed field. 
This problem differed in no degree 
fr<mi that presented by the pr(»|M)sed 
field, save that it was impossible to 
get a free outlet. Notwithstanding 
this disadvantage the system has 
worked satisfactorily ; so satisfaclo- 
rilv that there have been but few in 
the present generation of 8tu«lents 
but who, if they have given the mat- 
ter any thought, have considered the 
plot draine*! entirely by natural 
means. 

It may be worth while to iio'e, in 
this connection, that so well )|ualified 
an engineer as William Wheeler '71 
and a member of the board of trus- 
tees of the college, has given his 
approval to the plan as presented by 
the joint committee. 

Very truly yours. 

SiKNKV B. IIaskkm. '04. 



PEACE SOCIETY PRIZE 

The attention of the undert;;niu- 
ates is calle<l to the bulletin f the 
Massachusetts Peace society i sted 
ou the registrar's board in Sou! i col- 
lege ofTering three prizes of <100. 
S75 and ?50 respectively for tin beit 
essays on some [ihase of the sniject. 
"The Substitution of Law for \^ ar." 
and open to undergriiiiuates : ,11 
Massachusetts colleges. Tin time 
limit of the essays is not up until 
March l'». 

The $100 Lake .Mohawk Ai'itra 
tion prize, notice of which ni:i\ |i, 
found on the Knglish bulletin I <>ari. 
open to all undergraduates in tlit 
rutted States and Canada. 1- alv. 
worthy of consitleration. 



NINETEEN.THlRTEtN NOTES 

>:i>ITKI> l«Y TIIK NINFrrKKN-TIIIHTEk* 
M. A. ('. CLL'B or AMIIKHxl. 

ATHKBTIC riKLIi. 

TiiK CoLLKUK Signal will puhiiith 
iu one of the January issues the ath- 
letic field contributions to tlHtt. 
together with the umoiints raised »• 
far bv each class. If you want 1913 
to head the list sen<l in your •*iro8 
men" or the etpiivalent at once, 

IIM.'J NhJHT. 

The Ik>ston bampiet held at tlir 
United .States hotel was a great huc- 
cess, there were 2r» Thirteeiiite!« iher* 
and everylKMly was full of the okl 
Aggie spirit. The athletic field. iIm 
class letter, alumni night, and tb^ 
.lune banquet were the chief \tt\m-> 
of discussion. The It* I. 'I M. \ ' 
Club of BostoQ was orgaiiind mtu 
(Hover K. Howe at the head. Tlif 
cinb plans to hold monMilv get- 
togethers, the first meeting t<i ix 
.Ian I4lh at 7-.'iO o'cliK-k iit tbe 
Arena wheie the Af^le-ll.irvMnl 
h<K'key game will be attended. Tbf 
following men were present : Nii-fc- 
ols. Tucker, C'ulley, 11 lleaifW. 
Malone. I.yon. Cristman. Kisenhaiirr. 
Whitney. Bullard. M. Ileadl.-, K«if 
bush. Little, G. K. Howe. Klli». 
Brown, Neal, Bevan. Parsons ex-'!.1. 
(Ireenleaf, (Jore. I/owry. rurlii. 
(iaskill. and I'illsbury. 

Telegrams were exchange<l )» tw* • : 
the following I)anquet8. .SprmprHi; 
Ni'w York, Boston. ( hicapo. lii.ii 
Isle and Atlanta, (in. 

More news of 191.1 night n»\t wpfk 

NK.W> ITKMS. 

At Springfield. Nov. I'.t. Lester 
Pease married Miss Agnes ( iiristiK 
.lensen. Their present a<ldrt'«!» » 
"lieechwoo«1," Templeton. 

By trimming "I'lmalion lli" 
Brewer's ffKitlcill team won thcili" 
pionship. Herb writes lli'f •'"' 
teams average«l over 170 p(»i!i! l* itiji 
that Canea, his Hawaian liidfbark 
was getting off C>h yurd I'liiit* *itt 
regularity. 



TO THE ALUMNI 

'• B<H>8t old Aggie" thro 
alumni columns. Ix;t tli< 
editor know what you are 
the worhl. let him know al ' 
promotions and your succe.'^s 
know about the new fields f)f • 
you may enter, and in fact 
"from vital statistics to el 
address. Anything that i' 
be heralded with prompt n 
0U8 strokes of the edit' 
Write first concerning yon 
fill as many pages as you 
news concerning other ah 



alamni 

loing '■^ 
Hit vonr 
let' hi' 
iidesvtX 
1 tiythii^ 
nges iif 

, pen 

If tht" 

.,„ witli 

,ni ^"^ 



(1 -* '15 



Eldridge '14 



All Student Supplies 

M. A. C. STORE 

BANNERS AND POSTERS 



CANOV TOMIC 



M.iitague "15 



Hager '16 



Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

I'\(KKKH. I'OUi.TKl' l>KI-.SsKK.<i 
AN1> HI I'TKK .MAKKKS. 

WHOLESALE liEALF.IIS IN 

H(ci Mutton, Ljimb. Veal. Pork. Lard, Ham«. 

Hacun, S«u»aK«*. P<>uilr>. <lainr. Butter 

Ciiccac, ligK*. Hcan». 

, it; c .. ^tofM 53>5!,57.5'V. ■ I & '>^ Black»tonr St. 

|i,.yit>n i'^citing House. BriKhtun. Mas.i 

N.iti'a i'uultfT Dressing Flant, Boston. 

Cieameries in Vermnnl. 



SHORTHORNS... 

I'.ut of" your college educa- 
tiim may be obtained in the 

DOG CART 



SEE AND 

TRY A 

DE LAVAL 



Those who know 
buy the De Laval 

< >• Aitirrynicn — |{ec4u«« th«r> are '%■ 
ihthe liandlinR of cr«ann and know 
-IK experience that the !)• I.a»al 
< i<M^e^l and wears longest. I hat 
■ 'l^4 of the Wi>rld's creaineriei use 

'. ■' I >e l^*al«xclusively. 
^ tprrlenrrd Italrymrn—TbeDe Laval 
iniversal favorit* among big Hairy 
I liry know that no other separator 
> i'-ff them such satisfactory service. 
«»l"l t>« l.«v»l i;aera -Whenever a man 
' IS used an old mniiel l>e I aval de 
purchase- a later style machine he 
'iiy buys another l>e I. aval. 
^1 '■ Who Invmlinlr— Itecause tlie> 
I'i."- majorityoi l>e I.avalmachinet 
• >' they are used by the liest in 
.' rsevervwhere : that they stand 
n use. and that their users are het 
%tied than users of other separatori. 

THE DE imi SEPARATM CO 

t'iwar, x) K. Madison St. 

: '>rl< Chicago. 



whom you come in contact or even 
hear of indirectly. 

The s trength of the ilemocratic 
spirit which has ever prevaileil with 
us, is giving rise to the most success- 
ful athletic teams and broad cultural 
and vocational training the college 
has ever known. The alumni have 
reason to grow prouder of their alma 
mater every day. IJy exchanging 
view-points aiitl ideas, aixi keeping 
in touch with one another }'0(i may 
know promptly, not only what has 
been done to '* l»o<)8t old Aggie", but 
what is being done, and what meth- 
ods may be best to pursue in the 
future, that the work of our institu- 
tion may the scM>ner command the at- 
tention from the people at large, 
and we better our position by it. 

Alumni, you have no regular pidjli- 
cation, but the ('oi.i.K(iK Shjnai, is 
willing to devote a whole page every 
week to material ilirectly concerning 
you, so will vou iiotiiatronize it more 
and make it a better pa|>er by so <lo- 
iug, and also help with the lMX)Btiug. 

Some fault has been found concern- 
ing the amount of space devoted to 
the alumni notes, but as the paper is 
maintaining only two double sheets 
and there is |M>pular demand 
for full write-ups of athletics. 
t»ome other news must be given 
less space and this has generally 
been the alumni notes. With the 
football season over more alumni 
notes will naturally be inserte<i. Hut 
the alumni e«litors cannot maintain 
an extensive clippings bureau and un- 
aided aitpuiint himself with what over 
eight hundred alumni seattereil thru- 
out the w(»rld are dtting. S<> it is up 
to every loyal alumnus to re|H>rt 
whatever newt» he can. and as soon 
as possible after it hap|>eiiB. .Sliouhl 
this appeal for news i>e received as 

the c«Itt*»« •••♦•••'I" St wt..«ll, '1.-^ ."I '• 

will 1h? enlarged by at least one sheet 
each issue. 'Ai-UMM Kiutok. 



J Lamiers, Morris H., f»l»'j Seventh I 
St., Detroit, Mich. I'hysician and' 
surgeon. 

I Lewis, James F., address unknown. 

[ Monahan, Arthur C, 182 Bryant 
'St., Washington. I). (\ Specialist 
' in agricultural e<lucati*ui. 

Morrill, Austin W., Thoenix, Ariz. 
Kntomologist. Arizona horticultural 
cumiuission and agricultural experi- 
ment station. 

Muuson, Mark li., Huntington. 
Farmer, 

I'armenter, (ieoige F., Waterville, 
Me. Professor of chemistry at Col- 
by college. 

Stanley, Fiaiicis (i., 114 Cabot 
St.. Heverly. I'hysician. 

West, Aliiert .M., Washington, I). 
C. r. S. department of agriculture, 
bureau of animal industry. 

The Highland Hotel 

Corner ol Hillman and tlainrs Stie«t«i. three 
blocks from the Cniun Depot, i> a modern hos- 
telry run on tlip Kur<>i>e,in I'Uii. It is jutt * step 
from Main .^tieet, away Imm the noise and dust 
and yet in the center of the business distiitt. 

Its rooms are well furnished and comfurlable, 
liavinii a trlepli<ine and hot and cold runnini; 
w-ttrt in eveiyriMiiii I'lices VI .iiui up. loonis 
with Uith (siiiKle) SI All and up. 

Itscxcwllent cuisine an.-l well ventilatfd dinliiK 
room make's a 'i;i • :''asant inemoi y~evjr> 
thiiiK 111 the hi >lity. w,-ll cooked and 

seiv^ in the Ik--.' , ■ iiMnner. 

Stay at the lliKhl,ind Motel once .tnd mmi will 
anticipate stayiiiK tlipie again Mm- ■»•■ h 
evening. 

D. H. SIEVERS, 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Su».day Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



HlahlNiHl Miii'l. 



H|trliiKa*'l<l, Wii> 



StKI* II K.V I ., A .V K l'"'«»l.«iKW 

»«AS(l'KA«-ri'MI .N«* .IKSS I I I l< 

1H«> ltl^>.VI)\V.\V. Nl;\V >«»UK 

I»INM ANIJ WINCJK ^ 

o<>i.i>. ••ii.vKn *Mr» MMox/.K \t«ii»i»« 



Ihere are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 



or 



C. R, ELDER 



ALUMNI NOTES 

•10. — UoHs K. Aunis represents 
Uie paving and roads division of the 
sales tlepartment of the Texas Co. 
Husineas atldress, I4»; Summer St., 
liosttJD. 

'10.— Henry K. Francis, change of 
address from 77.t Whalley Ave., 
New Haven, Conn, to care of New 
York State College of Forestry. 
Syracuse, N, Y, 

MNKTKKN III NhUKH. 

.s,., i.tary Kdwin K. Atkins re|>ort« 
the following address list revised to 
date : 

Atkins, F/lwin K., V* Hubbard 
Ave., Northampton, civil engineer. 

Baker, Howard, South Hadley, 
veterinarian. 

Hrown, F, Howard, flosrin r St,, i 
Marlboro, farmer, 

CarnpMl, Martin A,, not heard 
from since 1910. 

Canto, Ysidro. atldress unknown. 

Crane. Henry I... Westwootl. 
Fruit grower. 

Frost, Arthur F., Amherst, Civil 
engineer. 

(Albert. Ralph D-. Miilbunie 
Road, Iklnumt. Chemist and vice- 
president, Bowker Insecticijle Co, 

Halligan, .lames K., Baton Rouge, 
La, Chemist, State experiment 
station. 

Hull, K<lward F., il-'O Seventh 
Ave,, New York city. Phy^i^^^'an- 

Kellogg, .Tames W., i:5.'{ Walnut 
St., Harrisburg, l':i Chief chemist. 
Pennsylvania department of agri- 
calture. 



The Connecticut Valley 
Street Railway 



EWELL'5 

STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn- 
gland of Special Studen humishings. 

LOWKR K.Xl'ENSKS Knable us 
to offer an absolute lower price. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

ANn 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



cox SONS 

— AMI) — 

VININO 



7J 74 Madison Avenue, New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

Uesi Materials and Workmanship 




From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields. past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Ml., alongside the 
famous Mloody Hrook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield. thence to (;recn- 
ficld, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant. Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 



50 Miles of Trackage nodern 
Hquipment Train l)i«patch> 
infc 5>' stem -Freight and Ex* 
press Service over entire line. 



WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



17 Main St., Masonic BIdg., 
Northampton, .Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Chted only from r A. M. h 4 A. M. 



Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



Toefil Mientka 

snoes Sinned aod Pollsteii 

Make old shoes look like new 

Neat, classy workmanship 

Op«n 8niid«]r Main St, 

Ob war to P«it Ofic*. 






I 



■' ) 



j^^^^ 

'^^ 







The College Signal, Tuesday, January 6, 19 14. 



TENNIS 
RACKETS 




-At— 



DEUEL'S 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundfy 

Uigh-Grade College Work 

LAUNDRY 

Shins, 10-15C 



Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash. 
Same, rough dry, 



3 i-ac 

3 I-2C 

48c per doz. 
30c per doz. 



DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Dry Cleaning and Pressing, #1.50 a Suit 



Kalph J. Boiii>i<<«. AK«nt. 7 North Cotttfe 
KiiWAKii C. EuwAKUs, Agent 

Put full name and address on laundry 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



Loose • Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 

Uefore buying elsewhere, see our assort- 
ment of pennants and banners 

CURRAN A DYER. Propa. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green* 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300 



The Massachusetts Agricultural Gollese 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty six teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in the following subjects : 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairyimg 

Poultry Husbandry 



Horticulture 

Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 



Agricultural Chemistry 
Economic Entomology 
Plant Physiology and Pathology 
Agricultural Education 



For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



£. E. HILLETT 

JEWELER AND OPTOMETl M 

Lenses ground while you wait 
College Jewblkv 
Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar tririgs 

AMIIICKaT, MASiS. 
Ne»t to Post Office. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



Juiut Coiumittee on Interi-olli'giate Athletics, 

'J'be College Senate, 

Football Associutiou, 

buiiebull Atisociatiou, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Hide club. 

Musical Association, 
Nineteen Hundred F'ourteeu Index, 
Nineteen Hundred Fifteen Index, 
M. A. C'. Christian Assuciutiuu, 
M. A. C. Catholic Club, 
Fraternity Conference, 
SUxkbriilgc Club, 



Philip H. Smith, Secretary 

I>. W. Jones, President 

J. A. Price, Manager 

G. D. Melicau, .Manager 

K. C. Fklwards, Manager 

.1. l>. Pellett, Manager 

U. K. MacLain, Manager 

J. T. Oertel, President 

'* ' I,ewiu M<inntj«»r 

H. I). Brown, Manager 

K. S. Clark, Jr., Manager 

H. M. Rogers, Manager 

K. H. Powers, Presitieut 

I>. A. Coleman, President 

J. I). Pellett, Presiileut 

N. U. Oearing, President 



If^ hen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



Barsalotti & G^ntoso 

Cigars ClKarettes 

Nkc Line Fresh Candy 

Ice Cream, Fruit, Soda, Etc. 

The Right Goods at the Right Prices 

Open till II o'clock EVEKV night 
C«ra«r Amity «nd rimwaat 8tr««t» 



If yon want to be 

SOLID WITH THK OIRLA 

you nust have your clothes preaae<l aod cle*aed 

AT BPSTBIM'S 



11 Amity St. 



Maroon Store 



Prvaaing and Cleaning a sp^rialty 

Moat literal Ucket syatem la Iowb 
T«l. 803-11 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of " Gold Medal Uniforms. " 



STEAM FITTING, Telepho. - j^. 

GAS FITTING. TINNING. 

F. W. Dance & Co. 
PLUMBERS 



Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Wini>ows, 
Lead Liohts, &c. 
6 Clifton Ave., AMHERST, MAS^ 

V^<*i|£l^t <S9 Dltnoii 

Catalogues of 

ITnll ^ft, '\^rlrktor Oootia 

Are Out. Copy mailed to any addreN> i <.n'Ht 
Students and Athletes who want the re» I. ui*ti ; 
articles for ilie various spoils shoald \n^i-\ u)k<ii 
thosebearing the Wright & Uitson ItalrMaik 



1424-1426 Chestnut St., 



Philadelphia, Pa. 



Skat'x5hoef 

Sweaters 

Jersey! 

Uniforms 
lor all sportt 

Wright & Uitson Goods are the >tandar<i fei 
all sports 

.U4 Washington St., Boston, y>>- 



Foot Bali 
Basket Bail 
Hockey 
SkaUs 




THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CI-EANSINO. 



REPAIRING. 

Qsilclieat M»r«l«o, H«*t W*r1i, Ijumrmi rrk* 

All woik carefully done. Work called lur *»: 
delivered. (Cents' overcoats, suits. i>antt mi 
coats. Ijkdies' hne linen suita a specialty 

Teams will call every day at M. A C. 

Wn. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rmt Naab Bl'k. Amhwit. 



Tei No 34i< 



CARS 



Leave AQQIE COLLEQE for HOL- 
YOKE on each HOUR. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AQQIli COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 min. past Mcb 
HOUR. 

•pKU Cars at RiMisnfcls Rates 



AIHIRSI & SUNDIRLANO ST. RV. CO 



For a Daily and .Sunday N ^•'f'^P*^ 
You should Read 

rrHB 

Springfield Reputlicao 

While you are at college in A ncr- 

II has all or The M. A. C. Newa 

The K«>«t .SporlltiK Newa 

Fall General Newa 

A StroHK Kdltorlal Paffe 

InterestlnK Featnrra 

It ia a Keal N«*w«pa|ter 

Daily, 3 cents ; 70 cents a mo ;h; >J* 
a quarter. 

.S"i»«<i<fly, 5 cents; 50 cents a f'^^ 

Subscribe by mail or through the A i '' ''*'' 
dealer. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



MASSACHUSETTTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEOE 



\-,)L. XXIV. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, Jamiury 13. 19 '4- 



No. 15 



BASEBALL SCHEDULE INTERCLASS BASKETBALL RECEPTION TO STUDENTS 



Includes Seventeen Games. Four at 
Home. Two Osmes with Amherst. 

riie baseball schedule for the sea- 
, I, of 11H4 has been arranged by 
M iimger Melican and includes seven- 
t. , 11 games of which four are to be 
|,!;ived at home and two to be played 
;ii IValt field. Two games are to be 
|.l:ived with Amherst college this 
V. ;ii, one on May 13 and the second 
:. month later. Home games include 
Maine, Vermont, possibly Hates, 
Norwich and Springfiehl. The first 
jianie is to be played with Harvard at 
( ambridge, the first game with that 
. ullege in many years. The schedule 
is a well balanced, interesting one 
hikI the manager is to be coinmen«le«l 
upon arranging it. 

The dates as arrangetl are as 
fullows: 

April 1 1— Harvanl at Cambridge. 
April IX — Maine at Amherst. 
April 20— Springfield at Springfiehl. 
April 22— Holy Cross at Worcester. 
April 2.")— Williams at Williainstown. 
.May 2 — Dartmouth at Hanover. 
.May G — I'ending with IJates. 
^I;^y l.l — Amherst at Arnherst. 
May 15 — Norwich at Amherst. 
.May 22— Norwich at Northfield, Vt. 
May ^^ — Vermont at Burlington. 
May 28 — Spring'ield at Amherst. 
Mi,y 29— IkHJton College at Roston. 
.May 30— TufU at Me<lford. 
.Iinie .'i — Vermont at Amherst. 
-Iiine 13 — Amherst at Amherst 



SOCIAL UNION 
A most interesting recital of Kng- 
iisU Folk Songs was given by the 
Misses Dorothy. Rosalind and Cyn- 
tl.iu Fuller of I>or8et, Knglan<l, 
in the chapel Satunlay evening 
under the auspices of the Social 
Ihion. The Fuller sisters are well 
known at M. A. C. from their visit 
li. re last spring, and as a result the 
<ha|M?l was entirely filled at seven 
< lock, when the recital began. The 
f'lfim'rs wore early Victorian cos- 
innpH, and their singing wn9 accom- 
i .'lied on the Irish harp. A varied 
I'lograinme of well selected songs 
»^ It rcndere<l in a very pleasing man- 
i.' I . ami each number was foUowed 
i' a hearty encore to which the sing- 
cheerfully responded. It in 
ii i 'm1 that the Fuller sisters may be 
p<i-iiiaded to come to M. A. C. next 
i for a thinl timr. 



Starts with Victory for Seniors and 
Sophomores. 

The basketball season at .M. A. C. 
started on Weilnesday, when the 
seniors ilefeated the freshmen 31-11), 
and the sophomores won from the 
juniors 20-ir.. 

I In the first half of their game, the 
freshmen could not hold the fust 

: senior team and the latter weie able 

I to pile up !'.» points to their oppo- 
nents 11. The story was repeated in 
the second half, but the freshmen 
showtMl better t«'am work than in the 

I first. The seniors passing was of 
the best, an<l gave Smith every oppor- 
tunity for helping in the point-get- 
ting. HadfieUl an<l Christie also 
played well for the seniors. (Iray- 
son was easily the star for the fresh- 
men. 

Neither »he sophomores or the 
juniors showe<l especial ly good form 
in the fust half of the se«ond game, 
but the former had a little the better 
of the argument. In the sej-oiid half 
the juniors ttM»k u brace but were 
unable to »>vercome the lead of the 
I'.Mf. men. Uee«l was the principal 
p<jint getter for the sophs, sho<iting 
four liaskets and five goals from 
fouls. Frost and Masse played well 
for the juniors. The work of Uef- 
erce Hictn-k was notaldy fair and 
impartial and an effort will be made 
to secure him for all future games. 
The lineup follows : 

1914 '917- 

Brewer, rK If, Harrington, Farwell 

Edgerton, Ig rf, Wheeler 

Hadhcld.c c, Grayson 

Smith, rf Ig, Kverbeck, Kelsry 

Christie, If rg, Karwtrll. Kvetlietk 

Score— 1914. 31 ; 1917. '9 Haskets - 

Karwell 3. (;ray»<in 4, Hv«;rl>eck, Smith 

5. H.tdti.ld 3. CliriHlie 2. Kdgerlon 2. 

Goals from fouls (.rayson s.Smiih 7 

,915 ""6. 

Smith, Masse, If rg. Linle 

Frost, rf 'K- Mo^es 

Dole.c *^'"»" 

P.ke, Ig '*' '^"'^ 

Meiican.rg If. Darhnj- 

Score- iyi6, 20: v)is. 16 Itasktts- 
Keed 4. »»" ^- •'^'•"*'=^- •'Ik'-, trmti 
liole 2 M4.sse. ( ,oals IronHuuU - l>arl- 
ing. Kecd 5. Frost 3. Masse. Time- 20 



Twelfth Night Entertainment Given by 
Ladies of the Faculty a Pleasant Event. 



The ladies of the faculty gave a 

reception to the student botly in the 

drill hall on Friday evei.ing. The 

affair was largely attemled and b*-- 

sides being a great sticcess, was an 

; innovation in the history <»f the so- 

iciallifeof the college. The rccep- 

I tion was in the form of a twelfth 

I night entertainment, following an «»ld 

Knglish custom of makitit! merry on 

the twelfth night after Christmas In 

the wonls of the annonncerv Mrs. 

Hasbrouck, "the affair sln»uhl have 

l>een hehl last Tuesilay evening, but 

so the lords ami dons uf the Faculty 

did not decree." 

The drill hall was artistically dec- 
orated, with the south end in the 
form of an old Knglish manor hall 
with the coat of arms «»f the lortl 
over it. The lights were dimme«l by 
the use of mariMtn bunting and the 
effect was lieightene<l by humlretls 
of lighted candles. The pages 
d?«sM.i ill Klizal>ethan <ostume, 
brought in great boar';. hea<ls and 
the steaming plum puthling and 
nuirche<l arounti the hall, 'ollowetl by 
the sewing ladies. 

Refreshments of plum putlding, 
nuts, raisins, apples, and piin«h 
were serve<l throughout the eve- 
ning. A feature was the dancing, 
in costume, of the \'irginitt reel by 
Mother (l(M*se characters, impersona- 
ted by members of the faculty, fac- 
ulty ladies and co-eds This cul- 
minated in a grand march in which 
all took part to form a larg«! letter 
M. After a long yell for the latlies. 
dancing u.i^ enjoye<l. The thanks 
of the student Insly are due the 
ladies who H|K>nt so mu<-h time in 
making a success of one of the most 
pleasant and unique euterUiinments 
ever held at M. A. C. 



mTnute hiilves Keftree- Hicock of 
Y. M <■ A riillexe. 



INVITATION 



'^ T. V. fraternity held their in- 
ifliMon banquet at the Amherst 
on Saturday evening, Jan. 10. 
LaznlKla Chi Alpha also celebrated 
tilt -iame event at Ilahar's lnn,North- 
'<" 'on, that evening. 



All voting nieii interested in the 
discussion of "worth while" topics as 
presented and di.scussed in a young 
men's class are (-ordiallv invited to 
attend the meetings of the Young 
Men's Class at the First Congrega- 
tional church, Main street. Meet- 
ings hehl every Sunday at 12 o'clock. 

Capt.Coley 'Ifi and Richards '16 
havebeen awarded the cM<; for work 
on the cross country team this year. 



PROM. 

The .lunior I'rom commiftee is still 
at work perfecting its pian.^. Tliey 
have decided to ad<l a new feature 
to the prom season this year, namely 
a •" Tango Tea "to he given in the 
drill hall on the Saturday aftermion 
after the prom. The following mem- 
bers of the faculty and wives of the 
faculty have consented to act as pat- 
ironn at the protii : 

President and .Mrs.Hutlerfleld. Act- 
ing President aii<l Mrs. Lt'wis, Mr. 
and .Mrs ,Ma<liiM»;r, Mrs. Hasbrouck, 
Mrs. Harrison. Mrs. Hicks and Mrs. 
Perry- The preliminary orders arc 
out and may f)e obtained from mem- 
bers of the committee. 



Zabriskie and Drury '13 spent the 
week end at college. 



HOCKEY TEAM LOSES 

In Close Game with Dartmouth. The 
Green Successful in Goal Shooting. 

In what proved to be one of the 
fastest games of the present season, 
the .M. A C. hockey men went «lown 
to defeat at the hands of Darttnoilth 
on Saturday. This was not accom- 
plished however, until aftei the 
hardest struggle which the Green will 
have this season Had the timer's 
whistle blown ten seconds later in the 
final perijxl, ati overtime periotl would 
have lesulted, and the victory would 
have come to the .Mar<M>n and White 
for Dartmoulh was visibly all out of 
speed at this stage of the game. 
Speed and "pep" ably descriltes 
the kiml of game that the Aggie 
liunch put out. DarlnuMith was out- 
skated at every stage «»f the game. 
Buttrick was there on each burst of 
speed of the opponents, and his stops 
brought forth a great amount of 
praise from the spiclators. Hutch- 
inson's work was the feature of the 
game, and ha<l the other team not 
lMixe<l him up on practiially all occa- 
)4ions, the s«-ore woiihl have shown a 
large surplus on the Massaehuselts 
Hi<U'. .lohuson aUo phiyed a \«r\ 
fast game. For DHrtinouih.lhe work 
of Wanamakei and Murchie was most 
noti<abh'. In fact, the former played 
the aggresMive part of the Green's 
game in the lar*t half. The ice was 
badly cut up over practically the 
entire skating surface, and this made 
it very difliiull to carry the puck suc- 
cessfully the full length of the rink. 
Time after time a clear chance for a 
shot presente«l itself, but the pu<k 
Mould strike a poor spot and roll off 
in some other direction. 

The first goal for Dartmouth came 
after aliout a mintite and a half. 
Murchie on a pass from Tuck did the 
trick. This only served to make the 
Aggie contingent work all the harder 
and faster. The puck seesawed up 
and (h)wn the rink, but the aggressive 
w(»ik of the Aggie forwards kept it 
in the enemy's lerritor\ l"i a large 
share of the lime. Neither team was 
able to score again, until after the 
middle «»f the half when .lohnson shot 
a pretty one into the net scoring the 
first point for Massachusetts. The 
skrimmages were fast and many, but 
the time whistle blew before any more 
points had been obtained. In a mix- 
iip in fr«»nt of the Dartmouth goal, 
the goal tender used Fernald rather 
roughly and he was put out. A 
moment later Fernald, after several 
warnings was caught again lagging 
off, an<l he was sent to the boards. 
The half hatl ended before they were 
again allowed on the ice. 
I In the second period, Aggie came 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 13. 1914 



Tne College Signal. Tuesday. January i.^ 1914 



^I^P 




hack Htroiiglv, itml it looked us they 
liiul it all their own way. The puck 
haidly moved awav from the tenitorv 
aroumi the Daitmouth goal for 
several minutes. Repeated tivs 
faile<l to tally the desired points. 
Hutchinson neenu'd to be feared by 
the Dartmouth mm n :ind they kept 
him closely covered at all times. He 
tried his best to score, but numlters 
prevailetl. Wanamaker, who had not 
played for l>aitmouth in the lirst 
periixl, was put in, anti immediately 
the (ireen team left the carrying of 
the puck to him. After numerous 
tries, he finally managed to get one 
by Hiittrick. and the last point of the 
game vv;i» >,(oic.l. i'he Dartmouth 
team 8U)w«-d up very noticebly in this 
period, whiU* the Aggie men seemed 
nearly as fresh as at the iteginning of 
the game. On a pretty passing and 
carrying game, the Maroon ami 
White carried the puck up the rink, 
the puck was >fiu' U with the stick, 
and just at that moment tlie whistle 
blew denoting time-u|>. A moment 
later the rubber lay in the net, just 
too late to <«>unt. ( onsiderable 
rough \\..ik develo|ied in this periiMl, 
and at times tin* game resemliled a 
football ganu- on skali's. Om- of 
these enrounl«Ms saw .Johnson of 
Dartmouth out of the game f«tr one 
minute. 

AltogeJher. it was n very line game 
es|>ecially fium tin- iIk- viewpoint of 
the spectators. If the comparison of 
the two teams at this eiic«>unler is an\ 
criterion, the vinit of Ihf (;recn team 
I" \ggic will result m .1 v i.toi s f..i 
thf Hay Slaters. 

The liue-u|> : 

MAsSA( U( St ITU. 

Uutliick. K 

Archibald, p 
Koss, cp 
A. Juhn<ti>n, Iw 
Jonrs, (Capl.>. Ic l( llolmf., W.^namakri 
HutchinMin, c . . Tuck 

Fernald, iw r», .\iurchie 

Score l>4rtii»outh 2, .MaHsachusrtts 1 
(iuals fir«l half -Murchir 1 : jS, A John- 
Mill 12:15 "second hall - Wanamakn 
9:16. t'enaltiCK — Donahur 1 min 
roughiieft.% ; Keriiald 1 mm. la^jtling nflf , 
H, Johnson i min tripping Krttree- 
i'atterson ol iii.thnp'it collcgr, Montreal. 
Time— JO minute halves. 



It \l< I Mol I M 

g, Donahue 

p, Deliingrr ^Capl * 

cp, H Johnson 

Iw, Frost, Holmes 



SHORT COURSES OPEN 

The I'l-n Weeks' course at the 
Massachusetts AgitcultiirHl College 
openetl Tucwlay. .Ian. f?. with the 
largest enrollni«-nt since this course 
has become a regular annual feattiie 
<»f the instruction offered by the i-ol- 
lege. The registration is now I7A 
ami many applicants for certain 
courses had to be denied adndttance 
owing to inadequate aecominfMln- 
tions, full clasaes, or luraiisc a|>pli- 
cants were under the reiptiied age. 
.Students are having ditflcultv in 
securing rooming accomtmMlations 
and the capacity of the dining hall is 
very heavily taxed. Of course the 
great majority of the short-course 
students arc resiflents of .Massachu- 
setts but Connecticut, New Vork, 
New Hampshire, Vermont. New .Jer- 
sey, t^hio. Iowa, Illinois, and Japan 
are also represented. The aim of 



this course is to give students the 
results of the latest investigations in 
agricultural science and just as much 
practical agriculture and related sub- 
jects as possible during this period. 
An elTort will also be made through 
the assembly which will be held twice 
each week to acqiuiint the students 
with the various op|)ortunities which 
are open through the Kxtension Ser- 
vice of the <'ollege. for instruction in 
their <iwn home towns and upon 
the farms in their neighborhc»o<.ls. 
Through them, then, the farmers 
throughout the state will be more 
effectively assisted and the rural 
towns make more rapid progress in 
community development. 

The couisf will last froui .lau. <"« 
l«) .March \:>. Wliib- many of the 
sttidi'uts attending are «lirectly frouj 
the farm there are plenty of others 
that are college graduates or who 
have scarcely ever seen a farm. No 
stmlent i> permitted t<> take more 
than twenty-four nor less tli.-m twelve 
t'Xer<ises per week. 

Two or three slight changes have 
been made in the courses offered. 
Live stO(*k feeding and li\e stiX'k 
management are sidNlivisions of the 
.Animal Hreeding course. \ course 
on Marketing of Kami IVoducts is 
given for the first time by Dr. Cance. 
It takes up a discussion of the prac- 
tical problems confronting the farmer 
in the dispos.-d of his prislucts. and 
the purrhasc of agrii-ultiiial supplies. 



STUDENT CONVENTION 

At tilt ( hristian AsHoeiation meet- 
ing oil riiiii.sday President l*owers 
gave si»me impressions of the recent 
students convention held in Kansas 
City. Over live thousand college 
men from this mimI other countries 
were present at the convention and 
all were entert.ained by the {leople 
of the rity. The size of the gather- 
ing and the manner in which the con- 
vention was earrie«i on excee<ied all 
exi*ectation»<. The meetings were 
held in tlie great Convention hall, 
which ^ats l.'V.tM'u, 'flu- speakers 
were missionario iilurniug from 
foreign iields. and each had a mes- 
sage which be told in 1 1 oiivincing 
manner. 

The object of such a convention 
as this is to show students the inj- 
poitaiice of iievelo|)ing these newly- 
awakened countricH. as China. .lap.'in 
and India, along Christian lines. 
The [K'ople have become dissatisfied 
with their old religions and are at a 
loss to know where to turn. It will 
be easy to win them for Christianity 
an<l civilization if only men enough 
can bf sent. 

P«»wer8 said that the country-wide 
campaign along the lines 9Uggeste<l 
at the convention would probably be 
taken up here. Meanwhile, he is 
preparing his noted in inore complete 
form and will present them at some 
future meeting, so that the student 
body may get a better idea of what 
was actually discussed in the meet- 
ings of the convention. 



HERMAN'S U.S.Aiv 
SERVICE BLltChEn 

III Tan Willow C.ill 

<iua Metul. .V huuil- 

s<>iue,Mia|)[)y y^\\>H'. 

oiillieOrliiopeilic 

l.i-.t, de-,i}»'iieil liy 

ariny siir^feuus. 

Vou never saw 

a shoe like it 

for wear.ooin-^ 

fort uud 

sly le. 

Sinj;le 
Kolo <>t 
T<'\JIS UD- 
.scc»iir«MU»ak i'<'.\ 
to,-, soU* leu I her 
««Miii(er.s,evcr> purl 
iitspecti'd. l.ii.in;^ <pf 
spceially tesii-l drill. A MdUl 
leather slioe that will clvellie 
wear of IIm* 4*iviliaii .slio4> that 
seIN t°or.i(4(. 'Iliis is one of the 
sJi'M's I'licle Sam iMivslorhis 
!^<d/!i,.rs. IT'S A \VO|;i.D 
1:i:AT1::R. seethe Army llni'. 




HERMAN S U.S. 
ARMY SHOES 




AitMV Siir. 

J.V<*01ls. .Mat.M . 

i.ietliobest I • 

can be obtaiii. ,, 

Woikniaiisi, ;, 

inspected 

ad irUiir- 

anteed. 



No. 968 

GARRISON 

BLUCHCR. 

Ono of tlio most jii>|mlur 
in liui .Army I'um- M.e'i- in Tun \\ i|. 
low <'alf'un<l tJiiii >lel,il. Il< r , 
stiii:l« s<i!(.. l»i\ I.. . sidid l«*atiM'r 
tlir<>u;:liiiiit . A haiiilsttiufMiH|tpy >.h<M'. 
Coiiu" i'l (i> *■••• f 'ii- 111"'. Muiiiifiii !i! . 

onlv bv Jo'fM'i •!. Il('rnian^('o..lt(tsi»ii. 



PRICE $4.00 



PRICE $4.00 



PAGEis shoe; store 



THE 



Hoover& Smith Co. 

616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 



Phiiadelpiila s Official Fraternlti Jeweler 

8PBOIALISTS IN 
Praternity Badges, Fobs. Novelties, 
Rings, Charms ..... Prizes Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

Ringa, Charms.-. 




Che 
Pheasant 

Bnut\2 St.. 
Bmbcrrt 

teNCHHiN 
AVrtUtHHitt TEA 

Dinner if arranged fitt. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

WiLUAM.s Block, .Amhekst, Ma.ss. 

OrricB Hours, 
otoiM A..ivf . !.(•<> to ««r*.:vi. 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 



Now xt I? fM*a«ant St. 



Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Hroken Lenses Accurately Kf}ii.i 
Fine Watch Kcpairing PrompiK 1 
Skilfully Done 



Satislaction duaiiintped 



HAVE YOU m STOPPED TO THINK THAI 

"The effect uf )<>ui message greally dejieiuls 
ujxin the st\le ami qiialitv of your .Statinnrry ? '" 

\()u .ire more often judged by the paper yon use than liy tin- 
thoughts vou express in writing. I'ricit-. good i.istc, K-nneiiH-ii' 
dentand that you use Stationery that is distinctive, stylish, good. 

SYMPHONY LAWN WRITING PAPER 

( <>\1KS in a wide \ irietv of beautiful tints, modish shap«'s - 

correct sizes So r ir „ n\ tint its use will lull) establish y 

,1 |irrsoii of excellent good taste in the minds of those you write to. 



Price per box (all tints), . 



50c 



THE HENRY ADAMS CO., Drugeists 



The REXALL Store 



ON TFIK CORNER 



Heart - to - Heart Talks 

To Aggie Men 

By the Largest Retaileis of 
Apparel in New Entrland 



-o- 



Durin^ January anti Kebriiary you iiu-n can liiul at 
our store vi-rv t-xceptional values — jjrt-rurou.s inulerprio' 
s.ilufs ill tiiH- Clotbiii^. Furui.sbings. Furuilure ami 
main ctlit-r ibiu<fs in (k-matitl by college nun. Intleed 
siuh vahu-s an- worth coining matiy miles to be taken 
atlvanta^f "'• 

ViMi tii-mand clothes that .ire stylisb in i ut and in 
pattern as well as ol the best wearing ijuahlies : you de- 
mand beauty and longevity in Furniture : you suk nov- 
,!iu'> in niaiiv lim s ol niercbandi.'«e : in lat't, you niu.st 
liavt- the he.st of' t veiytbing at ih.- tnost modest prices. 

All lhe.se requirements are represented in our huge 
stocks. 1 1 \'>u will visit our More when in lioslon or 
vicinity this n»..ntli or next, you will find many liberal 
reductions seUlom equalled elsewhere (.11 -uch Ingli- 
grade merchandise. 



-()- 



JORDAN MARSH COMPANY 

Boston 



of hari.lr-; i.n l! 



SMOOTHEST 
TOBACCO 

pEW sophomorei but have a smok- ^.^ 

* ing koowledge cf Velvet— the i^ff-lP 

greatest of tobacco leaf — the olden 

tlays method of curing by aging — 2 yer.rs 

warehouse under perfect condltionc— a perfect sra^c .tn^ 

mellowinothat dicpcls every vestige of ieaf harshness— a b^v. 

emor»h flavor of tobacco that challenges the best smoke y 

' r .xperienced. Cant bum hot-can'l bifel Srrioke It as often 

you will it is alwayi. l!ie same delighrful p^fuJ— Vchrct— Jinool. 

Today or any time you t~j — i^t a'JdcJets. 




W 



Full Two 
Ounce Tins 



^A-^S^vQ 



Mackinaws 



AND 



Sweaters 



This is Mackinaw and Sweater .season. l''ootb,ill. (ioll and 
all other VaW and Winter spoits call for good .Sweater pro- 
tection. We have in stock toda\ st-vera! buiubi-d Macki- 
naws in all gratles. 



The lamou.s .Summit bi.iiul. well kiioNMi in the Northwest 
and acknowledged to be one «)l the best. Coal Sweaters, 
llu- Shawl C'ollai. C-'at Collar and the legidar shape 



Sweaters, all the best selling cohirs. 



)Hti.<H> tc» mT.in^ 




SANDERSON & THOMPSON 

ScDool and Coikgc pl)0(o$raphcrs . . . 




LOCALLY' 52 Center St.. Northampton Mass., 

' and South Hadlcy. Mas*. 




M MS OfFIt K: 

1546 1 54K r.ruadway. 

.New Nnrk t ilv 



rhr!»€ Studios otfer thr \>r%i skilled 
iirtihts and most c«»mplrle 

r<|iii|>tiicnt obtainable 



U SOLICIT YOUR PATRONAGE 

In sn far a>- onr henefits are iiuHtial. 

rut AMHERST (iAS COMPANY 

ElverytHi ng Electric3l 

^ FOUNTAIN PEN "•• 

Minimi7.e your ^"V"*jj'fl .ffh"e<^ 

^ trouble, by own.nft a McK,re_s «I^I» '^^^^ ^ 
P- ^fest. roundest and most d«Pf"*l«»:^,^f'"rJ"h7^ ^ 
«T Its strength lies In U» very simpHclty. Nothing 
finVyJoftetou"of order. C Vou can ft ve your- y 
sJlV nobe.ler^reat than a Mo«.re« Non-leakable. ^ 

For Sale by IXwIem F.Tery«herr v^ 

American Fountain Pen Company ^ / > 

168 UKVON.SIIIRE STREKT :: - BO.STON. MA.SS. ^-^ej^ ^Tf^JCTj- 



l4 



^P^ 



"I 



m' 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 13, 1914 



The College Signal, Tueaday, January 13, 19 14. 



«i!l 



THE CO LLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOABD OF BDIT0B8. 

CHESTER K. WIIKKI.KR '14, Kditor-i 
FKANK W. lU'Kl.I. 'i5. Managing 

HA KOI. D C. BLACK '14, Competition 



HAROLD F. CLAY '14. Assistant 

STUART B. FOS'I F.K '14. Athletic 

ERVINF. F. PAKKFR'14. Alumni 

J. ALBF.KT PRICE '15. Athletic 

GEO. E. DONNELL '15, Dep.irtment 

EARLE S. DRAPER '15. Campus 

TYLER S. ROr.EKS '16, Associate 



n-Chief 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 



CHARLES W. CURTIN'ift, Associate 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

ERNEST S. CI. ARK, |R. '14. Bus. Manager 
MAURICE J. CLOl'GH '15. Ass't Bus. Mgr. 
ERNEST F. UPTON '14. Advertisinu Managei 
W. RICHARD SEAKS '11;. Asst. \d». Manager 
CHAS A. HUNTINOTUN. ]K. '16, Circulation 

Subscription I1.50 per year. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all ordt-rs payable 
to Ernest S. Clark, Jk. 



Entarad u Mcond-c^as matter at th* Amkarai 
OfftM. 



Vol. XXIV. TutsDAV. Jan. 13. No. 15 
«« Boost Old Aggie." 



Okck again, the Junior aiiniial Ims 
made its a|>|>e:irance on the cnnipiis. 
This year's lMK>k, like its prftleces- 
sora gives the history of the class, 
with the iiHiial statistics of college 
institutions ami customs. On the 
whoU>, it is a credit to the class 
which is the pnldisher and tt» the col- 
lege which it is trying to Iniost. It 
will make a gmvl addition t<» the set 
which every upjuMclassman should 
poMess, aD<l which every freshman 
ho|>es s<mie day to have. 



(Not 
the Sic 
•15. on 
itsac. 1 

Jao. 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

ices for tlii^ columr> should l>r i1r<>|iped in 
tNAL Oflioeor lianded to Earle > Dra|<er 
or before the Saturday preceding riich 



Jan. 
Jao. 

Jmi. 

Jan. 
Jan. 



14 — l-IO p. M., Assembly — 
Riahop Charles I). Williams. 
Detroit, Mich. 

14 — 7 p. M. — InterclasH basket- 
ball games. Drill Hall. 

l7_2-00 p. M 11. K key. .M. A. 
C second team vs. Williston 
Academy at .M. A. ('. rink. 

18 — y-li'* A. M. — Sunday chapel. 
Rev. Charles H. Hiown. dean 
of Yale Divinity scIkjoI. 
2()_7-O0 p. M. Stmkbridgc 
club, South College. 

21 — 1-10 P.M. Asseuibly, l)r 
William liurdick, director 
public athletic league. Haiti- 
more Md. 



CAMPUS NOTES 

Tra«'k practice is on in earnest. A 
large number of candidates for the 
relay team linve lepor.ted tuCiiptain 
Nieolet. 

'♦Billy" Fit/,iiiaui ic» — our baseball 
coach — is back at college again. 
Billy says he expecl.s to turn out 
Horn* baseball team lliis ^pring. 

The speaker at Sunday chaiicl was 
Albert K. Hoberts of the Interna- 
tional committee of the Y. M. (' A. 
His talk was on the service that the 
men of the college <:in render in rtiral 
uplift work. 



A debate has also been arranged 
with Clark college at Worcester 
sometime in April. The Aggie team 
will debate the aflirmative of the 
question, Resolved : "that the United 
States should grant the Philip- 
pine Islands, their immediate 
independence." 

The hockey game scheduled for 
Saturday with the Yale freshmen and 
second team of M. A. C. was can- 
celled by that team, because the rink 
at New Haven was not completed. 
The second team game with Willis- 
ton on Jan. 17 is to be played on the 
M. A. C. rink. 

The fact that lioth the rinks 
erected on the campus pond are 
being used constantly seems to in- 
sure the peipetuation of this idea 
every season. Two rinks gives a 
chance for both varsity practice and 
amateur games at the same time thus 
rendering it easier for gym credits to 
be worked off on the ice. 

The college debate will be held in 
the chapel Friday evening. The sub- 
ject for debate is Resolved: •' That 
the Monroe doctrine, as a policy of 
intervention based uptm the primacy 
of the Cnited Slates in American 
affairs should be abandoned." The 
winners in this debate will c(»Mi|io8e 
lh#*team to debate Rhcnle Island 
State college at Kingst<»n. U. I. 

ATHLETIC FIELD 

Reports from the Physical Direct- 
or's olllce indicate that the tioances 
of the new athletic field are coming 
in very encouragingly. On Wednes- 
day, the tlay of payment of the 
January pledge, was met by the stu- 
dents in good shape, and alK>nt ^750 
was received at this time. There is 
now alKMit i^^HllO all paid in. and of 
this amount the alumni have contrib- 
utetl Shoo. Scarcely a day passes 
that there is not an addition to this 
aniount. Considering the financial 
status of the country and the present 
depression in business the results 
are most satisfactory and the out- 
look for the spring is encouraging. 
There has been a delay in giving an 
otiicial re|M)rt of the matter, but Prof. 
Hicks will have complete figures 
ready to publish in the issue of Feb. 
."?. This delay is caused liy the 
fact that many classes are sending 
in their contributions thioiigh their 
class secretaries and it takes time to 
gatiier this all in. Don't forget that 
whether you are of the undergradu- 
ate Inwly or an alumnus your mite is 
needed to help the field along ami to 
"Boost Old Aggie." 

SIGNAL COMPETITION 

standing of the freshmen candi- 
dates for tne business departtnent of 
the Signal, Jan. Ih : 

Swett, F. S. \K2h 

Babcock, P. R. H.OO 

Rosequist, B. R. fi.l.'i 




rn 



CARAFE 

Have a Hot Coffee in Your Room. 

Fill at the cart Stay hot 24 hours 

Other styles for tramps. 



KEEPS HOT 



KEEPS COLD 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith. 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

KKULXAK SINDAV SKKVICK ATI I* M 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest line in 
the state uutside of Boston. 



Seeourlineof Drill Shoes 

E. RUSSELL NORTON $2.00 tO $4.00 



sALKS AQF.NT 



Davenport Miller 
Vein Coal 

Best Quality Pennsylvania Coal 



boston orricE 
8S Water St. 



NEW VriKK OFFICE 
I Broadway 



L.OW PRICE TAILORING CO. 

srrrs made jo okdek 

Suits Cleaned. Pre«.s»-d and Dyed. Allkindsof 
K^pairihs lot I^adies and (lentlemen neatly done. 
Iliuh-Krade work b\ tir^t das'* tailor. Work 
called for and delivered. Sell ticket* fot preMing, 
4 SVITS FOR |i.;o 

GEORGE KOTO^VITZ. f»no^. 

Main .street, Amherst. Mass. Nash Block 

On your way to the Post « >ffice. lei. 43*-W 



MODERN REPAIR 
DEPARTMENT 



E.M.BOLLES 



OM VOUM %VAV TO ^. O.) 



"SCOTTIE" 
H. HOOPER 

Will clean and press your clothes so you 

will be satisfied. It costs no more 

and he is nearer to "Aggie." 

liDliltAl, n< Kf.T SVSTBM 

Under Columbia Cafe 



'10. — Frank T. Ila3'ne8 was re- 
oentlv elected Master of the Stnr- 
birdge grange. 



I. M. LABROVITZ, Custom TaUor 

Fashions, Fit, First Class Work Guaranteed 

Large assortment on hand. (.KNTS KUKMSHlNt.S. Red-Man Collars and 

Dress .Shirts. Cleaning and Pressing. DRESS SUITS 

TO KKNF. Military Collars and Gloves. 

11 AMITY ST., Telephone 302 w. AMHERST, MASS. 

CHRISTMAS GIFTS ! 

A portrait is a most acceptable Christtnas gift — 

Appointments made now can be finished in time- 

Miss McClellan's StQdio is the Place 



NINETEEN-FIFTEEN INDEX 
|.;x uiis are coming, but — Isk ge 
l.ihhit (to be original) the Iwlcx \» 
Ijtjie. You've lunl a chance to see 
that I' <'onie8 up to our promises, and 
tii.ij - >ine. You go to the treasurer's 
ml part with two "seeds" for a 
luudi inferior book. Why delay get- 
liua ""^ <^' t''^' finest souvenirs of 
the K'llege? <'«t it now! Don't 
go Ic lilt' for that little recess after 
the lii.:il!-. Nvithoiit one in the lK)ttonj 
of your suitcase Somebody there 
will .Hppreciate it, take it from us. 
.lust a wonl to those who will take a 
Umilt^r vacation than the rest ; take 
one t«> roiiuse yon until yon do come 
l»!ick. ' *i' ^i»l*^ »t the SioNAl. ollice 
,.hly S".' I'fi '•"!'> NVeT supply 

ca lis fast as yuull take 'em. 

I'lIK lioAun. 



•,^j._C'harleM S. i'utnani. HI I 
l.analilo St , Honolulu. II. I. .teacher 
of ii;itnr»' stutiv in the .N'ormal uclt«>ol. 



COMMUNICATION 
Ki>iTous, Collk<;k StoNAU. 

Dear Sir: 

I am a prejudiced \'M',\ man.only 
a grain of "salt of the earth" as an 
alunmus would put it. but reviewing 
the (piestion as fairly as I i-an 1 sih* 
no justification for the anonymou-t 
reference regarding the liM.'t notes 
pultlished in your last issue before 
the Christmas recess. 

During my short actpiaintaui't- 
with the SioNAi. and its problems 
there has never been as unicli space 
devoted to alumni notes of any kind 
as the editors felt the field fur mate- 
rial would stand, simply ln-cause It 
has been impossiiil*- to ^^I't aluuiiii 
news. Year afbi \rui theSh.svi. 
management have encouraged alnnnii 
news and printe<l all that has ever 
bct'ii presented to them and hwiked 
around for more. 

Again, student readers in my 



WHEN CONSIDERING FERTILIZERS 

In ciji»u<^cii<» 1 witii y^iur studies and experiments, don't fail to .u tjuaint 
vourself witit tlio vvonilerful priduciu^ and soil nouri»htng proper lies of 



Write for booklets 
on •• Soil l-ertlllt> ." 
"The Urass Crop," 
"The Apple," etc. 



I 



^utsSLlSJJ*-.,^ 



rJAsIL,,-! 



f^mnxi^^ 



One Dollar Invested ' 
In Mubbard's Bone 
Base l-'ertillzera 
buys as much plant 
food as $l.7n to 
$1.90 In low grade 
fertilizers. { 



THE ROGERS 'it HUBBARD COMPANY, Niildletown. Conn. 

Oltti'c mikI >V<>ik>. I'orllniKi, f Hiiii. 



* Keeping in Front ** 

You fellows know what that means I 
We've been very successful in this 
regard with Fatima Cigarettes. By 
the way, these cigarettes were first 
sold in the college towns — and you 
■greed with us that they were good. 

Then we put out fo." the big race, 
to make Fatimas of nation-wide rep- 
utation, and today more are sold than 
any other cigarette in this country. 

No purer, or more carefully chosen 
tobacco grows than that in r atimas. 
We puffxwely put theni in a pla:n 
inexpensive wrapper — in this way 
we can afford quality tobacco, and 
twenty of the smokes for I 5 cents. 

Now your college crew is of utmost 
iTifwrtance to you — so is a good 
ngarette, and it's your aim in life 
to keep Fatimas in the lead —right 
up to their good quality — right up 
to where you first found them, and 
Will always find them. 

Success fellows ! You started this 
cigarette on 'ts succes-^ful career — 
and you pull a strong oar all over 
this country. 




fATlN4 

^ TVRIUSH aiXMD ^ 

aCARETTES 
20 for \5< 




44 



State St re ft, 



Northampton, Mass. 



'I)lstfnrHrrHr fndh'Hhia/' 



WITH A CAPITAL ''P" 

■ Vo state wh.it one sells and to sell whai one slates," should be 
the underlying principle of all business transactions. .As the ferti- 
lizer itulustry .ind all the fertilizer inspection laws are noA b.ised 
on this piiuciple, the farmer cm feel re >sonal)ly >urc of jietliii;; 
what he buys as to the i/ii,iHtify t>f plant food in a ton of fertilizer. 
I'nfortunately. official inspection, vyhicli is rigidly enforced in every 
state, while it reveals the (juantity of pl.iut food in a ton, does not 
and cannot, in the present ^tate of ( lu-mical knowledge, reveal the 
./ua/ity that is, the dejjree of inuti/ithi/ity. Kor the quality the 
i^uyt-r must still lely upon the inleprity of the finn with whom In- 
deals. Touching this point, tit- itm.iiks o( tlit- l.ile I'rofrssoi 
Johnson of Connecticut, the pioneer otticial fertilizer inspector, 
hold good. Referring t(» quality, he said 

" ri>p otily security of purchaseis <if frrtili/eis is in itr.ilini; 
witli tiim« which have thp h-ghtst (rpulation • • • aikI in 
aviiiiling 'cheap goods' offered by irrfsponxible parties." 

Study the Plant J-md problem. 
'llttre is tuipitiil tn it. 
i 'an we kelp you f 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER COMPANY 
43 Chatham St., Boston 




A. SHEPARD 



MEN'S STORE 



Use our new cash discount card 
and save five per cent on 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 

IMPORTANT : 



The most practical present to give your brother or sister is one of the 

f a inous — ^ — 

Patrick- Dulutli Mackinaws 

Sold at Cost at Campion's the Next 10 Dasrs 



$6.50 Mackinaws for $4.00 

$9.00 Mackinaws for $6.50 

$10.00 Mackinaws for $7.25 

$12.00 Mackinaws for $8.00 

200 Suits and Overcoats to be cleaned op at cost 

No goods (barged at the above prices. 

CAMPION - TWO COLLEGE STORES 




Hid 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January »3. '9'4 



The College Signal. Tuesday, January i.^ 1914 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

jubtwrs of Wroiijtht Iron and Brass I'lj)*-, X'alves 
ind KittinK* f<>' Steam. Water an<l <Ja«. Vsliestos 
and Magnesia Holler and \'\\^ CoveriiiK*, I'ipe 
Cut to Sketch. Mill Suptlies. KnKireeis and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water Heating. 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Hoilei and KiiKire 
Connection*. holyoke. Mm*. 



TH^TtACHERS Exchange 

0/ B»stOH 1 10 Boylston St. 

RecGniinends Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



^arp^n-ter St Morehouse, 

PRII^TEnS, 



No I, Cook Place, 



Amherst, M 



Students Attention ! ! ! 

We .ire ready at the start to furnish you with a fine 
line of Campus and Fraternity Mouse Views, also Post 
Cards. Kodak work given prompt and careful attention. 
Knlarging and picture framing given our personal at- 
tention. See us ;«bout (Jroups and Portraits for the very 
best work. 



Satisfaction Guaranteed, 
the Square Deal Studio 



Patronize 



KINSMAN'S COLLEGE STUDIO 



Nash BlocK, Amherst 



H. M KtM;KRs, '15, Agent. 
S7 Pleasant St.. 



Studio Phone 303-t. 



GRAND SWEEPSTAKES TROPHY 



(1750.00 Sterling Stiver Cup) 
FOR 



BEST STATE EXHIBIT OF POTATOES 




AT THE 



New York Land Show 



1912 



WON SY 

The L L. Cleveland Company 

HOULTON. M«. 

/~^NE of the largest and most 
^^ reliable seed potato houses 
in the United States. Competi- 
tion open to the entire United 
States and Canada. Messrs. E. L. 
Cleveland Company also won the 
First Pri/e for Best Coantj Exbibit 
of Potatoes. (Silver Cup valued 
at $200.00.) 
The v.. L. Cleveland Company use 

L FRANK COE 
FERTILIZERS 

E. Frank Coe Fertilizers have 
been the business farmers favorite 
for over fifty-five years. Why not 
follow the example of these lead- 
ing commercial potato growers. 

\tm mftt*t*t* •'** "Thv Sl->ry<it A Prnfllnhl- l''-l.iln 
Crtip" nrUtrnhj an 4r l"«W f atinty. <l«ln« f»rm*r_ 



The Coe-Mortimer Company, 



SI CHAMBERS STREET. 
NEW YORK. N. Y. 



recently bygone dav» were ever prone 
to SHV, wln'ie are the ahiiiuii of this 
phiee, whiit me they doing? Don't 
tliey take any interest in or keep in 
toueh with the college? There is 
no news lo show that they do. The 
rcHSOU WU8, none hud lieen sent in. 

Is It necesBaiy for a graduate to 
beconu- hoary with age and decorated 
with world renowned honors hefore 
the several hun<lrod men he knew in 
college shall hear of his whereubouts 
and his activities? As » class we do 
not feel that it is. We feel that the 
8IGNAI. as a combined college and 
abnnni weekly is t\ natural cleuring 
house for matters which concern any 
Aggie man in any phase of his 
Mctivity. And with this emi in view 
wf h:(\e used the .Sios\i with the 
:i|>proval of the management and the 
iipproval of the majority of interested 
facility ami "active" alumni. It is 
signilicant that a graduate of six 
years ago, and an olHcial of the lol- 
lege closely in touch with its inmost 
and best intereata should rind justiH- 
cation for our iiM'agrc attempts at 
self a<lverti«-ing. 

Theie must Iw enough of interest 
going cm among the thoiissind or more 
alumni to supply adecpiate alumni 
notes Ml that our scii|»ture <|Uoting 
••kicker" woidd not feel that r.M.'5 was 
not getting all the publicity ; pro- 
vided the alumni have interest 
enonult to send in material. Nim- 
teen-thirtcen woidd be only too glad 
to know others, who h:ive gone 
l»efoie. are doing. M. S. F. 

ITALIAN CLUB 

This dull being a newly formed 
organization at .M . A. C . meds |h.t- 
liap> some explanation as to its pur- 
pose, and wh:tt it hopes to accomplish. 1 

The pin post- of the Italian club is 
to give the felUiws a practical kuowl ] 
edgeof the Italian language, (iram-i 
mar and pionouncation are now the 
two topics on which atresa ia laiii, 
though later we shall emphasize 
readitig and conversation. An exten- 
sive Nocabidaiy is given to the 
students. 

Why do we teach Italian? Tlie 
everv-d:ty agriculturist comes in con- 
stant contact with Italian people 
whon» he employs in his fiehls. Most 
<>f the help in iiHMlern greenhouse 
u..iU !■> Italian A great numbci of 
piosperons Italians are undertaking 
! farming as then source of inciJiiie, 
and wouhl gladly employ a graduate 
of a s<icntific .•igriciiltuial •schcMd 
who has :t little knowletlgeof llali.an. 
College graduates are every snmmei 
I endeavoring to seciirt' p«>sitioiis from 
I contractors who employ a great num- 
ber of Italian-speaking |M-ople. 
' Many <»f om students who ha\e sucii 
i positions now during tlicii >utiimei' 
motiths. lind diHiiulty in iii;iUiii«: tlnii 
help iindcistaml A littif Italian 
would he beiielicial to tli.iii. Then' 
: is nothing that will wmi in the heart <>f 
j any stranger among stranjicis iiior.- 
' than a few words in his own longiu . 
j as those who have traveleil in foreign 
! countries can well iiiidt>ist:ind. .lust 
'imagine the happy feeling that tiiiisl 
run over those Yankee sailor-, now in 
I Italy or France when a student or 
I schoollioy greets them with a clear 
(•lit American. "Ilow do yon do," 
in an atmosphere of Krem h or Italian- 



speaking people. No matter .(■« 

broken the Knglish of the little fd. 

low, he will seem to yoii like an .i|i| 

friend. We reati in newspuitin 

every year of stu<lent8 who bitut 

their siiiinuci vacation abroad. Wf 

have examples in this college. 'I iiev 

tell us that they made good us of 

the French or (ierman they kinw, 

, why shouldn't it be so uf the Italiun'f 

Italy is perhaps the moat vi^it«fl 

1 country in Kur«)pe except Swiui 

land, and is certaiidy as interesiiii^ 

for the educated tourist. Moreuvci, 

I Italian is well understood in Soutlieru 

I France. S<iulhern .Switzerland lO'l 

in the Valley of the Tyrol. 

Italian is the sinoollu-st and < 
liipronounceof till Uonianlangn .. 
it is extensively used hy singers. \ 
thttse interested in mtiisic would Hiki 
in Italian a source of useful infuiiim- 
; tion as practically ••very term in 
' nmsi<-al composition is in tbt« 
language. 

Italians are numerous in New K«g- 
land. Sooner or later they mu-t 
assimilated and the future of llif 
country will tiepend in some measure 
on the way in which that assimilatiMi 
takes place. It is thereftnf liic 
tluty of every American to (lo hiri 
share towards imiking the best |mjs- 
sible <itl;!en out of every Italian iii 
the rnite<l Stat«'s. What w<»«!.l 
bring better results towards ittii 
great work than the use of their 
language? 

We have trieil t» make thetiH)> 
stitntion of the Italian niili i* 
liberal as possihlc, and htii ! . - j 
gest that we will Ik,* glad 1- 
member ()f the chili any p«i-.ir : 
anv way coneernc<l with da- •■ ' : 
; and extend oiM' call to aii\ !■ 
' nost-grailuate. .i-siHlanl oi inn 
graduate. 



DEPARTMENT NOTl- 

INHLTKIf RBKinW, tViMPCTtTlox M« 
MOr* AM» OIKI.s. 

During tin* past year there mrt 
verv nearly 'Jti.tMKi |ii«\s roi.l •jiil- 
under ]^ years of age •■■> M 
setts, who were engaged in sou* 
phase of agrii'iiltural or hortiiMiltiirnl 
elub work under the direction i»f IW 
(). A. Morion of the Kxtennion Si- 
viee of the college working in ">- 
op'i-ration with the C S Depfirtmriit 
<if AgricultiMe. 

Kvery boy and girl wliw ii.im' ;.- 
articU- should write at once to l'r»>f 
(). A. Mi.rton. Amhei.'^t, asking fw 
an application blank. 

ANNolVrKMKM oK rXTK?<*IO> •< Jl«^'t • 
I III! .IXNfAltl \NI» Kr:HUr4K<' 

So far this year the extenft 
scIkkiIs held l.\ the Massii. Iiu-«tn- 
Agricullnral college have proved wn 
satisfactory, both from stanrl|K>iiit '»f 
interest and attendance. Tb** 
scheduled for the next two tixfJi*'* 
promise even greater results -.*!• ll 
are to l>e held in coinnmnities Iiw»' 
in riose proximity to town- wli' 
smh schools have been he!il in i"- 
ceding \(,ii~ 

Ucginning the week of •' 
.s(h<M>l will 1.0 held at Holl'Oi 
at l)il<llr\ ; .I:in. •.'.■. at II '" 
Feb. ■> at Acton: Feh. '•• ;> '■ 
P»ariiiigton. Feb. \i\ at Colni 



Kx-'l 1.- .b.^epli Koacnhai.iii ' 

of the department of Plant I'ntli- 

ogv. College of Agriciiltiiie ('<»rn*'^ 

university. Ithaca. N. V.. " s iiwf- 
ried on Dec :.':'►. t.. Mi— ^ '' " 

tow of Hloomfield, Com ' 
cotiple will resitle in Itha<a 



( ik'i^ 



Eldridge '14 



All Student Supplies 



M. A. C. STORE 



BANNERS AND POSTERS 



CANOV TONIC 



Miintayue '1 :; 



Haj/er ' 1 6 



i NINETEEN-THIRTEEN NOTES F. L. Kdwards was recently elected 

' KUiTKi> BY TUK NiNKTEKN-TuiinKKN president of a newly formed organ- 
j M. A. c. CLUB OK AMHKRST. ; izatiou of directors and instructors 

\ Ueisenweber's was the scene of the I •" «econdary agriculture in Massa- 
r.M.'! .New York hannuet. Seven of chusetts. 



Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

I \l IvKKs, |-ori.TI(\ l>Kl'H'«KICS 
A.NO Itt I TKK \l tKKKs, 

-wimirsAlt 1 s 

iirri Mutliin. I.«mb. Vral. I'urk. lard. Hmids, 

lUion, SauKSKO. Moullr> , Oamr, Butter 

ChccBC. hgg*. H«an». 

ri:*- .'4 sjt/fei v5k,;7.VJ. 1 >V ''5 Bl4ck»liini- St. 
1; .•itiiq ('.(Ckitij; H(iu>e, lirii:lilun. M»*s 
Sih.'« I' Hiltry DittsMDii Hliijf. Boston 
< ii-.tmeri«-» in \>riri«>nl. 



NOTICE 



AU students desiring a special 

course in CJastronomic 

Economy, sec l*r<jl. 

J.uk, at the 

DOG CART 



aE LAVAL 

Means a Cream Separator 
With the "Trouble Left Gut 

I 1141 * the way 4 uswrt wIhi U,\f> tMtl 
■i ."! ..f i>frM>n.«l Hep4i4tor cipcficiice 
■till tilt. oppurtunity tnoh.teiM; i^'icMt 
' i! r>l otlter people's expt'iiciu e. 
;>- ril>r)i the inraiiitig of the 
- i'v I-avjil" on a s«"par.iior - 
•« M-parator with the troulile left out." 

To many l>uycrs 
i>f a cieam separa- 
tor And other farm 
m.ichinf*ry, there's 
more meaning in 
th^t simple •>l.«tf 
ineiit nf f;«rt tlian 
in a hundred other 
citims aiiif .ufti- 
metits tli U\ 

easily l>e iii.^m«- ior 
the I)e Laval 

An«J if anynntr would know how 

«ii<l why the "troiihle has l>een left 

out" ol A IJe Laval machine a new 

''• " ll catalog -the mo*t complete 

' rpsting story of the cream 

•' ever piil)lished to ht had 

-♦^king, will help to make it 

Sec the local agent or address 

f .irc^t office a<* helow 

THE DE UVU SEPARATOR CO. 




.•jkk 
HAHClUCO 



I Hit *f.<i 
•SJATTI 1 



Ihere are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 



or 



C. R. ELDER 



ALUMNI NOTES 

'H9.— ltol»ert 1*. .Sellew who for 
many year* bail l>een a-sociated 
with the .1. Vf IJiles company of 
Cincinnati, in the fee<l business, with 
his headquarters :it lioston, now hat 
charge of the lioston olfices of Chap- 
man tV ( o.. Ilanunond. Ind., in a 
similai capacity. 

'y.'i. — At a iiH'eting of the Ameri- 
can Farm Management assm'iation 
held in Washington. IL C, .Nov. 14 
and l.'i. (leorge A. Hillings was 
elected secretary and treasurer. The 
object is to promote the investiga- 
tion and teaching of farm manage- 
ment. Kvery farm management 
worker should become a member of 
this asaociation. 

Willir* s Fisher for the 
past tij.;lit years principal of a schf>ol 
in .Meliose. has received the appoint- 
ment aa principal of tlie I't isf street 
school in Provident .. having been 
chosen from a list of ."iO applicants. 

NINETKEN-KIOHT. 

The class of '"H are requeste<l to 
send their cla.ss letters to the secre- 
tary at once as preiiarations are 
being made for the publication of 
the letter at an early date. 



the old guard were on hand and 
much enthusiasm was created and 
many progressive ideas exploded. 
Those piesent were I). F. Baker. 
Dayton, I'ackard, Post, Uoehrs. 
.Serex ami Zalniskie. 

The Springlleld get-together at 
the Highland proiiucetl 10 men and 
was votetl a decitletl success. "Dw" 
Fav was tt)astina8ter and evervboilv 
present htul their little bit to say. A 
g(HMl sum was raised towards the 
I'.M.l pleilge for the athletic lieUl. 
Those present were .\dams, Hurby, 
Clark, ( obb. Fay. Harris. Ilolden. 
.Murray. Hosehrooks ami Thayer. 

The M. A ( I'.ti;; Club of Chi- 
cago held their haiapiet ;it the Itoston 
()\stei hoiiHi-. The class was wull 
represented. II. 11. ISursely of Chi- 
cago acted a« toastnukstei . The ftil- 
lowing toasts were replied to: — '•Our 
.Alma .Mater," ••.Massaehusetts Men 
in the West.' '.Xthletic Fiehl" ami 
••l'.»i:5 the -Salt ..f the Karth'." The 
election of otiicers was us follows: 
President, II. H llursley of Chicago; 
secretary. W. .S. .Moir of F*.ni|eav«>r. 
Wis. It was a very enthusiastic 
meeting and althiMigh sparsely at- 
temled. the spirit shown was the la'st. 

The lionolnhi haiKpiet w:is held at 
the Young hotel, Honolulu. T. 11.. 
and :ittende<l dv l.onh-n. Hiewtr and 
French. 

The two "Sams' niitntrtl a 
"whole roast pig on h.df-shell" at 
the (.rand Isle ban<)Uet. 

I he t'ollowing clipping from a 
Hartford pa|»er : ••The |»eripatetic 
leeture upon th< tries of llushnelt 
park which was ^iveii recently, 
attracted an attendance of nearly 
half a hundred t><-li<Hil teachers anil 
others. H. W. Hea«lle. who lead 
the party, not ontjr explaineil the 
names of the trees ami the earmniks 
hy which they may be recognized, 
but toll! many interesting biU of 
their life histtn ie^." 



•I. H. Parker of Uozemun, Mont, 
recently spent several days in 
Amherst. 

The engagement of T. L. Warner 
to Miss Huth Clark of .Sunderland is 
announced. 

Harold K. Alley, agriculturist at 
the Preston scIkmiI of Iiulustry, J*me, 
Cal. Adilress 721 Webster .St., Pido 
Alto, Cal. 

T. H. .lones, entomologist, F-sta- 
cion Kx(H'rimental, Kio Pietlras. 
I* IC 

•s I, l)aven|H)rt, instructor in fruit 
growing at the Fssex County Imle- 
|M.'udeul Agricultural school. 



The Highland Hotel 

t urtpi III Hilliii.iii Kiitl Barii.-<t stir>,rts, IIiOh- 
l)l<M.k.H Itiiiii the Cniuli DrlHtl, l^ ■ iiKxleiil lios 
liflr> run uii dir Kuii>)>t!.iii I Ui> It ■« lust ■ %tr|> 
Ironi M.tiii sti«,-t, 4w.i> liitiii tin* iioiv ,« rid dust 
4nd \rt III tlir celitri of tin- l>Utllir>s dislllct 

ll» rmini^ trv »"ll tiiriiishfd .tiiil i ■iiiifutl.iblr. 
h^vmu « I' ' 4iid hot anil ci.ld luniiinK 

wjtei III • ' f'lUPH Ol .in<t up. it>otii% 

will) ImIIi (....K"^ •I.IMI .ind u|i. 

Il« e»t«^llrnt c»ii«iii»' ^^ 1 w,>ll vrntiliilMl dininK 
XMiiii niuk' .lilt iiK>iiM>i>' evfiy 

ihlMK (i( I Wfll ciiiikfii itnd 

«iv«diiitt.. ■. ^: ,...,. .....iiDpr 

.Htay at |h<> >ii»(ltl.<>«i il<>i.-| onr« and von will 

4lltlr)|iritr ' .. . '■ ' .: ^1 . Vt I V 

CVeniOK 

D. H. SIEVERS, 

lll«hlaii«l llolfi. <,|*rlnKafl.l. Ha>«. 



St r I* ft k n 1j \ n k F t* i««i k m 

IM<I II m».\ !>««'. %V, NKW YOWK 

OI.I'II .V.NIJ <-ol.l.i:i.K 
l»INH A. NO l<I.N«i!-i ^ 



The GoDDecticut Valley 
Street Railway 



From Amherst, vm Northampton, 
through the Hatficld.s, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf .Mi., alongside the 
famous bloody Hrook battle ground 
to Old l>eerfield. thence to (Green- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains" to I^ke Pleasant, .Monta- 
gue and .Millers Falls. 



50 Miles of Trackage .lodern 
Rquipmcnt Train Dispatch- 
ing System — Preight and Hx- 
pres5 5ervicc over entire line. 



Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Sunday Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



EWELL'S 

STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPEIS 

Largest assortment in .New Kn- 
gland of Special Student l-urnishings. 

LOWKR KXI'KNSF.S Kiiable us 
to offer an absolute lower piice. 

AMHERST FURNITURE 



ANH 



CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 




cox SONS 



ANI> 



VINING 

7a-74 Madison Avenue. New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

Beat Materials aad Workmaeahip 

WOODWARD'S 
LUNCH 



17 Main St., Masonic Bldg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



CU$«d »nly from 1 A. M. h 4 A. M. 

Toefll Mientka 

Shoes smned and Polisteii 

Make old shoes look like new 

Neat, classy workmanship 
Op«n Handay Malu ,St. 

On way to Past QfElcs. 



I'l 



m 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 13, igU 



TENNIS 

RACKETS 




—At- 



DEUEL'S 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

Hi jrh Grade College Work 

LAUNDRY 
Shirts, 10 15c 

Collars, - 2 i-ac 

Cuifs, - J I 2C 

Plain wash, - 48c p«r cloz. 

Same, rough dry, • - 30c per d«»z. 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 50c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Tressing, ^ijo a Suit 



The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

Offers courses of instruction in twenty six teaching 
departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science. 

A student may specialize in ihe following subjects: 



Horticulture 

Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape Gardening 

Pomology 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairyinig 

Poultry Husbandry 

Agricultural Chemistry 

Economic Entomology 

Plant Physiology and Pathology 

Agricultural Education 

For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERFIELD. President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELER AND OPTOMETRIST 
Lenses Kround while you wait 
College Jkwelky 
Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar >trm|s 

AMHKKMT, MASS. 
Neat to Post Ottice. 



STEAM PITTING. Telephone »-, 

GAS FITTING. TINNING. 

F. W. Dance & Co. 
PLUMBERS. 



Kalpm ]. BoKUiN. Attent. 7 North Cottaxe 

KiiW*Kt> C. Ki'W*«l's, Agent 

Put full name and addres* on laundry 



AMHERST BOOK STORE 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 

.Jt)int Committee <»n Inl» r«.«>ll«giate AthleiifH. 

The College Senate, 

Football Association, 

UaHeball Association, 

Track Association, 

Hockey Assoi'iatiou, 

T'euais Association, 

Hide club. 

Roister Doisters 

Musical Association, 

Nineteen Hundred Ft)Urteen Imlex, 

Niueteeu Hundred Fifteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association. 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stock bridge Club, 



Loose 



Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 



Itefore buying elsewhere, see our assort- 
ment of pennants and banners 

CUKRAN ft DYER, Props. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Philip H. Smith, Secretary 

I). \V. .Jones, i'lesident 

J. A. I'rifc, Manager 

(;. L>. Melicau, Manager 

K. C. Fxlwards, Manager 

,J. 1). Pellett, Mauager 

U. v.. MacLaiu, Manager 

J. T. Oertel, I'resident 

I). ,1. Lewis, Manager 

U. 1). Hrown, Manager 

K. S. Clark, .Ir., Manager 

H. M. Kogers, Manager 

U. H. i'owers. President 

1). A. Coleman, I'lesident 

J. D. Pellett, President 

N. U. Ueariug, Preaident 



Specialty of Kepairing 

Church Wimk)ws, 
Memorial Windows, 
Lkau Lights, &c. 
( Cliftoo Ave.. AMHERST. MASS 



Catalogues of 

Are out. Copy mailed to any addres* ( ollfp 
Students and Athletes who want the ir*l vui»-i ■ 
atticlet lor the various sports should in -: 1.; :. 
those bearinu the Wright & IJitson J 14 i' M.u 



Foot Ball 


^~^ Skat'gShoe* 


Basket Ball / 


j^Q^H^ Sweaters 


Hockey \ 
Skatea 


H^SP' Uniforms 



^/hen Fitting Out Your Room 



Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters 
Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 
Towels, Etc. Also denims for 
that corner seat. 



for 



Wright & Ditson Good* are ths ^Undatd fer 
all sports 

.U4 Washinuton St., B.^ton, M*5« 

THE TERPSf PARLOR 

CLEANSING. 

PRESSING. 

REPAIRING 

Qulckrat IterviM, B*»t Work, l^wr.i Prl« 

All woik carefully done Work call'-'i t^' i'- 
delivered. Gents' overcoats, sult^. | ";« *- 
coats. Ladies' hot liocn suita a spcci^lu 

Teams will call ewry day at M. \ ( 

Wn. FRANKLYN, Prop. 

Rmt Naah Bl'k, Amherst. Tel. Xo JiH 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



Buy your flowers of the floricut- 
tural department The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300 



Barsalotti & Gentoso 

Cigars Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresh Candy 

Ice Cream, Fruit, Soda, Etc. 

The Right Goods at the Right Prices 

Open till II o'clock EVERY night 
Csracr Amity and Fleaaaat Ntrerta 



If 70a want to be 

S«>l.ll> WITH THK fllKI.S 

you must hmyo your clothes pr«<ii.^<l and cleaned 

ATBPSTBIIV'S 

II Amity «t. MaroiMi .Store 

PreaslDg and Cleaning a apfclalty 

Moat liberal ticket systein In loirn 
Tal. 303-1I 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNI FORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1434-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



CARS 

Leave AOOIE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKE at 15 min. paat the hour. 



CARS 

Leave AMHERST for AOOIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 mIn. paat the hour 



i^MlalCaraat 



RatM 



AIHERST & SUNDtRLANO SI. BY^ 

For a Daily and Sunday .Newsp»p«f 
You should Read 

Springfield Repiiblian 

While you are at college in Amherst 

It him all of The M . A. C. »w« 

Thf Heat Hportlnff News 

Full fieneral New* 

A 8tronK Editorial Pane 

InlerpStlDK Keatare* 

It la a Real Newspaper 

Daily, 3 cents; 70 cents a m^ nthJJ-'*' 
a quarter. 

Sunday, 5 cents; 50 cents a laf"' 

Subscribe by mail or through the Ai ^f' • ' 
daalar. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 



Vol. XXIV. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, January 20, 1914. 



No. 16 



DEFEATED BY ONE POINT ANNUAL DEBATE 



RIFLE TEAM SCORES 



Hprvard Wins In Overtime Ptriod of To Select College Team Clark, Rhode Show Good Early Season Form. Pur- 
Fast Game at Boston Arena. Island and Springfield to be Met. due Defeated in First Match. 

' ! 

In a hard fought gtiui.; the Aggie The fifth annual college debate Thi- lust week of the ritle team 
t,;iMi went down to defeat before the was held in the chapel Friday seitson of inatrhes eiuk'd with a victory 



llarvani seven on Wednesday even 
inir in the Boston Arena. TIiIh was 



evening liefore a aiuall but appre- over I'lirdue university. The score 
; lu luc ..woiw.. ^».-^M„. . ....^ "..» ciative audie ice. The question was, | is n«»t as large as some have been in 

I accomplished until ten minutes I "Resolved, that the Monio*' Doctriin' forincr years but consitbTing that it 
-itinie ha«l been played. In the as a systein or policy of intervention was the beginning of the season and 
i,i>t period, although the score was based u|M.n the primary of the I niled that there are several new men to 
ti.dattheend,Harvardhadalittlethe States in American atTairs should be develop, there is no cause for roiii- 
|.,tter of the play. In the second | abandoned." The debate was a ment. Purdue, also in the infancy of 
perioil the situation was reversed, the I most interesting one, with excellent the season scored only »12. The 
Mai o«m forcing the play and keeping presentations of aiguinents on lM>th daily press reported that Aggie had 
the Crimson defense busy. The over- j sides, and apt discussions of the ini- , defaulted to the western team, but in- 
liiiie period brought out some gootl ' p«»rtaDce of the Monroe doctrine. ! cpiiry of Sergeant Lee revealed a rule 

There can be no doubt that the judges, whereby the time limit for the Hist 
selected the men who most deserved I match isextendetl foi an extra week 
the honor, whei. they chose Kretler- if there was for any reason a delay in 
ick VV. Read Ml, rhomaa L, liar- organizing the team. When the tar- 
rocks 'K, amUharles II Could 'IG, 'gets were turned in they were sent 
to make up the debating team which at once to Washington and 
ta to represent this jollege In \ were there in plenty of time to come 
intercollegiate debates with (lark within the ruling of the olllcial in 
college, Hh<»de Island State ((illejie 
an<l the Internalionul V. .M. (". A. 
eollege later in the year. 



i Ml key and Aggie hatl the better of 
ii^iiineut until there was only al>out 
a minute to play when Harvard 
seeuretl the winning scores. 

The game was clean and well 
|.laye<l. The interest of the apeeta- 
tors was not allowed to lag as the 
]i!:iy was close ami the winning score 
came only ft>rty stu-onds before the 
pxme closed. IJoth teams fought 
liurd and played their best game. 
The team certainly deserves a great 
i. >1 of credit for tUe game they 
playe<l as taking the game as a whole 
they outplayed Harvard, a team 
|iicked by the papers as one of the 
three having a chance for the inler- 
illegiate bwkey title. For the 
Aggies Jones, Hutchinson ami 
( hiaholm played a g4MKi game on the 
MtTense while IJuttrick gave a fine 
. \hibiiion of defense work in goal. 
1 .1 Harvard Phillips, Smart, Clark 
!in<l Willetts |dayetl well. 

When the game started it Itjoked 

a^ though Harvard \va8 going to have 

tht- better of the play as they had the 

jiiu k in the Aggie territory 'oi the 

ftral few minutes. Harvard scored 

first when Phillips shot the puck by 

iJultrick after ahoiit nine minutes of 

jltiy. ScxjH after this Hutchinson 

•\'<\ the score when he secure*! a goal 

' I !i pass from Jones. This score 

• juickly followed by one for Har- 

V- ^ tul on a shot from the side by 

:3 ( l:irk. With the periotl nearly over 

;"1 .l<<iies made oursecoml score and lieil 

, M n\, the gatpe. 

When the second perio<l started 

rvard had some new men on the 

i The change which was the most 

1 uutile was the substitution of 

< fiochan for Washburn in goal, as 

< nochan added a goo<l deal to the 
H \ aid defense. When the whistle 
I' <v our forwards carried the 
p k into Harvard's territory, keep- 
iii their <lefeu»e busy. For a 
ti p it looked as though one of the 

\ shots our forwards made must 
« it but the Harvard defense played 
u eat game and no score was made. 



PROM DRAMATIC PhRFORM. 
ANCE. 



charge. Lieutenant A. S. Jones. 
Tlu-rc seems to be no doubt but that 
the error will be rectified at once. 
In this match Oertel lead with a 
total of IH.J. Dunbar and Wetherbee 
each had 1 '••2 to their credit and all 



The .11.1, uai Prom show wdl l.c held indications at practice |M)int ttiwanl 
in the Academy of Music this year an improvement by iMith. These 
on Saturday evening, Feb. 1 1 Only three men are sure to approach the 
through the jiersonal efforts of Prof, reconis made by the high men 
Hurd was it jmssible to obtain the last year. The other membeis of the 
Acatlemy f<»r Saturday night. Such team have <lone consistent w.uk and 
an efforl should be amply rewarded have made higher scores, so there 
bv a large aiidienc.-. I promises t.» be a continual inter- 

Under the coaching of Prof. Smith change of the men who are of the 
the cast is doing exceptionally g^axl first five in each match. Already the 
work this year and an excellent |iro- teams have completetl the shocit with 
.luction, with ela»M>rate costumes, is .Minnesota with a score <.f *^h>^. re- 
pioMiised. Be sure to see Aggies ported iinol!i«ially by Sergeant U-e. 
first appearance in Shakespeare. i The uiH.tllcial score in the latest 

Special cars will run from Amherst match was ;>7n. The scores for the 
to Hamp. and return. One car will Pm n I ue 8h<x)t follow : 
be reservecl for faculty members, 
one for Prom people, and the rest for Oertel 
the stmlent btnly. j l^""'^*"* 

Rememl>er the date, Feb. 14, VMX. \ Wetherl.ee 
I, llotis 



1.1 



MUSICAL CLUBS TRIPS. 
The Musical ( lubs opened their 
season We.lnesday night with a suc- 
cessful c«mcert at Three River- 



Hvde 



StandinK 

a.'i 

93 
S6 



I'lone 

m 

98 

100 

94 

98 



Lane 

Whitmore 



86 
M6 



Total for first five 

Parois IM) 

I'armenter 80 

operating with Mr. Sherk the social ^,j^^j^^ g,^ 

service secretary. A <louble cpiartet 

and six tnandolinsmade up the jiarty.. 

Thursday evening the full combined 

clubs entertained a large audience at 

Turners Falls. The roncci t. given 

for the athletic association of the 

high sch<x>l. was very successful. 

Dancing followed the completion of , 

the program. ' 



97 
t>6 

m 

9() 



Total for second five 
Team total 



lolal. 
I9.J 

Vdi 
19-2 
1«7 
IHl 

\h:\ 
182 
181 
Wo 
17«J 

H\r, 

IMI.^ 



[Continued on page 2] 



HONOR FOR PROF. GORDON. 

Professor Gordon was recently 
elected a Fellow of the Geological 
Society of America. 



DIPLOMAS IN ENGLISH 

The Trustees have voted that 
hereafter the Bachelor of Science 
diploma shall be written in English 
only. 



T. W. (ilover Mr, of South Dux- 
bury has pledged Lambda Chi Alpha 



EASY VICTORY 

Over Holy CioBS in Game at Worces- 
ter by Score of 13-0. 

Aggie won the fourth game of the 
season Satunlay by defeating Holy 
Cross 1:5-0. The game was decid- 
edly in favor of Aggie from the 
beginning, the puck being in Holy 
Cross's territory most of the time. 
Buttrick had veiy little to tU>, mak- 
ing but four stops. Hilly one of which 
was by any means ditllcult. The 
ganu" was exceptionally clean, the 
only fault that our men couhl find 
was that the rink was too small to 
get in the best team work. 

This game was Ihe fiist game of 
hockey which Holy Cross has ever 
playe<l an«l as one of the local pajwrs 
said *'lhe Purple has little hope of 
winning against the Aggie seven 
which is one of the fastest playing 
wllege teams in New Knglaml." 

For the first few minutes, while 
our men were "sizing up" their op- 
|M*nents tlie puck stayetl near the 
center of the rink. This observation 
work didn't take very long however 
for Jones miule the fust goat after 
three minutes »)f play. From that 
lime on the puck was near the Purple 
goal except for an twcasional sprint 
of Captain llamel or Mullen of Holy 
Cross who. four limes got within 
sh<M>ting distance of our goal. Mur- 
ray the goal tender was the banlest 
wiuketl man on the Holy Cross team. 
llut<hinson scored the second goal 
on a pass from Jones who had ear- 
ned the puck thiough the Purple 
t^feusf. In less than one minute 
Jones scored again ami Chisholm 
made an<»ther goal liefore the Be<x>nd 
bind had gone around again. After 
.fones maile the fifth |M>int in the score 
Holv Cross startetl on a ilefensive 
game trying to cover each man more 
than l»efore. Captain Jones called 
Fernahl to take Chisholm's place anti 
before the first half was over two 
more goals were made, one by 
Hutchinsiui and another by Ross. 

Holy Cross started the second 
perio<l with the determination to keep 
the score down for the game was a 
little more ex<iting and niixups were 
more numerous. Neetlham went in for 
Archibald and he brought the puck 
into the Purple's territory several 
times Johnson showe<l to a<lvan- 
tage the second period, several times 
getting clear of all the men. He 
made the first score in this periwi 
and Jones shot another in quick 
succession. Two more goals were 
shot by the same men in the same 
order and then Ross put one by 
Murray. Hutchinson made the last 
score of the game bringing the total 
up to V.\. Toward the end of the 



i 



I 



The College Signal. Tuesday, January 20. 19 



»4 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 20, 1914 



second period liariy wont in for 
Blair. 

Jones was easily the most con- 
BpicuouB man on the ice and he 
gave the Hpectntors an well as the 
opposing team some good exhibitions 
of shooting and earning the pnek 
down the rink. Ross was in the game 
everj minute and did gotnl work all 
the time. 

The line-up and sumnutry : 

U. A. C. MOLV CROSS. 

Chisholm, Fernald, Iw rw, Halluway 

Johnson, c c, BUnchett 

Hutchinson, r r, Fitzpalrick 

Jones, capt., rw tw, Haniei, capt. 

Archibald, Needham, cp cp, Mullen 

Ko&s, p p, Carty 

Huttrick, g g, .Murray 

Score-M. A. C. 13, Holy i m^s o. 
(ioals — Jones 5, f^utchinson v J<j''">'i>n 
«, Koss 2, Chisholm Kfferees— Acker- 
Oian and Kean. Timers— Pellett and 
Laughnam. Time— i5-minule periods. 

DEFEATED BY HARVARD * 

[Continued fruni p»te i] 

The play was faster and l><>th teams 
tried their hardest to score. Harvard 
was doing tlieir best, but only sm*- 
i-eeiletl in getting %'ery few shots at 
our goal and Huttriek safely stopped 
the few they nuide. This peri«Hl 
eiukMl with the score »till tied. 

It was then deeidcil i<i play ten 
minutes overtime, playing the min- 
utes eaeh way. After a short rest 
play was resumed. 'Inside of a min- 
ute Jones carried the puck down the 
rink and put the Aggie team in the 
lead with the s<-ure standing 3-2 At 
this time the chances for an .Aggie 
victory l<M)ketl luiglit It did iii>t l<H»k 
as though Harvard could Hcorc an our 
team bad Ikhmi out playing them. 
The first five minutes ended with the 
Aggie retaining their lead. The teams 
tlien changed goa's and play was re- 
sumed. As the close of the overtime 
|>eri«Nl drew near the proHpcct.H for a 
victory grew brighter I lir «>uth»ok 
howerer waa entirely changed when 
Smart tied the score with only forty- 
seven seconds left to play. The 
score which finally blaste«l the Aggie 
hopes was shot by Wanamaker just 
ten seconds after this from a scrritn- 
nuge in front of the g<ial. In the 
short time left the team tried hard but 
could not do anything and so left the 
ice defeatetl in a game which they 
deserved to win. 

The line-np : 
M. A. C. 
Chisholm, rw 
Hutchinson, r 
Jones, c 
Johnson, Iw 
Archibald, cp 
Koss, p 
Huttrick, g 



HAKVAKI) 
Iw, S. P. Clark. Curtis 
r, Hopkins 
c, Phillips, Wanamaker 
rw, Smart 
cp, Claflin 
p, Willetts. Doty 
g, Washburn, Tarno* han. 
.Score— Harvard 4, M A C. 3. (loals 
first period— Phillips 8 m., 51 s. Ifutchin- 
son 16 m . 10 9s., Clark 17 m., 14 s.. Over- 
time period -Jones ^(k) s. Smart q m., 
ij s., Wanamaker 9 m . 23 s. Referees — 
Tingley and Regue, Time— Two ao- 
miniite and two 5 minute extra periods. 



Rev. Charles R. Brown, dean of 
Yale Divinity school, preached a 
strong sermon at Sunday's chapel. 



INTERCLASS BASKETBALL 

In the second of the interclass 
basketball series for this winter, the 
seniors, Wednesday night, defeated 
the sophomores, and the juniors 
defeated the freshmen in the Drill 
Hall, 13-22, and 2f;-2.'», respectively. 
The games were exceedingly fast and 
always kept the on-lookers anxious, 
especially the last part of the junior- 
freshmen game. 

The line-ups : 

1914. 1916. 
.Smith, If If, Moses 
Kdgerton, rf rf. Reed 
Hadfield.c c. Hall 
Christie, lb lb, Darling 
Mrewer Wot>d. lb rl). Little 

Score— KM4, 43, i<ji6,22. (ioals — Smith 
5, Christie 5, Kdgerton 4, Hadfield 4, 
.Moses 4, Darling 1, lirewer. Goals from 
fouls Smith 5 Reed 2. 

1915. I9«7- 
Smith, If If, Irving 
Pike, cf rf, Karwell 
Dole, c C.Grayson 
Frost, lb lb, Harrington, KeUey 
Melican, rb rl», Wheeler, Hailow 

Score- 101527,19172s. (ioals— Smith 
5. Karrell 5. Pike 4, (irayson 3. Irving 
3. Fouls thrown liost 7, (;rayson3. 
Referee- Hitkox, I. V M ( . A 
Umpire Powers, M A C. Timer — 
Kd wards, .M .\ < . I'eriods - 20- 
minutc halve*. Attendance— 400. 



PAGE'S SHOE STORE 



INVEISITORY SALE 



$2.00 Skates, 
$300 Skates, 



$1.50 $j.5o Skating Shoes, $2.75 

$2.25 $5.00 Tan Shoes, $3.98 



Repairing— Goodyear System 



JiVAlK 



r? 



F»A01 



T. N. E. BECOMtS THECEDES 

Kta Kta chapter of Tlicta Nil Kpsi- 
lon. founded in this institution in 
liMo. has resigiHMl from the national 
organisation. The inlerfraternity 
conference recently held at New 
York unanimously declared against 
I'heta Nil Kpsiloii. Inasmuch as 
this coiiferen<-e has a representation 
from pra<-tically all the fraternities of 
this institution it was deci<led by tiie 
l<H'al chapter to give the findings of 
this conference ilue consitleration. 
It was deciiled by Kta Kta chapter 
that to continue as a branch of tlie 
national organization would be incom- 
patible with the liest interests of the 
college and the several fraternities 
represented therein. The chapter, 
retaining all its memlters, has inaug- 
urated the honorary senior society of 
Thecedes. 

Thecetles, through its inemlwrs. 
will strive to attain the following 
ideas : 

1 . To IwKJst ( >ld Aggie. 

•-'. To encourage strong (ies of 
friendship among the men of the 
college and among the several 
fraternities. 

.'t. To honor those men who have 
achieved success in the variotis col- 
lege activities including scholarship. 

1. To maintain and promulgate 
college customs. 

.'». To foster, as alumni, the l)est 
interests of the college. 



'04.— Prof. Arthur W. (iilbert will 
give three of a series of fourteen 
weekly lectures to be given by well 
known men of many institutions at 
at Cornell this winter. He will give 
the introductory lecture and the two 
following concerning Mendel's laws. 



THE 



Hoover & Smith Go. 

616 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 



PUUdilphU's OfficUi Fntiriiti iiwilir 

BPEOIALISTS IN 
Pratemity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prices Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

Rinfs, Charms.-. .*. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass 

OrricB Hours: 
otc>ia>>^.iM* 1.00 a«» CSS* .iM. 




Che 

PDeasani 

BmttiS St.. 
Bmber^t 

Telephone 470 



HKiiAKFAST 

LUNCHeON 
APTIKNOON TSA 

I>inner if arranged (or. 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 



Now at 13 Pleasant St. 



Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Broken Lenses .Accurately Replaced 

Fine Watch Repairing Promptly and 
Skilfully Done 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 



HAVE YOU EVER STOPPD TO THINK THAI 

"The etTect of your message greatly depends 
upon the style and quality of your Stationery .>" 

You are more often judged by the paper you use than by the 
thoughts you express in writing. Pride, good taste, refinen>ent— all 
demand that you use Stationery that is distinctive, stylish, good. 

SYMPHONY LAWN WRITING PAPER 

('()MKS in a wide variety of beautiful tints, modish shapes 1 'i 
correct sizes. So rarely good that its use will help establish you i*- 
a person of excellent good taste in the minds of those you write '>. 



Price per l)ox (all tints), 



50c 



THE HENRY ADAMS CO., Druggists 

The REXALL Store on the corner 



Heart -to -Heart Talks 

To Aggie Men 

By the iMrgest Retailers of 
Apparel in Nezv England 



During January and February you men can find at 
our store vt-ry t*.\cepli<>nal values — ^rtnerous underprice 
values in tine Clothing, Furnishings. Furniture and 
many other things in demand by college men. Indeed 
such values are worth coming many miles to be taken 
advantage of. 

You demand clothes that are styli.sli in ml and in 
pattern as well as of the best wearing qualities ; you de- 
mand beauty and longevity in Furniture ;-\ou seek nov- 
elties in many lines ol merchandi.se ; in fact, you must 
have the best of everything at the most modest prices. 

All these requirements are represented in our huge 
stocks. It' you will visit our store when in Boston or 
vicinitv this month or next, you will find many liberal 
reductions seldom equalled elsewhere on such high- 
grade merchandise. 

o 

JORDAN MARSH COMPANY 

Boston 



Mackinaws 



AND 




Sweaters 



This is Mackinaw and Swealn mmmhi. I'ootbali, CjoII and 
all other I-'all and Winter spoils call lor good .Swtaler pro- 
tection. We have in stm k today several hundred Macki- 
naws in all grades. 



The lanious Summit brand, well known in the Northwest 
and acknowledged to be one of the best. Coat Sweaters, 
the Sliawl C<»llar, Coat Collar ami the regular shape 
Sweaters, all the best selling colors. 

HJIl.OO to «Ht7.<M> 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 

Scbool und College pbotograpDcrs . . . 




L^QOALLY: 5^ Center St.. Northampton Mass., 

and South Hadley, Mass. 

Main Offick : I Thr»e .Studion offer the l»est skilled 

1546 I S48 liroadway. *r\^*^% and most c.mipletc 

S'ew York < itv i cquipmrnt •ihtainable 



pUSH il a'or - "ioot it 

* over! Velv I — JM>-caUed 

• .use exoeccl.oglf smooth 
-smooii b«;-uy^ a^,,^ over 

t vo y.:- i, in Vv'h.w'.* ^e aJ 

I ir nness Jb .ppcai.. ':oin the 

' ■ nvi*: 1 1!".- g«x)d.i-3j ihal 

cnv -; f-.r our piix , Velvet 

• l-acco m -Ibwness HiiHcrto 
,.„ — t-io '•^"'ofS ta harbor 
« ' ': " '. 3 -. .tt'^e«orto^ato- 
' c c V «J 'O' 1 ] nuke for your- 
' !l. .'1 ''i ins cf 'n-1 cHeer l^ it 

■r\- r i4n*"W rf a man who 
<'d ililteVelvcl Hurrah! Don't 
t^t It {>aM yoiu At all dcakifc 



WE SOLICIT YOL'R PATRONAGE 

In so far as out bcmefits arc nnitnal. 

THE AMHERST GAS COMPANY 

EIvervtHing Eleotrical 



NON-LKAKABLC 



FOUNTAIN PEN 



^250 



Minimize your fountain pen ^^ 
^ troubles by ownlnft a Mwrcs C If i» «he ^^ 
F- safest, soundest and most dcfH-ndahlo P*"" "^n/'^^- 
CItsstrenftth lies In its vcr> simplicity. Nothing 
fliilkv to ftet ou t of order. C Vou can g ve your 
seUno better treat than a Moore's Non-leakable 

For Sale by I>ealer(i F.verj where ^ 

American Fountain Pen Company ^./ 

Adams. <;u«hln<» & Fo»ter. Solllnft ^<l^n«» 
168 I)KV<)SSHIRE.STRKtr ;: :: BOSTON. MASS 



Full Two 
Ounce TitM 



III* 



W 



«ii 







'W^ 



' """I fi 



'*! 



The ColUge Signal, Tuesday, January 20, 1914- 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 



BOABD OF EDITORS. 



CHESTER K. WMKKLK 
FRANK W. in KI.L '15. 
HAROl.D C. BLACK '14 
HAROLD |. CLAV'm. 
J. ALBEKT PRICE '15. 
GEO. E. DONNEI.L'i5. 

earle s. draper '15 

TYLER S. KOGEKS'i6. 
CHARLES W. CURTIN 



R'u. Editor! 

Managing 

Competition 

Assistant 

Athletic 

Department 

Campus 

Athletic 

'16, Alumni 



n-Chief 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 



BUSINESS DEPAKTMENT. 

ERNEST S. CLAKK. IR '14. »"» Manager 
MAURICE J. CLOl'GH '15. Ass't Bus. Mgr. 
ERNEST p. I'FTDN '14. Advertlsinu Manaxer 
W. RICHARD SEARS 'i^ Asst. Ad». Manager 
CHAS A. HUNTINGTON. JR. '16. Circulation 

Subscription $1.50 per vear. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all uiders payable 
to Ernest S. Clark. Jr. 



Entorwi •• MOond-ctaM mMtar M th« AmlMrx 
Pom Offtca 

Vol. XXIV. TuK.sDAV, Jan. ao. No. 16 



Signal Huuni meeting on Jan. 22, 
Wednesday, at 5-00 p. m. A re- 
minder to the usual delinquents. 

Protn invitations are out and are 
to be obtained of Archibaltl '15 at 
West Kntiy, Soutit Doriu. Please 
purchiiBe these right away- 

Junior Proui preparations are pro- 
ceeding actively. Kappa Sigma, 
|{eta Kap)>a Phi and Alpha Sigma 
I*hi are planning to have Prom house 
parties. 

At the .M. A. C. C. A. on Thurs- 
day evening, L. fJ. Da vies, 11. W. 
Brewer and Mr. Sherk gave suggest- 
ions for a more elllcient association 
here in college. 

The track candidates are practis- 
ing daily. The management is say- 
ing nothing — but the team's chances 
in the coming South Armory meet at 
iioston look pretty bright. 



i< 



Boost Old Aggte. 



»t 



The next issue of the Signal will 
appear on February 3. 

Beginning with the next semester 
the CoLLMJK Si<;nal is to increase 
its size by the addititm of two pages. 
The recent discussion of the alumni 
column has led partially tt> this inno- 
vation. From Feb. :l on, the .Su.nal 
will give at leaMl two full columns, 
and possibly more, for the exclusive 
use of the alumni, if they will (111 
them. This will be exclusive of the 
notes frotn the alinimi "freshmen." 
We wish at this time to diflfer with 
those who maintain that the alumni 
read the paper only for the alumni 
news therein contained. Kvery 
reader of this pa|>er slioiihl l>e vitally 
interested in what the college Inxly 
of today is doing. It is by such an 
interest and no other that we can 
ever hope to '*lkM>8t Old Aggie .She 
needs the moral !:iup|>ort of nil her 
sons. 



SIGNAL COMPETITION 

The present standing of the com- 
petitors in the editorial <lepartiueiil 
is as follows : 

White '15, 

Farrar '15, 

Pendleton*' 15, 

MacCulloch 'lt>. 

(iioissa 'lf>, 




THERMOS 

CARAFE 

Have a Hot Coffee in Your Room. 

Fill at the cart Stay hot 24 hours 

Other styles for tramp.s. 



KEEPS HOT 



KEEPS COLD 



DEUEL'S DEUG STORE 



ONITY CHURCH 

North F'lkasant St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

RKfai.AK KINOAV JiKKVICK AT7 I* M 



27.57 
20.73 

27. Hi 



22.14 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

(Notice* for thi« coltimr should tie dropped in 
the SuiNAL Office or handed to Earle S. Draper 
'15, on or before the >aturdav precedinti each 

issue. 1 

Jan. 21, 1-10 p. M.. Assembly— Dr. 
William Hurdick, director 
|)ublic athletic league. Balti- 
more, Md. 

Jan. 23, Friday, 8-O0 \. m.— Semes- 
ter examinations begin. 

Jan. 25 — A'o Sunday chapel. 

Jan. 31, Hockey game — M. A. C. vs- 
Amherst at Pratt rink. 

Feb. 2, 10-30 a. m.— M A. C. sec- 
ond hockey team vs. Vermont 
academy at M. A. C". rink. 

Feb. 2, 1-00 r. .m. — Second semester 
begins. 






CAMPUS NOTES 

The next installment on the ath- 
letic tax comes due the (irst of Feb- 
ruary. 

All Sunday and daily chapels and 
assembly will be omitted iliiring the 
examination period. 



•17, 



23.67 

IM.25 

13.'.>0 

23.48 

23.47 

y.44 

6.31» 

I (W, 

4.u; 

2..3 

2.4r. 



E. RUSSELL NORTON 



llarrock's'ir.. 

Russell '16, 

Mooney '16, 

Smith '17. 

Lawrence '17. 

lioo|>er '17, 

F. W. Mayo '17, 

Biickman '17, 

W.I. Mavo, Jr. 

Favor '17, 

llallett 17. 
The men who stand low should 
get busy and write up material. 
Assignments will be |)Oi>te<l each 
week outside the .Sionai, olJice. 
Those men who have reached 25 , 
credits should read Given's "Making! 
a Newspaper" in the library. 1 i 
would like to have tlu)8e men who 
stand high see me at the Kappa .Sigma 
house ;iny evening for criticiHms. 
11. ('. Hi.AcK, Cotnp. I'kl. 



SALES AGENT 



Davenport Miller 
Vein Coal 

Best Quality Pennsylvania Coal 



HU.SION OKKICE 

85 Water St. 



NEW YORK UKKKE 

I Broadway 



SECOND TEAM LOSES TO 
WILLISTON 

Saturday afternoon the »<ec*ond 
team lost to Williston by the scHjreof 
1-0. 

The line-up follows : 



LOW PRICE TAI1.0RING CO. 

Mils M XPK 10 OKOKK 
.Snil» Cleaned. PreiSPd and Dyed. Allkindsof 
Kepairihi; for l-adips and Gentlemen neatly dpne. 
MiRh uradf wnrk by rir^t class tailor. Work 
called for and deli»ered. Sell tickets f<»i pre<tsin(i, 

4 SUIT5 KOR fl.SO 

GCORGC KOTOV^TZ. PnoP. 

Main Street. Amherst. Mass. Nash Block 
On your way to '.'■ I' • office. Tel. 438-W 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest line in 
the .state outside of Boston. 



Seeourlineof Drill Shoes 

$2.00 to $4.00 



MODERN REPAIR 
DEPARTMENT 



E.M.BOLLES 



OM VOUtt %VAV TO P. O.) 



"SCOTTIE" 
H. HOOPEE 

Will clean and press your cloth« s m' . 
will l»€ sati.sfied. It costs no more 
and he is nearer to "Aggie." 

Under Columbia Cafe 



WII.LISTON. 

Garvin, Iw 
Mcfirath, rw 
(]rady, c 
Short, r 
Nash, cp 
Fatten iCapt ). p 
Deveney, g 



SRCOKU TKAM. 

Iw, Doggett 

rw, Wildon 

c, .Sanderson 

r, Sherinyan (Capt.) 

cp, I'laisted 

p, Westman 

g, Curtin 



I. M. LABROVITZ, Custom Tailor 

Fashions, Fit, First Class Work Guaranteed 

Large assortment on hand. (.KNT'S ^t^^N LSH I N(.S. Red-Man Collars and 

Dress Shirts. Cleaning and Pressing. DRhSS SUITh 

TO KKNT. Military Collars and Glovps 

11 AMITY ST., Telephone 302VV. AMHERST, MASS. 



Time — ao-minute halves. Goal- 
Short. Referee — Draper, M. A. C. 
Timer— Gore, M. A. C. 



'89. — Jamea T. Hutchings spoke 
concerning "Six years' experience 
on public service corporations un- 
der state regulation" at the New 
York state waterways association 
convention, held at Albany Oct. 31. 



CHRISTMAS GIFTS ! 

A portrait is a most acceptable Christmas gift — 

Appointments made now can be finished in time. 

Miss McClellan's Studio is the Place 



44 State Strfht. 



Northampton, M>ss. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 20, 191 4. 



COMMUNICATIONS 

[., 1 i KiuTOR OF The Signal. 

//. Sir: 

I very sorry that anybotly has 

^jij,^,,, .!;ig8il the class of l"J13 or any 
„iIk.i class on the point of supplying 
aliiiiiiii news. 'I'his feature of the 
lM.;SAi. is one of the Ixst. and I am 
inclisu d to think the very best thing 
!iiuli I pap<?i' <-■!*" handle. It would 
l,e \.iy luuch better if instead of 
rt'iiiK ing the amount of rji;i news, 
v,m ")iild get ecpially liberal reports 
• i, ; ther classes. 

\ ery truly yours. 

F. A. Waj (ill. 
Aiiili.rst. Mass., .Ian. HI, 11M4. 



KitlK'US. CoLLKGK SlONAI., 

Ih'itr Sira: 

111 view of the fact that the so- 
ralk'tl Waterloo 8e:>8<.n «tf the year is 
r:i[»idl\ approaching, it might be well 
locouiintnt upon tlu 



evil " eflfectfl 



of the said season. In the past the 
mid-year examinations have been the 
cause of severing the connections be- 
tween a needlessly large nuniber of 
lirst-rate men and the college, truly 
a Ininentable condition of attairs. 
Much hard feeliug directed t«)ward 
the faculty has at such times arisen 
throughout the student ImxIv anil 
I many are inclined to place the entire 
blame upon the shoulders (»f the pro- 
fessors. 

Let us take a look at the situation 
from the standp(»int of the faculty. 
In all walks of the present work-a- | 
dav 'worlil there exists a decidedly i 
important element known as ('ompe-j 
tition against which every employer 
and employe!' must strive ; the for- 
mer in ill! emIeaviM to stand up 
against other but>ines»es, while the 
latter is obliged to compete against 
other men ItHiking for the aame job. 
This applies to college profesnorships 



WHEN CONSIDERING FERTILIZERS 

In connectifji with your studies and experiments, don't fail to ac<)uaint 
\ourself with the wonderful producing and soilnouri-hing proper t 



Write for booklets 
on • 5oll Fertility," 
•• the (irass Crop." 
"I he Apple," etc. 



^ vi!«2Ll!L**h« ^ 






*tHtllj%B^ 



One Dollar invested 
In Hubbard's Bone 
Base l-ertlilzers 
buys as much plant 
food as $1.70 to 
$I.O(i In low grade 
fertilizers. 



THE ROGERS H HUBBARD COMPANY, Middletown, Conn. 

Iinti'c himI \%<>tk>, I'orllMiKl, 4'4,nn. 



C< 



Keeping in Front " 

You fellows know what that means I 
We've been very successful in this 
regard with Fatima Ggarettes. By 
the way, these cigarettes were 6rst 
sold in the colleRC towns — and you 
agreed with us that they were good. 

Then we put out for the big race, 
to make F atimasof nation-wide rep>- 
utation, and today more are sold than 
any other cigarette in this country. 

No purer, or more carefully chosen 
tobacco grows than that in r atimas. 
We purposely put them in a plain 
inexpensive wrapper — in this way 
ue can afford quality tobacco, and 
twer.'.y of the smokes for I 3 cents. 

Now your college crew is of utmost 
i-nportancc to you — so is a good 
cigarette, and it's your aim in life 
to keep Fatimas in the lead right 
up to their good quality — right up 
to where you first found them, and 
NviJI always find them. 

Success fellows! You started this 
cigarette on its successful career — 
' nd you pull a strong oar all over 
this country. 




^ TUBIIISM»UND ^ 

aCARETTES 
20 for i^i 




"Dhtincttr^ Tndindual' 



WITH A CAPITAL T" 

• I'o stale wh.u one sells and to sell whai (me states." should be 
the underlying principle of all business transactions. As the ferti 
li/er industry and all ilie fertilizer ins|)eclion l.iws are now b.ised 
on this principle, the farmer cin feel reasonably snre of gettin;^ 
wh.it lie buys as to the ifuantil\ of plant food in a ton of fertilizer. 
Unfortunately, ofhcial inspection, which is rigidly enforced in every 
Slate, while it reveals the quantity of plant food in a ton, iloes not 
and cannot, in the present state of chemical knowledge, reveal the 
,/Uit/ity that is, the degree of ,n,ii/iil>i/ih. lor the tpiality the 
buyer must still rely upon the integrity of the fiim with whom lu 
deals. Touching this point, the runnrks of the late Professor 
Johnson of Connecticut, the pioneer othci.d feitilizer insjiector. 
Injld gond Referring to quality, he said : 

■ 1 hr only security of purchasers of fritiii/ei'. is m dcdiim 
\vitl> tirms which have the h'uhest reputation ' • * .okI in 
avf>iding 'cheap goods' offered by irrtsponsihlr jj.uiies ' 

Stuiiy the Plant Ftnui foohlfm. 
ThiP( /> .(tpttti/ in it. 



( .i>: 



BOWKER 



FERTILIZER COMPANY 
43 Chatham St., Boston 




. A. SHERARD 

MIEN'S STORE 



Use our new cash discount card 
and save five per cent on 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 



IMPORTANT I 

I h»- most |>ractical present tf» give your brother or sister is one of the 

famous 

Patrick- Dulutli Maokinaws 

Sold at Cost at Campion's the Next 10 Days 



$6.50 Mackinaws for $4.00 

$9.00 Mackinaws for $6.50 

$10.00 Mackinaws for $7.25 

$12.00 Mackinaws for $8.00 

200 Suits and Overcoats to be cleaned up at cost 

No goods charged at the above prices. 

CAMPION -TWO COLLEGE STORES 



'i\ 






■iiWi 




The Collefe Signal, Tuesday, January 20, 1914. 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 20, 1914. 



The Holyoke Valve 3. Hydrant Co. 

jobbers of Wroiitjbl ifoii and Hr«s> I'lpr, \'alve> 
ind Kitliiius 111' Mt-atii. Wal<-r ;triil (ia*. ^^Ijfstos 
and M^gne-^u limltr unil I'ipe CnvL'tiiiKS. t'ipe 
Cut to Sketch. Mill Siippllf-s Kn^jiiceis ;iiKi 
Contractors for Steam and Hot \\ ali-i Ke.iliii^, 
Automatic Sprinkler Systems, Holier and KiiHue 
Connections. Holyoke, Mass. 



The TMERS EXCHiGE 



Of flffSfOH 



1 20 Bi>vliton St. 



Recommenils Teachers, Tutors and Schools 



C^rp^n-tcr & Morehouse, 

PRINTERS, 



No I. Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Students Attention ! ! ! 

We are read\ at tlu- start to furnish you with a fine 
line of Campus and Fraternity House Views, also Post 
( .irds. Kocl.ik work given prompt and careful attention. 
Kniarging and picture framing given our personal at- 
tention. See us alwut (Iroups and Portraits for the very 
best work. 



Satisfaction Guaranteed, 
the Square Deal Studio 



Patronize 



KINSMAN'S COLLEGE STUDIO 



Nash DlocK, Amherst 



H. M. RtM.ERs. 15, Ajjcnt. 
87 Pleasant St., 



Studio Phone 303-2. 



I 

m 



1,6 



'11S|; 



\l 




GRAND SWEEPSTAKES TROPHY 



(f750.00 Sterling Silver Cup) 
r OR 



BEST STATE EXHIBIT OF POTATOES 




AT THE 



New York Land Show 



1912 



WON BY 

The LL Cleveland Company 

HOULTON. Mc. 

/"^NK of the largest and most 
reliable seed potato houses 
in the United States. Competi- 
tion open to the entire United 
States and Canatla. Messrs. E. L. 
Cleveland Company also won the 
First Prize for Best County Exhibit 
of Potatoes. <Siiwr Cup valued 
at ,$'.*()().W. ' 
The F. L. Cleveland Coinpanv use 

L FRANK COE 
FERTILIZERS 



E. Frank Coe Fertilizers have 
been the business fanner's favorite 
for over fifty-five years. Why not 
follow the example of these lead- 
ing commercial potato growers. 

t»« nnrtu '" ■•• I III, \,,,f\,,f \ I'riifilithir I'Dtiilo 
f^ritp" »wfii«-iihj Mn 4rniiMiM»li *tMiii«». tlitlit* fmrmrr^ 



The Coe-Mortimer Company, 



SI CHAMBERS STREET, 
NEW YORK. N. Y. 



just as much as to any other form of i RESOLUTIONS. 

hiisiness nn<l the professor who turns WtereuJi, It hath pleased (J«iliij 
out men poorly trained is forever His infinite wisdom to take into 
menaneed bv the elUeient iustruetor. »Ii">»tdf the father of oin- beloved 

'iM t 1 '1 -.1 .1 !„„:....» .,...i.« f>"K'»d and biulher, Lewis Pli 'lips 

I hat eou|)led with the desire to make ; ,. , , •.. ' 

. . , , , Howani, be it 

an ellieientlv truined man out of tlie ,, , , ,,,, , ^, , 

lieHoh'i'd^ I hat we, the membesof 
material at hand i)rompls the i)iofess- ^,,^. Umbda (hi Alpha fraternitv . do 



or in regard to his work as much as 
possible. It must be remembered 
that even in this institution there 
are exceptions to this rule but for- 
tunately such exceptions are a rarity. 
On the side of the undergraduate 
there is a constant muttering against 



extend to our brother and to lii^ be- 
reaved family our sincere and li«art- 
felt sympathy in this their h<..!.if 
grief, and be it further 

Hesol red , That a copy of thetie 
resolutions be sent to our l»eii iveil 
brother and to his family, thul a 
copy be published in the Cm 1 ki,> 



professional action which will entail [ SKiSAi., and that a copy be tih -I it 



any real work. There is a tendency 
to avoid anything pertaining towartl 
coiisistant study an<l yet when the 
testing perioti arrives louiplaints 
conic ill from all sides against the 
" designing " professors who are in 
reality trying to make the men profi- 
cient along at least one line. No 
teacher living can hand out knowl- 
etlge on a silver platter anti no man 
who calls himself a college student 
can ex|>ect to gain any gfxxi from 
his course unless he meets the faculty 
at least half way. Do that and then 
if a professor oversteps the Itonnds 
of etiquette there uic l;<.-h| grounds 
fur a •' come back 



the reconU of the (iamma Zt la of 

the Lambda Chi Al|iha fraternit 

Mi.'KKAV 1). Lincoln, i ,, . 

Mkkton C . Lank, ., . 

/, ..f . i rratermtv. 

C IIAKI.KS W. t I KTIN, ) 



\V/ifreu.i, It has pleased fiuil in 
His infinite wisdom to take unto 
Himself the father of our beloved 
friend an«l classmate. Charles Holt 
(lould, be it 

Jteaolved, That wc, the iiuiiiImms 
of the class of I'Jlft, do extend to 
our classmate our sincere syininit' 
in this, his hour of sorrow ; mikI ;>. 
it further 

liesiilved. Thitt a copy of thchc n-i- 
olutions be sent to our ber»'.t\e<l 
classmate, that a copy be filed in the 
records of the class, and that > 1 npv 



There is still time to get in some !„. publisheil in the Coi.i.F.riK .S|..nvi 



solid work on the piehCiit semester 
courses and siicli woik will not be 
wasted. The college cannot afford 
to los«' so many men each year as has 
lieeii the ease in the past, but that is 
entirely up to the student ImhIv. If 
the men will work they can stay in 
college an«l no man should come here 
in the llrst place unle.ts he intends to 
remain for four years. Kvery one 
will admit that the sophomore year is 
a hard one l>ut is that any reason 
why twenty percent, of a class should 
balk when it comes to the finals ? It 
shoiibl not l"c so. There is a great 
deal of personal satisfaction in re- 
ceixing a college diploma and no 
man who completes the four years 
piescrilted will t-ver regret that he 
stayetl to see the thing through. 
Right here is op[>ortiinity for every 
man in M. A. C. to show his loyalty 
to the college. Hit those stiulies, 
clean up the finals, remember that 
yon are in a college and not a "prep" 
Sihool and by sr> doing, with the best 
of vour ability, you are <loing most 
ollicieiitly what each man should do 
and that is to " Boost Old Aggie." 

Kakatii>. 



TlloMA> L HaI!IC<m k- 

Pk.hk/ Simmons, 

.ALKKKII a. (ilOIOSA. 



} Koi tlie 

i ( hiss. 



Whrii.i.s, It has pleased IkmI m 
His infinite wisdom to take unto liim- 
s«.'lf the father of our beloved broth. 
.lames Albert Price, fte it 

/iisiih'fil. That we the iiuiuici- 
of the Phi Sigma Ktippa fraternity, 
do extend to him our sincere sympa 
thy in this his hour of sorrow ;iii<l 
l»e it fiirther 

ItfUftived, That a copy of ih'- 
resolutions be sent to our liin-iveo 
brother, tliat a copy l»e tiled in tli« 
records <»f the fraternity, ami that s 
copy lie |)uldisheii in theC"iit..F 

SKiNAI.. 

Li <ivi. ( ;. |)\\ iK«. » For liif 

Ki»wAKii C. Ki>WAiM>s. \ Kraft niit\ 



STOCKBRIDGE CLUB 

At a business meeting of the Stock- 
Inj.l^e club on Tues4lay night the 
following olliceis were elected for the 
second semester. President, K. M. 
Ingham <if (iraiil>y: vice-president, 
P. v. Whittemorc "f Sunderland; 
secretary ami treasurer, W. C. Ken- 
nedy of Hardwick ; executive com- 
mittee, W. A. Davis of Northfleld 
V. Clark of dranbv. Conn. 



iind K 
'09. 



-II. W. Turner, care Consuelo 
Co.. San Pedro de Macoris, 
Dominican Republic. 



Sugar 



ALUMNI NOTES 
■'.•7. — A son. (i. A Drew, .li.wi- 
ftorn Oct. 2'». I'.H"., to Mr. :in i Mi" 
Drew. 

•01. — .Married. Dec. .il. K^li'li ' 
Smith to Miss Margaret HmHu'I ' 
West Falls Church, Va. M ' 

Mrs. Smith have recently vi-itti 
I^everett and Amherst as part i»f tkir 
wedding trip. After Feb. 1 lliey will 
be at home at Mayague/., P K. 
where Mr. Smith is acting lean of 
the College of Agriculture m li' 
University of Porto Rico. 

'(•2. — Hansom W. Morsi 
four years advertising man -'»'' 
the Worcester Teloqrdiii hn- ti"*' 
charge of the advertising ■!»'!> ' 
ments of Mntnr Tniek, >!' 
Jfninuil and Auto A<'Cff<-'<"''' 
magazines published from t' 
office. His associates in tli' 
uess ollice of the TeJcijrnm imsenti' 
Mr. Morse with a gold waf< !i-'h«in 
as a memento of their frieni-^liil'*' 
the time of his leaving. 



. tiiif 
. bii!»i- 



OVER es YEARS* 
EXPERIENCE 




'or*. — At the annual meeting and 



'18. — Laurence Ueven of North 



Trade Marks 

DeSIGMB 

.... Copyrights Ac. 

rone tending a«k«trh nnd dencrtptlon may 
r,. ir Mcertaln our t>i>iiii..ii free wIh-iIht >u 
, 'ii,,n l» prohalily rmeiitiiMe- Coinnmiilra- 
i ,,trictlT<'<<nil<<«>»l»>- HANDBOOK un i-nlenu 
ll,, I free. Oldest iijreiirr fur iieiuriiiir p«leii(a. 

i-it.>iiis t«ken tlimuKh Muim h, Co. rvcetre 
fp, kU notiet, without c harg e, iu tUe 

Scientific JImericaii. 

« tiiinrt»om<>lT lllniitnited w«.«.klf. I.iire«iit rtr- 

". ,fi,.ii ..f atir »i'ienlino louriiiU. T<tm.^. f:i ■ 
' t Mir nioiitbt, $L Sold brail new xiK-nlem. 

HUNN 4 Co."* »'«-"» New Tort 

Hraucb Office. 636 F BC WMhlDutuii, D. C. 

Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

rtCKKKS. HOITI.TKV l)KKS<iKKS 
A.NU HirTKK M.4Ki-:itS. 

Wlim l-SAI F. MMl-KSIN 

Brel Mutton. Lamb, Veal, Pork, Lard, Ham*, 

Haion, SauaaK**' Poultry, (jame. Butter 

Cheea*. Egga, Beana, 

,it, ? \ ^Uiivi U.jS.S?.}"*. ' & "3 BUclcstonr St. 

l!o>.tiin. l'.«cKinjj House. IttiKhton, Mas*. 

N.ttitra Huultrf Dressini: I'lant, Huston. 

Creameries in Vermont. 



ii vou are nervnu.s about your 

finals, drop in for some 

solid encouragement 

at the 

DOG CART 



DE LAVAl, 

Means a Cream Separator 
With the 'trouble" Left Out 

i at's the way a user who Ii<ik had 
* iui uf personal separator experience 
and the opportunity to ob.Hcrve a ^rcat 
deal of Other pcople'ft experience, 
aptly descrdxTS the meaning <»f the 
ri.ime '• iJe Laval" on a separator — 
' a s-parator with the troulUe left out." 

To many buyers 
of a cream separa 
tor and othtrr farm 
machinery, there's 
more meaning in 
that simple state- 
ment of fact than 
in a hundred other 
cUims and argu- 
ments that might 
easily he made for 
the De Laval. 

And if anyone would know how 
atifl why the "trouble has been left 
"lit of a De Laval machine a new 
l>e i aval catalog -the mo<t complete 
and interesting story of the cream 
sep'Mtor ever published — to l>e had 
for !he asking, will help to make it 
p'a ' See the local agent or address 
the nearest office as fielow. 

THE OE lAVAl SEPARATOR CO. 




VO » K 
1 RANCfSCO 



CHICAGO 
SFATTI,^ 



l>anquet of the College Men's dub Leominster was entirely burned out 
held in Honcdulu, H. I., recently. Thurs^lay, Dec. IK. "'Mev" bought 
between 7A and 100 men were in ' the farm last summer :tnd liad put 
attendance. It may be interesting j consi<lerab|c money in il. The house, 
to note that of all colleges repre- 1 barn, carriage house, horse and 3.'> tons 
sented M. A. C. had the greatest of hay were burned and the prt>perty I 
number, Karle Hartlett '0«, Dave ! was only partly insured, (io to it \ 
Larsen. Putnam *0.'». Hiewer, French ' ""Hev" and if you hold one of thos«' 
and IJonlen 'i:5, being present. : old fashioned barn-raisings in the 
.Music was furnished by the Kameha- 
meha faculty trio (Brewer, French 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Su..Jay Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



spring we will all be there. 

'!;{.— Fretl <;riggs— 130.". Reiser 
and Bonleii M;}) and the Kamehame- 1 ^^ ^, j „i,.,.,^it,. ^,f MisBo.ni, Colum- 
ha faculty .piartet of which Fiemh ; ,,j.^_^,^, working f-.i .Mu^lci-, de- 
gree in Kcoiiomics. 

I.'.. H. W. 1 1 viand, teaching fel- 



liiere are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 



or 



C. R. ELDER 



M.J and Uartlelt oh are members. 
Partridge "10 and Willanl '1 1 were 
unable to be present. 

'07. — A. W . Higgiiis is developing 
a fertilizer trade as a siile-line in 
connection with his greenhouse and 
general farming business at Westliebl. 

'o7. — II. P. \V<mmI is the author' 
of IJ. S. Department <»f Agriculture 
Bulletin 4.'», entitled "F.xperiments 
in the use of sheep i'l the eradication 
of the Itoi'ky Mountain sputteil 
fever tick." 

'07. — Frederick C. Peters is treas- 
urer and direet«»r of the Aidmore 
building and loau ass<M-iation and 
also a directt»r of the lower union Y. 
M. C. A. His addrcsj, is .\rdinore. 
Pa. 

•ot>.— .Mr. and Mrs. A. \V. Iliil.- 
bard announce the birth of :i »on, 
Har<dd Hussell, Dc<-. 2;;, .it Siiu- 
derland. 

'oy. — Mained. Sept. Jo. :it .larnai- 
ca Plain, L. S. (^orbftt i.. .Mi.s»» 
.Mabtd Campbell. 

'10. — I.4iwrence S. Dickinson, di- 
rector of the i'«dlege grounds and 
Miss Va\\{\\ Morgan, daughter uf Mr. 
aiui Mrs. William II. II. .Morgan of 
Amherst, were united in marriage at 
(irace church, Amherst. Dee. •.'<;. 

'10. — II. R. Francis, formerly with 
the landsca|)e department of the Kim 
Citv nurseries, was engaged to take 
up the teaching of landscape gardeo- 
tng in the .Scluxd of Forestry at Syr- 
acuse university Dec. I. 

'11. — 0. P Nlekerson has fwen 
appointed 2d Lieut. V S- Cavalry 
and assigned to the I llh Cavalry on 
the Mexican border. .Xddress Care 
Adjutant (Jeneral liiited States 
Army, Washington, D. C. 

'12.— Herbert .1. Stack is assisUot 
principal of the Wallingford (Conn.) 
high school with some graduate work 
at Yale in Physics and Kngineering. 

'12. — Charles C. Pearson is now 
with K. Naumberg & Co., bankers of 
New York and Hartford. Conn. His 
address is box \f>'.K Hartford. Conn. 

'12.— William K. Philbri<k is now 
with Mf)rell »V Nichols, landscape 
engineers of Miuneajwlis, .Minn. 
Address Palace Building. 

•|3.__\V. Sfiiart Moir is teaching 
natural sciences at Kndeavor acad- 
emy. Kndeavor. Wis. He intends 
to take up graduate work in forestry 
at Yale next year. 

'13,_Frederick D. fJriggs is tak- 
ing graduate work at the I'niversity 
of Missouri. 



low in zoology at Oi»'gt»u Agricultu- 
ral cidlege.t orvallis. ( Megon — ••|daii- 
iiing trip to Alaska f«)r next summer." 



The Highland Hotel 

Corr«-r ol Hiltiii;in ami ll.«rrir» Sti»^t*, tlitv.' 
!,{... L .. I toni tt..' r III,, II Ofuot, l** a tiMMl<-t ti Im»i, 
1. M I'Un. I •>(r|. 

Ir Mini tin- '■ • 'lll^^ 

4II<1 4«'l HI III. IClit,! ol til.- l»^l^lIlt■■^» lll>tlll t 

Iti trxjiii'. .ii>' »<'il flioiittifiJ ami coiiiiMil.ililr. 
tiaviRK ■* I ">d l*"l >'><l *■"''' 'U'oo")^ 

«rat«i in •■ rrite* •! jiwl \\v loom* 

with bath on^cli . al.Ao «nd up. 

ItH.'toll.-iit cui'Mi. .« ■'. «»»-ll vmtilatcrl (tinini! 



fhlim o( thf hiuli-*! ijiiility. <*,■ 4iiil 

'.rivml in till- iMftt |> i«>ti)li' tiuinnri 

St.«v .il til"- MiKhland II.H' I '■■n • »«ll 

fv. riiiiv; 

D. H. SIEVERS, 

HlahlMii.l II. .1.1 -j,. mull' I.I. »l»--. 



, .., \ mm* 

StKIMIIO.V I.vni I'ol.uKK 

»l AJ«l'rA«-llMI ^<. •'• %V KI.KK 
|K<> IIUOA l»\V \ V. Ni;\v V<»l<l% 

«l,l II \ N l» ««»l.l.l'.«. !•. 
|'INS% .\NI» U I.N. I. "-I .J* 



r«<»l l«. .at I V >- II . 



1 1 1. ■ 1 % / I M t- 



The Connecticut Valley 
Street Railway 



From Amherst, via Northampton, 
through the Hatfields. p.ist the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Ml., alongside the 
famous Hloody Mrook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield. thence to (Ireen- 
field, Turners Falls aixl .»< ros.s ihe 
" Plains ■' to Lake I'ieasanl. .Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 



50 Miles of Trackage Hodern 
f-.quipment Train Dispatch' 
ing System -Freight and Ex- 
presA Service over entire line. 



Connecticut Valley Street Railway 
Company 



EWELL'S 

STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPETS 

Largest assortment in New Kn- 
gland of Special Siudeit t utnisihings. 

LOWKR KXPKNSKS Knable us 
to offer .in absolute lower pru e 

AMHERST FURNITURE 



A.MI» 



CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



cox SONS 

— ANI» — 

VINING 

73 74 .Madison Avenue, New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

liest Materials and Workmanship 

WOODWARD'S 




LUNCH 



s; Main St., Masonic BIdg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Cht*d only from i A. M. to 4 A.M. 

Toefil Mientka 

Shoes Shliieii agd Pollsteii 

Make old shoes took like new 

Neat, classy workmanship 

Op«D flandhy Main St. 

On way to P«it Offic«. 







M )4 m><-i 



1 1 



ii 



The College Signal, Tuesday, January 20, 19 14 



M. A.c. Seal The Massachusetts Agricultural College 

ClQr3iI*fii'f"f^^ Offers courses of instruction in twenty six teaching 

^ departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science- 



BENSON & HEDGES' 
25c 



MAKAROFF 
15c 





Agriculture 




Horticulture 




Agronomy 




Floriculture 


• • 


Animal Husbandry 




Forestry 


I • 


Dairyimg 




Landscape (Jardening 




Poultry Hust)andry 




Pomology 




Agricultural Che 


niistry 




Econo 


mic Entom 


ology 




Plant 


Physiology 


and Pathology 




Agricultural Education 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

Hi^h-Grade Colle^f Work 
LAUNDRY 



Shiru, 






10 


15c 


Collars, 
Cuffs, - 
Plain wash. 
Same, rough 


dry. 


- 


2 

2 
48c per 
JOC per 


I-2C 

1 ,:c 
(loz. 
do/. 


DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 


Steam 
Dry Cleaninfj 


Pressing, 50c 
; and Pressing, 


a Suit 
#1.50 a 


Suit 



M W. BitewKH. \ . ]. CiKGo. 

Put full name aad address on laundry 

AMHERST BOOK STORE 



A Student may specialize in ihe following subjects 



For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYQN L. BUTTERFIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



Joiut Committee on lut»Mi-ullfglat4' Athletics, 

'J'be College Senate, 

FootbuU AMSix-itiliou, 

BaaebuU Attsociution, 

Track AstMX-iution, 

Hockey AttiMM'iatiua, 

Tcuniti A»tH>ciation, 

Hide club, 

Roister iioisters 

Musical Association, 

Niueteeu lluudred Fourteen Index, 

Niueteeu Hundred Fifteen Index, 

M. A. C. Christian Association, 

M. A. C. Cutliolic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

8to<-k bridge Club, 



Philip H. .Smith, Secretary 

I). W. Jones, Piesident 

J. A. Price, Manager 

G. D. .Melicau, Manager 

E. C txlwards, Manager 

J. I). I'ellett, Manager 

H. K. MacLaiu, Manager 

.J. r. Oertel, President 

I). .]. Ia'wIs, Manager 

U. I). Brown, Manager 

K. S. Clark, Jr., Manager 

H. M. Kogers, Manager 

li. H. Powers, President 

I). A. Coleman, President 

J. I). Pellett, President 

N. ii. Uearing, President 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELER AND OPTOMETI isi 

Lenses ground white you wait 
College Jewelry 
Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and Guitar >ttin^ 

AMIlKKiiT, MAKK. 
Next to Post Oftice. 



STEAM FITTING, Telephone VH. 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

P. W. Dance & Co. 



Specialty of Repairing 

Church Winiwws, 
Memorial Windows, 
Leau Lights, &c. 
( Clifton Avfc, AMHERST. MASS 

Wf-itflmt dis r>itMon 

Catalogues of 

F'ctll A A^rltmter Ooocia 

Are Out. Copy mailed to any address in!;.,-. 
Students and Athletr* who want the (f(l . • 
articles (or the various sports should ir 
those Ijcarinu the Wright &. Ditson i i.i •- M. . 



Skat'KShoci 
Sweaters 
Jerxcys 
Uniforms 
for all spurts 

Wright &. Ditson Goods are the ^tandard Ivi 
alt sports 

%v^Mio»i*r se i>i'r«<>x 

U4 Washington St., Bost«>n, M4" 



Foot Ball 
Baaket Ball 
Hockey 
Skates 




Loose • Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 

Before buying elsewhere, see our assort- 
ment of pennants and banners 

CUKKAN A DYER. Props. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green, 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations,violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300 



U^hen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



Barsalotti & Gentoso 

Cigars Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresh Candy 

Ice Cream, Fruit, 3oda, Etc. 

The Right Goods at the Right Prices 

Open till II o'clock EVERY night 

C*racr Amity and Plesaant Stre«t* 



If yon want to be 

MOLIII WITH THK OIKL8 

yoa must have your clothes |*rcs;>o<l and cleaned 

ATBPSTBZlf'S 



11 Amity St. 



Maroon Store 



PrMalog and Cleaning a apeclalty 

Moat liberal ticket syateni In town 
Tol. 303-11 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of **Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1424-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



THE TERPSY PARLOR 

C1.EANSING. 

PRESSING. 

REPAIRING 

Quiekrat Mrvlcv. Brat Work, L.o«i-»l ITI" 

All wolk carefully done. Work calM lof »"« 
delivered, (ients' overcoats, suits, iwntt ii>d 
coats, ladies' hn« linen suits a spccialtv 

Teams will call every day at M. A (. 

Wn. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rear Na«h Bl'k, Amiicrst. 



T«il(s.3M 



CARS 



Leave AOtilE COLLEGE (or HOL- 
YOKE at 15 min. |Mst the hour. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AQOIH COL- 
LEQE at 7 and 37 mIn. past the hour. 

Spocisl Car* at R—o — Ma Ratas 



AMHERST & SUNDERLAND SI. BY. CD 

For a Daily and Sunday Newspaptf 
You should Read 
TUB 

Springfield Republiao 

While you are at college in .Amhersl. 

It ha* all of Thr M . A. C. New* 

Tlip lU-Ki MporlltiK New* 

Full General Newa 

A StrotiK Kditorlal Pace 

InterestlnK feature* 

It la a Kesl Newapaper 

Daily, 3 cents ; 70 cents a m« 
a quarter. 



Sunday, 5 cents; 50 cents a > 

Subscribe by mail or through the Aii 
dealer. 



after, 
-rst >'•>■ 



FEB;> ^^"^^ 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL^^ 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEOE 



XXIV. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, I'tbruary 3. 1914. 



No. 17 



HOCKEY TEAM WINS 

Spiingfield by Small Score. Poor 
Ice Mars Game. 

'I'll!' .M. A. ('. hockey tejirn was 

:ijjain victorious in the gniue played 

-t the Y. M. ('. A. college at 

-, i^lield on .Jan. 21. The low 

I ~ 

, . c,f L'-(i wai» dtie toa large extent 
M poor ice on the Y. M. t . A. 

i ,. game was the scrappiest tluit 
ilu >|»riiigtlelil team lias put n|) for 
.4 liiiiij time. They played a defen- 
A\i: game for the most part but occ«- 
-loiiaHy Patterson and Bowers would 
worli \ht puck up near Aggie's g<»»l 
rut Ruttrick was right <»n the job. 
.Mti.ill the Springfield goal tendei 
|>iit up a giKHl game but twii of 
.ioiu-s' shots went by him. 
For the first half the ice was very 
uijli and the puck was in Hpring- 
tii'ld'«« territoiy mo.Ht of the time. 
Ni) M^-oring was ilone until near the 
t>n<l of the period when .loiies shot 

-<t goal. 
I lie ice was 8crape<l between the 
!■« and the Spiingtield playera 
I .... .id here with a determination to 
ke<«p the H<>ore down and put up a 
i:ti>py game. Hoss was injurtKl and 
luce was taken by Neeilham. 
.I'»u« n made the most seiiMational play 
' \\"' liame in this half when lie shot 
a- |(iick right Ihniiigh the .Springlichl 
t«>am and i)ast Mc<till f«»r the seeoiid 
..«l. 
rill' line-up : 

MASiSACHtlhBTTS. 



THE ATHLETIC FIELD REPORT 

By Committee, Shows a Total of Over Five Thousand Dollars 
Pledged. Contributions by Classes Show Close Competition. 



g. Mcnm 

P, Wiisun 
cp, Cochmtie 

r, liowcrs 

c, Patterson (Capl.) 

Iw, Eltis 

rw, Kadie 

^ 'f - .Mas.s,.. ,.,i-,ctti 2 Springfield o. 

made— by joiits j Umpires — 

i.Hi(e and Kriedlund. Kelcree— first 

"•*H, Nredhain ; second half, Ailicck. 

Time 20-iiimute half and 15 minute hall. 



<iham, p 
(chihaW, cp 

-■>n, r 

•V^.i, C 
.bison, I w 

' ilm. rw 



^ RIFLE MATCHhS. 

„ <ii' M. A. C itid<»«i ride team is 

^ I -iii^ (he high marks that it 

.^'a •■ itf«elf during the first of the 

•<* •"! and is turning in record scores 

> M il of the matches. .Minneaota 

2 tt I" aten with a score of '.>.'»7. 

:r« Jm oaehing of (Iiinnery-sergeant 

M ^hiii\ei w;iM veiv e\ idi'iit in 

^'"' M 1. I". luMtcii wlii'li a tell iii.tii 

*"'•' '■ I'.MC. was made. This i.s 

till' largest ten men score 

l>y a colU'tf*' tcMiii on the 

'''tv i...,t range, llotis easily led the 

'earn ivith the remarkable score of 

'•'8. Ciptain Dunbar coming in sec- 

Jod w th 19.5. A total of 970 was 

inadt the first five. 



[Continued on page 2] 



The following lepor 
Field Committee. It 
an earlier date, but it 

71 
72 
73 
74 
7/1 
76 
77 
78 
79 

m 

81 
82 
83 

84 
8.5 

8r> 

87 
88 
89 
'.»0 

in 

»2 
93 
94 
95 
9fi 
97 
98 
99 
00 
01 
02 
•03 
04 
0.5 
06 
07 
••08 
09 
10 
II- 
12 
13 
H 
U 
Ifi 
17 
In.-. 

Total ^nderg^ldll;ltt^s 

Total Alumni 



t embodies the fust liiiaiicial HtatemiMit of llie .\tlileti<- 
was ho{>ed that such a statement could be insiied at 
has seemed best to defer It uiiti' this time. 



2'1 

16 

10 

9 

17 

17 

8 

\U 

6 

7 

12 
27 
10 
4 
9 
12 
18 
19 
12 
Ifi 
16 

21 
30 

28 

to 

14 
19 
25 
21 
24 
20 
29 
29 

n 

.J7 

m 
43 

42 

82 
IK) 

98 
1 11.^ 
lid 
200 

23 
.'.66 
996 



I'.ii.i. 

95 <N) 
160 00 

.•|0 Wi 

m 00 

2.'i 00 

3 00 

\m 00 



« 00 
20 w> 



IKH) 00 



1(H) (K) 
2.'i <H> 



i.t.i ; 

.•^ . 00 

inu 00 

..0 00 

.•»0 (M) 

•_'.. no 

. , I II I 

■>0(l 00 



10;. 00 
45 00 



'1 m 



h 00 



20 00 

.'1 00 

10 00 
10 00 



h 00 
!."• fM) 
\'o 00 

\h m 
479 00 

231 75 
226 ii'i 
270 62 
464 90 

II OH 

1.210 79 
1,101 (HI 



.'iO 00 

.!.-. (Ml 

1.'. nil 

.'i21 m 

181 2.'. 

238 01 

311 2.'» 

69.*» 7.'. 

i.j2<; 2<; 

s~i; (1(1 



,50 OC* 

5 00 

1.*. 00 

80 00 

\'i m 

I .'(• (Ml 

1,0<MI 00 
416 00 
461 :>:{ 

:>H\ HI 

1,1 r.o (•„", 

14 (K) 

2,r,:j7 o.'i 

I.;i'<n Of) 



.'(0 (Ml 



.■»0 (10 



Final totals. 



\<A\ me 



20 00 


2 


3 m 


1 


to fNI 
10 (K» 


1 

1 



I 
I 
i 
1 

8 
.1.1 
1*0 

:>« 
I2;t 

\HH 
."> 

.-.oj 

m 



Tot.il alumni .V iind. I.-.62 2,314 7:' J,.;n.'_'ii .f.CjTo.-, •,•);{ 

Hecreation }ZiM>in.l fun-l IMI.h nl ;t!ts (i| 

Kririiil of ci*)!!'^!' 



• I ill. ,;l.^.<.r 

reavin no itflniitc 
committee. 

•* It IS kinwn th.it th« c'.i-- >: i 



$3,312 80 g2,3.')2 26 U,t]{\:, oC, 

'"span"sibility foi tli.' buiMin^ •'! m entrance i; ''• ' ■" Oii* 
.t Pi- iM 1 t.;r is siill 1" the hands ot tlie cla*» 

. nri i . ■ ■ 



[Continued on page 2.] 



RELAY TEAM NEWS 



First Race Lost by Small Margin. Tri- 
angular Match This Week. 

The Atrjiie lelav lost to TuflB at 
the C'oa.Ht Artillery torps track mt^et 
held at the South .\rmorv in Uoston, 
.Ian. 21. The .Medloid collegians 
obtained a substantial lead on the 
set-ond relay and niaintainetl it to the 
finish. Captain Nieolet ami his men 
worked hard, but they were up agHinst 
a stronjj; eoml>iiiation. Sturtevant, 
the freshman member «»f the team led 
otY with McClellan <«f Tufts, these 
two furnishing' the prettiest ami hard- 
est fought tw«> laps of the evening, 
riie former secured the pole with 
the Tufts man close behind. On the 
second stieteh lie ranged alongside 
and for nearly half a lap they ran 
neck and neck but, although .McClel- 
lan strained every nerve and crowtled 
sturtevant on the corners, he wan 
unable to get the |Mde. 1 In fresli- 
itian gradtiiilly pulhd away on the 
seeond lap aiiil handed a 10 yard 
lead to Nicolel. I he Aggie captalu 
was op|Mised U> Slalb.id, reputed to 
Ue Tufts' fastest man, and conhl not 
It4»ld tlie leati hMlttg an additional 10 
ynrtls. .Smith an«l Mosiroin, toe 
remaining two Aggie men, ran hard 
and well, holding their own, but Ihey 
eould not cut d«»wnlhehad that Staf- 
fonl ha«l earned. The time for tito 
dislanci> of 1320 yards wan 2 min. 48 

2-.'» Se< . 

'The team i«» eiileied in the li A A. 
names iMinrring t>u Saturday even- 
ing in lioHton and wilt iw op|M>!M!d to 
Worceater Polyteetmit* ami B«»slaB 
olle^. Ill I I '.40 yani triangular 
relay. This i> a ileparluie from the 
customary entry whuii included only 
\S , 1*. I. Ikith of thest! teams ap- 
peared at the Coant Artillery meet 
and won their rat'ca, VV. P. 1. wlo* 
iiiiig over Wesleyan and lloston Col- 
lege beating out l{li<sle Island Slate. 
The time was in each case faster 
than that made by Tufts. Itoston 
Boston Ctillege and \\ i' I ni. t at 
the Irish Ameiicau games last ,Sat- 
iirdav. the former winning over the 
l.'i'.lO yard distance in the fast lime of 
:» mm. 20 l-.'i aec. Coach Dick- 
inson has the wpiad out every after- 
noon .iiiil liiiir tii.iis will decide the 
four who will make the trip. 

Ill addition to the relay at the Const 
Arlillery games. .Sturtevant and Nic- 
olel were entered in the 7.'> yard han- 
dicap dash. The former with a han- 
dicap of six t'c<!t won his trial heat, 
but was .>«liiit out in the Hemi-liiial. 
Nicitlff did not place in his heat. 

'01. — r. ('. |{r<M»ks has cli.inged 
his residence from 1H2H Kiidid 
avenue to 2.">'.l West I'ltli street., 
Chicago Heights, 111. 



™ 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 3, 1914. 



i 



i 



THE ATHLETIC FIELD REPORT 

(Ciiiitiniied fioiii ikiK'' '• 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 3, 1914. 



$2.00 Skatt's, 
$300 Skates. 



All Mctiial fund in available cush aniomitiug to ??;$312.MU is now on hand. 
This, (»f course, doos not inc'hi(it' oiitstamliiig pledges. Ail <<>n8idi'it'd, 
this is far from discouraging. More than two-thirds of this amount comes 
eitlier from students now in college, or is derived from funds cieate<l by 
students in the past. The uluinni as vet haxi- scarcely had an opportunity 
to realize that an athletic flehl is au a.ssured thing and to get in their con- 
tributions. It is earnestly urged that this I.e done as soon as possible. 
The committee fully appreciates that the appeal f<»r funds had to be issue*! 
at a rather ino|»portune time, and that many willing contributors are still in 
the background. The spirit and enthusiasm shown by those who have 
already answered has been very encouraging. 

The We<reation (Jround Fuiul was founded in I'.MO by K. Karnum Damon, 
at that time business manager of the C'ollkok .Shjnai., from surplus earn- 
ings of his paper ; later I'lirk W. Allen, business manager in 1 '.» 1 1 , atlded 
his surplus. The committee in charge of this Recreation (i round Fund 
have voted to contribute the »ntirc fund, amounting to ?'.tl>M.(U . if left to 
diaw interest until .luly tiist. as the nucleus for the athletic tield. 

Some ipiehtions have been raised in regard to the funds now held by the 
old M. A. ('. Alumni Athletic .Vssociation. While no definite statement 
can be made at this time the funds amounting to ab<mt »1.'>(M) will probably 
be tiuiieil ..ver tveiitually to the new organization. In which case the 
amounts originally paid in by each stock boliler plus the acciimulatetl inter- 
est will be credited to them and also to the classes of which they are iiieiii- 
bers in the same manner as the present contributi«>ns. 

However, it is urueiitlv necessarv lliat the committee, liv some means, 
gain an apiu'oximate itiea of the extent to which the aid of the alumni may 
be expected I'liis affords an opportunity for those who wish to send in j ^ , 

their donation at once, while others can imiicatc the amount which may be llnnypr Ju \rn|tn 110 
hK>ked f..i within the time limit indicated. JIUUfUl W Ulllllll UUl 



PAGE'S SHOE STORE 



INVENTORY SALE! 



$1.50 $3.50 SkaiiiiiT Shoes. $2.75 

$2.25 ?^5.oo Tan Shoes, $3.9H 

Repairing— Goodyear System 



J AIMl^ 



1* A i;t 1 



THE 



MASSACHUSETTS AGRICULTURAL COLLEGE 
JOINT COMMITTTEE ON INTERCOLLEGIATE ATHLETICS 

ATHLETIC FIELD FUND 

J . . do contribute 

*» • •'**'* '" ' pledge to pay on or 

befoif .May 1. I'.tll. ihr Mini of ?« , to be ii«ird f..i tin- ctnistriiction 

tif the Athletic Field. 

Date . I'.MI. 

Tear out. till ixit. and iflnni to ( iiii\ ^. Hicks, toiMi.il Manager of 

Athletics. 



RIFLE MATCHES 

'Contm • 



The scores are as follows : 

Standing. I'rtnp. 

Hulis. '.»« 1(»0 

DiiulMr, Capt. .•<; '.»'.) 

Clarke. u;J UK) 

Lane, t»3 HKI 

Whitmore. 'J.'l !♦« 



lotal. 

Miti 
IDS 



The Harvard match *vhich has just 
t>een completed finds th«! total but 
one point less than that of the Tech 
sho«)t giving a record of '.♦fi!! which 
was an easy victory. 

The score : 



Standing I'ronf 



r»tal 



Dunbar. 


C: 


ipt. 


'.»7 


9s 


19:. 


Upton, 






'.».'» 


100 


195 


Clarke. 






9o 


jm 


193 


Hv.lf. 






94 


99 


193 


Wether! 


>ee 




9.". 


100 


193 



im;9 

MaMBchitsetts and Michigan A. ('. 
are tied for tirst place, and this 
week's shoot will probably decide the 
supremacy of the league. 

hi. i:. A. Back, '04. of the De- 
paitment of Agricultuie. injw sta- 
tioned in Hawaii, spent a few days 
around college during the Christmas 
vacation. 



COMMUNICATION 

I'o IIIK Kl'ltoi; ,i| TlU Sl<,\\l.. 

/Mir Sir : 

Kvery year at this time we hear the 
Hame old <r\ of half a hundred 
"rtnnk outs" with their half a hun- 
tlred excuses togethei with their pro- 
testations for liel|» to the college 
Senate and the various professors. 
Urged on !i\ sympathizing fraternity 
brothers and upper classmen they 
soon imagine themselves the most 
cruelly persecuted of martyrs. The 
idea that each year .sees a higher 
standard for passing has l>»'eii fos- 
tered until it is actually believed by 
those who know better. Have we 
forgotten the hockey season (»f I'.Ml- 
\'2 when every one of the present 
seniors pl.'\ying on the teams was out 
oD account of studies? Again, the 
idea that men should Ik- permitted to 
take the final regardless of whether 
th«y reached the mark of fiO or not 
.seems to be fairly popular. This fea- 
ture seeni to ]<,- an all-im|K>rtant one 
in keeping a student working through- 
out the course for the larger part of 
the student body now electing a 
course would simply loaf through the 
semester and resort to *' cribbing" 
oi ••cramming" to pass the final. 

Thirdlv. should the value of the final 



6i6 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 

Diamond Merchants 

PMIadelpMi's Official Fntiriiti JeweJer 

8PBOIALISTSIN 

Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prizes Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs. Seals, 

Rings, Charms.-. 

E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass 

orrtcm lious.* 

i>t<> lU A.. .%1. I.Xt4 ttoSft'.^f* 




Che 

Pheasant 

Bmtt^ St.. 
BmbCTrt 

T«Wph<>ne 470 



BRBAKrAST 

LUNrHSOM 
ArTFRNOON TKA 

l>inner if mrri 



tM. 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 

Now at 13 Pleasant St. 



Oculists' Prescriptrons Filled 

Broken Lenses .Accurately Replaced 
Fine Watch Repairing I'romptU ai:«! 
Skilfully Done 



Sati^action Guaranteed 



HAVE YOU EVER STOPPED TO THINK THAT 

'•The etl'eit of your message greatly depends 
upon the style and f|uality of your Stationery?'' 

You are mort- often judged !)\ the paper you use than by t! 
tliouf^hts you express in writing. Pride, good ta^tt^ retinemenl- a 
demand that you use Stationery thai is distinctive, stylish, good. 

SYMPHONY LAWN WRITING PAPER 

("().MKS in .1 wide variety of beautiful tinl.s, modish shapes ■•■ 
correct sizts. So rarely good that its use will help establish you i- 
a person of excellent good tSste in the minds of those you write t' 



Price per Ix^x (all tints i, 



50c 



THE HENRY ADAMS CO., Dnigeists 



The REXALL Store 



ON THE CORNER 



lowered? We can see cases in ele- 
iitMiy work ill which there aiereei- 
ii(Hi8 and iiiiiiierdiiH ({iiiz/es where 
!^ plan could he sulopted, at the iu- 
iictor's discretion, hut »m u college 
iixlnrd we believe that the present 
!i( V should prevail. Will you not be 
odder to graduate from an institu- 

II whose Htaiidards are among the 
jlirst ill the country, and wlicic the 

(liriile to survive ban been fierce 

III to receive a diploma from au in- 
-iitution where entrance is easy, ex- 
iiiiiiiations siinplc. and degrees a 

lice? 

The tact tlint .mi iiiaii\ iiiin fail in 
III- examinations demands a reason. 
- it that they arc not pio|»erly 
:,iij;hf:' We doubt it. I> it that 
lliey tl«» not stiitl\ pi«HH'ily? I*r«)b«- 
! Iv this applies to isutiie of them. Is 
,1 because tlu-s are not properly pre- 
{•ared? It is our idea that this solii- 
loll will take care of a huge |K'rcen- 

■J,,' of the unfortunate oius. The 
jiivilegc of certification i-. an abused 
one. The principals of many liigli 
m'ImmiU grantcertilicates to applicants 
vMthn mistaken sense that they are 
In ipiiig them when, in truth, to put 
!t ligiiratively, they are st-nding them 
to the front with no ammunition. 
When lliis fa<*t is realised an»l those 
- lioiiU vvliH'h I'citify ineligables, are 
ieprivad of the right v\ii<> < ontiniie it 
I lit- iiiiml>er of mid-year tlunk outs 

lid faihires will be materially 

!• ;t>ed. Kitt in the mean 

. Ul us forget to sob ami 



moan at fate and the "profs" who 
have "stuck "us an<l get to work, 
for a new semester with the resoln- 
that"once 'stuck' is enough." 



Si Mel!. 



ALUMNI ! TAKE NOTICE! 

The annual reunion and dinner of 
the .M. A. ('. Abimiii Club of Massa- 
chusetts will be held at the American 
House. Boston, on Friday, Feb. I. "5, 
l".»14 at r> o'chx U, !•. M. The college 
• |Uaitet will be there to sing the songs 
you like t<i hear and every Aggie boy 
will have a chance to sing them t<Ki. 

Speakers : Prof. Kdward M. l.a;wis, 
Acting President. M. A. C ; Prof. 
Curry S. IIi<ks, Dire* toi ol Physical 
Kdiication and Hygiene: Philip il. 
Smith ';»7, and Haiohl M. (ioie .\:\. 
Kvery alumnus is rei|uested to urge 
the attendance of ever\ other alumnus 
within reach. Talk to them. Write 
them. Come yourself. 

Hkkkkiei I.. Wiim . 'it'.t. 
Clerk. M A ( A. ( . M. 



ALUMNI DAY 
A < oinmittee of students and fac- 
ulty IS planning for the annual 
Alumni Day program to be carrieii 
out oil .Saturday, Fell. 2>«. The sub- 
eommittees follow . Athletic events 

— F,. C. h^lward- 11; tiitertainment 

— D. .1 l,ex*i- "I ', sup|H'r — .1 (1. 
liutchiiisoii 'II; reeeptiiMl — D. W. 
.I<»nes "H ; publicity — C K. Wheeler 
*ll. Watch the Siusal foi further 
announce uients. 




THI 
SMOOTH 



Alhhj ...forts — 



^'hcn I xt\ fuiows get tocel 
llipn V-^v. t a eupreme This m. 
r^rbleaf Itdotiuugin the Waicltouic 
over two ycurs — a tremer.doii* 
fliangc — i.n harshnc^ is nulli.'irc' — 
iKc leaf gfo%» s rich — rcmaxkabi ■ 
• i^lh — an J in tK« pipe, Y"- c^ ' 
what a smok ! It's tco moolH to 
ntt' — too mellow l^ b*^ f-^vthing bvt 
♦' f best smf keen <-•"•' 'lhat'»Y/\-f 
its called Velvet. One tia is & 
tevclatioa. At all dealers. 




> . £ ounce 
^^.^^■&t 5 cent:, 

r mvenicnt 

iof cigfarctls 



%3aol- r* 



Full Two 
Ounce Tu^ 



Maekinaws 



AND 



Sweaters 



Thi.s is .Mackinaw atui Sweater sea-son. Kootball, Golf" and 
all other Fall and VV'inter spoits call lor good .Sweater pro- 
tection. Wf h.iNt' in stuck t(i(l.i\ sc\ci.il luiiiiircd Maeki- 
naws in all gi.ulcs. 



'I'iic lainous .Summit hiand.wcll ktuiuii in the Ntutliwcst 
and acknowledged to In* one of the bi>t. Coat Sweaters, 
llic Shawl C<dlar, Coat Collar and the ic^nlai sh-ipt- 
Sweaters, all the best selling color.s. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



School and College PbotosrapDcrs . . . 




L.OCALLy: 5« Center St., Northampton Mass.. 

and South Hadley, Mass. 

Theae .Studio* offer the l>eM skilled 
Mftisls .ind iiioftt roniiilrtr 

equipmtii! >>litain<ible 



.Main n»-n« h : 

1546 1548 Kroadway. 

New York < itv 




WE SOLICIT YOl'llPATROMCE 

III so far .1^ niir iK-ncfits arc muttial. 

THE AMHERST CAS COMPANY 

Elvorythiing Electrical 



FOUNTAIN PEN "*• 



Minimize your fountain pen ^^^ 

troublea by owning a Moore's. C It U the ^^^ 
safest, soundest and most depend.ible pen known. 
Cits «t«"*^nft*b lies In Us v«ry simplicity. NothlnH 
flnlky toftetoutof order. €L V«hi can ftive your- 
self no better treat than a Moore's Non-leakable. 

For .Sale by r>«ileni E»«»y*here O/ " 

American Founfain Pen Company <'/ J/ 

A<l:im>i, <.u<liinit * K>iHr«T, Srillnit AUentu 
168 DEVON.SHIRK STRKKI :; BO.STON, MA.S.S. 



1^ 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 3, 1914 



^^5 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
Agricultural College. 

BOABD OF CDITOBS. 

CHKSTKR K. Wll KKLF.K u. Kditorin Chief 
FRANK W. ni'KI.I. '15. ManaRiriK Kditor 

HAROLD C. BI-ACK '14. Competition Kditor 
HAROI.n J. CLAY '11. Assistant Kditot 

S rUART B. FOS'IKK 'u, Atliletic Editor 

ERVINK F. PAKKKR'm. Alumni Kditor 

J. ALBP:i<T price '15, Athletic Editor 

GEO. E. DONNELL '15. Oepartmrnt Editor 
EARLE S. DRAPER '15. Athletic Editor 

TYLER S. ROf;ERS'i6. C iinpus Editor 

CHARLES W. CURTIN 'if>. Alumni Editor 

BUSINESS DEPARTMENT 

ERNEST S. CLARK. IR. '14. Bus. Manager 
MAURICE J. CLOl'GH 'i;, Ass't Bus Mgr. 
ERNEST F. I'PTON '14. Advertising Manager 
W. RICHARD SEAKS "i?. Asst. \d» Manager 
CHAS A. HUNTING roN, r; "Ki. Circulation 

Subscription |i 50 pt r year. Single 
copies. 5 cents. Make all ordt-rs payable 
to Ernest S. Clauk, Jr. 

Entered •• ■econ4l-claaa mallar at the Amham 
Pom omoe. 



Vol. XXIV. TUKSDAY. Feb. 3. No. 17 
" Boost Old Aggie." 



TuK leport of the Athletk- Field 
campaign is very eiHOiiragiii}i:, yet 
there seems to l»e a lack «»f re8|)oiiw 
on the part of the ohler ahuiini. 
This ntny be <liie to iinfiiniiliarily 
with the proposition at is.Hiie. l»iit if 
that 18 the case, Professor Iliekn and 
the rest of tlie eoinniittee stand rea<ly 
to enlijihten all questioners. It i» to 
be "Alumni FieM." anti we want 
each and evt-ry uhimnns fioin thoM' 
of laTl to the youngster of I'.MTto 
have his part in it. All of ns are, or 
soon will lie alumni, loyal sons of 
Old Aggie. Let ns finish that Held 
now. If we all help, we can do it. 
We are going to do it 1 



At no time in the history of the 
college, has there lH»en such a need 
for dormitories as at present. Cer- 
tain newspapers, apparently domin- 
ated by selfish motives, have inelTect- 
iially endeavored to prove that dor- 
triitories at Massachusetts are not a 
necessity. We maintain that so long 
as the students are obli<»ed to nM>ni 
»)fT-cnmpns. the conditions are neither 
satisfactory nor etiicicnt. The stu- 
dents know these conditi«ins from the 
inside. Outsitlers are not (pndilied 
to judge, ami tlicir npinifdis should 
be of little wei<ilit. Dormitories are 
greatly neetled here. Nc» serious 
thinking man can deny that fact 



CAMPUS CALENDAR 

[Notice* for this column should be dropped in 
the SlrjNAL Office or handed to Tyler S. Rogers 
•16, on or before the Saturday preceding each 
issue. I 



Feb. 



Feb. 



4 — 1-1(1 I'. M. Assembly. 
Acting President K. M. 
Lewi.s. .Student Mass 
Mt'tling. 

.'> — 7-<M» c. M. Class basket- 
ball series. Seniors vs. 
juniors and sophomores 
vs. freshmen. 

<> — Il<»ckey game. M. A. C. 
vs. Dartmouth. 

M — ;t-l.'» A. M. Sunday chapel. 
Rev. Albert V. Fitch, 
President Andover Theo- 
logical seniiimry, 

7-tM> I'. \i. Stockbridg<' 
(lull. South College. 

l-'M) p. M. Landscape .\rt 
Club Wilder Hall. 
|.\.b. 1 1 — l-lo I-. M. Assembly. 
Lincoln Day address. 



Feb 
Feb 



Fcl). 10- 



COMEDY OF ERRORS 

Don't forget that the "Comedy of 
Furors" is a part of the regular Prom 
program. Don't ini^s the nUitw even 
thotigh yvu are not ntfending the 
Prom. Tickets will be (»n sale at the 
Dining Hall at dinnei lime every day 
anti at Deuel's drug store. 

The Prom show offers everyone the 
opportunity of enjoying the social 
festivities so ju'evaleiit at this time 
of the year, lie at tlic Academy of 
Music, Northampton. ;itM-lo Satur- 
day night. Fell. 1 1 ami olifain your 
share. 



COMPETITION FOR SEAL OF 
THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

A |)ri/.e of $.'» is otTeretl by the 
Skjsvl Board to any untlergratlimte 
«)f the .Massachusett.s Agricultural 
college, who siibniits the design 
accepted by the iJoartl to be U8e<l as 
a seal <»f the Board. The competi- 
tion closes Feb. M, at midnight. 
All designs must lie handed to mem- 
bers «>f the committee in charge, on 
or before that date. 

The Board reserves the right of 
witholding acceptance of any design 
in case those Mubmittetl are not con- 
sidered satisfactory f«»r theii use. 

Details of the competition are as 
follows : 

I. All tirawings must be in India 
ink. 

'2. All ilravvings unist fw in tietail, 
all lines and letters must be heavy. 

;i The design -..hall be circidar or 
oval, not less than eight inches in 
iliametei • 

4. All drawings must be done on 
white paper or btistot Imard. 

Do not put your name on the 
design, numlter it on tlie back 
and put your name together with the 
numbt>r in an envelope and give 
these to the comndttee. No enve- 
lope will lie o|icned until after a 
design has been acceptetl. 

For further information, see the 
committee. 

K. SCMNKK DitAPK.U, 

W. R. Skaus. 



NEW FLORICULTURE HEAD. 

A. II Ncln iling of the (It |i.u tint lit 
of horticulture in the Iniversity of 
Illinois at ( hampaign, 111., has re- 
signed to accept the position of head 
of the department of floriculture .it 
this college. Mr. Nehcrling has been 
very successful in his work at the 
university of Illinois, and the college 
is very fortunate in securing him. 
Ho takes the place of Prof. K. A. 
White who resigned last summer. 



( 





> 




1 


r 


) 


THFiTlMOS 


i 


11 


i 


Have a Hot Coffee In Ycur Room. 


Jr-N 


Fill at the cart Stay hot 24 hoiis 


■ 1 


Other styles for tramps. 


■ J 


KEEPS HOT KEEPS COlO 


%J 


DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 



QNITY CHURCH 

.North I'lkasant .St. 

A Church home of the liberal Faith. 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome 

KKtiULAK St'KU.tV SKKVIC'K AT 7 r M 



E. RUSSELL NORTON 

SALKS AOKNT 

Davenport Miller 
Vein Coal 

Best Quality Pennsylvania Coal 



BOSTON OKKICE 

85 Water .St. 



NEW VORK OFFICE 
I Broadway 



tt 



SCOTTIE" 
H. HOOPER 

Will (lean and prrs.s your clothes so you 

will be satisfied. It costs no moit 

and he is nearer to "Aggie." 

MBkRAL TiCKIT »VSTBM 

Under Columbia Cafe 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest line in 
the state outside of Bostoi 



Seeourlineof Drill Shoes 

$2.00 to $4.00 



MODERN REPAIR 
DEPARTMENT 



E.M.BOLLES 



(OM \€Hjn %VAV TO l». O.) 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



LOW PRICE TAILORINO CO 

SlITS MADE TO OkDKK 
Suit* Cleaned. Prp«fH .inH I>veH .All imH^ 
Kepainha tor I..i'' 
ItiRhcraae wiii. 

called lor and ddivritni •-.•ii m i,ii-< .■ 
4 SUITS FOR fi.;o 

GEORGE KOTOWITZ. Prop 

Main ''trcet. A inherst. Mass N .' 

<in\.M.ru..\ to the Post < >flicp lei. 4j'>-" 



I. M. LABROVITZ, Custom Tailor 

Fashions, Fit, First Class Work Guaranteed 

Large a8.sortment on hand. (.KNlS KIJ K.MSH I M.S. KeH-Man Cil 
Dress .Shirts. Cleaning and Pressing. DRESS .StTlT.S 
TO KKN 1. Military Collars and Gloves 

11 AMITY ST., Telephone 302 w. AMHERST, MASS. 



Nov^ is thi- time to be planning for 

Fraternity Groups 

— H;ivf them t.tken at 

MISS McCLELLAN'S STUDIO 



44 State Street, 



Northampto! Ma*^ 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 3, 19 14. 



ALUMNI ATTENTION! 

:\ stiuly of the table on page 1 will 
glj.w that out of nearly 1000 living 
ghmiiii only about nine percent 
lijiM' eoutributed toward 'the athletie 
li, , i ; the larger number of those 
ciiiirihuting being from'the younger 
(■|,i-.ses. The stuilents have eontrib- 
iii, i iiiid pleilgeil *2r».'57.0.'», the 
.1; . uiii ^lyOii. From other sourceH 
til. mmmittee have received SlO(i3 01 
,1, sing u total of 8.')r.«;.'».06. While 
,1, li^otj cannot always be counted 
(liti the committee feel that in this 
cist' practically | all *of the pledges 
,;iu be collected. 

riic fa<t is that the sum alrea«ly 
I, . ivfd bitnply insures a start. 
1;, II- is needed Sl-',nu(> in all to 
(..iii|)lete the field. If the alumni 
tt..iil<| give an average of SIO per 
111 ill the Held couhl be coinplete<l this 
\t;u. The committee woidd like to 
itMvive something fr«)m every alum- 
iHiH ill order that this may )>«■ :in 
uliiiiiiii Held in fact as well as in 
iiiiriu*. The movement is one for 
nilU'<:e betterment mul one that can- 
«ot be brought to its completion with- 
out the help of the alumni. "Ath- 
U'tif Fiehl" has iKren talked for at 
leant 2.*» years at .M. A. ('. K«ir this 
ii'MHiin it aiipears dilticiilt for the 
ul.ivr nluiiini to realize that construc- 
!.i.ii rtill actually be Itegun this year 
:.iiil that it can he carrietl only as far 
:»^ the generosity of the alumni will 
|H*riiiit. 

The question has been raised that 
if this is to be called ''Alumni 
Kii'ld" why are contributions accepted 
fniin students ami others. Most of 
the students expect to eventually 
iHToine alumni ; however the best 
:tu<«wfr to this question is a study of 
th<- tabulated eontributious. Note 
the difference in the amount given 
liy undergraduates and graduates. 

Alumni do not aUotr the name 
•'AlHmm Fifhl" to be a miatiomer. 

Men prominent in public life are 
tiMlny asking what the state is recov- 
ering or is going to re<'eive in the 
futiirt' for the large sums of money it 
is expending for education at M. A.C. 
TLi college will justify itself but the 
iMilic must be shown. One wav to 
<lo \U\^ is to let the piddic know that 
the :iluinni have an interest in the 
•"ollige and believe in her. This is 
a g'Hxl time for you Mr. Alumnus to 
begin to pay hack some of the debt 
yon have incurred to the state for 
yoiii .fliieation. Alumni it is up to 
yon |)o you want to see an Ath- 
1' ' Field completed at M. A. C 
ill 11. If you ciiirt give much 
III at least "Boost." 



I "■-'. -Daniel Willar*!, president 

"1 Haltirnore iV: Ohio railroad 

ft'"' oiiiparatively recent addition 

'" ! Itiinore's list of big men, re- 

teii'i was elected unanimously a 

''■"'^ ■ of .Tohns Hopkins tiniversity 

to, oed William 11. IJuckler, the 



ii" 



ha'ologist. 



COMMUNICATIONS 

(Communications to the Signal conceininn 
matters of general inteiest ate welcomt-il. 'Ihe 
SioNAi. IS not to b* held responsible tiir llie 
opinions thus expiessed.) 

Amiieicst, Mass., Dec. .Itl, I'.M.'J. 

KoiToit t'oLLKtiK .Signal : 
IJriir Sir : 

In a recent issue of the HuiSAL 
there appeare«l a communication writ- 
ten by an aluiiinns who Inis always 
been one of the most loyal suppor- 
ters the college possesses. In his 
communication he liecries the meth- 
Otis used in establishing the long 
wished-for athletic liehl and criticizes 
the present system of athletic con- 
trol. Mention is also made of the 
unsuitablcness of the >it<- selected 
for the lield and an argumeiil i> :id- 
vance«l fav«>ring the originally pro- 
p«>sed site west of Lincoln .Vveniie 
between the old Kappa Sigma House 
and the Veterinary Laboratory as 
against the site acttially chosen. 
I feel sure that if Mr. Hriggs will 
slop a few moments to reconsider the 



arguments he has put forward he will 
see that things are not so bad as he 
has painted them. 

In the lirst place as regards the 
joint eoininittee on athletics, the fact 
that the alumni are in the minority is 
certainly true, but how «ould a larger 
alumni representatii>n be assured? 
As long as there are alumni «)n the 
faculty who are willing to serve on 
this board it might lu- well to in- 
crease the representation from that 
IkmU', but suppose these local alumni 
change their places of business ? In 
the case of large representation there 
wouhl be no one to fill the places of 
the '• departed ones " and the ctuisti- 
tiition would have to undergo revis- 
ion. Inless men are actively en- 
gaged in the work of the college 
tlit-y are not going to leave their biLsi- 
ness and travel up to Amherst to at- 
tend an athletic boar<) meeting. No 
man enjoys such encounters and 
were it necessary to place non-resi- 
dent alumni on the committee these 



members would be only too glad of 
an excuse to be absent. It is only 
natural that the committee be com- 
posed of members who are in direct 
contact with athletics at the college 
and should it be necessary through 
revision of the constitution to elect 
non-resident alumni to the boarti be- 
cause of a lack of hK'al alumni, these 
ontsiile iiieiiiliers would have no itlea 
of the neetls of the Athletic associa- 
tiun. The only way in which the 
graduates can show their love for, and 
hiyalty to, the college is by respond- 
ing to her call in time of need and 
there should be iu> protest about un- 
fair representation. The college 
should not need to «'all fi>r money, 
the alumni shoiddcomr rmw.ud with- 
out l»eiug called, without leference 
to "taxation without representation." 
When it comes to the question of 
draining the site selected it might 
be well to iiHpiire into the exact con- 
dition of affairs. Any man who has 
ever met Curry Hicks knows that no 



Can You Grow 1 50 Bushels Dry 
Shelled Com on One Acre? 



$500 or a Handsome Grandfather *s Clock 

if You Succeed 



$100 if You Approach It 



Cnn 150 busJH'Js crilwlrv iiht 



(-ii:iu 



t:il) 



I 



one ncrv ol lam 



W'r hciir ol \:aK UiH) aiM 



»!«• mm Fm- prown on 



Id I 



hisIh'I.s Im'II 



grown in other parts of the counlrv 



I 



n order t<i nee w 



hilt 



en 1 1 



he (1 



one in iNew 



IJowker Fertilizer (yoiiii)anv ofl'eiN jiollO. ii 



I fje 



Kiij^-I 

to the 



and 



>»« 



the 



ni.-iii or woman 



i»ov or u 



irl, 



who 



will 



raiHe on a m»':isured aere 



person, 
I 



l'»0 Im-'hel-i <ril»-'h V -liilhij corn on a ha-^i*! of lU' moi>-tnr( 



wine 



ll 



K* nioi iiiif Ml niert liantaole eorn 



Til 



f torn 



to I 



m 



grown < xclnsivt'lv on Stoeklnidge ('<nii .Maniu'e, nsin;^ not less 
than hidO IIm. per acre, aiirl inider riiloH nnti regulations similar 
to tlmst' whjfh were pro.serihed in tli" IIowkiT wnii contests of 
IIMO and I'ljl. If no one in the contest <rrows \'t{) hnshels of 
eril>-drv <«Mn per acre, then the ^^AH). will In- dividetl into five 
cash piizesof $;i(lO. each to Im' awartlcil lo tlios<. who ap|)roaeh 
nearest the vicdd of lofi bushels; if ?i;o; (hin one contfsfjint 



IS III 



,() 



MlSllClS 



the 



K»' 



IIKI 



prize 



u II 



hi- flivnletl 



hilt no pnzi- will Ik* awanletl to anv yield that dtn-.s not exceed 
the average of d'.) bushels per acre which was obtained in the 



IJowker etmtests for the t 



wo vears. eliminattntr three vieUiM 



Inch were manifestlv harvested too trpccn. Contestants nr 



w 

plant any variety of corn and use any niethotl of cultivation. 

GRATUITY 

In order to see what can he done in growing corn with stable manure alone or 
with stable manure and ffrlijizer combined, we offer a gratuity of a Grandfather's 
8-day Chime Clock for the largest yield of com above 69 bushels per acre ; the only 
stipulation being that if any commercial fertilizer is used it shall be one of the Bowker 
brand*. 

Send for your copy of the Rule* today and make your plana fo vnler the conleal. You aro 
«ure of a Rood crop anyhow with the Stockbridse, and may win on* of tboae $100 priaM 
or the clock. 



ROWICFR FERTILIZER COMPANY 

'^^^^ ▼▼ l.^J^J.\. 43 CHATHAM STREET BOSTON 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 3, 1914. 



The College Signal. Tuesday, February 3, 191 4. 



' • 



more capable man could be found to 
head such a cainpuign as is now un- 
der way 'Mr. Hic-ks has visited 
pratlically every important athletic 
Held In the country, getting ideas 
from all he inspected. an«l it seems 
most improbable that he would ovei- 
look the essential element of good 
drainage in selecting a site at M. A. 
C. A noted drainage expert from 
Boston pronounce<l the present site 
as "very easily drainetl " ami Pr»)- 
fessor Haskell after a detailed inspec- 
tion holds that any part of the licld 
can be drained in a suHlciently short 
time, to avoid interference with the 
progress of athletic contests. This 
proves that Mr. Hicks did not jump 
at conclusions as regards ibainajie. 

Finally, it seems to me that there 
need Ite no doubt regarding the future 
of athletics jit the college. It is cer- 
tain that with the advent of the Held 
more money can lie taken in at the 
games than at present ami thus far 
the ahnnui have not l>een called upon 
to support the various teams. True, 
it may be necessary to solitit a little 
money for the upkeep >*( the field 
tlurihg the next lw<» <>r three years, 
but with the teams that Aggie has 
been turning «»ut lately there need be 
no fear as to the " drawing power" 
of ihesf tinii-. ThecolKge is grow- 
ing so rapidly that athletics aie earh 
year getting ou a sounder basis and 
with the erection of the new gymna- 
sium, her athletic supremacy seems 
assured. 

Thus, although I ma_\ Im- entirely 
wrong, it appears to me that .Mr. 
Urigtfs' arguments lack "water hold- 
ing cajmcity '* and I feel sure 
that if he will rcconsiiler his state- 
meats he will agree with me that 
everything is being done with 
ma eve for the future and for the 
pnr|)Ose of boosting the old college 
U> the very l»€st possllile advantage. 
Very tnilv vonrs, 

• • • 

Grokue Zahkiskik 2ni», '13. 



To TiiK Ki>iTOR OK The Siunal. 
Dear Sir : 

There are many indications that 
the relations existing between the 
students and alumni of M. A. C. are 
not ideal. The present situation is 
apparently the result of natural 
causes, but conditions aic changing 
and I believe that now is the time for 
these two bo<lies to come together 
and work unitedly in Boosting Old 
Aggie. 

I wish that this subject might l>« 
freely discussed in the Siunai., and 
accordingly the following suggestion 
is made : The Sfonal has a unique 
opportunity to keep the graduates 
in touch with the college life of the 
day ; perhaps it has a better <»ppor- 
tunity than other agency. 1 believe 
that the Si«;NAr, should clearly define 
its relation to this proposition and 
map out a definite |)oIicy for accom- 
plishing its t.isk. Among other 
things it might issue two or three 
tiroes a year a special Alumni num- 



ber and send it to all alumni and for- 
mer students whether or not they be 
subscribers ; doubtless this method 
would result in a larger subscription 
list among the graduates. 

An entire i)age in each issue of the 
paper might Ite set aside as an alumni 
se<*tion ; by asking the secretary of 
each class to funiiHh material for a 
certain date, a large amount of c<»py 
would inidoubtedly be secured Spec- 
ial articles could also be obtained 
regarding the work of some of the 
more promising graduates. 

Moreover, the Sionai. through its 
editorial column could, t<» a greater 
extent than at present, inter|)ret to 
the alumni the trend of student life 
and thought, and indicate the de- 
velopment of various college policies. 
Voins truly, 
Haliii .1. Wah-, '07. 

Januarv. 2H, 1914. 



ALUMNI NOTES 

';M. — Among the s[»eakers at the 
convention of the .Massachuselts 
Fruit Growers ass<M-iation held last 
week at Springfield wi-re : Dr. K. 
I'orter Felt, state entomologist for 
.New York ; F. Howard Brown '00 of 
Mon.s(m and All»crt It. .lenks'il of 
the Hampden county improvement 
league. The meetings were very 
largely allemled l»v Aggie men and 
.S4)me very pleasimi reunions tvere 
the result. Thursday nfterntMMi 
some -'SO alumni were pres4<nt in an 
nudieui c of mitie than 20o- Why 
ni»t make it inoic of an .M. A. ('. 
affair each year us it ought to be. 

'y7. — Dr. riiarles A. Peters and 
assistant, strife in the Decemlter 

Jininml nf IntfiiAtiff tinil Kt*yiii»'i-rtiiff 
ClifiniHtrtf, that as n result of their 
investigations, microorganisms of 
ltcggiat«>a. or n closely related group, 
have Ih'cu found to be the cause of 
an apparent preci|)itate of sulfur 
occurring in conunercial lime-sulfur 
concentrates, making the whole nntss 
of the c<insistency of thin ketchup. 
Further stu<ly of the microorganisms 
is l»eing carried *>n 

'08. — Dr. Carleton Bates of the 
Bureau of Chemistry, will join the 
Fish Hawk before sailing to make a 
chemical examination of oysters 
taken from the beds in the rivers to 
determine their wholesomeness for 
fcKwl. Just where these oysters will 
be secured will be determined in the 
orders received by Captain O'Brien. 
No oysters in the Chespeake Bay 
proper, it was said, will be given a 
chemical analysis. 

'09.— Mr. and Mrs. Arthur W. 
Hnbliard announce the birth of a son, 
Harold Russell, Dec. 23. 

'09. — Henry W. Turner has 
<hanged his address to care of Con- 
suelo Sugar Co., San Pedro de Maco- 
ris B. K.. Dominican Repiddic He 
is a sugarcane farmer for this 
company. 

•09.— On Jan. '21. at Bethlehem, 
N. II.. John Noyes to Miss Betsy 
Allen Abbe. 



Heart -to- He? .rt Talks 

TO AGGIE MEN 

By the Largest Retailers ot 
Apparel in New England. 

Going to the Prom, young man? Time to get that 
outfit ready if you are to dress faultlessly while enter- 
taining the ladies. Time to think seriously of just what 
you are going to need. 

Perhaps your Dress Suit is a bit out of style and 
you need an up-to-date one. You may want a silk or 
opera hat, a pair of dress shoes, dress shirts and other 
furnishings so nece.ssary to the particular college man. 
It niav be that you must have a warm ulster or motor 
coat, tor many of you will go on sleigh and motor rides, 
and it's bound to be cold. Then you may be planning 
to make your room or suite of rooms more attractive for 
the inspection of your guests, and you are going to in- 
vest in Furniture, Pictures and other such things. 

We are ready and eager to assist you in choosing 
most carefully and authoritatively. Our Men's Store 
can fill all your wants in Clothing, JIaberdaslury, Shoc^ 
anil Hats. We have the la.st word in style. Our Furni- 
ture and Ilousefurnishing Stores are now showing won- 
derful I v complete assortments and are always ready to 
serve you best. 

In fact, our entire 169 selling sections are filled with 
all that is newest and finest in their lines. Incidentally, 
this is the season of price reductions, and this fact aloiu 
should induce you to come to our store while in Bost<»n. 
tor you can save many dollars by so doing. 

JORDAN MARSH COMPANY 

Boston. 



Hillside Orchards 
Apple Institute 

E. CYRUS MILLKR, Proprietor. 

Haydenville, Hampshire County, Mass. 

Thirty Minutes by Trolley from Northampton Telephone 711 



TIIK only school of its kind in the country where young nifn 
are Trttindi. .is well as /'<iugfit, in all phases of orchard w ^ 
and management. 

.All pro.s|)ective students should apply in |)erson toreceiv 
tails of outlined plans together with cost per period or year. 

From my school I furnish trained men to do all kinds of ur( . 
work. .Several of my clients are now seeking competent niati.i. > 
for their orchards. Are jou not interested? 

Visitors are cordially welcomed at Hillside Orchards •'^ 
season. Methods of tnanagement are explained and advu' 
counsel on orchard niatters given free of charge. t)rchar(i> 
under diiection on a yearly fee basis. About 500 acics now 
njy m magement and direction. 

TWO FINE ORCHARD FARMS FOR SAl E 
One with 1200 Mature Bearing Fruit Trees on it 



COMMUNICATIONS 

I ommunications to the Signal concetninK 
itrrs of Kcneral intetest are welcon-nl. I he 
NAl, IS not to b-f held rrsponsibi for the 
nions thus expressed.) 

niroKS, ('oi.I.E<!K SlONAL. 

J)iitr Sirs: 

1 ha\e rciul with doop interest and 

iin-ern a i-oinnuinicution which ap- 

iirt'd in the issue, of the Sh.nai. nf 

. (. IC) relating to the proposed Inea- 

tiOO, maintainence .uiil management 

f .ilninni field. I am glail that the 

ittei has been tlir<»vvri open for di;*- 

i.s^ion in your colninn>. .Such pul>- 

Aiy cannot helpbut awaken interest 

ml bring residts. 

I have no doubt that the writer ol 
•Aw above nientione<| eonnnunicatii*n 
li.is endeavored to keep in totnh witii 
fill' exaet situation ever hinee the lieltl 
I- tirst prt>jK)8ed. We will all agree 
with him when he Kays, "The college 
eds an aihietie lield. »»• will <lo 
well to provide the bt^t tjiut \ti :ivail- 
•.Me." 

lint the greater part of the letter 

iipresMos nie as coming fioin »)ne who 

ili.esn't know the ri'al eirennistances. 

\«) nnitter how well intended the 

litieisni of the present eommittee 

11(1 its plans may be, I cannot help 

'It feel that the writer is in almost 

ital ignorance of ilif tint- nllililu 

situation at --.\ggie" as it is to«lay. 

•Such a letter, (if it misrepresents 

'lie facts as I believe it does) can 

iilv residt in harm. It ereates doubt 

ilii- iiiiriilv of :iliimni reHd«*is;it 



liindeis the woik of the eonuiiittee, 
the men who need the eonfUlenee ami 
support of every alumnus; and it 
reflects discredit upon tiie i-ollege 
authorities who have the matter in 
clnuge. 

May I pr.st'nt. very brietly, a few 
of the facts as ( I believe) they nmst 
appeal to the recent alunuii, the 
nmlergra<lnate8 and to those who are 
cU»se to the real situation? 

The locution of du' fleld has been 
decided upon aftei a thor<»ugli exami- 
nation of the ground l>y spe<'ialistw. 
The committif has taken everv pos- 
sible detail into consideration and 
has linally settled on the pro|H>.He<l 
location as the most desirable :uid the 
very Itest available. 

"Aggie may <'ongiatnlate heiself 
on the personnel of this eonunittee 
Kvery man is in sympathy with the 
proposition ; each man has been 
picked because he is tin uian for the 
job; and e:ich man is a 'MHxjster." 

The joint cotnniittee on inter-col- 
legiate athletics is composed of twelve 
meudu'rs, of whom two are elected by 
the Associate .\bimni, li\e <-onsist <»f 
the IVesiilent of the c(tllege, his 
appointees and the physical dlreet«>r. 
and the remaining five are the stu- 
dent managers, ft is the buninessof 
this coniMiittee to control athletics at 
.Massacluisetl^. Alumni, f.uiilty and 
students are .ill {.presented. Itnl 
who can say that one rmttroh muic 
than another? Faculty and students 
eacb have five votes. If tliere slionld 



WHEN CONSIDERING FERTILIZERS 

In connection with your studies and experiments, don't fail to ac(juaint 
yourself wiih the wonderful producing and soil-nourishing properties of 



Write for booklets 
on •• 5oll rertlllty," 
*• The (irass Crop," 
•• I he Apple," etc. 




UZf^ 



One Dollar Invested 
In Hubbard's Hone 
Base rertillzers 
buys as much plant 
food as $1.70 to 
$1.00 In low Krade 
fertilizers. 



THE ROGERS « HUBBARD COMPANY. Niddletown. Conn. 

onit'i- >«ii<i Woiko, r<ii I ihiiiI, < ituu. 



¥J ^ C J itresiipplifd every year 

DUrpee S OeedS i^tt to mure Amen 
* laii planters than are 

tlie seeils of aii\ other jjrowers. Do \on know Hur|>ee- 
OiiahtN "Seetl.s that Grow" .? If not, we uoiiltl like to 
make your aix]iiaintanie. Simply .seiul lis y(»iir a(ltlres.s 
(a postal eard will do) and \»)ii will receive Burpee's 
Annual for 1914, a bright new hook < f ISJ! pa^e.s, which 
is recojrnizeil a.s ' TJie Leadinjr .\miriian Seed Catalojj." 
Kindly write to-day! \ddre.ss 

W. ATLEE BURPEE & CO., Burpee Buildings, Philadelphia 




A. 




MEN'S STORE 



" Keepin^f in Front " 

You fellows know what that means ! 
We've Bern very successful in this 
regard witli f atima Cigarettes. By 
the v.ciy, these cigarettes were first 
sold in the college towns — and you 
agreed with us that they were good. 

Tlien we put out for the big race, 
to make F atimas of nation-wide rep- 
utation, and today more are sold than 
eny other cigarette in this country. 

No purer, or more carefully cho.sen 
tobacco grows than that in r atimas. 
We purposely put thc-n in a plain 
inexpensive wrapper — in this wav 
we can afiord quality tobacco, and 
tw2n'.y cf the smokes for I 5 cents. 

Now your college crewi-, of utmost 
importance to you — so is a good 
'"igarette, and it's your aim in life 
to keep Fatimas in the lead -right 
up to their good quality — right up 
to where yoa first found them, and 
will always find them. 

Success fellows I You started this 
cigarette on Us successfiil career — 
and you pull a strong oar all over 
this country. 




Use our new cash discount card 
and save five per cent on 

SHOES, HATS, CLOTHING 

Furnishings and Custom Tailoring 



^ •niPRlSH BLEND ^ 

CIGARETTES 

20>Sr!5< 




'liittincHrt^ Individual' 



IMPORTANT ! 

111. ri,,,st practical present to give ymir l.rcilici or ^islt-i is one of tht- 

famous 

Patrick Duluth Mackinaws 

Sold at Cost at Campion's the Next 10 Days 

$6.50 Mackinaws for $4.00 

$9.00 Mackinaws for $6.50 

$10.00 Mackinaws for $7.25 

$12.00 Mackinaws for $8.00 

200 Suits and Overcoats to be cleaned up at cost 

\<> goods charged at the above prices. 

CAMPION -" TWO COLLEGE STORES 



« 



\ 




The CoUcfe Signal, Tuesday, February 3. 1914. 



The Holyoke Valve & Hydrant Co. 

Jobbers of \Vroii|tht Iron and Brass I'ipt-. Valves 
and Kittings til- Steam, Water an<MJa-. Asbestos 
and Miifnesi.i Moiler and Mipe Covei iiiKS, I'ipe 
Cut to Sketch, Mill Supplies. Knuiieeis and 
Contractors for Steam and Hot Water Heatinc. 
,'VutUMiatic Sprinkler Systems, Ki>iler and KnKiie 
Connections. Holyoke, Mac*. 



TNf TtMRS EXCHANCE 



01 Boston 



120 liirli/on Sf. 



Recoirnnends Teac^.ers, Tutors and Schools 



C^^rp^n-tcr & AAorehous^, 

PRINTERS, 



No I. Cook Place, 



Amherst, Mass. 



Students Attention ! ! ! 

W'l- .ire ready at the start to furnish you with a fine 
line of Campus and Fraternity House Views, also I'ust 
Cards, Kodak work j;iven prompt and « artful attention, 
Kniarging and picture framing given our [jersonal at- 
tention. See us aiK>ut (<roups and I'urtraits for the very 
best work. 



I be a clash betweeu these two factors, once, and the good work go • 1 i 
who would have the <leciding vote rapid completion. Nineteen hiui ic,| 
and declare the policy ? The ahnnni and fourteen is a big year f.,i 
in every case. "Aggie's athletic teams. I'm n,, 

Ih there any gtMxl rrjtson why we, ^ Yours in M. A. C', 

j as alurnni, should demand more than Fhko I), (uik.o. i 

two representatives on the l)oanl 1 University of Missouri, 
when it is clear that we hold the I Columbia, Mo., 
balance of power as it is? Is it to be '.Ian. .">, I'.Ml. 
supposed for an i istant that we will — — ^^— — 

ever waul to go against both faculty i SALE OF PROM TICKET- 
and students on any proposition? The Prom season begins in an. -li.. 
Besides, it is almost mik t.. !.» the .week. The tickets will go on ;,!, 
case as at present that one or more I Thursday, Feb. .1. when the .In,, 
of the faculty representatives will b ' ,M'ogrammes will piol.ably he r .mIv 
nl""""i f«.r distribution also. Willis H:i»k,.i| 

The (pieslion of maintainauce has wjn gell the tickets at 1 Norlli ( .,!. 
bcfii l.iought up Will n<»t the U.ge. his oMice liouis l.ciiin | .■ 
alinnni he called upon for funds to 1 (.dm y. m. and ti-<Mi to r.-.io 1 v, 
maintain the field after its completion? every day. H»-«ord will he niai. ,,; 

It is true that athletics never have the order i.f piinhahe of tickit- u 
l)een on a paying basis at ••Aggie." the hacks will call for the pe(>| . n 
I^ek of an enclosed field has made 1 the same onler. Tickets will 
this Impossible. Hut have the alumni | $| i .<m) ami will admit to the Mtiniol 
been <alled u|mmi in the past t«isup- j Club's concert and to th«: -Inf..! rim! 
port the teams? Not to my knowl- -pea" of Saturdav aftern«M.n, Ihm.|.. 



Satisfaction Guaranteed. Patronize 
the Square Deal Studio 



edge. Kach year the undergraduates 
have born the full bm-deii by means 



covering all Piom expen.ses. Hniv 
people goiug to the Prom will Im 



of a tax levied u|>on themselves, j eligible foi atlemlance at the Inf-iiiial 
The annual .Midget thus raised has ' 'fea. The gallery will be open on t||. 
nmountc<l to more than ^.l.oiMi. night »>f the Prom to all those «illiiij; 

IQINSM^N'S COLLEGE STUDIO i TIk- acquisition of an athU-lic UeUI ,„ p.,, » with a small sum of n, 

is going to gradually cut down that ni^ — - 

tax. Uut ill.- mi.h-rgi.iduates will DEPARTMENT NOTES 

continue to meet any deficit. It U Mr .lames K. Dodge, inaiiM- 
the «luty of the alumni to make the n|,p ||,^^| |.',„ „,, |,owell. .Mass. I - 



NasH DlocK, Amherst 

II. M R»m;ers. '15, A^ent. 



87 Pleasant St., 



.Studio Phone 303-2 




E. Frank Coe Fertilizers 

t QCT THE BUSINESS FARMERS* STANDARD 1 01y| 

lOd/ For over fifty five years li JlH 

Do You Raise 300 Bushels of Potatoes per Acre? 

jyU^HHK hundred bushels per acre is 
not an unusuni yield by any means, 
but did you get it ihis year ? 
^If you uere planning to raise 300 
bushels of potatoes to the acre how 
^ far apart would you space your rows? 
How far apart would you drop the seed pieces in 
the row? 

^How nuich fertilizer \>t»uld you use to grow .^00 
bushels of potatoes per acre? Mow would you 
apply it ? 

^.\re you sure that your seed potatoes are true to 
name and true to type ? 

^What are you doing i » prevent "scab," and early 
and late blight ? 

^[^id you ha\'- a short crop of potatoes because of 
dry weather ? Have you decideil how you will 
overcome this trouble in the future ? 



I 



L 



^All (hete practical piiinl«, and inan> more, are fully cnverrJ »n our 
new ho(»k 

"Potatoes: A Money Crop" 

which will he nent free to every poiato ((rower who requests a copy, and 

mentions ihis paper. 

^Thi* honk is written hy a man who himself has had years i>f experience as 

a potato ifnwer, and who has made a careful *tudy of the best methods of 

«)ther |(rowers. 

^If you read this hook you will keep it for future reference. It is a "worth 

while" puSlicilion 

The Coe-Mortimer Company 

51 CHAMBERS STREET, NEW YORK CITY 



field iM.s9jble by subseril.iiig the i ,.t.,.^.,„iy sent to tlir Animal llu- 
necessary funds oof. These sub- |,j,|,(i,v department a l.if.r in «l,i, ! 

he offers to give n^ n jn!/. 
bred registerc«l herkshiit 
short course stialetit doing I In ' ' >' 
work in Live Stock judging tliu'iigli 
out the ten weeks course this vcir. 
1I<xmI Farm stands at the wi; 



scriplions should be as geuet^iis ns 
possible for after the field is a reality 
there will be no nee<l for further cf>n- 
triltutions 

To one v\h<i ha.t not kept closely in 
touch with athletics at M. A. C. <lar- 



iiig the past three yeais, it would be : fr„„t i„ the ranks of .Iers«'y l.ree.1 
hard to iinderstaml the new older of 4.,.^. m„i „i»o of Berkshire bieeder* 
ihiiigN The old inefllcient, hap- ih^.j,. sto<(i is most excellent, aii- 
ha/.ani, iinsupervisetl student man- ||,py |,„vi. no «learth of buyers .it e\ 
agemcnt of the teams have given eelleiit prices for all their siir|»lii. 

stiM-k. { on sequel! lly this pri/*- tmu 



wav i<> .1 far iiion- salisfactoiy sys- 
fi'iii. \-k :iiis member of the faciiltv 



them for the purposi' of >ln 



01 any undergraduate and he will tell | „„ interest in the llvesUM-k «mi 
you of the im|»roviinent. The physi- j pe<iallv among Short CoiUHe mt 11. ■ 
cal director has been made general | vi-ry generous. It is sur«ly iiiiai 
supervisor of athletics. He advists ; m,p,.p^.mte,| \,y ^\^^, Aniuiiil 11"' 



tlh' student managers in their work 
The result has been better e<piippe<l 
t<>ains, better scheilules an<l more 
ollitient coaching. All of this has 
l>een brt.Might about with no increase 
II) the .-ithletic tax mihI :it least one 
(licreu.s)' since 1!»1U. 

TiK) much praise cannot be accorded 
Professor Ilicks, the present i)hysical 

director, for his efficient service. |(,gigt, Alhany, N. Y. : Di ^^ 
May he continue his goo<l work :it Hinds, '"ly, Auburn. Aln. . A I 
•Aggie" for many yeara to come is ^ H„rgeH8. 'if'). Melrose IIi^:iiiamli 
the hope and wish of every man who I I) ( >, llc.w.i, '7«. CltM i " 
knows him. College men do not i{. ,\. CtMjley, 9.'», IJozeiiui 
often misjudge a man when they come Dr. A W. Morrill, '"^i. 
to know him. Ariz 

I believe that tin' men who have 
the field in charge know their job. 
The undergraduates believe it for 



bandry departmont, ami is uikKmiM 
ediy appreciated by the Short ( (Mtrw- 
students. 

At the meeting, during iln ii.^ 
•lays, of the Ameii«'an As>.i" ints"! 
for the advancement of ~ 
Atlanta, (ia., the presence of the foi 
lowing M. A. ('. men was not. i 

Dr. K. P. Felt, 'S^I, Stale I Ktoin- 

K 



(;. \v. Klls, 'i;i. 

Ala. : K H. Cooper, 'UJ, \\ 
eigh, N. C. : H. T. Fern - 
herst. 

Prof. II. T. Fcrnald ^^:' 



Mlli/. 
iHllll. 

Ami- 



tliey have come forward with a splen- [ president of the American 
<lid show of loyalty and support. | tion of Kconomic Kntonn-: 
There should be no cause for doubt in ' their 2«th annual meeting' 
fin- min<l of any alumnus. 1 »H'>'' »< Atlanta (;a. and A 

•^ gess was re-ele«ted seen' 



-!- .'' 

Vl'llll} 

. Bur- 
• an<i 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 3, 191 4 



R 6S YEARS' 
EXPERIENCE 




Trade Marks 

Designs 

COPVRIGHTS Ac. 

r .ne sondlnu aKkelrh and dfscrliitlon ni«y 

V iu<i<'ortHiii «>iir oi'i ii free wihmIht >ii 

.ii.>ii Id pnihuMf piileiiiHfile. ( "iinuiinlcii. 
.^trictlr<''»><l<l«Millal. HANDBOOK on CuiHiiu 
frca. Olilt'st aueiK'jr i-'r j<i'iiiriTiif puteiim. 
.'ii'i taken liirouuh Stunu Jt Co. reculva 
,, ..d li^'tice, without c harn e. lu Itie 

Scientific JImeiKaii. 

\ 1 .ii.tn.iiiii'lr lllu»tratp<l wprklr. IjircoHt clr- 
.■ Mil uf ii'iT »<-leiintlc J"iiriml. Ti-rn ». |'J a 
- . t'lir nioiittis, IL Sold by all nonmlralers. 

MUNNSCo«*«---' New York 



met omo«. «& V HU WMblUKiun. U. U 



Batchelder & Snyder Co. 

i \< HKKS. l>4>ll.TIC\ IMtK't^KKs 
AM> HI TTKK M %KKKs. 



-Wllot KSAI.E M tl^KS IN. 



IWri Mutton. Lamb, Veal. Pork. Lard, Mams, 

iUv.on. Sausages, Poultry, (iam«. Butter 

Cheese, Eggs. Beans. 

»i ir*-* ;i.5i.57.;'J. 'I & «J BUdc-Hoiif St. 
I'ACKiiii; House. HriKhtoii, Mas». 
-■ J'oiiltrv Dres'iinK I'iant, Itoston. 
> leamerif* in V^rniniit. 



It you are nervous about your 

hnals. drop in for some 

solid encouragement 

ill the 

DOG CART 



U>t LAVAL 

Butter Triumphs As 
Usual At The 

NATIONAL DAIRY SHOW 

B 



1 I EK iiiad« from ( 
Its I...iv.il ."^.-p^rato 



1 f.«tf<l by 

If IINU.ll 

; ., ;% jt the 

3n»t Il4ir^' "hom 

> ot t^ Nalion,il 

«««-i»' .\><,<>ct.ition. ju»t a* It n«» 

I -nf ••very year «inrf th« ori{.>ni- 

:iie National Vs n in i^>. 

'f the followiiii; iir high- 

• !f mAs awariico m Duttfr made 

un separated with the |>e I.aval 



Whole Milk Creamery 
Butter 



NINETEEN.THIRTEEN NOTES 

• .l.E.VNIMJ."*. 

(ieorge A. I'ost. "Ulythedale" , 
Martinsville, N. J. | 

Webster J. liirdsall, gentleman! 
farmer, Otego, N. Y. 

".Mike" Iaoii, sole and par exeel- 1 
lent member of the lt>i;{ .M. .\. ('. 
elub of Williams met .Ian. 2l'> and 
forwarded his contriliiition for the 
new field wishing to go on record as 
one working for a more aggressive 
aggregation of I'.M.'i '-Aggie Aggre- 
gates." 

Karle Hubbard. IJowdoin College, 
Rriiuswiok. Mr. t\ IJ. has joined 
our list of contrihiitors. 

Nils I'. Fiarsen. Cornell Medieal 
sehool. 177 First avenue. New York 
city. 

F.,awreuce Uurby, Ingleroek Poul- 
try Farm, Uelehertown. 

Charles M. Streetrr, Ibimlield. 

•lames F. llolden, graduate a.ssist- 
ant, Kastman HuHiness cDllfgc. 
Poughkeepaie. N . V . 

niK AT^L^rrn■ rrNn hack I 
Kunniug a iiitaeaheadof all comers 
we are within •S.'l of the half way 
|M>st on the class fund for the Ath- 
letic tiehl. We still have "some 
stepping" to be done befon- we go 
iiixler the wire at a thouaand iloltur 
clip. S«-nd in your oats ! 

Mill III! \l t MM ' 

Miimni leaiiers have heard much 
of r.M.'l of late and opportunifii's are 
iKxin to be offered to show ourselves. 
The Massachusetts Alumni riub will 
ban«iUet in Moslmi l\li. I;}. The 
Conn. \'alluy Alumni assoiiation 
meets in Springtirld I"eh iM and Feb. 
'JH will be alumni night aii<i open 
house at college All '!■'{ men should 
plan to attend at least onr of these 
functions if |>ossible. "Ki"!" (tore 
will <-ommunicat«> with {KisKibles for 
the iU)Ston baixpiet "I)<k'" Fay 
will notify the Conn. Valley men. 
IxK>k for Iheir notices. Active co- 
operation witii till asa<M'iati(iii in 
your district is a rhanncl for your 
loyal sup|)ort. 



•♦♦.♦we- ■•■v«.-« I ►"«»•• 



BECKMAN 



RAHAR'S INN 

Northamptun, Massachusetts 
M I UK DRn>l 

Tlie hotel wlii re ilicfc is co.iifoil ( witli- 

out e\tr.i\.«n.tiur ) Mdio popu!.)! 

th.«n ever. 

Special LuHihcun 12-2 P. M. 

PRIVATE DINING ROOMS 

,\ 1,1 < .lite .Seivitc 
l>om « sn to II P. .%!. 



The Highland Hotel 

t'orirr ol llillnian and llatnr^ .'^tle«•l^, thri-<- 
bliKk«froiii the Inioii l>i-tK>t. !■» a iiitKli'tn ho»- 
Irlry run on the Kuii«i)e.ili I laii. Il l» ltt>t ^ •Irp 
lium Main >tie«t.aw4\ liiiiii ih<> nuiw^ and du>l 
and yet in (lie cenlei ul iIm' lm«iiie«a di^tiict. 

l(f rnunil are M I'll liiiiii-ti--'1 .iml in'iidirlable. 
liaVihu a teleplione and • ' ' 'iltl luiininn 

W4l«-i in ••¥• I y riMiiii i'li ^> I ii(/. lutiiii* 
with l>ath (%ii>ul< »l '" ..11.1 ii(. 

ItH exct>li.-iit ii'i '4>-ll ventilaln) (lininK 

room makes a Mte.< • ^ pU'^isant inemor» - eveiy 
ihinR of tlte lil|ihi*«t i|ii.ilit> well cimkrd and 
ler*^ in the ()e»t po*%ii»l<' manner 



St.iv It thi- 
ail' 



llii, M Slid Hiitrl once 

' • .lg.«ilL M !i -u 



»lll 



D. H. SIEVERS, 

HIclilitiMl MmI. I '«|>rlltKarl<l. Wa«*. 



St ki' n I. n I ., \ n i; I < . i.«. 

\l A N I'KAfI I'MI >•* .IK\% Kl.*-. M 



I : K 



I HO mvo\ l»\V \ Y 



V|.;\v vowK 



Gathered Cream 
Creamery Butter 

Farm Dairy Butter 

T".i'ifiice of the suixTioiitv of I li- 
.>il ere 1 111 ind l>utt<T »% demon. 
i by the winning nf all highest 
> the World over lo< thirty year», ii 
nvliifiininii as to be indls[iiii;ible 
i inswerabU- 

THE DE lAVAl SEPARATOR CO. 

■ VoKK ' ill! Afiii 



Ihere are seven good reasons 
why YOU should buy 

COAL 

or 

C. R. ELDER 



RESOLUTIONS 

Wfiereii.t, It ha.*^ pleaaeil (io<l in his 
infinite wisdom to take unto Himself 
the mother of our beloved friend and 
brother, Raymoml Chamberlain, \te it 

Jii'Holvetl, That we. the meml>ers of 
the Alpha Sigma I'hi Fraternity, do 
extern! to our brother and his l>ereavcd 
family our heartfelt sympathy, in this 
their hour of sorrow, and be it further 

lifHitli'ed. That a copy «»f these 
I resoluti<^>ris I" stiif to the Ix-reaved 
family, that a copy l»e in.serted in 
the Coi,i,k,<;k siosal, and that a copy 
be place<l with the records of (iamma 
Chapter of the Fraternity. 
I.KON F. SMn... ^ p,,^ j^^. 

''""^'- (Fraternitv. 



«'IA Ii \.NI» l-«»l.i<K<il-. 
IMNH ANI> WI.NtjH ^ 



The Connecticut Valley 
Street Railway 



RoHKKT T. 
AkTMLI! S. 



Ti i-i- 



l,t t till' iiecessarv funds come in at 



riie second team Iioekey game 
scheduled with Vermont .icademy to 
be played nt .M. .\ C. rink on Mon- 
day morniiif.' w.m postponed because 
of ice condifionH. The game will be 
played later in February weather cou- 
ditloDS permittiag. 



From Amherst, vi.i Northampton, 
through the Haitield.s, past the foot 
of Sugar Loaf Mt.. alongside the 
famous itioody Mrook battle ground 
to Old Deerfield. thence to (Jreen- 
field, Turners Falls and across the 
"Plains" to Lake Pleasant, Monta- 
gue and Millers Falls. 



M) Miles of Trackage Modern 
Equipment Train DK^patch- 
ing System- Freight and Hx- 
press Service over entire line. 



ALL THE MAGAZINES 



And all Daily and Si;.iJay Papers 
with a full line of College Supplies 
may be found at 



EWELL'S 

STUDENT 
FURNITURE, 

RUGS 
CARPKTS 

Largest a.ssortmeui in New Fn- 
gland of .Special Student Furnishings. 

LOWFR KXI'K.NSFS Fnable us 
to offer an absolute lower price, 

AMHERST FURNITURE 

ANI> 

CARPET ROOMS 
E. D. HARSH. 



cox SONS 

— ANI» 

VINING 

72 74 Madison Avrniir. New York 

CAPS AND GOWNS 

ikal .VlateriaU and Workmanship 

WOODWARD'S 




LUNCH 



t^ Main St., Masonic BIdg., 
Northampton, Mass. 



Connecticut yalley Street Railway 
Company 



LUNCHES 
SODA, 



ICE CREAM, 



Chstd only from i A. M. h 4 A. M. 



treasurer of the association 



Toefll IVIientka 

Shoes siiiiieii ago Pollslieii 

Make old shoes look like new 

Neat, classy workmanship 
0|^n HaatUy M«ln 8t. 

On way to P«tt Ofic*. 



^ 



\ 



■H 



to 



The College Signal, Tuesday, February 3, 19 14 




ff 



M.A.c. Seal The Massachusetts Asriculturai College 

i~y4o*Q T'Q^^OQ Offers courses of instruction ii) twenty six teaching 

^ departments, which embrace the study of 

Agriculture, Horticulture, Science, Humanities and 

Rural Social Science- 



BENSON & HEDGES' 
25c 

:: MAKAROFF :: 
15c 



DEUEL'S DRUG STORE 

AMHERST 

Co-op Laundry 

High-Grade College Work 

LAUNDRY 

Shirts, - 10-15C 

Collars, - - 2 i-ac 

Cuffs, - - - . 2 I-2C 

Plain wash, - 48c per <loz. 

Same, rough dry, - - 30c per doz. 

DRY CLEANING AND PRESSING 

Steam Pressing, 30c a Suit 
Dry Cleaning and Pressing, #1.50 a Suit 



II. W. llHMM-K I . I Cl K-.f;. 

Put full name and address on laundry 

AMHERST eOOK STORE 



Loose - Leaf Note Books and 
Fountain Pens 

Before buying elsewhere, see our assort- 
ment of pennants and banners 

CUKRAN & DYER. Propa. 



FLORICULTURE 
DEPARTMENT 



Buy your flowers of the floricul- 
tural department. The new green- 
houses are now producing first class 
material and we have excellent roses, 
carnations.violets and chysanthemums 
in their season. Telephone or leave 
your orders at the office in French 
Hall. These will receive prompt 
and careful attention. Liberal dis- 
count on prices to students. 

TELEPHONE— 300 



A student may specialize in the following subjects 



Agriculture 

Agronomy 

Animal Husbandry 

Dairyinig 

Poultry Husbandry 



Horticulture 

Floriculture 

Forestry 

Landscape (lardening 

Pomology 



Agricultural Chemistry 
Economic Entomology 
Plant Physiology and Pathology 
Agricultural Education 



For complete catalog and illustrated booklet, write 
KENYON L. BUTTERRIELD, President 

AMHERST. MASS. 



SIGNAL DIRECTORY 



Juiut C<»unuittee uu luterectlU'giali- .Vthletics, 

'J'he College Senate, 

Football Association, 

Uuseball Association, 

Truck Association, 

Hockey Association, 

Tennis Association, 

Uitle club. 

Roister Doisters 

Musical Association, 

Niueteen Hundred Fourteen Index, 

Nineteen Hundred Fifteen Index, 

M. A. C'. Christian Association. 

M. A. C. Catholic Club, 

Fraternity Conference, 

Stockbridge Club, 



IMiilip H. .Smith, Secretary 

1). \V. Jones, I'lesident 

,1. A. Prire, Manager 

(i. D. .Melican, .Manager 

K. C. Edwarda, Manager 

.1. 1). Pellett, .Manager 

U. E. MacLain, Manager 

J. T. Oertel, President 

I). .1. lA'wis, Manager 

H. 1). Hrown, Manager 

E. S. Clark, Jr.. Manager 

li. M. Rogers, Manager 

K. H. Powers, President 

I). A. Coleman, I'resideul 

.1. 1). Pellett, President 

N. H. hearing, President 



M^ 



Hhen Fitting Out Your Room 

Remember that Jackson & Cutler are headquarters for 

Blankets, Sheets, Pillow Cases, Comfortables, 

Towels, Etc. Also denims for 

that corner seat. 



JACKSON & CUTLER 



Barsalotti & Gentoso 

Cigars Cigarettes 

Nice Line Fresh Candy 

ice Cream, Fruit, Soda, Etc. 

The Right (ioods at the Right Prices 

Open till II o'clock EVERY night 
C«rser Ankity Mod Pleaaaut Htrrrls 



If yoa want to be 

HOLIO WITH THK filRLS 

jrou miint hitve your dothen prttntcil and rleanfd 

AT BPSTBZBr'S 

II A ratty St. Maroon Store 

PrMstng anil Cleanlnfr a A|>»T.ialty 

MoBt lil>eral ticket syMtem In town 
T«l. 30.1-I1 



Jacob Reed's Sons are the leading manufacturers of 

UNIFORMS 

For college and military schools, and have won and 
maintain their prestige by sheer merit. The uni- 
forms worn at Massachusetts Agricultural College 
are finished examples of our product. 

Jacob Reed's Sons, 

Makers of "Gold Medal Uniforms. " 

1434-1426 Chestnut St., Philadelphia, Pa. 



E. E. MILLETT 

JEWELER ANi> OPTOMETRIS'I 

Lenses ground while you wait 
College Jkwhlky 
Violin, Banjo, Mandolin and (iuitar Strn 

AMHKKiST, »IAss. 
Next to Post Office. 



STKAM FITTING. Telephone w * 

GAS FITTING, TINNING. 

P. W. Dance & Co. 

PLUMBERS. 



Specialty of Repairing 

Church Windows, 
Memorial Winuows, 
Lead Lu.hts, &c. 
• Clifton Ave.. AMHERST. MA.ss 



(.'.italoKiif, of 

Are out. Copy mailed to any addrr<i-t. ( i.i;»-^<- 
Students and AthWtes who want the leal. svi\»-< t 
articles (or tlie Various sports should insist ti; . r, 
those hearinK the Wright & Ditson Trade Mjit 



Foot Ball 
Baalcet Ball 
Hockey 
Skates 




5kat'K5hoes 
Sweaters 
Jerseys 
Uniforms 
for all sports 



Wright & Ditson (loods are the ■^trfiidatii ' 
all sports 

t44 Washington >t, Hoston, M- 



THE TERPSY PARLOR 

CL.EANSINO. 

PRESSING. 

REPAIRING. 

Ualrkeat t»er»ler. H^at Work, Lowml l'n.»- 

All woik carefully done. Work called fur and 
delivered, (rents' overcoats, suits, parity anH 
coats. Ladies' tine linen suit* a specialty 

reams will call every day at M. A (- 

Wn. FRANKLYN, Prop. 



Rear Nash Brk. Amherst. 



Tal. No i«J-« 



CARS 



Leave AOOIE COLLEGE for HOL- 
YOKE at 15 min. paat the hour. 



CARS 



Leave AMHERST for AUQIE COL- 
LEGE at 7 and 37 min. past the hour. 

SpcciiU Car* at RcMonablc RatM 



AIHERST & SUNDERLAND ST. BY. CO 

For a Daily and .Sunday .New.-i ii>e' 
Vou should Read 

Springfield Republicao 

While y<iu are at college in Am'.i* 
It linn nil of The M. A. C. NfWa 
Tlif llfHl SpnrliliK NeWH 
Full (ii-iKTnl NfWM 
A Strong KtlltorlMl Pmk« 
Iiil«*r4>8tinK KenliirfM 
It i* a Kcnl Nrwnpnii^T 

Daily, 3 cents ; 70 cents a mont) 
a quarter. 

Sunday, 5 cents; 50 cents a qua: 

Subscribe by mail or through the Anihc 
dealer. 



•i.cc 




COLLEGE SIGNAL 

MASSACHUSETTS AORICULTURAL COLLEGE 



XXIV. 



Amherst, Mass., Tuesday, February 10, 1914. 



No. 18 



bENIORS STILL AHEAD 

H etball Victories Go to Seniors and 
Freshmen in Fast Games. 

I iu' ItuNketbull seuKOii w:is contin- 
luii «Mi Tliurstluy evening, when tlit; 
Aeiiiors defeated the juniors 21-16, 
ih i the freshmen won from the Hoph- 
M-i res 20-1.'.. 

ill the first half of senior-junior 

L'Mii.e. tlie jtiniorH Miiowed Hiirprising 

work, uiid several times were 

,: il. The t»enior8. howisii. «:iine 

X k strong and tinaiiy manuged to 

will out by five points. Edgertou. 

will* ih out of the game hecaiise of an 

iiijiired ankle, wuh liudly luisHcd liy 

tli< senior teiiiu, which did not show 

ij' MS well us in former games. Ilad- 

' V\ and Smith played well for the 

Miiiuis, while Frost wsm easily the 

i!ar for the juiiiorri. 

Neither the freshmen nor »opho- 

- -lixwfd gooil form, yet the 

game WUH Mo cloHe thut the fellows 

aere kept in u eontiniiul roar. The 

frinhiueu managed to get the lea<] in 

!Ih' first half, and held it the rest of 

tilt <>:tme. (iruyson was easily the 

the fiesbineo, while Ilall and 

i.i 'I played liest for the sophomores. 

I Ik- »iiiiim:.rv will lie (tmw\ oB 



i'.t^'' 



TWO ALUMNI REUNIONS 
liosTox, Fkb. 13. At 6 o'clock p. 
'■\ this date the M. A. C. Alumni 
i'l of .MuKsachiisctts will ast»eiul)le 
'! tlii-ir aniiiinl reunion nnd dinner 
»!if American House. The speak- 
viil lie Prof. Edward M. I.«wis, 
Aeliiig President, M. A. C. : Pn)f. 
< urry S. Hicks. l)irectt>r <jf Physicnl 
I'lii'.ttion ami Hygiene. Philip H. 
>miih IJT, and Harold M. fJore 'l.J. 
**ruiNciKiKi.i», Fkii. 21. The Con- 
necticut Valley Alumni association 
wi!i hold its annual lianipiet at the 
^\<'ilhy during the evening of the 
-l>t. Acting I'resident Lewis and 
I'lof, Curry S. Hicks are two of the 
-jic.-iheni. 

ivvo meetings <leserve the 
|"'^i hearty sup|>ort nnd largest possi- 
! tendance An excellent op|>or- 
to get together, hear live news 
liat is taking place on the cara- 
• nd to make plans for attending 
ihiinni night and open house at 
'liege CD Feb. 2H. 



hi, 



[III 
til. 



— Mr. and .Mrs. Kalpli I). 
'''■'■M announce the arrival of a 
'liiiu hter, Deborah Champion, on 
•*' t. Their home is at 432 Main 
^ VjiK-hester. 



MID-YEAR ALUMNI DAY 



RELAY TEAM LOSES 



Graduates and Former Students of M. A. C. Invited as Guests of 

the Undergraduates on February 28. An Inter- 

esting Program Arranged. 

(;hai)i;ate.s and fokmeh stidents 

oK TIIK. 

MA.SSA( III SETT.s A(;KI( I III RAI. COM.Er.E 

are invitetl to visit the College, .Saturday. Feb. 2«. us guests of the stu- 
dents and faculty. The following program has been arranged : 
Saturday, \-'M) v. m. — Hockey CJume (weather permitting). 

2-."{0 I'. M. — Interclass rrack .Meet. 

i>-0<) p. M. — .Supper at Diaper Hull 

x-OO I'. M. — Entertainment in Chapel. 
Sumluy, \\-\:< A. M. — Sunday Chapel. Speaker, l{c\ . Herlierf .1 White mT. 

Come and see the College in operation and at*quaiiil yourself with wliut 
the students are doing in their various aetivities. 

Come prepared to remain over night. The students will provide free 
entertainment. 

We want yon to be here and help make this (irst mid-year event a siicceaa. 

Headipiurters will lie at the Social Cnion Uooiii in North College. 
Please answer befon- I'di. 2t'.. 

I). \V. .I..NK>. I'residont of tin- Student .Senate. 
E. M. I.i WI-, .Veting President of the College. 



The tiist annual mid-year alumni day will be held on the .M. A. C. cam- 
pus Saturday, Feb. 2M. IU14. Plans have Imcm nmde to mukc this a gala 
event of the college year, an op|>ortiinity for eaeh and every alumnus, 
graduate or not, to see the new M. A. C. in sound working order, (iradu- 
ates have returned in the past but it has U'en usually at coinmen<fmeiit. 
when everything is in holiday dreas and when play ami not work is up|ter- 
most in the minds of all. 

With the idea of giving the uliiiiini a chance to see the college at II to, 
dav in and day out, the president up|H>inted a committee to arrange for a 
mid-vear alumni day. H. .1. Watts '07 was made permanent chairman niul 
the various siib-<-ommiltees were headed by iindeigraduates. 'I'he commit- 
tee decidetl to send out .1 general invitation to all alumni through the c<il- 
umns of the .Sioxai.. For that purpose, the student Inxly generously voted 
to forego their copies for this week in order that as many almni as [tossible 
might be supplied. 

A vcrv interesting program has lieen arrange*!, starting with a hoekey 
game, weather permitting ; ami the annual interclass indo«>r tra<-k meet in 
the drill hull Saturday alternoon. At live o'cha-k an alumni supper will i>e 
served in Draper Hull. Here prominent alumni will s|K-ak and the apeecbes 
will be short and snappy. Most f»f them will be improm{>tu. After sup|M>r 
the gathering will adjourn to the ebapel where a vaudeville show will 
be staged. All of the different college activities will be exhibited at the 
show ineluding dramatics and musical clubs. The committee |»romises 
"some show." Siin<lay morning the usual Sunday chapel exercise will be 
a(hliessed bv a prominent uIiiiiiimi.m. Eveiy visitor is welcome f<, this 

service. 

.Sleeping acconiino<lations will lie provided by the students so no one 
need worrv about a "bunk." .lust drop a postal saying I'm coming to 
that alumni day to st.iy over Saturday night" an<l the ( uiiunittee will see to 
It that yon have a |»lace to slee|t. 

The benefits of sm-h an alumni day t() those in attendance eannot be 

overestimated. 

[Continued on page a.] 



In Triangular Meet with W. P. L and 
Boston College at B. A. A. Games. 

The relay team lost a hard-fought 
race with Worcester Polytechnic in- 
stitute and liosion college at the H. 
A. X. games in Mechanics Hall, 
Hoslon. Saturday night. After the 
tlrst two laps Tech went to the front, 
obtaining a lead which she kept to 
the eiul. Keith, her star quarter-miler 
and anchor man, crossing the final 
line in the fast time of 3 min., 14 l-'> 
aec. 

.Sturtevant started the race for M. 
A. C. and fought for the lead 
throughout the tlrst two laps. On 
the third lap Uee<l of Worcester suc- 
ceede<l in freeing himself from the 
others atxl finishetl 4 yartU ahead of 
Sturtevant, who passed a 1-yartl 
lead over li(>st«>n college to liaer, the 
sec*ond Aggie runner, liaer ran a 
fast race and held this leatl until the 
luHt bank, when .Mctiovern, the Itoa- 
ton college man. passed him, finish- 
ing ■'> yards ahead. When Smith, 
the third Aggie man. reached the 
first bunk the other two na'n were 
fuirly well down the straightaway. 
Murphy, uf lioslx>i) college gaining 
conHitlernbly on his tag, hati a start 
of 1(» yards, with Worcester Ti yarda 
iu the lead. Murphy cut ilown the 
distance ta-tween hiiiiselt and Uusaell 
of Worci*sler, but could not manage 
to gain any more over Smith. Illoa- 
trom, the anchor man. ran well for 
his first two laps, but on the third 
lap lost steadily. Worcester Tech 
finished l'> yards ahead of liostnn 
college and :5<i yards aheatl of .M. A. 
C , in .'J: 14 l-.'>. Aggie's time for 
her four men was M min. 20 sec. 
Captain Nicolet wus unable to com- 
pete on account of a strained shoul- 
der caused by a fall on the track in 
pnictice earlier in the week. 

In the Harvard-Cornell short dis- 
tance relay race, which set up new 
worhl's figures for the event, Dave 
Caldwell, ex-'l.'J, ran third for Cor- 
nell. With 2.'» yards to make up, 
Dave was f>vertakirig his man with 
all his old time speed, and had 20 
yards of it made up when he fell on 
hii> second lap and though he was up 
and off ngain like a flash, could not 
regain the lost <listftnce. 

The worhl's record for the l.'ifiO- 
yard relay was shattered again later 
in the evening, when the crack B. A. 
A four. Burns, Merrihew, (iram and 
Halpin went inUi their race against 



[Continued on page a] 



ALUMNI NUMBER 



M '' 




The College Signal, Tassday, February 



lo, 1914. 



The College Signal, Tuesday. February 10, 1914 




MID YEAR ALUMNI DAY 

ICuntiiuied tfoni page i. 



First: It will give the uluuini 11 cUniue to see the college in working 



onk'i . 

SeconiJ : It will give the :ilunmi n <li;iii<e to see the growth of the col- 
lege in the past few veiirs. 

Third : It will tend to make mine ellleieiit co-operation and greater 
cordiality between undergraduates and ahinini. 

Fourth : It will give cuch alinliniis a chance to meet the rest of the 
hoys. 

Tile att'uir has heeu set for Salunlav so men can get away from business, 
It has been set in the winter because many alumni are farmers and can best 
ijti :iw.i\ ;it that time* 

riie stiides that M. A. C. has nuide in the past few years can hardly be 
comprehended Itv anyone who has not visited the college recently. The ^j^'-' Skates, 
alumnus who has noi Itecn in Andierst since l'.Ml."i can hardly appreciate the 
growth. If after seeing it he tloesn't go back home, shove out his chest 
and say '-(Hi y< >i. I oinc uttended M. A. <' " he will l>f an ixicption to the 



PAGE'S SHOE STORE 



INVEINTORY SALE 

$2.00 Skates, 



$1.50 

$2.25 



$3.50 Skating Shoes. $2.7H 
$5.00 Tan Shoes, $3.95 



rule 



Repairing— Goodyear System 



The students anlently (lesire to l)e on cordial terms with the alumni, but 
cordiality can scarcely exist lietween strangers. If im|)lies getting toirether 
and meeting each other. 

Sonn- alumni haven't seen tin it.->t <if the boys since giaduation. lleie's v .^ 1%. /W "B"^ ^ 
your chan<e. He at .M . A. ('. Feb. 2s and you'll sec them, talk with them, J^ -^^^ -^^A -MlV ^ 
swap yams and in general have the time of your life. The M. A. ('. watch- j 
word this year is "Boost OKI Aggie." .The motto of the class of I'.MC. is 
"He there." Combiue the two. .-ibuni. ••Ue there" and "ItoostOld Aggie." 
Talk it up with the rest of the "grads." liring along a couple if you can 
Hemeniber 

I^t the committee know you're couiing. 

He in Amherst Satunlay morning Feb. :i?s, IIM I. 

Come prepate^i fur ibe time of y«xir life. 



r? 



F»A01 



THE 



Hooverfi Smith Go. 



RELAY TEAM LOStS 

[Continued from pafcttl 



N. V. A. C. with the determination 
to n;^ain their lost honors. Tom 
Hatpin, tin I'.. \ \ nn hoi man. 
unotlici.'illy covered his distance in 
the wonderful tin-e of II 2-.'» se*-., 
luHering the iccord to .'i min. •'• :)-•'» 
•ec., .H-A of a second Iwttvr than 
Harvard's time earlier in the evening. 

The other records l»roken «iuring 
the evening were the Harvard-Yale 
:i 1 20 yard relay race in 7 min. ;{ l-.'» 
sec, « !-.'» seconds faster than the 
previous dual relay reconl for the 
812U yards between the t«.. univer- 
sities, and the tiecisive victory of 
Kramer in the three-mile run. whose 
time of 14 min. I.*} 2-."> sec. established 
a new indoor record for the distance 
in a hall, exclusive of armories. 

The next meet in whi* h the track 
team will compete will be held in 
Providence on Feb. 2H. when they 
will meet Rhode Island and will 
probably be their la»t indoor meet of 
the veai .iw.iv from home. 



eniy, Feb. 14, :ind se»' "The ConuHly 
of Krrois.'" Then \<)ii will realize 
wliil \ oiii college is capable of doing. 

j Freshmen — here's vour chance to 
show true college spirit and get an 

' eviMiing's enjoyment at thesauu- time. 

j KverylMMly lakes in the I'rom shows, 

! whole classes migrate to llamp that 
night ! Show us that IIM 7 is as loyal 

I a!» the rest ! 

Short horiiK — you have little oppor- 
timity to see much of <»ur college 
life, but the I'rom show gives you a 
chance to we one of the biggest 
social functions of the year. (live 
us ytMir siippoit and let the ct>llege 
know that yon have her intersts at 
heart. 



6t6 Chestnut St., Philadelphia 

Jewelers and Silversmiths, 
Diamond Merchants 

Philadelpliia's Official Fraternity Jeweler 

SPECIALISTS IN 
Fraternity Badges, Fobs, Novelties, 

Rings, Charms Prises Trophies. 

Medals College Pins, Fobs, Seals, 

Rings, Charms.-. 




Pheasani 

amit? St.. 
Bmberet 

Telephone 470 



BKKAKrAST 

LUNCH BON 
AfTERNOON TBA 



l>iBiMr t( arranged for. 



JUNIOR PROM SHOW 

Seniors — <lo you realize that this 
is your last opportunity to see an 
Aggie production as undergraduates? 
Don't mi.ss this last opportunity — the 

best ever ' ,Scc MINI college !_M \ e il> 

first Shakespearean production. 

.Juniors — remember it is your turn 
to make merry at Prom tune this 
year. Don't miss the show, even 
though you're not taking in the Prom. 
Get a girl and be there strong ! 

Sophomores — you have never had 
a chance to see what Aggie can do 
ahmg dranuitics lines under favorable 
conditions, come over to the Acad 



MONTANA ALUMNI WELCOME 
PROFESSOR WAUGH 

Profes.sor Waugh was one of the 
leading speakers at tlie "Farmers' 
Week" held at the .M«)nlana Agricul- 
tural college. Jan. -il-i'It. His prin- 
cipal talks were : "A Better Place to 
Li\e, ' >neAutifying the Home." and 
"The Next Steps in Agriculture." 

While in Mozeman. Professor 
Waugh was the guest of honor at a 
banquet given by the local M. A. ('. 
alumni. Those present were .Mr. 
and Mrs. F. S. Cooley 'mm, Mr. 
li. A. C<K>ley '!!.'., Mr. and Mrs. H. 
.M. .Fennison 'OH. Mr. and Mrs. J. U. 
Parker 'OH, Mr. and Mrs. L. (;. 
Schermerhoin '10; and Mr. and Mrs. 
O. 15. Whipple (graduate student 
H>04-0r>). 

Professor Waugh also gave several 
lectures before the annual meeting of 
the Montana Horticultural society at 
Missoula. 



E.B. DICKINSON D.D.S. 

Williams Block, Amherst, Mass 

Orrici Hours: 
Oto lU A..2M. A.UOto«SS>.2MI« 



S. S. HYDE 

JEWELER & OPTICIAN 



Now at ij Pleasant St. 



Oculists' Prescriptions Filled 

Kroken Lenses .Accurately Repbred 
Fine Watch Repairing Promptly and 
.Skilfully Done 



Satisfaction Guaranteed 



For the Prom .^ 

CANDY THAT PLEASES 

n.AINrV, DKLir.HrFUL AND |)ELICIOi;S IKJ.s'T half express rHB SAI 1- 
FACTION' AMI PI.KASITRK YOU WILL HAVE WHEN Vol? PURCHASE ( ASn\ 
FROM US. OUR CANDY PLEASES BF.CAl?SE IT KEI'RFiiENTS rHE HEKiHH' 
OF PKRFECTION. THE ( ONFECTIONERS THAT MAKE OUR CANDIES V>> 
NOIHIM. l:l I IIIKIINK-I \ M ' IIK^T I .MJR EDIEN IS, AND SKILLED WoRK 
MANSHIP RENI>KKs iT IllV^lVd ro louKAT AS WELL AS lO lASIr 

We have just received from the factories espe- 
cially for the PROM the following brands: 

IIGGETT'S, FISH'S. COLONIU AND BEtlE MEltD SWEETS 



THE HENRY ADAMS CO., Druggist! 



The REXALL Store 



ON THE CORNER 



MRS. MCLAIN IN SOCIAL 
UNION. 

An extremely interesting and well- 



DYNAMITE ON THE FARM 

A special illustrate<l lectuiv dh 
•Dynamite on the Farm" will be 
iidere.l program of readings was I given in Room M Flint Laboratory, 
veil at the Chapel on Saturday j Tuesday evening. Feb. 17. P.» 14. at 
vening, to a large an.l appreciative i 7.00 r. m. A set ..f sii<li.s prepared 
iidience. The entertainer of the | |,y the Diipont com|)any. showing 
v.iiing was Mrs. .Maig.iret H. Me- | what dynamite is, how toset a charge, 
.:iin wife of Prof. M( Lain of the ! |,ow tcj iX|. lode il, what it is capable 
Kiilty. The prt.gram was varied, I „f d«.ing in dearing stumpy or rocky 



uiitaining both poetry and prose. 
The first number was Kipling's "Story 



lany, and comparing its cost with 
other methods of clearing lan«l, will 



.f L'ng." For her seet.iKl number. | he shown. The sli<les will be accorn- 
Mrs. McLain selected a piece which | ,,,,„i^.,| |,y an interesting leetuie given 
iiised great meriment. It was tme \,y „„ authority (.11 the subject of 

blasting. Dynamite is rapidly Ih'coiii- 
ing one <>r the most important agents 
in reclaiming land. siibHoiling, blast- 
ing, digging post-holfs, holes for tele- 



( I VI If Fitcli's famoiiK c«>llegt 
stories, •'Formality at Old Siwnsh " 
The Kxplorer," l»y Kipling followed 
;iid it was finely rendered. A scene 
:10m "Rebecca «»f Siiiuiybi'o<»k 
I arm," by Kate Douglas Wiggin 
• :uiie next, and Mr^^. .MeLain made 



phone :\ii<l other poles, and for r^etting 
trees. .Slidi's will be shuwii illustrat- 
ing the valur I'f tlii> i\|>li»i\i' in al 



h.r iharacterit to actually seem to j t|,eij«. lines and many othti > llvery- 

onc is cordially invite*! to come, see 
the pic'tiires. hear the lecture, and 
learn how to use this valuable agent 
recently ailde*! to the list of rewnu'ces 
available to the farmer f«»r putting 
his land in c4mdition for raising '.Him- 
[H'V crops, an<l for enaiiling him to 
sniHiue land what has alw.avs been 
unavailable for agrii-ultural (Mirposes. 
Short courae me 1 in particular are 
) invited to attend this lecture. \\<>^\ 
of you have some such problem to 
face when v«mi return to voiir farms 



ive, as she depicted the happenings 
..f a day in the life of that well- 
known character. She showed her 
'4reat ability in the potrayal of the 
liiTerent characters. The final niim- 
l>er. "The Corner of my Library" by 
Ibissell W'hitcoiiib was tliiely given. 
I lie students were very fortunate in 
MTiiring such an interesting enter- 

1 iiifi . 



'08. — Lloyd W ( hapmaii is in 
liarge of the research laU^ratory of 
ur Hogtonaml Montana amalgamate.l ' »« l»«« ''i'^'» worke.h.iit in th.- prepar 
..|.|.er .oinpany. f;i.at Falls. Mont . 1 »»•"» "f ll»t'««*" pietun- 




THE 
SMOOTHEST 



All the cc;aforts — 

^XTien { ooJ fulows get loffclKcr— 
t!»ai Velvet is nipretne T hii lu- 
fc-rb leaf has hung in the wareiiouse 
over tMo years — a tremendous 
rliangc — all harshoc^ is nuHifirt] — 
'lie leal grovs rich — reniarkal I - 
Tiontli — and in the pipe, Yc goc' I 
what a smok I It's too mooth to 
blip — toomrllow In be f "ythinj? b* t 
tKebe»l»m< keonc-"*'- Tiiat'swl / 
it's called Velvet. One tia b ft 
tcvdatioii. At all dealers. 




Voii c.in finil f\(i vtliino in tht 



Full 



Dress 



Line 



Ihtc .111(1 tlu |)ii<<^ wiii inlri'>l \'>u. 



SANDERSON & THOMPSON 



School and College Pbotograpbcrs . . . 




LOCALLY: 52 Center St., Northampton Mass.. 

and South Hadley, Mass. 



M \IS OhFK r: 

1546-1548 HroaHway, 

.\r;w N Ork City 



J hr.se .Miidios offer ihr lirM skilled 
arttftts and most complete 

equipntrnt obtainat)le 




WE SOLICIT YOLTI PATRONAGE 



In so far as our benefits .in mutual. 



THE AMHERST CAS C0.\1PANY 

Evorythiing Ellectrical 



FOUNTAIN PEN "»» 

Minimize your foutitain pen ^^ 

troubles by ownlnft a Moore's. « I» Is the s,^^ 
safeflt. soundest and most dependable pen known. -. 
Cits strength lies in its very simplicity. Nuthlnft 
flnikv toftet out of order. C. Vou can give your 
self no better treat than a M«K>re"s Non-leakabic 



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Full Two 
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The Colltge Signal, Tnesday, February lo, 1914. 



THE COLLEGE SIGNAL 

Published every Tuesday evening by 
the Students of the Massachusetts 
A|[rioultural College. 



BOABD OP IDITOBB. 

CHESTER K. WHEKLER'u. Editor! 



FRANK W. Bl'F.I.I. '15. ManaRing 

HAROLD C. BI-ACK '14. Competition 
HAROLD I. CLAY "m. Assistant 

S rUART B. FOS lEK '14. Athletic 

ERVINE F. PAKKFR'i4, Alumni 

J. ALBEKT I'RICR'15. Athlftic 

GEO. E DONNELL 'i?. Department 
EARLE S. DRAfEK "15. Athletic 

TYLER S. ROCERS '16. C impus 

CHARLES \V. CL'RTIN'iA. Alumni 



n-Chief 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 
Editor 



BUSINESS DEPARTMENT. 

ERNEST S. CLARK. IR. '14. Bu» Manager 
MAURICE J. CLOl'GH '15. Ass't Bus Mgr. 
ERNEST F. UPTON '14. Advertising Manager 
W. RICHARD SEARS '15. A«t. \dr Manager 
CHAS A. HUNTINGTON, | K. '16. Circulation 



Subscription ft. 50 per ^ar. Single 
copies, s cents. Make all orders payable 
to Ernest S. Ci.akk, Jr. 

Eiilerwd M Moonrf-cteM mattar at the Amh«r« 
rm» Offie*. 

Vol. XXIV. Tuesday, Fkb. 10. No. 18 
** Boost Old Aggie.** 



The titudeuts have plaiiiio<i tbiH 
year for a mul-Year Aliinuii Dny to 
be held 011 Uu' -'Stii of February. 
This is a ik>w idea, and it is boped 
tbat tbe Aliiiiini will re«|MUid well tbis 
year, so tbat a sticcesufid nlart may 
be inacle. Tbe present jdaiis are to 
bold sucb an event eaeb year during 
tbe winter season. Many Alumni re- 
turn to tlieir Alma Mater at the time 
of commencement, but few. especially 
the older Alumni, oome to look her 
over during the school year. Tiie 
idea is to have all former stutlents. 
whether graduates or not, come bark 
for a get-together day with the un- 
dergraduates as the luMtts. We stu- 
dents invite you, tbe Alumni, to come 
and help to make our first raid<;ear 
event a su(>ce8s. 



Many changes have taken place in 
the College in the last few years. 
Tbe un«lergra<liiate Innly has grown 
by leaps and bound.H, the teaching 
force has enlarged greatly, new build- 
ings have sprung up. .-iinl a syste- 
matic plan for the layout of I be cam- 
pus is in effect. You of the Aliiiuni 
who have not been here foi a long 
time, should make every effort to l>e 
here on Feb. 2« We know that by 
so doing, you will ba\e an added in- 
terest in the great iuHiilution which 
bears tbe name of tbe Old Hay State, 
and that the great love that you al- 
ready bold for her will l>o increased 
tenfold. 



The Collctc Signal, Taesday, February lo, 1914. 



SPRINGFIELD ALUMNI ATTEN- 
TION. 

A iiioveiiient is on foot in -M. A. C. 
to from a "Springtieiil ( liili," tbe 
members of which hIiuII lie mtii wliusc 
homesare in Si)ringliol(l. All ahimni 
who woidd c<»n8ider joining this club 
are urged to write to [..ester 
Needbam, Kapi»a Sigma House, 
Massachusetts Agriciiituial College, 
Amherst. 



MEETING OF MARLBORO CLUB 

The Marlboro M. A. ('. club met 
at the Gleason bouse, Marlboro, Dec. 
30, for an informal banquet. A 
very pleasant evening was passed 
during which all the old spirit was 
revive*!. 

David (loodale 'H2 was elected 
[)re.Hident ; Arthur M. Nourse 'Hit 
was elected vice-president, and Wil- 
liam K. Howe *08 secretary-treasurer. 
The following men were present : 
.1. J. Shaughnessy *87, K. D. Howe 
'HI, L. K. Smith '91), J. W. Allen 
'97, F. H. Hrown '(M), D C.ooilale 
'82, C. A. Nutting 'W, T. V. Felt.m 
'90, A. M. Nourse '89, W . L. Howe 
•OH, J. .1. Badger ami C. K. Hiickky, 
short course, and Haskcl. 





THERMOS 






CARAFE 


/^B 


L 


Have a Hot Coffee in Ycur Room. 


^^^^^^^^^F^ * ^^^^^ 


Fill at the cart Slay hot 24 bout s 


^^^^Hr iM 


Other styles for tramps. 




KEEPS HOT KEEPS COID 




DEUFJ.'S DRUG STORE 



NINETEEN.THIRTEEN NOTES 

BO.STON BANgUKT. 

February tbe l.'ith — Massachusetts 
Alumni Clid» banquet. We want a 
big delegation from "1913". (iet 
there eaily and we will hohl a regular 
•'1913" reunion Iwfore the curtain 
goes up. American House — Be 
there! \ 

\l.l MM NUilir. 

February 28tb — Alumni Night, 
••I9I.S", y<ni are the invitetl guests of 
thi- "i:U3 ' .M. A.C. Club of Amherat 
— w:it( li this spare I 

ATHLETIC KIEI.H ItllKiET. 

< bir athletic field fnn<l has passed 
tlie five huntlted dollar mark— ^r.OH.oo 
to l»e exact. W-bo is the next? 
NEWS rrEMs. 

Harold W. Curtis, Newton Theo- 
logical Institution, address Sturtevant 
Hall, Newton Centre. 

The Southern 1913 Club hehi a 
banquet in the Winecoff Hotel, 
Atlanta, (ia., on l>ec. 30. Anioag 
tboae present were C«io|>er and 
•♦Micky" Klls. 

John L. Selden, instructor, Bristol 
academy. Bristol, Vt. 

Thomas 1*. Duoley, Itoston Normal 
scb(K>l. Home address. 320 Silver 
.St., .South lloHton. 

Charles D. Walker. Trinid:i<i Sugar 
Co., Trinidad, Cuba. 

Herbert ('. Iliitchingsis tree exi)ert 
foi tbe Albert W. iXnlge Co. 

It is reported that Bernard J. 
Kelley is a farm manager in Hamilton. 

Clyde M Packard is employed by 
the national bureau of entomology, 
and is located at ilagerstown. Md. 

Harry W. Allen is located at the 
government entomological parasite 
ialK>ratory at Melrose Highlands. 

George W. Barber has recently 
receive<l an appointment to service 
in the U. S. bureau of entomology, 
and is now located at Hyattsville.Md. 

Joseph J. Pillsbury is at present 
engaged in field work on the gipsy 
moth, with headquarters at the gov- 
ernment entomological parasite lab- 
oratory at Melrose Highlands. 

Ralph W Howe has been located 
for some fim< Tallulah, La. He 
holds an appointment under the 
r. S. bureau of entomology and is 
engaged in work on the cotton boll 
weevil. He has been travelling (pjite 
extensively through several of the 
cotton states. 



UNITY CHURCH 

North Pleasant St. 

A Church home of the lilieral Kaith, 

where every student will meet 

with a cordial welcome. 

KKOt'l-AK Hl'NUAV HKKVICK AT 7 f M 



E. RUSSELL NORTON 



SALES AOKNT 



Davenport Miller 
Vein Coal 

Best Quality Pennsylvania Coal 



boston office 
8$ Water St. 



NEW YORK OFFICE 
I Broadway 



<( 



SCOTTTE" 
H. HOOPER 

Will (lean arid pres.s your clothes so you 

will l>e satisfied, ft costs no more 

and he is nearer to "Aggie." 

I IRKRAt IK Kl-T SYSTBM 

Under Columbia Cafe 



COLLEGE SHOES 

We carry the largest liiu n, 
the state outside of BoNt'ti 



Seeourlineof Drill Shoes 

$2.00 to $4.00 



MODERN REPAIR 
DEPARTMENT 



E.M.BOLLES 



(OM VOUn %VAV TO p. OJ 



FLEMING'S SHOE STORE 



Northampton 



LOW PRICE TAILORING CO 

sriLS MADE TO ORDKK 

.Suits flpaned, rre*ipd and Dyed All V\- 
l< • tor Ladips an?; Upntlemen m-.it • ■ 

II: ,'■ work by first c1as^ tailor. W tk 

called for and deliverpd. S^ll tickets for (<if<<'>ing. 

4 SUITS FOR li.so 

GEORGE KOroWITZ. Pnop 

Mam >tropt. Anlher^t. Ma»». N." ' I '"^ 

( >n your way <o the Post CHSce. 



I. M. LABROVITZ, Custom Tailor 

Fashions, Fit, First Class Work Guaranteed 

I arge a.ssortment on hand. (HINT'S FUKMSHIN(.S. Red Man Coll 

Dress Shirts. Cleaning and Pressing. URKSS Sl'ITS 
TO KKNT. -Military Collars and Gloves. 

II AMITY ST., Telephone 302 W. AMHERST, MASS. 



Now i.s the time to be planning for 

Fraternity Qroup5 

Have them taken at 

MISS McCLELLAN'S STUDIO 

44 Slate Street, . - - . Northampton, \Ia>- 



COMMUNICATIONS 

I ii!nu lications tu tlie Signal concerning 
.,, liters of K«n*'i' interest are welcomed. '1 he 
Sh.n^i. is out tu b« held respnnsible for the 
i.|iiiii(iiis thus expressed.) 

Kkitoiuj, Collkgk Sionai . 
/Mir Hirm: 

.Vs one who servetl on the SitiNAi- 
f.»i four vearH while in college, I nmy 
claiin to know a little about the task 
(utifrontiu^ the aluiuni editor. I 
mo8t heartily agree with Mr. VVattH 
that it iH nut an easy problem to eilit 
a Hatisfaetoiy eolumu uf aluiuni news. 
Ami this for the very g<MKl reason 
that the neWH in not at hand ; gener- 
ally speaking, our uluinni will not 
>teu(i in the newH items tbat eome 
Id their uotiee. It is a regretable 
state of affairs, fur the aluinui of 
uiir college occupy prominent jilaees 
,h many linen of emieavor :iii<l their 
tioiugs are of interest to the uiuler- 
graduates as well as to their class- 
iiiates You cannot, ht)wever. ex- 
pect an uiitiergratliiate. even though 
he l>e an alumni editor, to have at 
lii^ command. DewM of «>hler grutlii- 

:<'.>. unless they themselves send it 
III, In the last analysis, therefore, 
the success or fiiilure of such a col- 
unin de|HMu1s U|m>u the alumni theiii- 
M«>|vi- If eontlilioii^ li;i\i- nut 

':!.:•< I ;;ie.iliy, I «ill venture tin 
;.-i»<Mliciii th il ;>t least two thirds ot 
the alumni notes appearing, coiuc 
Ii'<»ni a very small group <»f men wiio 
have euough at heart the interests of 

I I'uper as a tie binding the aliinini 
to the college, to put time and lalK>r 
intrj the task of collecting news of 
thin wjrl an«l seeing that it reaches 
tbe HHiNAi.. Atui let me here hrv 
tbat tbase few live wires iM*attered 
through the different classea are 
blessed again and again by giicceiling 
*'iov\i, boards. 

VtMirs for "Old Aggie." 

.Mll.l.RK .loRllAS. 'KJ. 



KniToR itV TIIK ColXKOK .S|(iNAi., 

Ih-itr Sir : 

As an alumnus I am very much in- 
terested in the communication piib- 
biishcd in the .Sujnai. un<ler date of 
l>ec. Hi, and the replies made hy 
incm>>crs of the alumni. 

The entire question concerning the 
spirit which tin- alumni should show 
to the editor of the Sionai.. and also 
t«» the work which should be done by 
the SiiiXAi. Hoard in co-operation 
with the alumni, is one which from 
111 own observation, neither the 
alumni as a botly. represented espec- 
ially by tlieir class secretaries, nor 
the editor of the Sionai, have fiillx 
grasped. As secretary of a class 
which has made it a point for the 
last few yeai'' to supply the Cokleok 
^ M. at least once e;i(h vcmi with 
a !iiU report covering the addres.ses 
suicj work of the various members 
and ex-members of the class, I can 
" ,v that I have yet to receive from 
'i' SroNAi, any communication other 
than a card at the beginning of the 
V'.'u asking for alumni notes. 



1 believe that a greater respousi- 
bilitv lies with the members of the 
SujNAi. Hoard in charge of alumni 
notes than is appaicntly rciili/f.l by 
them at present. 

As the college has gn)wn, with the 
subsequent increase in circulation of 
the SiiiNAi.. and with the fast increas- 
ing b«Kly of alumni, the news con- 
ceiiiing the alumni should lie given 
its proportionate space in the col- 
umns of the Skjnai., until such time 
as some such paper devote<l exclu- 
sively to items of interest to the 
alumni can be published on m xlf- 
supporting basis. 

If the alumni editot would adopt a 
systematic and consistent r:iii\nsof 
the various cla>ses,prefei ably through 
the medium of their secretaries, we' 
could s«K)ii lind the classes who are 
represented i»y secretaries who are 
not fullilling the ol»ligati«>ns of their I 
olHce. First «>f all their iliity should 
be to keep ill touch with the different ; 
membeix of tlieir classes and to keep 



the SioNAi. thoroughly informed con- 
cerning the work of the different 
members of the class. I am satisfied 
that nion' classes than llMlo, 190« 
and 11«|;! will co-operate in making a 
consistent »'tTort to have the columns 
of the Sit.Nvi. interesting to the 
alumni. The various secretaries 
should ap|ueciate the work which 
they should undertake in t|ie interest 
of the college ami of the alumni as- 
sociation. The SuiNAi. on its part 
shouhl devote tt» the alumni interest 
a certain definite portion of its ap- 
propriation for the piiltlishing of this 
paper. 

Tntil an alumni paper can Ik- pub- 
lished. I'm Vou.Kr.K SKiNAl, as an 
undergraduate and alumni organ 
should be of value to the abiiiini, 
both for its articles telling of the 
development ami work of the col- 
lege, ami :iIm> for the fullnesg of its 
altnnni columns. It sjiouhlalso be 
an inspiration to the undergraduate 
b<Ml\ ill that thev are kept constuntiv 



informetl concerning the progress of 
the men who have gone from the col- 
luge in previous years. 

I shouhl like U) see a systematic 
canvas iiiaile by the al miii editor, 
and to have the results of such a 
canvass publishtnl. in which would 
be shown a list of the classes whose 
secretaries take no action whatsoever 
toward getting the information for 
which the nliiiiini columns are often 
lacking. 

The paper must hM»k to the alumni 
for a part of its support, and it 
should he publislied partly in their 
interest. 

Sincerely, 
A. I). Tayi.ou. 'o.'.. 



11. Kdgar .\|. Hrown Iihn given 
up his |M)sition with Ceorge A. I'ar- 
ker '7ii and superintentlent of the 
liartfortl |»arks. He is now the vice- 
president of the .lames I.. (mmmIwIu 
assiK'iates incorporatetl, landsca|>e 
architects and ftiresters. Address, 
H<M>m .'lOI. Hartford National Hank 
building. Hartford. Conn. 



Can You Grow 1 50 Bushels Dry 
Shelled Com on One Acre ? 

'" S^Bi^B^^aS^S ..—JUL 

$500 or a Handsome Grandfather *8 Clock 

if You Succeed 

$100 if You Approach It 

Cnn 150 bttsii(>ls cril>-dry !in'rcliiiiital)li' ct»rii Ik* j^n)wn t)ii 
one acre ut laml ? \Wv lif.irOl loO. *J(H) ntnl L>.'»0 ImisIm-Is bfiiig 



grown in otluT jisirts <if tin- coimtrx 



ill order i' 



wh.it rail 



be d 



one 111 



N<'\v K 



il>rla)i(l 



tl 



U! 



HtiwktT Ferfili/tT Ctunpany otTtTx l^'iOd. tii caxli to tin* pernon, 
man or woman. Itoy <»r ;rirl, who will i:ii«^«' on ;i iiKasiircd acre 

nioi.sture, 
to bt? 



•11 



ii'llfii corn »»ii :i oaM- o 



l'»H litisbt'N t rill-dry 

whii'li i.< ibf iiioi>hiit' in mfrchantaltlf coin T 

trrowii ('.\<dn'*iv«'lv on Sfoclsl>iid;;o ("oiii .M;innrc. iisino not less 



If corn 



than KMKI 



Its. pi-r a<*n', ami iiiidt'r rnb'«j .md n'giilatioiis simiK'u* 



to those whith wi-n- piVHrribod in Hh- l5o\\ki'r corn runtestn of 



1!«I0 



a III 



MO oiHi in thi- (••)tilf-f irrows I '»!) bn.^htd.s of 



crib-thv corn per a( re, thon tin* iH^^AX). will bi' tiivitled int<» five 
cji.»»h prizes of $;jM(l. tM»li to be awarded lo those who approurh 
neare.st the yicdd of ]'A) biiMhtds ; if mo!- than one ((mtestant 
stieeeeils in rai.«<in<f IVl ini^'hels the <fr:infl prize will be tlivided; 
but no prize will 'm- awarded to any vitdd that «lt»eH not exceed 



the avenijfe of (V.l bii.<lir|s pep 



Howk 



er eonfesfs fur (he t 



iKH' wliieh \\".\!* 
li 



obt 



[lined in 



wo v<*ars. (diminatiiiL'' 



th re 



e vn 



thi 



which were niiinifestly harvested too green. Conte.stants may 
phint any variety of corn and use any niethotl of mltivation. 

GRATUITY 

In order to sec what can be done in growing com with stable manure alone of 
with stable manure and fertilizer combined, we offer a gratuity of a Grandfather's 
8-day Chime Clock for the largest yield of com above 69 bushels per acre ; the only 
stipulation being that if any commercial fertilizer is used it shall be one of the Bowker 

brand?. 

Send lor yoor eopjr of the Rule* today and make your pUaa to entor the conical. Yo« ar* 
surr of a cood crop anyhow with the Slockbrtdc*. •»! may wtet eno of tlioao $100 prisM 
or the clock. 



BOWKFR FERTILIZER COMPANY 

'^^^ »▼ A^A-i£\. 43 CHATHAM STREET BOSTON 



If r 



I 



The CoUcfe Signal, Tuesday, February lo, 1914. 




BUY AN INDEX! 
It has now been three weeks since 
tlie IiKlex was put on sale, and how 
many are there of the faiuity and 
ahiniiii who can boast tlie possession 
of this college annual, so brim full of 
good sound statistics, pictures, draw- 
ings and joke;?? Can you lieat it? 
Here is what you will get for your 
money — .'{21 pages, every page full 
of real interesting or instructive lit- 
erature — to tell the truth it is the 
biggest Index ever put out, an<l it 
makes the center table hK>k as 
though it was a lil»ra.iy literally cov- 
ered with Hriltanicas, Bailey's, and 
the last edition of Li/*-. Then the 
ilrawings, Ui-arly fifty of them iu all, 
and each a genuine (iibson, making 
vou shake y«»ur sides every time you 
UK»k at them au<l think of the gcMMl 
old college days, when you bci ame 
inspired. A^ for jokes you can 
surelv make up vour mind that thev 
are real ami really original. Two 
pages of the grind section are worth 
the two dollars invested in the Umk. 
and at that you are getting the bind- 
ing free of charge. The history of 
the »«H'ial attivitu-s at M. A. ('. was 
only obtained through several inter- 
views with some of the ohiest of M. 
A. C, graduates : it tells you many 
things you nevi-i liast- known aliout 
the past and the present. There is 
a rut containing the programmes of 
the first inforuud dance at M. A ('.. 
the one an<l only military ball, and 
the programme as now used. We 
took a great deal of pains to get this 
material and we hxjk anxiously 
toward your .sup|»ort in the sales. 
The Imlejr is regularly on sale at 
Adams' Drug Store. The College 
Store, or inav be obtaineil directly 
from H. M. Kogers '\^. Ke member 
the HUiiliiifj price in only two thdlars 
and ft <|uarter. Drop him a check 
and your address, aod you will get 
an lutlex bv return mail. 



LIBRARY ADDITIONS 
Abbott, Krnest H. Religious life in 

America. 
Agassiz, Alexander. letters and 

recollections of Alexander 

Agassiz. 
Browning, liobert. I^ettersof Robert 

Browning an<l Klizabeth Barrett. 
Crawford. M. C. Among old New 

Kngland Inns. 
Fox, John. Blue-grass and rhodo- 

denron. 
Hawaii Agricultural Kxperiment Sta- 
tion. Annual report 1907 to 

date. 
Kipling, Rudyard. Collected verse. 
Minot, C. S. Laboratory text-book 

of emltryology. 
Moody, W, V. Poems and plays. 
Morgan, Thomas H. Heredity and 

sex. 
Ogg, F. A. Governments of Kurope. 
Paine, Albert B. Mark Twain : a 

biography. 
Palmer, G. H. Life of Alice Free- 
man Palmer. 
Pearson, C. H. National life and 

character. 



Porto Rico Agricultural Kxperiment 

Station. Annual report 1!»0(> to 

date. 
Tawney, R. H. Agrarian i>roliliinb 

in the sixteenth century. 
Trent, VV. P. Southern writers. 
Webb, A. I). New dictionary of 

statistics. 
Whiting, L. The Brownings: their 

life and art. 



THE NEW DANCES i 

Regarding the matter of new dan- ; 
ces at college functions, the Student 
Life Conjmittee of the Faculty of the I 
Massachusels Agricultural collrge 
havi- rectjuiuifuded the adoption of 1 
the following resolution : t 

•' All social functions of the sin- 
dents at this institution must be con- 
ducted with propriety and dignity i 
and ill a spirit conforming with the I 
high ideals of the College. In s(» fur ' 
as the new dances in no way inter- 
fere with this principle they will be 
allowed. A committee consisting of 
two senior students, approved by 
the faculty shall Ik* appoiiile«l fori 
each Informal, Prom or <»tlici <l nice. ' 
This committee shall .see to it that j 
no student or other person shall so' 
conduct himself us to Itrittg criticism 
either upon himself or upon the Col- 
lege. This coiiiiiiitlee may if thev 
so desire ask a memlier of the facullv 
to c»MHK-Mate wiili them." 



BASKETBALL CHAMPIONSHIP 
CLASS GAMES 



Summary: 



1914. 







IrfK 


Ku 


P. 


L Kdgar .Sinith, 


If 


1 


5 


7 


lirrwer. rf 




J 





(1 


Madfield c 




i 





6 


Cliri.siie. ib 




1 





2 


Wood, rl> 













Hutchiiiiion. rl>. 







• 





TutHJv 


i'>i5. 


s 


5* 


21 






KdK 


Fg. 


P. 


Mrlican. il) 













Front. Ib 







5 


5 


DoIp.c 




S 





4 


Tike, rf 




2 





4 


H. Smith, If 




3 





4 


lutal.H, 


1916. 


6 


S 


"7 






VAg. 


Fg. 


P 


.Moses. If 













Darling, If, 




1 





2 


KeiH. rf 




4 


J 


1 1 


I'erry, c 













Hall. .1. 




1 





3 


Little, Ib 













Totals. 


1917. 


6 




•5 






Fdg. 


F« 


P. 


Wheeler, rb 




1 





3 


Kverbfch, ll» 




a 


1 


S 


Hagelstfin, c 




J 





6 


(Jrayson, Il 




3 


1 


7 


IrviiiR, rf 














Total.s, I) 2 20 

Referee — Hickox. Y. M.C. A. College. 
Umpire— Powers. M. A. C. Timers — 
Clowes. M. A C. and Clark. M. A. C. 
Scorer — (iore, M. .A. C. — Time of halves 
20 minutes. 



Heart - to - Heart Talks 

TO AGGIE MEN 

By the Largest Retailers ot 
Apparel in New England. 

Going to the Prom, yotiiig man? Time to get that 
outfit ready if you are to dre.ss laiiltiessly while enter- 
taining the ladies. Time to think .seriously of just what 
you are going to need. 

Perhaps your Dress Suit is a hit out of style and 
you need an up-to-date one. You may want a silk or 
opera hat, a pair of dress shoes, dress shirts and other 
lurnisliings so necessary to the particular college man. 
It may be that you must have a warm ulster or motor 
coat, for many of you will go on sleigh and motor rides, 
and it's hound tf) be cold. Then yoti may be planning 
to make your room or suite of rooms more attractive for 
the inspection of your giu'sts, and you are going to in- 
vest in Furniture, Pictures and other such things. 

We are ready and eager lo assi.st you in choosing 
mo>t carclully and authoritatively. Our Men's Store 
can till all your wants in Clothing, Haberdashery, Shoes 
and Hat